Citation
El Malcriado, Volume 3, Number 2

Material Information

Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 3, Number 2
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
El Malcrfodo
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER
HBi
in English
Volume 111, Number 2
Delano. California
March 15-31, 1969
MR. GROWER, THERE IS A WAY OUT...


:/tL malukiauu, March 15-31. 1969
SAFEWAY - AGRIBUSINESS LINK IS EXPOSED
AURARIA LIBRARY
UliATQE 024*1551
/ r^e' Safety people
,ore *. Safeway aOTa «*/
{ V
«*■« st°re‘ ling grapes.
now received
who pledge
;o
DELANO, March 15—Safeway Stores, Inc., the second largest supermarket chain in the world, and the largest buyer of table grapes in the West, has closed links with agribusiness and the table grape industry, according to a newly released study by the research department of the United Farm Workers.
Safeway, with more than 2,200 retail food stores, including 249 in Canada and 49 overseas, buys $1-5 million worth of grapes a year, and has been a leader in convincing other supermarkets to continue handling grapes.
Safeway managers claim to be "neutral" in the grape strike dispute, but their actions in continuing to buy scab grapes on such a massive scale guarantee the growers a huge market, for their produce, Union officials charge. As leaders of the retail food industry, Safeway’s actions are followed by many other chains which would normally be more responsive to consum-i ers’ rrioral and economic pressures.
It is no accident that Safeway’s managers have taken such a strong stand against the farm workers and in favor of the growers. One of the directors of Safeway, J.G.' Boswell, is also president and director of J.G. Boswell, Inc., one of the largest cotton growers in California and the largest grape grower in Arizona. He also grows many other crops. Last year Boswell received $4,091,818.00 from the Federal Government for NOT growing cotton, the largest subsidy paid to any rancher in die nation.
The Chairman of die Board of Safeway, Robert Ma-gowan, is a director of J.G. Boswell, which owns more than 135,000 acres of prime California land. Magowan is also a director of Del Monte Properties, one of the giants of California agribusiness, and owner of 18,000 acres on the Monterey Peninsula. He also sits on die Boards of Directors of Macy’s Department Stores, Soudiern Pacific Railroad, Caterpillar Tractor, and is a partner of Merrill Lynch and Company, one of the largest single owners of the supermarket chain.
F.rnest C. Arbuckle, anodier director of Safeway, is also a director of the Kern County Land Company, (KCL), with 350,000 acres in California, $838,000 in cotton subsidies, and thousands of acres of grapes.
BAKERYIWACKSM
KCL is one of the major growers being struck by UFWOC. Arbuckle also has interests in Ewa Plantation Co., Waialua Agricultural Co. Ltd. (Dole products), Kohula Sugar Co., and other agribusiness firms.
Anodier director of Safeway, Charles de Brette-ville, is president-director of Spreckles Sugar Co., which with one or two other giant sugar companies, has a near-monopoly on the sugar industry. ,
Another director of Safeway, Norman Chandler, is chairman of die board of die Times-Mirror Co. (LA Times) and Vice I’resident and director of die Tejon Ranch, a 168,000 acre spread which will soon be irrigated by the billion-dollar Federal-State "Westlands Water Project.’’ Taxpayers will foot the entire cost of this irrigation scheme, which will almost exclusively benefit the huge corporate ranches on the west side of the . San Joaquin Valley. Chandler’s connections may explain why the LA Times so rarely mentions die strike or grape boycott. It may also explain why die Times is so much in favor of diese irrigation projects and other government subsidies to the big growers.
(Tejon Ranch receives $155,000 for not growing cotton.)
Union leaders say dicy picked Safeway Stores as the main boycott target because of their huge purchases of grapes and their position as leader of the retail food industry in die West. As Safeway’s deep involvement with agribusiness, and its long history of support for the growers and against the farm workers come to light, it becomes apparent that the Union has a real fight on its hands.
But more than 25,000 people have already signed die plege refusing .to shop at Safeway. Maybe diis is a language they can understand. Have you signed die pledge?
i
4


EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969/3
Strikers speak to workers during Coachella Valley strike3 June3 1968.
COACHELLA VINEYARDS HEATING UP
COACHELLA, March 15—Temperatures are already up around 100*, and will top 125*. by early June in this rich desert vineyard area. The thousands of acres of table grapes here are already green with new growth and budding grapes. But that hot desert sun, which has always enabeled Coachella growers to begin shipping premium table grapes by the middle of May, earning top prices and profits in the Eastern markets, may be die growers’ worst enemy this year, as it ripens die grapes and there is no one to pick them and no one to buy diem.
The United Farm Workers has promised a major organizing drive again this year in the Coachella Valley, which was the scene of the first clash between workers and grape growers in 1965. At that time, workers were demanding a $1.40 an hour guarantee. Filipino workers in die former Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) went on strike in May of 1965, and after a strike lasting less than two weeks, were granted die $1.40 wage. But growers then, as now, refused to sign a written contract and soon reneged
on the wage agreement.
In 1968, UFWOC offered to hold representational elections for the workers, or negotiate with the growers on any fair way of determining whether the workers wanted, die Union and a contract. The growers unanimously refused to discuss anything with the Union. After repeated attempts to reach a settlement without going into a strike or boycott, Cesar Chavez, Director of UFWOC, put it up to die workers—were they willing to go on strike to win their demands? The workers voted overwhelmingly to authorize a strike, with over 1500 workers in favor of striking and less than 50 opposed.
The growers still refused to negotiate and so the strike was called. The growers then resorted to violence and to a massive illegal importation of strikebreakers from Mexico and broke the strike.
This year, the Union hopes to unite the regular-workers, Filipino, Mexican-American, and Green-Carders, and to prevent the growers from using poverty-striken Mexican nationals to brefck the strike.


VEL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969
this issue
El Malcriado says
SAFEWAY AGRIBUSINESS LINK IS EXPOSED p. 2
COACHELLA VINEYARDS HEATING UP p.3
MOTHERS PLEAD FOR WELFARE JUSTICE . p. 5
UFWOC BACKS BRADLEY FOR L.A. MAYOR p. 6
HEALTH PLAN NEARS COMPLETION p. 7
TRAINING BRINGS NEW JOB SKILS TO UFWOC W ORKER S p. 8 SOLIDARITY DAY MARCH FOR WORKERS IN LAMONT p. II
by the Editor
Monday night there was a meeting of the Delano High School trustees at which a group called Concerned Citizens of Delano presented a petition asking the board to consider its policies of "student controL”
Delano High School has been said to be more of a reformatory than a high school. There are strict rules about everything—with strict penalties attached.
Many girls at the school question the necessity of forcing them to kneel before administrative vigilantes to have the distance between their hemlines and the floor measured. If the gap passes four inches by so much as a hair, the girls are ordered home to change.
We wonder if the possible titillation of male students by an additional sixteenth of an inch of female knee is more costly than the loss of half a day’s classes by a girl who is later required to don shorts for PE.
The interesting thing about Monday’s meeting was the wide spectrum of citizens who participated in die protest of regulations which create an atmosphere of repression in what ought to be a pleasant place for students who are already tempted quit school, in many cases, to work in the
fields.
EL MALCRIADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker , is published twice monthly by die United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in the United States and its possessions are$3.S0 per year, and foreign, including Canada and Mexico, ^ scriptlons for members of PFWOC are included in monthly dues. -,
Editorial and business offices located at the northwest corner of Garces Highway and Mettler Avenue, Delano, California.
Address all correspondence to; EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.; - ‘C
Second class' postage paid at Delano, California.
For advertising rates, contact Jaime Reyes at (805) 725-1337 .or the mailing address listed above.
EDITORS_______________
you are welcome to re^mt ma-terlal from EL MALCRIADO, pro*, yided a copy Is sent to us,, and' the item is .credited; FFt^n.^ELS
Cesar fe â–  C haver. .MeHKw
Protestors (some of whom would probably shrink at being called such) ranged from Union supporters on the one hand to well-known staunch conservatives on the other.
One student told me he was once sent home from school to shave a quarter inch from his sideburns. A board member sported an absurd handlebar mustache which waggled when he spoke. Would this mustache be permitted in the school? Probably not, but what difference would it make if students did wear mustaches? Certainly administrators have more important things to worry about.
A blonde-haired, clean-cut looking student named Ron Baines tried to talk to the board about what he felt were injustices at Delano High School.
The board quickly went into a probably illegal executive session to hear his complaints, lest the public find out what students feel.
Young Mr. Baines told EL MALCRIADO after adjournment of the executive session that he had complained to the board about differing treatment for rich students and poor at die school. Just before the public was excluded, Baines said,
"I have nothing against being rich. I’d like to be rich myself. I know that if my name were Zaninovich instead of Baines, I’d be treated very differently by the administrators of my school."
(Zaninovich is the name of a local grape-growing family which would number among the "400" if Delano had such a listing of the socially e-lite.)
One man in the audience rose to say he thought petitions to the government for redress of grievances were "not the American way to do things.”
We suggest he read the Constitution.
* * * * *
EL MALCRIADO may be publishing irregularly for the next few months. Part of our staff will be going to the Coachella Valley for the upcoming organizing campaign there, and we will be short-handed.
We ask our readers to bear with us, and all subscribers will receive 24 issues, even if it takes a little longer than a year to get them out.


