Citation
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 2

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 2
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
fny Backs Grape i
Mrt» (grapes to back demand*
Sen. Eu-lhlgher wages and benelits. u£5f5v ised Oov.l “With the backing of bacWnglReaggn,” McCarthy said, "thell40.W d strike-(California r -tment of Eta-1 Ida grape!ployment qb* \y VWMPu
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in New v possibility
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Ktofferty1 satai Grafie Boy cot
» Instruction Max Ks.-OOC^i
■ recent denunciation' ol“th* ^Ittx Rat
workers’ boycott of California
CaWtornia brands target of V>oy cott
coercing and restraining New unions York chain stores, to Induce sec or., them to refuse to buy California prohibl table grapes. the
ThijgrUon was brought loOHHBOi
Jackson, Lewis & Sniteler. Wednesday field a $25 million damage suit against the New York City dkrtral Latgj
It Is trying to run a strike Urbanisation coals WQ.OQC> a mouth lot M)£k«r ibis week.
^orUatid labor la extend*
El Malcriado (*o*)
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKE
Thursday >
IN ENGLISH
mm i 1968
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Grape Growers Seek. 1)Etmages
- * u. LOS AN’QGLES — Council and three unions there U.S. District
V £ |V> | «u Approximately 100 California charging the labor groups with dWislLot* 9° 9»op*w 1 attorn^v*. *^r .. — . %
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2/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 1, I9b8
El Malcriado says
CONTENTS
STRIKE SWEEPS KERN P. 3
GROWERS' SUBSIDIES P^ 3
NEW WAVE OF GROWER VIOLENCE P. 4
McCarthy endorses boycott P. 6
BREAKTHROUGH ON HEALTH PLAN P. 7
GRAPE BOYCOTT P. 8-9
AURARIA LIBRARY
U1A7Q1 7534573
EL HALCRIADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker, is published twice monthly by the UNITED FARH WORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in the United States and its possessions are $3.50 per year, and foreiqn, including Canada and Mexico, US $5.00. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC, AFL-CIO are included in monthly dues.
Editorial and business offices located at the northwest corner of Gar-ces Hlqhway and Mettler Avenre, Delano, California.
Address all correspondence to: EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Delano, California 93215.
For advertising rates, contact Federico ChSvez at (805)725-1337 or the mailing address listed above.
El
By the Editor
The Delano Chamber of Commerce scheduled a dinner meeting for Wednesday night, July 24, to discuss Delano's "Image Gap." The Southern California Edison Company and the Southern Pacific Railroad Company were scheduled to send their hotshots to the meeting to explain what Delano needs to do to attract industry.
The Delano Record has been running plaintive articles a-bout the poor publicity showered on the town over the past three years.
The Chamber of Commerce and the City recently dropped a bundle on two fancy new lighted signs at the northern and southern city limits along the Highway 99 freeway. The signs feature the catchy and original slogan "Delano--Wei come Anytime." Each sign has a large clock-a perfect tie-in with the "Anytime" slogan. Highway billboards do a great deal to improve the landscape.
At the same time that the city father are frantically trying to overcome the "image gap," they are also screaming about their new "Don't Buy New York Products" campaign.- The local paper is urging people to write to their "Suppliers" in New York and tell them that nobody in Delano ain't a-gonna
buy nothin' from New York until them city fellers start buyin* scab grapes again.
While NevV York industrialists tremble, the have not yet announced which major industries they intend to re-locate in Delano.
Of course Delano has everything to appeal to new industry. The water is unsafe for infants. The work force is migratory as the result of low wages. The temperature soars above 100 degrees in the summer. The local yokels will be annoyed if potential indus-, tries buy anything from New York. A great â–  town for new industries.
If, however, the city fathers and the growers (who oppose industry because It raises the wage scale) wouldJ get together and siqn contracts with the Untied Farm Workers to settle the three-1 year-old strike, Delano could become known as the California town which made history in the struggle for justice. •
Propaganda is no substitute for a decent agricultural and industrial economy- If the Delano "brain trust" would clean house a little, some industries might come to town.
Settling the strike would be a good start. Our phone number is 725-1314.
subscribe to
EL MALCRIADO today
EL MALCRIADO P.0. BOX 130 DELANO, CA 93215
More and more people are finding out -that a subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English__ Espanol__
ADDRESS-domicilio_ CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
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I


Growers Fight Strike with Federal Subsidies
ARVIN-LAMONT, July 29—With the addition of 19 new ranches to the list of certified strikes, 90 percent of California's table grapes are being produced by struck companies. Union organizers reported this week.
As the campaign reached out to' add the five remaining large ranches in the Arvin-Lamont area to the certified strike list, the following ranches were actively struck:
Kovacovitch, Hoses!an, Sabo-vitch, El Rancho Farms, Nal-bandian, Bainco, Halovitch, Gagesian, Russo, Cal Fame, Fredlo, Giuderra, Kern Valley Farms» Arvin Grape Growers Co. (Fox), Ke rn County Land Company, ^ikI Giumarra.
The five remaining ranches are Sandrini, Johnson, Tozzi, Bidart, and Haddad. All are large corporate farms, and some of them, such as Kern County Land, Giumarra, and Bianco, control tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of acres.
The new wave of strikes was touched off after growers unanimously refused to discuss wages, contracts, or even Union recognition. In an election in Lamont on July 9, workers voted 1,658 to 16 to strike all ranches in the area where the ranchers, refused to al low negociations.The vote was taken by secret ballot, and only workers employed on Kern County ranches were allowed to vote, observers said.
Union officials said they had more than 2,000 signed authorization cards on file,giving the Union the go-ahead to act as collective bargaining agent for the workers in the area.
In early July the Union offered to present the cards as proof of representation, but, as in Delano and Coachella, growers refused to answer Union communications.
An offer of secret ballot elections followed. Growers responded with public refusals to hold elections.
Union officials say the strike and boycott of all California table grapes is the reply to the growers1 refusal to follow any more orderly procedure .
Among 20 Kern County farms added to thg list of struck growers in the last month are included some famous names in California agriculture.
Kern County Land Company, a subsidary of the Tenneco Corporation, owns 350,000 acres in Kern County alone, plus holdings in other parts of California, the Southwest, and
Australia. It owns manufacturing companies in Mississippi and Hawaii, producing farm e-quipment, auto parts, and a variety of other products. Kern County Land collected $838,130 in direct federal payments for NOT producing cotton in 1967.
Anthony Bianco and Sons,a I so
Continued on page


4/EL MALCRIADp, Thursday., Auaus

Warn 4 fyuM*** l/ioletct
SUBSIDIES
I i
Continued from page 3
struck, own 7,000 acres in Kern County, pius orchards and packing houses in Tulare, Fresno, and Santa Clara counties. They own citrus orchards, vineyards. and lettuce and cotton fields in Arizona. Their cotton subsidy last year was $50.(000, according to the Congressional Record.
• Other struck farmers who receive cash handouts from the federal government on the cotton they do not grow are Bidart Brothers ($131,1* * *17), Kern Valley Farms ($123,809), and Fredlo Farms ($58,651).
Giumarra, with more than 12,000 acres under cultiva-: tion, collected $278,721 in cotton payments last year.
It is difficult to explain sometimes why the government subsidizes a struck farmer to the tune of a quarter of a million dollars and refused to protect the rights of farm workers to organize,but life's/ 1 ike that.
iVIVA LA HUELGA!
SCABl ARRESTED1
Gilbert Rubio was released on $625 bail by Delano-McFar-land Judicial District John McNally after he was arrested on charges of brandishing a firearm "in a threatening manner."
Rubio, who fancies himself a leader of anti-Union forces in the Delano area, appeared at a Giumarra picket line on Wednesday July 3, and threatened pickets with a rifle.
UFW0C general counsel Jerome Cohen told £L MALCRIAD0 Rubio's action was one of a number of instances of violence or potential violence emanating from the Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association, a newly-formed group which opposes the organization of farm workers by the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee.
The charges against Rubio and his arrest stem from a complaint by UFW0C picket Victor Ortiz, who witnessed the incident July 3-
No trial date was set by Judge McNally, but a court clerk said it was expected the date for trial would be announced early this week.
Steve Belcher, Union volunteer, is carried to an ambu-lanoe after being run down by an unidentified ranch employee, Belcher was treated in Bakersfield Hospital and later released. Hern County District Attorney Kit Kelson has so far refused to accept any complaint or file any charges.
The pattern of violence a-gainst the Union in Lamont is similar to grower tactics in Coachella, states Union attorney David Averbuck. The son of grower William Mosesian jumped off a truck and accosted Father Mark Day in one incident. In another, a car bearing a "Don't Buy Rew York Products" sticker swerved at least four feet off the road and headed straight for Joaquin Murguia, a 13 year old boy who was playing while his mother picketted. The youth jumped and narrowly missed being killed. The grower then shouted obscenities at Mrs. Murguia.
Kern County officials refuse to protect the strikers and refuse to make arrests of the criminal element employed by the growers. That's "LAW AND ORDER" in Kern County.
t


EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August V, 1968/5
Growers Attack Church Publication
Delano Labor Day Parade
DELANO, July 30—Delano City Manaqer Gerald Minford told EL MALCRIADO today that a decision on UFWOC1s application for a Labor Day parade permit will be made some time next week.
UFWOC applied for the permit on Tuesday, July 23, in a letter which stated that 25-3 Several days later, the A-gricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association (a scab organization), requested a permit for a parade of similar size on the same day.
Minford said he would meet with the chief of police and the city attorney before a decision was made on the conflicting permits. He said officials would make an attempt to honor both requests if possible.
He said that city ordinances require, however, that the earliest request received take priority. He mentioned the possibility of one parade be-inq scheduled for 10 AM on Labor Day, and the other for ^ PM the same day.
UFWOC's parade, called a "Solidarity March," is expected to include union leaders, churchmen, political leaders, and union members from all parts of California and the rest of the country, according to Director CSsar Chavez.
FRfcSNO, July 30—Advertising cancellations -in'the Central California Registera a week1y newspaper published by the Roman Catholic diocese of Fresno, have plagued the paper as a result of pressure from anti-Union forces, according to Managing Editor Girard Sherry.
Sherry told EL MALCRIADO that a letter signed by Jos€ Mendoza was sent to all the Register'8 advertisers, advising them that any who continued to advertize after Au-: gust 1 would be picketed..
"I believe that there is a .tie-in between Mendoza and some of the growers and farmers," Sherry said. ."In several instances our advertisers have been approached either by telephone or personally by farmers and growers who appear to know in advance that the Mendoza letter had been sent out," the editor said.
"The growers urged that the particular business take their ads out of the Register, and many such advertisements have been cancelled."
The editorial position of the Register has been neutral in the three year-old UFWOC strike against California grape growers, though Sherry
said the paper's position is that "both sides have the right to organize if th^.majority of their members want it that way.
"The Farm Workers Union has never been given the chance to •hold elections to prove that a majority of the workers wish to be organized in a labor Union."
In informal elections (without legal standing) conducted recently in Coachella and Bakersfield, results showed clearly that workers did indeed desire representation by the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO. In the Coachella vote, conducted on June 15 and 16, by impartial church, government, and trades union leaders, workers voted 1,138 to 27 in favor of the Union.
Sherry said approximately one-third of the Register's weekly retail advertising was lost because of grower-linked pressures.
The paper supports National Labor Relations Act coverage for farmworkers. "This is a policy of the California Bishops," Sherry said. "We follow the guidelines set by them in our editorial policy.
He said several advertisers had voiced the positive intention to continue advertising in the Register. In a letter to the editor, pharmacist-grower J. Martin Winton told the Register he had no intention of being intimidated. "I expect you to run our advertisement as you have for many years," the letter said.
Sherry said growers were giving the Register a "hard time" long before the current campaign. "They have refused to help us, and they have deprived us of perhaps $6,000 worth of special advertising in the last year."
"An ironic thing," Sherry said, "is that our latest 'Good Will Issue1 had to be postponed. There seems to be very little good will around these days."
----------------------------------- .
Threat Against Union Att|orin;ey|s
cured so quickly and the lighting was so bad he was un-
DELAN0, July 22—UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen and attorney David Averbuck were threatened in their office by an unidentified man with a pistol about 9 PM tonight, according to a report they made to Delano po!ice.
Cohen and Averbuck were working late in their office when a man in a white T-shirt appeared at the window. "I'm going to get you bastards," the man said, and brandished a pistol.
Cohen said the man evidently changed his mind and ran off, either through a back alley or across neighboring yards. ^Cohenjsa^d^h^^nc^den^oc^
able to identify the man. He appeared to be of Latin American descent, was cleanshaven, and was 5 th. 1) in. or 6 ft. tall. Cohen estimated the man weighed between 185 and 190 pounds.
Cohen said the incident was only one of several threats of violence received recently. Jos€ Mendoza of the scab Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work association threatened a law cleric with a gun in front of the same building several days before. Cohen said the night-time threat was probably made by a different man. X