EL MALCRIADO
Mothers Plead for Welfare Justice
DELANO, March 13—Dozens of Black, Chicana,
and Anglo mothers picketed the Delano welfare office today in protest against unfair policies of the Kern County Welfare Department.
The women, carrying signs such as '68 cents a day won’t feed a child’ and 'we can’t read or write but we can fight for our rights,' demanded that the County Welfare Department give them funds provided for die State for improving their homes.
Out of 24 families who submitted applications for die special funds to help them bring their living conditions up to minimum standards, only two applications were approved.
The welfare department has only part of the blame. The State of California provides most of the money awarded welfare recipients, but always less than what is necessary to support a family.
The county 'may* provide additional funds to help families in need, but of course Kern County does not do so.
The ladies who staged the protest are members of the Delano chapter of the National Welfare Rights Organization, a national group composed of poor families in every part of the country.
When EL MALCRIADO talked to Robert Blalock, head of the Delano office of the Welfare Department, he answered all of our questions, but the answers he had to give us were very sad.
We asked him why he thought welfare problems in Kern County were more serious than in other counties of the State.
He said that agricultural workers do not earn enough
/>? The T>ept-OF WCLFARE?
money. He did not say that he was in favor of unionization of farm workers, but he did say that some solution was needed.
He gave us several examples of families on welfare, and when we figured them out, what the protestor’s were saying was true: in many cases, there is only 75 cents a day per member of the family. It takes some mighty stretching to be able to live on that.
About 13 percent of the population of Kern County is on Welfare, and these poor people are banding together to demand their rights.
They cannot understand why the welfare department can give more money to somebody who gets Social Security than to a person who does not have extra income. They cannot understand why the government can spend $24 billion to reach the moon when there is so much poverty and misery in the United States.
They cannot understand why the county Board of Supervisors can have plush meeting rooms with carpets on the floor when hundreds of children in Delano sleep on the floor.
They cannot understand why 27 growers in Kern County get over $5 million in cotton subsidies, while there is no food stamp program to help the working people make ends meet. That’s more than $100,000 per grower* and some get over $800,000 EACH.
And they cannot understand why the Chamber of Commerce gets government money to help the poor, poor businessman screw a little more out of the poor, while an association of farm workers — the Union — meets only opposition and violence from the city and police.
MALCRIADO can’t understand either.


6/EL MALCRIADO, March-15-31, 1969
UFWOC BACKS BRADLEY FOR MAYOR OF L. A.
Hie UFWOC voted almost unanimously tonight to endorse Thomas Bradley for Mayor of Los Angeles.
Bradley, who is a City Councilman in Los Angeles, has been a long-time.supporter of die farm workers and has endorsed the grape strike and boycotts since 1965. As a Black man, Bradley is familiar with the problems that minority groups, especially Chicanos and Blacks have with L A’s notorious cops and with the city bureaucracy, supporters point out.
Bradley is also familiar with die problems of poor minority youth in getting decent jobs and adjusting to the Anglo dominated society, and he has endorsed the aims of the East Side Chicano groups who seek to improve their educational standards. He is a member of the "Chicano 13“ Defense Committee, defending the 13 leaders of the chicano community who were framed on conspiracy charges during raids throughout the barrio last June.
“Los Angeles needs racial union,” Richard Calderon, a leader of die chicano community in Los Angeles said. “Bradley is the only candidate that can unite our city as it should be united, with all living in justice, peace, respect and prosperity.”
Many Union members, former residents of the Los Angeles area, have a keen interest in who is to be
the strike. The present administration, with its antilabor, anti-chicano, anti-Black attitude, has created a reactionary atmosphere in the city, and contributed towards making LA the largest consumer of scab grapes in the country. A new mayor, more sympathetic to the poor people, might help to change that atmosphere. This is certainly another good reason why the Union endorsed Bradley.
Finally, when one looks at die other candidates, Bradley is the only qualified candidate that combines honesty with understanding of and sympathy for the problems of the poor people.
Viva Bradley!
Thomas Bradley and Cesar Chavez

elected mayor of the city. They know that under Mayor Sam Yorty and previous mayors, LA had a vicious racist police force, job discrimination and de facto segregation of schools. The city was the scene of extensive race riots against Mexican-Americans in die 1940's, and die pent-up frustrations of the Black community exploded into the Watts Rebellion of August, 1963. Bradley, as mayor, would try to change the at-\ titudes and policies of the city which perpetuate this racism.
The Union is also interested in seeing a new administration in Los ANgeles for reasons related to
FILIPINO-AMERICAN |POLITIC AL ASSOCIATION TO MEET IN DELANO
by Juanita Villaruz
The Filipino American Political Association will hold its convention at the Filipino Hall in Delano, California on March 29 and 30. Delegations from all over California of about 100 will be here to attend the convention.
Guest of Honor will be Mr. Cayetano L. Santiago, Jr., a Filipino Illinois migrant council Project Director. Guest speakers are Bill Kircher, director of organizing of the AFL-CIO, and Paul Schrade, regional director of the United Auto Workers.
Program:
March 29—Lunch and session
Program and dance in the evening.
March 30—Prayer and breakfast Election of officers.
The State President is Emile Heredia. Officers of the Delano Chapter are President, Mr. Phillip Vera Cruz; Vice President, Mr. William Barrientos; Secretary, Mrs. Juanita Villaruz; Treasurer, Mrs. Lourdes Dahilig; PRO, Mr. Larry Itliong.
The purpose of this convention is to elect the state officers and to establish a more solid and active political participation and involvement of the Filipinos in the State of California. The reason behind why this convention is being held in Delano is to acquaint the FAPA and the people around the happenings in the city regarding the strike. Since the purpose and objective of the FAPA is aligned in die workers’ struggle for a better living socially, morally, and spiritually, it is a must that the FAPA would support and endorse the strike and the boycott.


EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31> 1969/7
HEALTH PLAN NEARS COMPLETION
DELANO, March 15—Growers under contract with UFWOC have deposited nearly $300,000 into the Farm Workers Health and Welfare Benefits Funds, according to LeRoy Chatfield, coordinator for die Health and Welfare program.
The fund, which represents payments of 10 cents per hour per worker from all the growers except Di Giorgio (which pays 5 cents) under contract, has been building up since 1966, when the first contracts were signed. It will be used to cover union members and their families under health benefits.
The UFWOC Health and Welfare Plan, the health insurance program for members, is finally nearing completion, according to Chatfield. An outline of the proposed plan has been presented to workers’ com-' mittees and to the growers under contract. Growers will consider the plan and then offer any suggestions or changes. Hopefully, any differences of opinion over the plan can quickly be ironed out so that die plan can go into effect as soon as possible.
Details of the plan will not be made public .until a final agreement is reached, according to UFWOC Vice President and Health Plan Chairman Dolores Huerta.
Officials hope the benefit program will cover all members of the worker's immediate family. A worker can earn minimum coverage after only a few weeks of work, arid many will be able to earn enough credit during die harvest and pruning seasons to receive
Chatfield discusses new UFWOC health insurance plan with Schenley workers.
coverage for their families throughout the year.
This last problem, the seasonality of the work, has been a major stumbling block in producing a good plan, but Chatfield’s proposal seems to offer maximum benefits possible to the seasonal worker, and a wide range of benefits for die permanent worker.
Full details on die plan’s benefits, eligibility provisions, and procedures for receiving payments will be printed in EL MALCRIADO as soon as available.
EL MALCRIADO congratulates Chatfield for doing an outstanding job in writing up die proposal, and prays that growers’ and workers’ representatives can quickly work out any remaining details, so that this long over-due program can be put into effect.
DELANO VISIT IMPRESSES SEN. MONDALE
DELANO, March 7—After spending several days in Delano, Senator Walter F. Mondale of Minnesota pledged renewed efforts to get farm workers decent legislation protecting their rights to organize and build their Union.
The Senator, new chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Migratory Farm Labor, expressed tremendous admiration and respect for Cesar Chavez, Director of UFWOC, and for the strikers and Union members for their efforts to improve the farm labor situation.
Mondale admitted that the Federal Government and Congress had discriminated against farm workers •over the years, and that it was time some new laws were passed to help die workers.
In a speech to die regular Friday
night Union meeting, Senator Mondale noted that die main push for new legislation at present is to extend the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to farm workers. The Senator expressed support for this measure, but noted that it would be of limited value to farm workers, and might even be used to destroy the Union, as long as there was no adequate regulation of green-card strikebreakers.
One suggestion on this problem is to ammend the NLRA to provide that using green card holders to break a strike be ruled an unfair labor practice. Another is to revoke all green cards except those issued to bona fide residents and immigrants to the U.S., and to tremendously increase efforts to apprehend violators of green card and visitors’
card regulations who use the cards for strikebreaking.
Mondale, who comes from a farming state, has for a long time been in favor of collective bargaining for farmers, where die farmers join together in a union and bargain with the chain stores and wholesale buyers and canners and shippers of fruit and vegetables and produce, to get a better price for their goods. Now he is in favor of similar procedures for farm workers, so that they can get a better price for their labor.
Union members and leaders expressed confidence that Senator Mondale has the intelligence and understanding of the situation to defend the rights of die farm workers in Congress. VIVA MONDALE!


DELANO, March 18—-About 56 members of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO, will be participating in on-the-job training programs by April, according to Union officials.
In a program involving UFWOC, employers under contract, and the Social Development Corporation (SDC), a government-financed organization, farm workers are being trained as shop mechanics, irrigators, mechanical pruning machine operators, tractor drivers, and other skilled farm jobs.
According to training program administrators, 31 workers at the Almaden Ranch in Hollister are currently working as trainees*
It is expected an additional 25 men will enter training at die Schenley Ranch in the Delano area by April 1.
Romero Ostelano and Alex Podymov of the SDC said their organization pays the cost of instructors’ time, while employers pay trainees their regular wages while they are receiving instruction.
Ostelano said die course for shop mechanics at Schenley’s would last for about 20 weeks. There is usually an hour a day of intensive instruction with trainees working at their new trades under the supervision of instructors for the rest of the day, he explained.
A program at Schenley’s for training tractor drivers in operation and maintenance of their equipment, plus the use of specialized implements, will last about 10 weeks.
At the Almaden Ranch, where the terrain is uneven and hilly, the tractor drivers' course will run several weeks longer.
Planners of the training program say the principal
aim is to give farm workers die opportunity to develop the skills required in modern farming.
Having a pool of trained specialists among die work force will also give a boost to the workers’ job security, Union officials say, because new men will not have to be brought in from outside the work force at peak seasons.
The advantage to the workers, of course, is that they are eligible to move into higher classifications with higher wages, they say.
A training program scheduled to begin at die Paul Masson Ranch was delayed by wet weather, but is expected to begin operation soon.
Perelli-Minetti workers, who. are in the process of negotiating their new contract, voted last week to request the cooperation of the employer in setting up a training program for P-M workers.
Trainees at Almaden include the following brothers;
Melchor Juarez, Leon Gamboa, Carlos Hernandez, Martin Alvarez, Antonio Centeno, Silviano Prado, Ci-priano Barrientos, Lorenzo Domingues, Luis Marquez, Alvaro Flores, Rafael Cruz, Claudio Fernandez, Francisco Escajeda, Tomas Gonzales, Ram6n Amaya, Bau-delio Mufioz, Agustin Salinas, Mauro Tinajeros, Luciano Medellin, and George Morales, all pruning trainees with foreman Louis Spadafore as instructor;
Antero Ruiz, Enrique Gaitan, Sr., Alberto Reyes, Priciliano Alvarez, Arturo Nevarez, Jose Parra, Pedro Ortega, Sr., and Enrique Pena, all tractor driver trainees with Kenneth Quaid as instructor;
Alfredo Rodriguez, Gilberto Parra, and Servando Flores as shop mechanic trainees with instructor Eric Luttrop.