6/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 1, 19.63
Me Carthy Backs Boycott
SAN FRANCISCO, July 26--Dem-ocratic Presidential candidate Eugene J. McCarthy pledged full support of the United Farm Workers organizing drive and the nation-wide boycott of California table grapes in a statement issued today.
McCarthy also accused Governor Ronald Reagan of supporting what the candidate termed "strike-breaking in the California grape pickers' strike."
"I urge all those who are concenred with human dignity and determined to lift the burden of poverty from out land to support the boycott," McCarthy $aid.
"A victory in their strike will bring both dignity and income so vital to workers whose living and working conditions are the shame of our nation."
He said that he believed the boycott to be legitimate "be-
cause the tactics of the grape growers...coupled with governmental failures at both the State and Federal levels have made an effective strike im? possible."
"With the backing of Governor Reagan," McCarthy S3id, "the California Department of Employment is apparently using its facilites to aid employ? ment of new immigrants who thus become strikebreakers."
"One of the solutions to urban problems lies in a serious effort to meet the challenge of poverty in the rurual areas," he stated.
McCarthy voiced his support for putting farm workers under the National Labor Relations Act, giving them the right to unionize, to be paid minimum wages, and to enjoy the benefits which urban workers have, become accustomed to.
UNION ASKS FOR JURY TRIAL
FRESNO, July 10—UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen reported today that an extension of time for further consideration of arguments was granted today by Presiding Judge Conley of the District Court of Appeals in the case of the Gi-umarra Corporation's suit a-gainst UFWOC for alleged vio-ations of an anti-strike injunct ion.
The case dates from late February, when UFWOC and individuals were charged with contempt of an injunction issued las August by Bakersfield Superior Judge Court Judge J. Kelly Steele. The injunction reguired pickets to remain 50 feet apart, and for awhile the use of bullhorns was prohibited, although that order was later rescinded.
CSsar Chavez, Epifanio Camacho, and the Union were accused of twelve counts of violating the injunction. When they first appeared for trial in Bakersfield six months ago,
more than 2,000 UFWOC members and supporters accompanied them in a silent demonstration.
In the appeal court, Cohen argued that the Union had the right to a jury trial, since the case could involve heavy fines or imprisonment. Giu-marra attorneys John Giumarra, Jr. and William A. Quinlan maintained that there was no right to a jury trial.
Cohen said the Union's lawyer and the opposition would present further arguments in writing for the consideration of the three-judge court.
The trial of the Union on contempt charges will not come about until the constitutional guest ion of the jury is decided, he said.
Cohen said that if the Court of Appeals rules unfavorably, the case will be appealed to the State Supreme Court, and to the Federal Supreme Court in Washington if that becomes necessary. .
Legal Heljp for the Ulnlion
DELANO, August 1—A large number of attorneys across the United States have offered free legal assistance to boycott representatives of the U-nited Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CI0, stationed In numerous cities around the country.
Legal department officials said the assistance of local attorneys greatly facilitated the work of the boycott, and added that support from the legal profession was far greater than expected.
The assistance of four law students who are spending the summer in Delano as law clerks was also mentioned in the announcements. The students, Nan Kripke, Pete Raeder, Pete Janiak, and Pete Williamson work under the supervision of attorneys Jerome Cohen, general counsel, and David Aver-buck.