Above left: Foreman Frio Luttrop (.1.1 and trainee, Gilbert Parra (r. 1 Above: Trainee Alfredo
Rodriguez (l) and Foreman Eric Luttrop
Right: Trainee 'Servanda Flores


10/EL MALCRIADO. March 15-31. 1969
UFWOC’s new office building nears completion on the Union’s 40 Acres.
Helping Hands on the New UFWOC Headquarters
DELANO—For a few months the Forty Acres die Union owns have been a very lonely place. With the exception of the clinic personel, the EL MALCRIADO staff and the night watchmen there are not too many other people coming this way.
The farm workers who were working in the new building were ‘shipped out on the boycott* and most of the work on the building was stopped last summer. Priorities are priorities, say the leaders.
Recently, though, a few people started working on the building again. They come from the East
Los Angeles Labor Action Community Union (ELALAC) and are finishing the taping in the building. The group consists of Rafael Cuaron, who is an instructor teaching young Steve Valencia, Kenneth Valencia, and Pete Ronaldo the art of building construction.
According to Cuaron, the ELALAC 'wants to help poor people, especially Mexican-Americans, to build better housing all over.*
‘We are involved tn concepts of Community Development which involves building the cities of the 21st century.’
Cuarron added that in East Los Angeles they try to recruit young people ‘to get them involved in community action — most especi-fically building.’ He adds that his being a ‘technical man’ helps him teach something to the young. ‘We ought to teach the young and give our experience to them, and the best of our knowledge if we are to build a new way of life.’
Cuaron and the young men working with him said they will stay in Delano until ‘their job is done.’ That way we’ll contribute to the farm, workers' struggle.'
New Center for El Teatro Campesino
FRESNO, March 16—El Centro Campesino Cultural, the Farm Workers Cultural Center, opened its new offices at the corner of Clark and Thomas Streets in Fresno today with singing, dancing, and two beautifully performed new actos. The Centro, which wa£ formally in Del Rey, is an outgrowth of the Teatro Campesino, founded by Luis Valdez as part of die grape strike in Delano in 1915.
The new Centro will have classes and performances of traditional Mexican folk dancing, classes indie English and Spanish language, history ‘happenings’ to acquaint Chicanos with their own history (which is largely ignored by the public school system) and discussion groups on Chicano history, politics, culture, and the role of die Chicano in the contemporary world.
The Teatro Campesino will continue to create and perform songs
and actos and plays about the farm worker movement and the Chicano liberation movement, and have also created a large new cast of puppets for their puppet theater performances.
For more information on the Teatro and die Centro, write to El Centro Campesino Cultural, Box 2302, Fresno, CA 93720 (phone 209-485-3892).
Viva El Centro Campesino Cultural!
$5,000 A WEEK???
Giumarra Vineyards, the largest table grape grower in die world, got $278,000 last year for NOT growing cotton. That’s over $5,000 a week for not doing something. How big was your pay check last week?
PESTICIOE TRAINING SHOULD TAKE EIGHT WEEKS FOR SAFETY
According to the government-backed Social Development Corporation, a training course they set up for teaching farm workers to apply pesticide dusts safely and properly takes about eight weeks, and is considered to be a specialized farm job.
EL MALCRIADO wonders (statistics are unavailable to the public) how many thousands of farm workers in California and other states apply dangerous chemicals every season — without proper training, precaution, or safety equipment.
We’ve never heard of such a training program anywhere except on ranches with Union contracts.
Don't shop of Safeway


EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969/11
WORKERS MARCH IN LAMONT
LAMONT, March 15—Workers in Lamont are planning a Solidarity Day march and fiesta on Sunday, March 30, according to Rep. Juan Flores.
All Union members, farm workers, and their friends are invited to participate, Flores said. Purpose of die march is to commemorate the second anniversary of die signing of the Di Giorgio Contract, which took place on April 3, 1967, and to demonstrate to Di Giorgio and the other ranchers of the area that we will never go back to the “bad old days’ which existed before the strike.
Workers, their families and friends will assemble at die UFWOC office at 10913 Main St. in Lamont at 10;30 in die morning for the march through Lamont. Be sure to bring your flag or banner if you have one for your town or group, advises Maree Flores, Lamont office secretary. Signs expressing support for die Di Giorgio workers will also be welcome, she said.
After the march, there will be a potluck dinner in die park, and everyone should bring enough food for his own family and a little extra. There will be music, singing and dancing, and a few words of welcome from officers of the Union.
Di Giorgio workers fought harder and longer than any other group of Union workers to win their contract, which was finally signed after months of difficult ne-
gotiations and arbitration, on April 3,1967.
Even then, because of Federal laws regulating die use of subsidized water, Di Giorgio was being forced by the government order to sell much of his ranch property. Recently, Di Giorgio announced that he was selling the bulk of die property in the Arvin-Lamont area, yith die largest portion presumably going to millionaire cotton rancher S. A. Camp. Camp has not yet indicated whether or not he will respect the workers’ rights at die ranch.
Last month it was alleged in sworn statements filed with die Federal Government that high Di Giorgio Ranch officials had conspired with other anti-Union growers to form and support the so-called “Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association,” a company union designed to undermine UFWOC.
Di Giorgio workers, many of whom remember the bloody and unsuccessful strike of the late 1940’s, and all of whom remember die long and bitter struggles of 1965 and 1966, vow that they will never go back to die $1.25-an-hour wages, die total lack of job security, the abuse and degradation and humiliations that they suffered before their Union won. They hope Mr. Di Giorgio and Mr. Camp are watch the parade. Di Giorgio and Camp are even invited to die picnic. They may learn something.
| John Gregory Donne's i&i i!§§ i;fPAP]ER:Sl|| |
[DELANO^H
I THE STORY OF THE CALIFORNIA GRAPE STRIKE
DELANO is the most complete narrative available on the history of the farm workers’ struggles to build a union, and on the background to the grape strike. The book recalls the great breakthroughs of 1966, the struggle and final victory with Di Giorgio, and the U.F.W.O.C.’s success in organizing wine grape pickers. The book carries the reader up to the summer of 1967, when U.F.W.O.C. shifted the strike emphasis to table grape growers and began its strike and boycott against California table grapes. DELANO is now being sold by the Union, and proceeds from the sale of the book will go the the U.F.W.O.C. strike fund.
f Please send me copies of John Dunne's DELANO3 The Story of the California f| j Grape Strike. Enclosed is $1.95 for each copy3 plus 30$ for postage and handrk 1 | ling: jl I Order from: NAME »|
If EL MALCRIADO II P. 0. BOX #130 |f DELANO, CA. 93215 ADDRESS
CITY i STATE ZIP !l
! 1 1 1 1 • J


12/EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 19^9
Pesticide Campaign-a Real Service Easter Caravan?
Editor:
Your campaign against the wanton and reckless use of pesticides is a real public service. I hope to see it continue and grow. Some years ago, when Rachel Carson’s book 'Silent Spring’ was published, there was an immense furor over pesticides. As a result new laws were passed, and fairly strict regulations set up.
But now the furor has died down, and so has the enforcement—if there ever was any. Probably die average person believes that their safety is being looked after by their officials. Apparently, you can tell them much differently. A strong new campaign is needed, and you may be the ones who can start it.
The chemical companies are protecting themselves by labeling their products with very stringent cautions and directions for use. They ought to know, so why not take them at their word and ask for injunctions requiring all users to comply with the labels?
You might not succeed at first, but it should send a shock wave up and down the Valley.
For in any practical or com-merical sense, the label requirements cannot be complied with. Such an injunction would reduce the use ol'pesticides to an hour or so a day—on favorable days, and completely eliminate the use of aircraft.
Making such a request should also bring home to the growers die fact that they are assuming all die liability for the use of these dangerous poisons. And that could add up to a very pretty piece of money durin" die next few years.
If only one of the present litigants could win their suit, it could be expected to bring a flood of others, and perhaps a blanket action, like the one in the Santa Barbara area against the oil companies. Looked at in that way, the use of pesticides might be no more war-
ranted for the growers, than for the sake of anyone else in the community.
Sincerely,
H. A. Vaughan Los Angeles, California March 8, 1969
Mr. Vaughan makes several interesting points.
What struck EL MALCRIADO most in the hearings in Bakersfield-; on the Union’s right to view pesticide records was the impression given by many witnesses that the use of pesticides was in large measure the result of advertising and promotion by die chemical companies.
While they put stringent rules for application on die labels, they are still inthebusinessofsellingchemi-cals, and some entomologists and others testified that getting die farmer to use the pesticides is like starting him on a treadmill.
Dice he starts using them, die ecological balance is destroyed, and he is required to use more and more. The bugs get killed, but nobody seems to know, or at least nobody is saying, what happens to workers, and to consumers.
—The Editor
Print More Often
—
As a college student, let me say that I find your publication more educational and relevant to the society than the S, F. Chronicle—and it’s a daily. When will you start
coming out more often?.
Viva la Causa,
Mickey Hewitt Santa Cruz, California
We’ll start coming out more often when California table grape growers agree to recognize the Union, negotiate contracts, and thereby end the strike.
When that happens, we’ll have more resources to do our job. —The Editor "
Editor:
Is there an Easter Caravan leaving from die Berekely-Oakland a-rea for Delano this Easter? And if there is can you tell me how to get in touch with it. I’d like to help, but right now I don’t know what I can do.
And could you please tell me if there is someone 1 can contact in the Antioch or Concord area who is working for the boycott. Maybe he could give me some suggestions.
Sincerely,
Rob Sledge Antioch, California
The Bay Area Caravan leaves on die fourth Saturday of. every month for Delano.
We are publishing die revised directory of boycott offices on page 15 of this issue. You can find your nearest boycott center on die list. Viva la Causa.
P-M Workers Begin
Negotiation^
McFarland, March 15 — Grape pickers at the Perelli-Minetti Vineyards here, all members of die United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, have elected a negotiating committee to negotiate a new contract with their employers, it was announced by UFWOC spokesmen today. Members of die negotiating committee include Javier Ortega, Enrique Vanegas, Mauro Sanchez, Henry Diaz, Max Lucas, Carmelo Robledo, and Mrs. Lupe Rodriguez.
At the first negotiating session, Juanito Ramirez of die P-M Ranch committee introduced the negotiating committee to the Perelli-Minettis. Negotiations began last week.
The Safe way is to go Elsewhere:..


ELMALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969/13
Letters
EL MALCRIADO P.O. Box 130 Delano, Ca. 93215
A Friend in Sweden
The following letter was received by Miss Elaine Elinson from a friend she met while representing the Table Grape Boycott in Europe.
Dear Friend;
Sending a peper cut from my peper. I thought I send it to you. And you’ll find a check for 5 dollar to UFWOC.
I hope you’ll allways ceep this happy smile hold it as a Victory smile. I hope it reminds you of a pleasant trip here in Sweden.
I’m pensioned but my heart is allways whit you in your struggle. I don't know for sure but I don’t think I’ve seen a grep in the store for a long time.
Sincerely yours,
S. H. Kempe Hedemora, Sweden March 4, 1969
The clipping which accompanied the letter at left was a picture of Miss Elinson and. a trade union friend which apoeared recently in a Swedish newspaper.
Make the Facts of this Injustice Known
Editor; „
In the struggle for justice which so many of us are making today, we need much encouragement. For this reason, I write this letter to give you the benefit of what little we are trying to do here for justice for the farm workers in your area and subsequently for all the nation.
We do not have the benefit of one of your men being in this area to plead for this justice as does the Mlnneanapolis area. But we read of the work of your representatives in the Catholic bulletin.
Last fall when the importance of
the grape boycott first came to our attention, we wrote a letter to the editor asking why so little coverage had been given this topic in the paper. This letter, when published, gave rise to much discussion and, we believe, did much good. I work for a very wealthy family. Up to the time our leter was published in the Free Press grapes had always been in their refrigerator. Now, grapes are never there.
We have likewise succeeded in getting the Catholic Bulletin to print an article by Msgr. O’Rourke concerning the part the Farm Bureau
is playing in opposition to the boycott. ..
Be assured that (we) will take every available opportunity to make the facts of this injustice known and encourage everyone to correct it.
With every sincere wish for success in your venture, I remain, Grayce Kortuem Rural Life Vice - Commissioner Marysburg Parish,
Fairbault Deanery
St. Paul - Minneapolis Archdiocese
February 22,1969
1


14/EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969
KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE
car... life... fire
PHONES: 3222 East Mayfair Blvd.
Office, 485-0650 Mayfair Shopping Center
Residence, 266-1349 Fresno, Calif. 93703
Mr. Leap will be in the UFWOC Service Center,
105 Asti, Delano, every Wednesday to serve U-nion members.
Robert J. Sanchez Omer
The only completely Mexican Mortuary in northern California
SANCHEZ.HALL MORTUARY
FRESNO
1022 “B" STREET TELEPHONE 337-3532
Services available everywhere. . ,No matter where you live, our price is the same . . .death notices in newspapers and on the radio are included,. , . we can make arrangements for every economic situation Telephone 237-3532
â–  SIGN THE PLEDGE
Viva la Causa
Y
Ei*Pro9reso
gountetot
o
Mcxica*-
rftuenieoH
Fresno California
We Will Not Shop At Safeway Until...
We, the undersigned, support the striking grape workers in their non-violent efforts to organize, to win recognition, and to bargain collectively with their employers.
Because of the growers’ consistent refusal to negotiate, grape workers have been forced to boycott all California table grapes. Various small chain stores and independent food markets in California and elsewhere are giving their support to grape workers by refusing to handle grapes. Safeway, the largest 'chain store in the West, has consistently supported the growers by continuing to buy table
grapes picked by strikebreakers.
THEREFORE, WE THE UNDERSIGNED WILL NOT SHOP AT SAFEWAY STORES UNTIL SAFEWAY MAKES A PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT THAT THEY WILL NOT HANDEL CALIFORNIA TABLE GRAPES FOR THE DURATION OF THE BOYCOTT.
It is our hope that a decision by Safeway not to handle table grapes will help bring table grape growers to negotiate a just settlement with their grape workers, therefore assuring a prompt end to die dispute.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY, STATE
YOU CAE HELP US'. Tell your friends and neighbors about the grape boycott. Ask them to help. And if there is a Safeway store in your county or city3 ask them to sign the pledge. GRACIAS!
This Petition Distributed By:
NAME: ___________________
ADDRESS: '_______
CITY:
STATE
ZIP-
(Yes, l will pass around the petition in my neighborhood. Please send me more petitions.)
Return completed petition to;
“DON’T BUY GRAPES CAMPAIGN”
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO P.O. Box 130, Delano, Calif. 93215 (phone 805-725-1314)


EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969/15
BOYCOTT OFFICES
SPAN THE NATION
ARIZONA
You don't have to be in Delano to help the farmworkers' campaign for justice. Get in touch with the boycott office in your city and volunteer your aid. We need it.
MISSOURI
KANSAS CITY: Ramon Pasillas, 1834 Jefferson, 221-1752.
ST. LOUIS; Harold Hamilton, 1215 Paul Brown Bldg., PHOENIX; Manuel Rivera, 1504 S. 20th Av., Apt. 176, . 818 Olive St., CHI-9266 or 521-4010.
254-2055. NEW YORK
CALIFORNIA BUFFALO; Linda Martin, 6264 Sheridan Dr., 632-
5AN JOSE: Andy Chavez, 504 S. 6th, Apt. 1, 287- 2607.
1283. NEW YORK CITY: Dolores Huerta, 182 21st SL, Bklyn.,
LOS ANGELES: Jose Serda, 3016-1/2 E. 1st St., 265- 499-6612, 4991410.
1053 or 265-1583. OHIO.
SAN PEDRO; Alfredo Vasquez, Box 1853, 547-2789. CLEVELAND: Julio Hernandez, 2605 Detroit Av., 781-OAKLAND: Pete Velasco, 568 47th St., 655-3256. 7764 or 781-8017.
IpaCOIMA: Pablo Espinosa, 13416 Van Nuys Blvd., CINCINNATTI: Jorge Zaragoza, 4520 Colerain, 541-896-3127. 0063.
SAN FRANCISCO; Lupe Murguia, 263 Andover St., COLUMBUS: Ramon Lara, 868 W. Henderson Rd., 451-647-7032 or 863-7011. 4504.
SACRAMENTO; Peggy McGivern, 1228 F St., 446- DAYTON: Bill Chandler, P.O. Box 192, Walnut St.
6560 or 447-8053. Station, 222-7484.
SAN DIEGO: Carlos Legerrette, 4463 Craigie Su, 295- . OREGON
4200 or 262-2950. PORTLAND: Nick Jones, Ed Chiera, 1553 N. Jessup
COLORADO St., 289-9588, 771-8639.
DENVER: Alfredo Herrera, 301 Elati, 222-2321. PENNSYLVANIA
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PITTSBURGH: Al Rojas, 1701 Brighton Pl„ 683-2669
WASHINGTON: Manuel Vasquez, 945 G. St. N.W., Rm. 321-5689.
207, 628-4317 or 546-3123. PHILADELPHIA: Esperanza Lopez, Eric Schmidt, 2536
FLORIDA N. Mascher, 425-7978.
MIAMI: Manuel Sanchez, 1454 NW 17th Av., 633-6189 TENNESSEE
or 371-2526. MEMPHIS: Darry Olson, 1728 Edward Av., 324-9766
GEORGIA . or 363-5196.
ATLANTA: Luis Melendrez, 1026 Hurt Bldg., 525-5002 TEXAS
or 524-5001. EL PASO: Pablo Carrizales, 5853 Cleveland. Av., 532-
ILLINOIS 8422.
CHICAGO: Eliseo Medina, 1300 Wabash, South, 427-7081 or 427-4357.
LOUISIANA
NEW ORLEANS: John Shroyer, 1014-1/2 Washington Av., 895-5950 or 897-0083.
MARYLAND
BALTIMORE: Andy Imutan, 2726 E. Monument, 727-2192 or 327-2832.
MASSACHUSETTS
BOSTON: Marcos Munoz, 73 Tremont St., Rm. 527, 442-7283.
MICHIGAN
DETROIT: Hijinio Rangel, 2500 Howard Av., 825-4811.
MINNESOTA
MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL: Macario Bustos, 3308 Portland Av., 822-5160.
HOUSTON: Jesus Cavazos, 110-1/2 Pine View.
HOUSTON: Rick Allen, 415 W. Poke, Apt. 4, 523-8235.
WISCONSIN I
MILWAUKEE: Lalo Valdez, 524 W. National Av., 384-3700 or 374-5269.
WASHINGTON
SEATTLE: Dale Van Pelt, Rm. 240, 2819 First Su Av., 743-3307 or NU2-8353.
CANADA
MONTREAL: Jessica Govea, 37 Milner St., 523-2147 or 486-8117.
DON MILLS, ONTARIO: Marshall Ganz, 15 Gervais Dr., 429-3602 or 924-3132.
VANCOUVER: Fred Dresser, Rm. 210, 517 E. Broadway.


Sttne "
5-J MARKET
JAVIER; JAIME; JACOB; JACQUE; JAY
No. 1
200 S. King Rd.
Phone 251-1315
IlN SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA
No. 2
1452 E. Whitton Ave. Phone 295-6080
TAMALES, EVERY DAY, 5 FOR $1.00
Staged
VIVA LA CAUSA”
History of Farm Labor
FARM LABOR ORGANIZING* 1905 - 1968
K booklet In English pub-] lished by the Natlonal Ad-, visory Committee on Farm' Labor. The book gives a] history of the effort's to.( organize farmworkers fromi pre - W.W. I days through' the great strikes of the] 30s; the struggle .agat.ps.ti the bracero system in the' 40s and 50s; and -the-pre-'.] sent drive by Cesar Chav-, ez and the United Farm' Workers to build a strong] Union. In addition to] giving a brief history ofi the strike in Delano* if tells of the organizing] drives in Wisconsin, Tex-, as and other parts of the' United States.
50$ each, plus 25$ postage and handling; 5 for $3.00
ORDER FROM EL MALCRIADO, P. 0. BOX 130 DELANO, CALIF. 93215


Full Text

PAGE 1

MR. GROWER, THERE IS A WAY OUT ... ' ) . . """ ... II'.. . " ................ . .. \ --..

PAGE 2

2/EL MALCRIAOO, March 15-31 , 1 969 S ,AFEWA Y AGRIBUSINESS liNK IS EXPOSED { tnan Until sareway ...........,..,., 'to boycott sa e __,.,.,...,--"-......_ J?ELANO, March IS-5afeway StOres , Inc., the second largest supermarket chain in the world, and the largest buyer of table grapes in the West, has closed links with agribusiness ai-td the table grape industry, according co a newly released study by the research department of the United Farm Workers. Safeway, with more than 2,200 retail food stores, including 249 i n Canada and 49 overseas, buys $1-5 million worth of grapes, a year, and has been a leader in convincing other supermarkets to continue handling KCL is one of the major growe1rs being struck by • UFWOC . Arbuckle also has interests in Ewa Plan -Safeway claim to be "neutral" i n the grape tation Co., Waialua Agriculrural Co. Ltd. (Dole prod Strike dispute, but their actions in continuin g to buy ucts) , Kohula Sugar Co., and other agribusiness firms. scab grapes on such a massive scale guarantee the Anothei-director of Safeway , Charles de Brette':" growers a huge market. for their produce, Union o _ fville , is president-director of Spreckles Sugar ficials c .harge . A s leaders of the retail food industry, which with one or two other giant sugar Safeway's 3crions ace followrZd by many other chains has a near-monopoly on the sugar industry. which would normally be more responsive co consumAhother director of sareway, Norman Chandler, is , ers' n\oral and economic pressures. chairman of the board of the Times-Mirror Co . (LA It is no accident that $1feway's managers have taken Times) and Vice President and director of the Tejon such a strong stand against tl1e farm workers aud in Ranch, a 168,000 acre spread which will soon be irfavor of the growers. One of the directorS of Safcway , rigated by the billion-dollar Federal-State •westlands J .G.' Boswell, is also president 3nd director of j,G. Water Project •. Taxpayers will foot the entire cost of . Boswell, Jhc., one of the largest cotton growers in this irrigation scheme, which will almost exclusively California and the largest grape grower irl Arizona. benefit the huge corporate ranches on the west side of He also grows tn3ny other crops. Last year Boswell the .San joaquin Valley. ChanJlcr"s connections may exreceived $4,091 , 818.00 from the Federal Government plain why the LA Times :;o rarely men tions the strike for NOT growing cotton, the largest subsidy paid to or grape boycott . It may also explain why the Times any rancher in the nation. is so much in favor of these irrigation projects and The Chairman of the Board o f Safcway, Robert M3other government subsidies to the big growers. gowan, is a director of J ,G. Uoswell, which owns (Tejon Ranch receives $155,000 for not growing cot-more than 135,000 ?crcs of pdmc Ca!ifomia land. ton.) Magowan is also a dirt•Ctor of Ucl Monte l'ropcr-Union leaders say they picked Safeway Stores as the ties, one of the giants of Ca!Hornia ngdbusiness, and Tll
PAGE 3

El -March Strikers speak to -wor>kers during Coachella Valley strike, June_, l968. COACHELLA VINEYARDS HEATING UP COAC HELLA, March IS--Temperatures are already ! up a r oun d IW, and will top 125• . by early Jui'le in this I rich desert v ineyard area. The thousand s of acres ' of tab l e grapes here are al r eady green with new g rowt h and budding grapes. But that hot desert sun , which 1 ha s a lways enabeled Coachella growers to begin ship { pin g premium table grapes by the middle of May, earni ng 1 wp prices and profits i n lhe Eastern markets, may be the growers' worst enemy this year, as it ripens I the grapes and there is no one t o pick them and no on e to buy them. The United Farm Worke r s has prom ised a major on the wage agreement. I n 1 968, UFWOC offer ed to hold representational elections for the workers, or negotiate with me g rowers o n any fai r way of determining whether the workers wanted. the Union and a contract. The g r owers unanimously refused to discuss anyth ing with the Uni on . After repeated atlempcs to reach a settlement with out going i nto a strike o r bOycott , Cesar Chavez, Di rector of UFWCX::, put it up to the workers---were they w ill ing to go on strike to win their demands? l11e workers voted overwhelming l y to authOrize a strike , with over !500 workers in favo r of Striking and !ess organizing drive aga i n this year in the Coac hella Valley, than 50 opposed. which was the scene of the first clash between workers The growers still refused 10 negot iate and so the and grape growers in 1965. At that tim e , workers strike was called. l11e growe r s then resorted to vic -were demandin g a $1.40 an hour guarantee. Pilipino lence and to a massive ill ega l importation of workers in !he former Agricultural Workers Organizing breaker s from Mexico and b roke the strike. Committee (AWOC) wem on strike in May of 1965 , This year, th e Union hopes to unit e the regular and after a strike lasting less than f\VO weeks, were workers, Filipino,Mexican-American,andGreen-Carders, granted the $1.40 wage . But growers then, as now, and to prevent the growers from using poverty-stri ken Mexican nationals co the strike.

PAGE 4

4/El MALCRIADO, March 1 5 3 1 , 1 969 in this issue SAFEWAY AGRIBUSINESS LINK IS EXPOSED p. 2 COACHELLA VINEYARDS HE lNG UP p. 3 MOTHERS PLEAD FOR W ELFARE JUSTICE p. 5 UFW OC BACKS BRADLEY FOR L.A . MAYOR p . 6 HEALTH PLAN NEARS COMPLETION P . 7 TRAINING BRINGS NEW JOB SKILS TO UFWOC WORKERS p. 8 SOLIDARITY DAY MARCH FOR WORKERS IN LAMONT p . u ... '•' :::.: ;:::::; ::::: El Malcriado says ::::::::: :;:;:::;: by the Editor Monday night there was a meeting of the Delano High SChool trustees at whi ch a group called Concerned Citizens of Delano presented a petition asking the board to consider its policies of "srudent control . " Delano High Schoo l has been said to be more of a reformatory than a high school . There are strict rules about everything with strict penalties attached. Many girls at the school question the necessity of forcing them to kneel before admin istrative v igilantes to have the distance between their hemlines and the floor measured. If the gap passes four inches by so much as a hair, the girls are ordered home to change. We wonder if the possible titillation of male students by an additional sixteenth of an inch of female knee is more costly than the loss of half a day's classes by a girl who is later required to don shorts for PE. The interesting thing about Monday's meeting was the wide spectrum of citizens who participated in the protest of regulations which create an atrposphere of repression in what ought to be a pleasant place for students who are already tempted quit school, in many cases, to work in the fields. Protestors (some of whom would probably shrink at being called such) ranged from Union supporters on the one hand to well-known StaWlCh conservative:> 011 the other. One srudent told me he was once sent home from school to shave a quarter inch from his sideburns. A board member sported an absurd handlebar mustache which waggled when he spoke. Would this mustache be permitted in the school? Probably not , but what difference would it make if students did wear mustaches? Certainly administrators have more important things to worry about. A blonde -haired, clean-cut looking student named Ron Baines tried to talk to the board about what he felt were injustices at Delano High School . The board quickly went into a probably illegal session to hear his complaints, lest the public find out what students feel. Yotu1g Mr. Baines told EL MALCRIADO after adjournment of the executive session that he had complained to the board about differing treatment for rich students and poor at the school. Just before the public was e x cluded, Baines said, . •r have nothing against being rich. I'd like to be rich myself. I know that if my name were Zaninovich instead of Baines, I'd be treated very differently by the administrators of my school ... {Zan i novich is the name of a local grape-growing family which would number among the ,. if Delano had such a listing of the socially e lite.) One man in the 3.udience rose to say he thought petitions to the government for redress of grievances were •not the American way to do We suggest he read the Constitution. EL MALCRIADO may be publishing irregularly for the next few months. Part of our staff will be going co the Coachella Valley for the upcoming organizing campai gn there, and we will be shorthanded. We ask readers to bear with us, and all subscribers will receive 24 issues, even if it cakes a little longer than a year to get them out.