EL.MALCRIADO. Thursday, August 1, 1968/7
Chatfield to Draw Up Union Benefit Plan
FRESNO, August 1—-A breakthrough in negotiations occurred last night, when LeRoy Chatfield, administrator of the National Farm Workers Service Center, Inc., was named coordinatro of the Farm Workers Health and Welfare Fund Benefit Program.
The appointment came at a meeting of employer representatives and union delegates, who were gathered to continue negotiations on setting up the fund. Officially known as-the "Agricultural Employers and UFWOC Health and Welfare Fund," the program is financed by employers who contribute 10 cents per hour for each employee.
Intended to provide health care, retirement benefits, and other welfare items for Union farm’ workers, the fund is jointly administered by the employers and the Union. Negotiations had broken down earlier over the question of hiring an outside firm to administer the benefit program. Union officials held out for appointment of a union representative rather than an outside f i rm.
The Fund Board of Directors, chaired by UFWOC vice president Mrs. Dolores Huerta, is scheduled to meet August l1* for further discussions. Mrs. Huerta siad she is hopefull the meeting will
produce a budget and a timetable for getting the Benefit Plan into operation."
"It may still be several months before the Plan is completed," Mrs. Huerta said.
"Due to the seasonal nature of farm work, it will be difficult to estimate costs. We want to provide all the workers, whether permanent employees or seasonal workers, with as broad coverage and benefits as we can afford.
"We cannot make committments that the contributions to the fund cannot pay for."
Chatfield, a former parochial school administrator, has been with UFWOC for several years. His wife Bonnie is secretary to the legal department.
Board of Trustees for the Health and Welfare Fund include the following: Mrs. Huerta, Chaii man; Tom Dibbs of Gall, co-chairman; Antonio Orendain, UFWOC treasurer; Philip Vera Cruz, UFWOC vice president; UFWOC Director Cesar E. Chavez; Jean Perel1i-Minetti of Perel1i-Minetti Vineyards; Irwin Guyette of Christain Brothers; George Morrison of Almaden (National Distilleries); and Ira Cross of Di Giorgio.
"GREEN CARD” SYSTEM ON TRIAL
SAN FRANCISCO—Mexican nationals working on U.S. farms took an estimated $15 million to Mexico last year, according to a suit filed in San Francisco by California Rural Legal Assistance recently.
The suit alleges that the State paid approximately $7 million in relief for permanent residents thus displaced from their jobs.
CRLA attorneys have echoed the United*Farm Workers' complaint that many Mexican citizens use an immigrant visa to enter the country though they have no intention whatsoever of becoming permanent residents .
Union officials have cited numerous cases of such "green card" immigrants being used as scabs and strike-breakers despite federal regulations prohibiting their work on struck ranches.
Federal Judge George B. Harris is expected to hand down a decree on the CRLA suit in early August, it was reported. At a July 23 hearing, the Im-
migration Service (a branch of the Department of Justice) was ordered to show cause why it should not be ordered to keep "green carders" from the nation's farms.
A 1965 federal immigration law requires that the secretary’ of labor certify a shortage of workers before foreign laborers may be imported. Immigration Service rules, now un-enforced, prohibit the importation of aliens for strike-breaking purposes.
A recent UFWOC survey of
1,000 farm workers on struck ranches showed a high percentage of aliens in violation of the regulation.
UFWOC general counsel Jerome Cohen said that while the Union is not directly involved in the CRLA case, it is keenly interested in the outcome. He said the Union is interested in protecting the rights of its members, many fo whom are resident aliens deprived of jobs by the importation of temporary residents.
The only completly Mexican mortuary in northern California
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Catholic and Episcopal Bishops of Detroit met with the city's Mayor, Jerome Cavanauqh, and union representatives to announce their support of the boycott. "It is essential that citizens of Michigan refrain from eatinq California table qrapes and that stores remove these qrapes from their shelves" stated Catholic Bishop Joseph Schoenherr
ine grape boycott fective since May troduced grapes rounded bv a huge
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Workers and other Unions unanimously backed the boycott. UFWOC representative Frank Diaz, 19 year old former employee of Giumarra Vineyards, is optimistic that the boycott will end the sale of the approximately 1126 car lots of grapes (1 ,1*07,500) usual -
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UFWOC representative Pete Cardenas announces city schools and hospitals are considering cancelling all purchases of qrapes. Minnesota Unions are uniting solidly be-hincKthe boycott.

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San Francisco—
Lupe Murgufa reports that the Alameda and San Francisco Labor Councils are solidly behind the boycott. Supervisor
Jack Morrison asked San Francisco to take offi* oral stand in favor of the boycott this week. Look to the Bay Area for a boycott as solid and successful as New York's, say Union lead*
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8/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 1
9Ust
1968/9
Grape Boycott Sprj ids Coast to Coast
Portland Jnions
welcomed Manuel
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and immed iately
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sentatIves have
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porting the grape
boycott" reports
the Oreqon Labor
Press.
Bakersfield_________
"We're only working 6 hour daYs because the growers can't Se*l their grapes'1 report worker$ in the Bakersfield *rea« Kern County is the cen-er of the table grape harvest _Qr JuW end August.



10/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 1, 1.36,8
Mi SWISS'
DELANO, July 25^-Complete support and active participation in UFWOC1 s consumer boycott of California grapes was announced today by Leonard H. Carter, west coast regional director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
Carter told a news conference in Delano, "Fifty-nine years ago the NAACP started its long battle against racial discrimination. Manifestations of racism have been exhibited most dramatically in the area of economic exploitation. Twentieth century quasi-slavery of farm workers in the South and North is a contributing factor to the plight of the California farm worker today."
Carter said his office's endorsement of the boycott was made with the knowledge and consent of national NAACP president Roy Vf likens, who has been requested to make the move a national policy for the association.
He told reporters that 10*4 adult branches and 19 youth chapters, with a total membership of approximately 25,000 people in nine western states were represented by the western region.
Carter said these local groups would be contacted and asked to assist Union representatives in their boycott activities.
"Our leadership in the target cities will work closely with farm worker families who have already been dispatched from Delano to these cities. They will plan meetings with a variety of groups and individuals, distribute educational materials, and participate in selected boycotting," Carter said.
He noted that Seattle, San Dieqo, San Jose, Portland, San Francisco, Fresno,Bakersfield, Los Angeles, and Sacramento were selected as the chief target areas for NAACP participation in a meeting held earlier with UFWOC director Cesar Chavez.
Carter said there is no NAACP group * in Vancouver, British Columbia, but that the Seattle branch would make contact with UFWOC representatives in the Canadian city.
"Mr. Ch£vez and the faithful followers in this effort have pursued a long, difficult, non-violent effort to bring equality and dignity to the workers in the tie las of Cali-
fornia. Every minority in California is included among the farm workers. Some 15 to 20 percent of them are Negroes," Carter said.
He said that many of the ghetto dwellers of the cities were former farm workers driven into urban poverty by the terrible conditions of farm work. "Thus the impact: of our efforts to join with our brothers in the United Farm Workers in their efforts toward equality will surely be felt in the cities."
Chavez, who sat beside Carter as he made hia announcement, commented, "The NAACP is the largest and oldest civil rights organization. They are the first to date to come forward as an organization with all-out support of our fight. It is perhaps fitting that they have taken the lead. However, we hope that many more who subscribe to the nonviolent belief and practices will join us. We welcome help under the terms and conditions of non-violence and the program of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO."