PAGE 5

Plead for Welfare Justice DELANO, March 13--Dozens of Black, Chicana, and Anglo mothers picketed the Delano welfare office today in protest against unfair policies of the Kern County Welfare Department. The women, carrying signs such as '68 cents a day won't feed a child' and 'we can't read or write but we fight for our rights,' demanded that the County Welfare give them funds provided for the State for improving their homes. OUt of 24 families who submitted applications for the special funds to help them bring their living conditions up to minimum standards, only two applications were approved. The welfare department has only part of the blame. The State of California provides most of the money awarded welfare recipients, but always less than what is necessary to support a family. The county 'may' provide addi tional funds to help families in need, but of course Kei-n County does not do so. The ladies who staged the protest are members of the Delano chapter of the National Welfare Rights Organi zation, a national group composed of poor families in every part of the country. When EL MALCRIADO talked to Robert Blalock, head of the Delano office of the Welfare Department, he answered all of our questions, but the :answers he had co give us were very sad. We asked him why he thought welfare problems in Kern County were more serious than in other count ies of the State. He said that agriculrural workers do not earn enough money. He did not say that he was in favor of unioni zation of farm workers, but he did say that some solu -cion was needed. He gave us several examples of families on wel fare, and when we figured them out, what the protestor's were saying was true: in many cases, there is only 75 cents a day per member of the family . It takes some mighty stretching to be able to live on char. About 13 percent of the population of Kern County is on Welfare, and these poor people are bandin g together to demand their rights. They cannot understand why the welfare departme nt can give more money to somebody who gets Social security than to a person who does not have extra income. TI1ey cannot understand why the government can spend $24 billion co reach the moon when there is so much poverty and misery in the United States . They cannot understand why the county Board of Supervisors can have plush meeting rooms with carpets on the floor when hundreds of children in Delano sleep on the floor. They cannot understand why 27 growers in Kern County get over $5 million i n cotton subsidies, while there is no food scamp program to help rhe working people make ends meet. TI1ar's more d1an $100,000 per grower, and some get over $800,000 EACH. And they cannot understand why the Chamber of Com merce get s government money to help the poor, poor .;;i bus i nessman screw a little more our of d1e poor, while an association of farm workers --the Union -MALCRIADO can ' t understand either.

PAGE 6

6/EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969 UFWOC BACKS BRADLEY FOR MAYOR OF l. A. The UFWOC voted almost unanimous l y tonight to endorse Thomas B r adley for Mayor of Los Al).geles. Bradley, who i s a City Councilman in Los Ange les, has been a of the farm workers and has endorsed the grape strike and boycotts since 1965. As a B l ack man, Bradley i s familiar with the problems that minority groups, especially Chicanos and Blacks have with L A's notorious cops and with the city bureaucracy, supporters point ou t. Bradley is a l so familiar with the problems ot poor minority youth in getting decent jobs and adjusting to the Anglo dominated society, and he has endorsed the aims of thE; East Side Chicano groups who seek to improve their educatio nal standards. He i s a member of the . " Chicano 13" Defense Committee, defending the 13 leaders of the chicano community who were framed the strike. The present administration, with its anti labor, anti-chicano, anti-Black attirude, has created a reactionar y atmosphere in the city, and contributed to wards making L A the largest consumer of scab grapes in the country. A n ew mayor, more sympathetic to the poor peop le, might help t o chan ge that atmosphere. This is certai nly another good reason why the Union endorsed Bradley. Finally , when one looks at the other candidates, Bradley is the only qualified candidate that combines honesty w ith understanding of and sympathy for the problems of the poor people . Viva Bradley] during raids throughout "Los Angeles need s racial union," Richard Calderon, a leader of th"e chicano communi ty in Los Angeles said. "B r adley is the on l y candidate that can unite our cicy as it should be united, w ith all living in just-ice, peace, respect and prosperiry. • Many Union members, former resi dents of the Los Ange les a rea. have a keen in terest i n who is to he Thomas Bradley and Cesar Chavez elected mayor of the city. They know that under May or Sam Yorty and previous mayors, LA had a vicious racist police force, job discrimination and de facto segregation of schoo l s . The city was the scene of extensive race riots against MexicanAmericans in the 1940's, and the pent -up frustrations of the Black community expl oded into the Watts Rebellion of August, 1963 . Bradley, as mayor, would try to change the at; titudes and polic ies of the city which perperuate thi s racism. The Union is a lso interested in seeing a new ad ministration in Los ANgeles for reasons related to FILIPINO-AMERICAN ITIC AL ASSOCIATION TO MEET IN DELANO by Juanita Villaruz The Filipino American Political Association will hold its convention at the Filipino Hall in Delano , California on March 29 and 30 . Delega tions from all over Cal1 fornia of abOut 100 will be here to attend the conven tion. Guest of H onor will be Mr. Caye tano L. Santiago, Jr., a Filipino Illino i s m igrant council Project Director. Guest speakers are Bill Kircher, director of organizing of the AFL-GIO , and Paul Schrade, regiona l director of the United Auto Workers. Program: March 29--Lunch and session Program and dance in the evening . Mar ch 30--Prayer and breakfast E l ection of officers. The S tate President is Emile Heredia. Officers of the Del ano Chapter are President, Mr. P hillip Vera Cruz; Vice P resid ent, Mr. William Barrientos; Secre tary, M rs. Jua ni ta Villaruz; Treasurer, Mrs. Lourdes Dahilig; PRO, Mr . Larry ltliong . The purpose of this con vention is t o elect the state officers and to establish a more solid and active political pa':ticipation and involvement of the Filipinos in the State of California. The reason beh ind why this convention i s bei ng held in De lano is to acquaint the FAPA and the peop l e a r ound th e happen ings in the city regarding the strike. Since the purpose and objective of th e FAPA i s aligned in the workers' struggle for a bette"r living socially, morally, and spiritually, it is a must that the FAPA wou ld suppo r t 3nd endorse the strike and the boycot t.

PAGE 7

HEALTH PLAN NEARS COMPLETION DELANO, March IS-Growers under contract with UFWOC have deposited nearly $300,000 into the Farm Workers, Health and Welfare Benefits Funds, according to LeRoy Chatfield, coordinator for the Health and Welfare program. The fund, which represents payments of 10 cents per hour per worker from all the growers except Di Giorgio (which pays 5 cents) under contract, has been building up since 1966, when the first contracts were signed, It will be used to cover union members and their families under health benefits. The UFWOC Health and Welfare Plan, the health insurance program for members, is finally nearing completion, according to Chatfield, An outline of the proposed plan has been presented to workers' com , mittees and to the growers under contract. Growers coverage for their families throughout the year. will consider the plan and then offer any suggestions This last problem, the seasonality of the work, has or changes. Hopefully, any differences of opinion over been a major stumbling block in producing a good the plan can quickly be ironed out so that the plan plan, but Chatfield's proposal seems to offer maximum can go into effect as soon as possible. benefits possible to the seasonal worker, and a wide Details of the plan will not be made public . until a range of benefits for the permanent worker. final agreement is reached, according to UFWOC Vice Full details on the plan's benefits, eligibility pro President and Health Plan Chairman Dolores Huer-visions, and procedures for receiving payments will be printed in EL MALCRIADO as soon as a vailable. Officials hope the benefit program will cover EL MALCRIADO congratulates Chatfield for doing an members of the worker's immediate family. A work-outstanding job in writing up the proposal, and prays er can earn minimum coverage after only a few weeks that growers' and workers' representatives can quickly of work, arid many will be able to earn enough credit work out any remaining details, so that this l ong during the harvest and pruning seasons to receive over-due program can be put into e f fect, DiEILANO VISIT IMPRESSES SEN. MONDALE DELANO, March 7--After spend-night lhlion meeting, Senator Moning several days in Delano, Senator dale noted tha t the main push for Walter F. Mondale of Minnesota new legislation at present is to expledged renewed efforts to get farm tend the National Labor Relations workers decent legislation pro-Act {NLRA) to farm workers. The tecting their rights to organize and Senator expressed support for this build their Union. measure, but noted that it would be The Senator, new chairman of the of limited value to farm workers, Senate SubCommittee on Migratory and migh t even be used to destroy Farm Labor, expressed tremendous the Union, as long as there was admiration and respect for Cesar no adequate regulation of greenChavez, Director ofUFWOC,andfor card strikebreakers, the strikers and Union members for One suggestion on this problem is their efforts to improve the farm to ammend the NLRA to provide that labor situation. using green card holders to break a Mondale admitted tha t the Federal strike be ruled an unfair labor Government and Congress had dis-practice. Another is to revoke all card regulations who use the cards for strikebreaking. Mondale, who comes from a farming state, has for a long time been in favorofcollectivebargair)ing for farmers, where the farmers join together in a union and bargain with the chain stores and sale buyers and canners and shippers of fruit and vegetables and produce, to get a better priCe for their goods. Now he is in favor of similar procedures for farm workers, so price for their labor. Union members and leaders criminated against farm workers green cards except those issued to expressed confidence that Senator over the years, and that it was time bona fide residents and immigrants Mondale has the intelligence and some new laws were passed to help to the U.S., and to tremendously understandi. ng of the siruation to the workers. increase efforts to apprehend viodefend the rights of the farm workIn a to the regular Friday Ia tors of green card . and visitors' ers in Congress. VIVA MONDA LEI

PAGE 8

aim is to give farm workers the opporrunity to devel Farm Workers Organizin g Committee, AFL-ciO, op the skills required in modern farming. be participating in on the-job training programs by Hav ing a pool of rrained specialists among the work April, according to Union officia ls. force will also g i ve a boost to the workers' job secu-ln a program involving UFWCX::, employers under rity, Union officials say, because new men will not contract, and the Social Development Corporation (SOC), have to be brought in from outside the work force at a government-financed organization, farm workers are peak seasons. being trained as shop mechanics , irrigators, mechanic Til e advantage to the workers, of course, is that al pruning machine operators, tractor drivers, and oth-they are eligible to move into higher classifications er skilled (arm jobs. with higher wages, they say. According to training program administrators, 3 1 A training program scheduled to begin at the Paul workers at !:he Almaden Ranch in Hollister are cur-Masson Ranch was delayed by wet weather, but is ex-rently working as trainees. pee ted to begin operation soon. I t i s ' expected an additional 25 men will enter trainPerelli-Mineni workers, who are in the process or ing at the Schenley Ranch in the De l ano area by April negotiating their new contract, voted last week t o re I . quest the cooperation of the employe r in setting up a Romero Ostelano and Alex Podymov of the SOC said training program for P-M workers. their organization pays the cost of instructors' time, Trainees at Almaden include the following brothers: while employers pay trainees their regular wages while Melchor ju8.rez, Leon Gamboa, Carlos Hernandez, they arc receiving instruction. Martin Alvarez , Antonio Centeno , Silviano Prado, Ci-Ostelano said the course for shop mechanics at Schenpriano Barrientos, Lorenzo Domingues, Luis Mli'rquez, ley's would last for abou t 20 weeks. There is usually Alvaro Flores, Rafael Cruz, C laudio Fernandez, Fran an hour a day of intensive instruction with trainees cisco Escajeda , Tom3 s Gonzales, Ram6n Amaya, Bau working at their new trades Wlder the supervision of delia Muiloz, Agustin Salinas , Mauro Tinajeros , Luciano instructors for the rest of the day, he explained. Medell!n, and George Morales, all prWling trainees with A program at Schenley's for training tractor driverS foreman Louis Spadafore as instructor; in operation and maintenance of their equipment, plus Antero Ruiz, Enrique GaitM , Sr. , Alberto Reye s , the use of spec ialized implements, will last about 10 Priciliano Alvarez, Arruro NevSrez, Parra, Pedro weeks. Ortega, Sr., and Enrique Petia, a ll tractor driver train-At t11e Almaden Ranch, where the terrain is uneven ees with Kenneth Quaid as instructor; and hilly, the tractor drivers' course will run several Alfredo Rodrfguez, Gilberta Parra, and Servando Flowcek_s longer. res as s hop mechanic trainees with instructor Eric P l a.nners or the Luttrop.

PAGE 9

rwoc Above left: FoY.eman Er>io Luttrop a. ) and tro:inee, Gilbert Parra {r.) Above : Trainee Alfredo Rodriguez (l) and Foreman Eric Luttrop Right: Trainee " Servando Flores Training Brings New Job Skills

PAGE 10

10/El MAL CRIADO, _ March 15-31, 1 969 L R • _ UF'WOC's new office building nears completion on the Union's 4 0 Acres . Helping Hands on the New UFWOC Headquarters a few months the Los Angeles Labor Action Com Farcy Acres the Union owns have muni ty Uni on (8LALAC) and a r e been a very lonely place. With finishing the taping ill the building, the exception of the clinic personel, The groupconsistsofRafaelCuaron, the EL MALCRIADO staff and the who is an instructor teaching young night watchmen there are no t too Steve Valencia, Kenneth Valencia, many other people coming this way. and Pete Rena l do the art o f building The farmworkerswhowerework-construction. ing in the new building were 'shipped According toCua r on , theELALAC out on the boycott' and most o f the 'wants to help poor people , espe-work on the bu il ding was stopped cially Mexican-Americans, to build last summer. Priorities are pri-better housing all over.' orities, say the leaders. 'We are involved in concepts of Recently, though, a few people Com munity Development which started work ing on the building invol ves b uildin g !:he cities of the again . They come from the East 21st century.' New Center for El Teatro Campesino FRESNO, March 1 6--El Centro and actos and play s about the farm Campesino C ultural, the Farm worker movement and d1e Chi cano Workers Culrural Center, opened its new offices at the corner of Clark and Thomas Streets in Fresno today with su\gin g , dancing, and two beau tifulty performed new acws. The Centro, which formally in Del Rey, is an outgrowth of the Teatro Campesino, founded by Luis Valdez as part of the grape strike in De l ano in 19). 5. The pew Centro will have classes and performances of traditional Mex ican folk dancing , classes in the English and Span ish language, history 'happenings' to acquain t Chicanos with their own history (which i:S largel y i gnored by the pub li c schoo l system) and discussion groups on Chicano hiStC?ry, politics, culture, and the role of the Chi cano in the contemporary world. Th e Teatro will . C
PAGE 11

EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, 1969/11 WORKERS MARCH IN LAMONT LAMONT, Mar .Ch IS-Workers in Lamont are plan-gotiations and arbitration, on AprilS, 1967. ning a Solidarity Day march and fiesta on SUnday, Even then, because of. Federal laws regulating the March 30, according to Rep. Juan Flores. use of subsidized Water, Di Giorgio was being forced All Union members, farm workers, and their friends by the government order to sell much of his ranch are invited to participate, Flores said. Purpose of the property. Recently, Di Giorgio announced that he was march is to commemorate the second anniversary of selling the bulk of the property in the Arvin-Lamont the signing of the DiGiorgio Contract, which took place area, 1'rith the largest portion presumably going to on Apiil 3, 1967, and to demonstrate to Di Giorgio lionaire cotton rancher S. A. Camp. Camp has not yet and the other ranchers of the area that we will never indicated whether or not he ,;ill respect the workers' go back to the "bad old days" which existed before rights at the ranch, the strike. Last month it was alleged in sworn statements filed Workers, their families and friends will asEemble wilh the Federal Government that high Di Giorgio Ranch at the UFWOC office at 10913 Main St. in Lamont at officials had conspired with other anti-Union growers 10:30 in the morning for !he march through Lamont. to form and support the so-called "Agriculrural Workers Be sure to bring your flag or banner if you have one Freedom to Work Association," acompanyuniondesigned for your town or group, advises Maree Flores, _Lamont to undermine UFWOC. office secretary. Signs expressing support for the Di Giorgio workers will also be welcome, she said, Mter the march, fhere will be a potluck dinner in the park, and everyone Should bring enough food for his own family and a little extra. There will be music, singing and dancing, and a few words of welcome from officers of the Union. Di Giorgio workers fought harder and longer than any other group of Union workers to win their contract, which was finally signed after months of difficult ne-John Gregory Dunne's m Giorgio workers, manyofwhomremethber the bloody and unsuccessful strike of the late 1940's, and au of whom remember the long and bitter struggles of 1965 and 1966, vow that they will never go back to the $1.25-an-hour wages, the total lack of job security, !he abuse and degradation and humiliations that they suffered before their Union won. They hope Mr. Di Giorgio and Mr. camp are watch the parade. Di Giorgio and Cam!= are even invited to the picnic. They may learn something. THE STORY OF THE CALIFORNIA GRAPE STRIKE DELANO is the most complete nar-Di Giorgio, and the U.F.W.O.C.'s rative available on the history of success in organizing wine grape the farm workers' struggles to build pickers. The book carries the a union, and on the background to reader up to the summer of 1967, the grape strike. The book recalls when U. F. W. O.C. shifted the strike the great breakthroughs of 1966, emphasis to table grape growers and strike fund. the struggle and final victory with began its strike and boycott against PZease send me _ aopies of John Dunne's DELANO, The Story o.f the ca;rit'o1'1na Grape Strike. Enalosed is $1.95 for eaah aopy, plus JO for postage ling: Order from: EL MALCRIADO NAME---------------------------------P. 0. BOX #130 DELANO, CA. 93215 ADDRESS CITY

PAGE 12

Pesticide Campaign a Real Service Easter Caravan? Editor: Your campaign aga in s t the wanton and reckless use o f pesticides is a real public service. I hope to see it continue and grow. Some years ago, when Rache l carson' s book 'Silent Spring' was published , there was an i mmense furor over pesticides. AS a result new law s were passed, a n d fairly lations set up. But now t he furor has died down, and s o has the enforcement -if there ever was any. Probably the average person believes that their safety is being looked after by their Ediror: ranted for the growers, than for the I s there an Easter Car8.van lea-sake of anyone else in the com-v ing from the Serekely-Oakland a-munity . rea for Delano this Easter? And Sincerely, H there i s can you tell me how H. A. VaUghan to get in touch with it. l ' d lik e Los Al).geles, California to help, but right now I don't know March ' s , 1969 what 1 can do . And could you please tell me if Mr . vaughan makes several interthere is someone I can contact esting points. in the Antioch or Concord area What strUck EL MALCRIADO who i s working for the boycott. most in the hearings in Maybe he could give rrie some on the Union's right to view pesti-suggestions. cide records was the impression Sincerely , given by many witnesses lhat lhe Rob Sledge use of pesticides was in large meaAntioch , California officials. Apparently, you can tell sure the res ult of advertising and the m much differently. A s trong promotion by the chemical com-The Bay Area Caravan leaves new campaign i s needed , and you panics . on the fourth sarurday of. every may be the o nes who can start i t . While they put stringent rules for month for De l ano . The chemical companies a r e w.oa pplication o n the lahels, they are We are publ ishing the revised tccti ng: t hemselves by labeling their still in lhebusinessofsellingchemidirectory o f boycon offices on page p r oducts with very stringent cal s , and some e nto mologists and IS of thi s issue. Y o u can fin d yOur cautions and directions for use . others testified that getting lhe far-nearest boycott center on the li s t. 111ey ought to know, so why not ta k e mer to use the pesticides is l ike Viva Ia Causa. the m at their word and ask for in -starting him on a treadmUl . . junctions requiring all users to comj:lly w ith the l abels? You might not s ucceed at first, but it s hould send a shock wave up and down the Valley. For in any practical or commertcal sense, the l abe l require ment:; cannot be complied with. Such an injunction would reduce the usc of ' pesticides to an hour or so a day--on favorable days , and com pletely climin::uc the use of aircraft. Maki n g such a request s hould also bring ho me to the growe r s lhe fact !:hat lhey arc assuming a ll the liability for the use of these danger,.. o u s poison s . And mat cou l d add up to a very pretty piece of money duvin,.,. !J:ic next few yea r s . only One of r.he Uti gam:; could w i . 1 their s uit, it could be expected to bring a flood of others, and pet-haps a b lanket action, Once he starts usin g them , lh e ecological balance i s desll"'Oyed, and he is required to us e more and more. The bugs ge t kille d , but nobody seems to know, or at least nobody is saying, what happens to workers, and to consumers. --The Editor Print More Often E it or: As a college srudent, let me say that I find your publ iCation more educationa l and relevant to the society than t h e s . F. Chronic l e--and i t' s a daily. When will you s tart coming out more often? ••••• Vi va la Ca usa, Mickey H ewitt Santa Cruz, California We'll start comin g out more often when California table grape growers agree to recognize the Union, ne gotiate contracts, and thereby end like the one in the Santa Barbara the strike. area against the oil companies. Looked at in that way , the use of pesticides might be no more war-When that happens, we'll have resources to do our job . ---The Editor • -----P-M Workers Begin Negotiationi s McFarland, March IS -Grape pi ckers at the Perelli-Minetti Vineyards here, all members o f the Uni ted Farm Workers Organizin g ComnUttee, have elected a negotiating committeetonegotiateanew contract w ith !:heir e mployers, it was announced by UFWOC spokes men today . M emberS of the ne gotiating committee inclu de Javier Ortega , Enrique Van egas, Mauro S anchez, Henry Diaz , Max Lucas, Car me l a Rob led o , and Mrs. Lupe Rodriguez. At the first negotiating session, juanito Ramirez of the P-M Ranch committe e introduced the negotiatin g committee to the Negotiations began last week. The Safe way is to go El-sewhere; . .