EL M'ALCR I ADO, Thursday, August 1, 1968/1J
Colorado Farm Workers on Strike
BRIGHTON, COLO.,July 1—Fifty-eight workers at the Kita-yama Brothers Green House in Brighton, Colorado, went on strike July 1 for higher wages and Union recognition, according to organizer Jim GarcTa.
The workers are represented by the fledgling National Floral Workers Organization, as yet unaffiliated with the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO.
Kitayama is Colorado's largest grower of carnations, the state's ninth largest crop by value. The same firm also owns an immense cut-flower farm outside Union City, California, near Oakland.
According to a statement by the workers, conditions at the Colorado farm are deplorable, with a single drinking fountain for 120 workers at the peak of the season, and a single rest room which often has three inches of dirt and mud on the floor. 7 Many of the workers are women..
Pre-strike wages were 80 cents per hour, according to reports, with a nine or ten-hour day and a six-day week the standard.
In what workers termed a strike-breaking move, Kitayama ra i sed wages to a top of $1.20 per hour and hired numerous Anglo students eager for summer jobs after the strike began.
Brighton is an agricultural center, and the home of a large Mexican-American community. There are 10-15,000 Chicanos in the county, forming about 15 percent of the population.
Sen. Eugene McCarthy, in Colorado recently to address the state Democratic convention, visited Brighton, where he joined workers on the picket line.
Garcfa admits that difficulties in organizing workers in Colorado are "almost insurmountable, but we will contin-|Ue with our struggle," he jsaid. "The people are sick and tired of being treated-like animals or machines. There comes a time when you have to make a stand."
iVIVA LA HUELGA!
NOW ALSO
IA
LAM0NT
11121 Main St.
Bakeries
FOUR LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU IN KERN COUNTY
BAKERSFIELD MASCO 0ELAN0
630 Baker St. 1000 "F" St. 407-llth Ave.
323-4294 758-5774 725-9178
Egg Bread and Pastries All Kinds of Donuts Cakes for all Occasions French Bread
We have a large Selection of Spanish Magazines, Books, and Records.
LAUKZANO ESPARZA, Pnp.


12/EL .MALCRIADO, Thursday, August I, 1968
August clink sdiedule
DELANO, August 1—The Rodri* go Terronez Memorial Clinic, operated by the United Farm Workers for its members, will remain open despite the recent departure of Dr. James Mc-Kniqht, who formerly served as director of the clinic.
Mrs. Lourdes Dahilig of the clinic staff said physicians will serve the clinic on a voluntary basis, providing medical care on the weekends for farm workers.
Mrs. Dahiliq said there will be a doctor In the clinic on Sunday, Auq. 4; Saturday and Sunday. Auq. 10 and 11; and on Sunday, August 18.
The clinic will be open from 10 AM to 4 PM on Saturday and 1 to 5 PM on Sunday.
She said the clinic is again in need of volunteer doctors and dentists: Physicians and dentists who are interested helpinq the clinic should contact Service Center director LeRoy Chatfield, she said.
Chatfield's address is Post Office Box 671, Delano, Cal fornia, 93215- The clinic telephone number is 725-1281.
Dr. McKnight, who served the clinic for several months, has returned to the San Francisco Bay area. His resignation was for personal reasons, he said. Union officials have voiced regret at his departure.
Viva la Causa Y
El Progreso
a
‘TKexiMtt-
rfttt&iiccut
Fresno California