PAGE 13

I Letters A Friend in Sweden The following letter was received by Miss Elaine Elinson from a friend she met while representing the Table Grape Boycott in Europe. Dear Friend: Sending a peper cut from my peper. I thought I send it to you. And you'll find a check for 5 dol-Iar to urncx::. I hope you'll allways ceep this happy smile hold it as a Victory smile. I Pope it reminds you of a pleasant trip here in SWeden. I'm pensioned but my heart is alhvays whit you in your struggle. I don't know for sure but I don't think I've seen a grep in the store for a long time. Sincerely yours, s. H. Kempe Hedemora, Sweden March 4, 1969 EL MALCRIADO, March 15-31, The clipping which accompa:nied the lettgr; at. Z.ef't was a picture o.f Miss Elins(:m and a tri:ule union .friend which appeared t'eoently in a SWedish newspaper. Make the Facts of this Injustice Known Editor: the grape boycott first came to is playing in opposition to the boy-In the struggle for justice which our attention, we wrote a letter cott ••• so many of us are making today , to the editor asking why so little we need much encouragement. For coverage had been given this topic Be assured that (we) will take this reason, I write this letter in the paper. This letter, when every available opportunity to make to give you the benefit of what published, gave rise to much dis-the facts of this in justice known little we are trying to do here cussion and, we believe , did much and encourage everyone w correct for justice for the farm workers good. I work for a very wealthy i t. in your area and subsequently for fam ily. Up to the time our leter With every sincere wish for sue-all the nation. was published in the Free Press cess in your venrur-c, t r-emain, We do not have the benefit of gr-apes had always been in their Gr-ayce Kortuem one of your men being in this area refdger-ator-. Now, grapes are Rural Lif e ViceComto plead forthis justice as does the never ther-e. missionerMinneanapolis ar-ea. But we read We have likewise succeeded in Marysburg Padsh, of the work of yourrepresentatives getting the Catholic Bulletin to print Fair'bault Deaner-y in the Catholic bulletin. an ar-ticle by Msgr. O'Rourke conSt. PaulMinneapolis Ar-chdiocese Last fall when the impor-tance of cer-ning the pan the Farm Bureau February 22, 1969

PAGE 14

14/EL MALCRIAOO, March 15-31, 1969 KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE car ••• life ••• fire PHONES: Office, 48S-0650 Res i z -66-1 349 3222 East Mayfair Blvd . Mayfair Shopping Center Fresno, C a I if. 93703 Mr. Leap witt be in the UFWOC Serviae' 105 ABti_, Delano, every Wednesday to serve U nion members. Robel't J. Sanoho.a """"" The only completely Mexican Hortuary in northern California SANCHEZ-HALL MORTUARY F"RESNO 1022 "B" STREET Services aval iable everywhere, . ,No te:where you live, our price Is the same arr01ngements for every economic situation . 1sl.ep1tone 237-3532 SIGN THE PLEDGE Viva Ia Causa y Ei Progreso D/ 4 11teue41eFresno California We Will Not Shop At Safeway Until ... We, the undersigned, support the strik ing grape grapes picked by strikebreakers. Workers i n their non-violent effort s to organi ze , to w in recogn iti on , and w ba r g a i n collectivel y with their llfEREFORE , WE THE l.NDERS I GNED WILL NOT emPloyers. S H OP A T SAFEWA Y STORES UNTIL SAFE\V AY MAK ES Because o f the growers' consistent refusal to ne A PUBLI C ANNOUNCEMENT THAT THEY WILL N OT gotiate, grape workers have b een forced to boycott HANDEL CALIFORNIA TABL E GRAPES FOR THE all California tabl e grapes. Various s mall chai n DURATION OF THE B OYCOTT. stores and independent food markets in California and elsewhere arc giving their support to grape It is our hope that a decision by Safeway not t o workers by refu s ing w handle grapes . Safeway, t he hand le t ab l e grapes will help bring tab l e grape growers largest' chain store in the West , has consistently to negotiate a just settlement with their grape workers, supported the g row e r s by con tin u ing to buy tabl e therefore assuring a prom pt end to the dispute . NA/AE ADDRESS CITY , STATE YOU CAN HELP US: Tell your friends and neighbors about the grape boycott. Ask them to heZp . And i.f there is a Safeway store in your county or ask them to sign the pledge. GRACIAS! This Petition Distributed By: Return comple t ed petit i on to: NAME: BUY GRAPES CAMPAIGN" ADDRESS: U nited Farm Workers OrganizingCommittee, AFL-CI O CITY: STATE ZIP..:__ P.O. Box 130, Delano , Calif. 93215 (phone 805-725-1314) (Yes, I will pass around the petition in my n e i ghborhood. Please send me rngrc petition s .)

PAGE 15

EL IADO, March IS-31 1969/,.5 BOYCOTT OFFICES. SPAN THE NATION You don • t have to be in De 1 a no to hel p the farm workers• campaign for Get i n tou ch with the boycott office inyour city and volunteer your aid. We need it. MISSOURI KANSAS GITY: Ramon Pasillas, 1 834 jerrerson, 1 752 . ST. LOUIS: Harold Hamilton, 1215 Paul Brown 818 Olive St. , CHI-9266 or 521-4010. NEW YORK BUFFALO: Linda Martin, 6264 Sheridan Or . , 2607. NEW YORK CITY: Dolores Huerta, 182 21st St., 499-6612, 4991410. OHIO . Alfredo Vasquez, Box 1 853 , 547-2789. CLEVELAND: julio Hernandez , 2605 Oea-oit Av., 7764 or 7818017. Nuys Blvd., CIN'CINNAITI: jorge Zaragoza, 4520 Colerain, 0063. Andover St. , COLUMBUS : Ramon Lara, 868 W . Henderson Rd. , 4504. F St., 446 -DAYTON: Bill Chandler, P.O. Box 192, Walnut SLlti on , 222-7484. OREGCN P ORTLAND : N ick Jones, Ed Ch iera, 1 553 N . S t., 289-9588, 77 1 8639. PENNSYLVANIA PITTSBURGH: AI Rojas , 1701 Brighton Pl., 321-5689. I'HILADELPHlA; Esperanza Lopez, Eric SChmidt , N . Mascher, 425-7978. TENNESSEE MEMPHIS: Darry Olson, 1728 Edwa r d Av., or 363-5!96. TEXAS EL PASO: Pablo Carrizales, 5853 Cleve l an d , Av., 8422. South , 427jesus Cavazos , 110-I/2 Pine View. HOUSTON: Rick Allen, 415 W, Poke, Apt. 4 , 8235. 1014-1/2 Wash in gton \'r"ISCCNSIN 1'11lLWAUKEE : Lalo Valdez, 524 W. National Av., MARYLAND 3700 or 374-5269. Monument, 727 WA.SHI.i\lGTQ\l S EAITLE : Dale Van Pelt, Rm . 240, 28 1 9 First St. MASSACHUSETTS 743-3307 or NU2-8353. 1'vltmoz , 73 Tremont St. , Rm. 527, CANADA MONTREAL: jessica Govea , 37 Milner St. , MICHIGAN or 486ll7. Hijinio Rangel, 2500 Howard Av., 825-481l. DON fi. IILLS, 0:''-JTARIO: Marshall Ganz, IS fi: !INNESOT/\ Dr., 429 3602 or 924-3132. I MIIN''"AI'Ul -1>>1. PAVL: Macario Bustos, 3308 Port-VANCOUVER; Fred Dresser, Rm. 210, 517 E. way. ' t )

PAGE 16

St01te" 5-J MARKET JAVIER; JAIME; JACOB; JACQUE; JAY No. 1 No. 2 200 S. King Rd. 1452 E. Whitton Ave. Phone 295-6080 VPhone 251-1315 --)N SAN JOSE, TAMALES, EVERY DAY, 5 FOR $1.00 f "VIVA LA CAUSA" . -------------------------------------------------------History of farm Labor FARM LABOR ORGANI ZING: 1905 -1968 f'r booklet in English pub lished hv the National Advisory cOmmittee o n Farm L abor, Th.e b oo k gives a history of the efforts to organize farmwo rkers from pre I days through the g reat strikes of the 30s; the e aiJai;nst the bracero system in the 40s and 50s; and the.present drive by Cesar Chav ez a nd the United Farm Horkers to build a Union, In addition t o qiving a briP.f history of the strike in Oelano, it tell s o f the orqanizinn ; n IIi scons in, as a nd other oarts o f the United S t ates . each, plus postage and h andling; 5 for $3.00 ORDER FROM EL MALCRIADO, P . 0. BOX 130 DELANO, CALIF. 93215 .\