"Sanitary conditions prevail in the fields including chemical toilets and washing facilities are under the constant supervision of the Kern County Health Department. Laborers are provided modern, air-conditioned housing which
have hot water showers and o-ther conveniences such as sanitary cooking facilities in modern kitchens."
--From a resolution praising grape growers passed recently by the Kern County Board of Supervisors.
Sisk Opposes School Lunch Program
Fresno's congressman Bernie Sisk was one of 78 votes a-gainst a bill to provide free or inexpensive school lunches for needy children which was passed by the House of Representatives 274-78 recently.
The new law, HR 17873, provides funds to help feed children between the ages of 3 and 17 whose families earn less than $3,00 per year.
While approximately 20 million children participate in school lunch programs, and a-boutN2.5 million receive free or reduced-price meals, "millions of those most in need do not have access to a*ny program,". according to Congress-
man Perkins of Kentucky.
"The primary objective of this bill is to see that some four-million-plus youngsters in pre-school, elementary, and secondary schools of this country who need free or reduced-price meals get them," Perki.ns said.
Sisk si ad he was opposed to the bill on "proccedural grounds." That's the same reason he gave for voting a-gainst the civil rights bill earlier this year.
Sisk's support among farm workers is expected to be minimal in the November elections, observers indicate.
Arroyosjflace
M
BAR
POOL HALL
BARBER SHOP
610 10 TH ST.
DELANO


Every California grape you buy helps keep this
child hungry.
UFWOC boycott representatives across the United States and in Canada need the assistance of local people who want to help in the organization of America's farm workers, according to a re-jquest issued today by the boycott coordination office.
Pressure from consumers can force chain stores jto stop selling scab California grapes in your area, the request said. Pickets are needed, as well as interested people to help in the many tasks necessary for the successful operation of the boycott.
To assist you in getting in touch with the boycott representative ip your area, EL MALCRIA-DO gives you the addresses and phone numbers of people you should contact if you want to help... and we ask for your help.
These are the latest
More
CUirOKMIA
10$ AW.ElES-Joe Serda
3016-1/2 Cast first Street 213*26S*I$86 or 213*26$*I0$3 OAKLAND—Pete Vile 1(0
$68 67th. Street 6l$-6$$-32S6
SACRAMENTO—Sacre-ent© friends of the f»rn Vor.tr 6$l 60th. St.
SAN OlEGO—Carlos legerrett L$;L Jwnceno Aye.
716-276-1620
SAN raAN(lSCO—luoe HurouS*
3690 »8th. St.
LI 5*626-79$$
SAN JOSE—Andre* Chive*
dvr lady Guadalupe Church 2020 Eait Sah Antonio 60$-2$8-70S7
COlORAOO
OCNVtll—Alfredo Herrera 361 Clatl 303*222-2321 or
Colorado labor Council
*00« 300
360 Aco*a Street
DISTRICT 0» COLUMBIA Nanueal Vasque*
633 Haiiechuietti Ave., N.w,
202-NA8-0028 or (ho*e)202*$L6*3l23
WISCONSIN
MAOI SON-Boycott Office
$67-West Washington 608*262*7861 MILWAUKEE—la I o Velde*
Spanish Center $26 West National Ave.
616*386*3700 or AI6-376-$269 wautoha—Jesus Salas 8ok 32'
616*787*289$ or 787-3650 WAS’lUr.TON
SEATTLE—Oale Van Pelt
3229 36th, Ave. west 206->V2-03$3 or 206-nrj.|6l7
ILLINOIS
CHICAGO-Cllsco "edina
1300 South Wabash
3I2-HA7-7078 or (ho-e) )I2*627*72I)
MARYLAND
BALTIMORE—Andv l"utan
$307 Eastern Ave.
30l-)62*l800 o» (hoae) 633*3366 MA5SACHUSETTS BOSTON—Marcos Mono*
73 Tre-ont Street. *00" 527 617*227*127$ or 662*728)
MICHIGAN
OfTAAlT—lupe Aneuiano
2)10 Cass Ave.. Sth. floor 313*962*6986 or (ho»e)861-66l)
, MINNESOTA
MINNEAPOLIS—Pete Cardenas Mali!
37)3 Portland Ave. I0JI M. *â– *
612*826*18)7
MISSOURI
KANSAS CITY—*obert Bustos
608 west 29th. St.
8I6-PL3-U68 or 9IJ*f»l*2$l8 ST. LOUIS—Pat Iryan
121$ Paul Drown Building 818 Olive St.
316.661*7652 or 3l6-CHl*9*66 NEW VOAK
BROOKLYN—f ran Ryan
182 21st. St.
212*699*6612 or 699-1*10 JUrrALO—Juan floras
1336 Prudential lulldlnq .28"Church St.
716-852*037$ or 862-0)74 OHIO
CINCINNATI—Jorge Zaraeo*e
101$ Vine St.. *oon $20 606-291-1260 or $13-621*9108 CLEVClANO—Julio Hernande*
260$ Oetrolt Ave.
Oayi 216-781*8017 Nlqhti 216-621-9108 OREGON
PORTLANO—Manual Urenday
690$ North interstate Ave.. Apt* SO)*222*7IO) or $03*289*9616 PENNSYLVANIA PHILADELPHIA—Prank Ola*
Heines St.
2l$-fl7-6)00 or JI$*PE$*7078
PITTSBURGH—Al Rojas
291$ Webster St. 612*621*1111 or 241*0822
i


1*»/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 1, 1968
DEL REY TO INCORPORATE
FRESNO, Auqust\ l-r-A group of residents of Del Rey, California were scheduled to appear before the Board of Supervisors and the County Local A-gency Formation Commission sometime this week to request incorporation of the town as a city.
Because we are "tired of people outside of Del Rey making al1 the decisions affecting the future of our town," one resident said, "we are requesting incorporation, which will allow us to elect our own town officials and administration1.1
The town of Del Rey, with approximately 1,200 residents, most of them Mexican Americans, is' currently administered as a part of Fresno county. The largest'employer in the town is Hegge-blade-Marguleas, which operates a packing shed in Del Ray.
The move to incorporate the city began last spring, according to Sal Gonzales,a former farm worker and member' of the United Farm Workers. On May 22, about 50 residents marched from Del Rey to the Fresno County courthouse to present the petition for incorporation.
Enedino "Nino" Perez, chairman of the Del Rey Committee for Better Government, led the march and was also responsible for a voter registration campaign that netted hundreds of new voters.
Both Perez and Gonzales predict hurdles for Del Rey. Though the poor are allowed to vote, only property owners are permitted to sign the petition. Heggeblade and Marguleas, therefore, may be able to block the petition.
San Joaquin Valley officials have been reluctant to include large blocks of Mexican-American voters in incorporated cities. In Parlier (population 1,300) for example, the oolonia is outside the city limits, though an integral part of the area.
-Observers in Del Rey have calculated that a substantial increase in municipal services, could be provided if taxes now levied by the county were transfered to the incorporated city.
Top: Citizens of Del Rey, California, assemble for their march to the Fresno County Courthouse. The huge Heggeblade Packing Shed in the background dominates the town.
Below• The marchers head for Fresno. Symbol for the movement is an owl and the inscription, "JUSTICE."
Almaden Vineyards Expands
Jose Luna, UFWOC representative for the Hoi 1ister-San Benito County area, reports that Almaden Vineyards, Inc. has arranged to purchase the Ferry Morse Seed Company ranch in the Hollister area.
Luna said he believed the transfer of property would take Diace in September and that Almaden was purchasing about 2,000 acres whith will be turned into vineyards. Almaden oDerates about 5,^00 acres of vineyards in the area now.
Luna reports that about 80 additional workers will come under the coverage of the $1.80 oer hour Almaden con-
tract as a result of the purchase.
Further details will be re-Dorted in the August 15 issue Of EL MALCRIADO.
Henry R. 1 fafoya, Jr.
1 Life Insurance Office, 222-3727
Res., 222-7544 ||( jalth Insurance 1
FRESNO CALIFORNIA
!


EL MALCRTAUO, Thursaa-r,'August i,
Books & Records of the Strike
"BASTAl11 ("Enough"). The Tale of Our Struggle. English ancl Spanish text. Photos by George Ballis.
"Bastal" is a unique book,, a photo-graphic essay on the battle for dignity in the fields of California. The text is from the historic Plan of Delano, the proclamation of the farm workers which was read at the rallies as farm workers marched from Delano to Sacramento in 1966. There is an Introduction by Cesar Chavez. The photographer, George Ballis, has spent his life in the San Joaquin Valley. He is a sensitive artist, in the tradition of Dorothea Lange, who truly captures the spirit of the Movement. $2.00
"HUELGA!" Great
The First
Delano Grape
IQQ Days of the Strike, Dy Eugene
Nelson.
"HUELGA!" by Eugene Nelson remains the finest account yet published on the early days of the Delano Grape Strike. Nelson was a picket line'Captain (and later led the Union drive to organize the melon fields of Texas) and writes with intimate knowledge of the origins and' beginnings of the strike. Nelson also- includes a brief biography and interviews with Cesar Chavez and other Union leaders, and a history of the National Farm Workers Association, the predecessor of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee.
160 pages, with illustrations by George Ballis. In English only, $1.50.
BLACK AND RED WALL POSTER, 17" x 23", of Emiliano Zapata, with the banner headline, "VIVA LA REVOLUCION". Zapata was the hero of the Mexican Revolution, who led the peasants of Central Mexico in their struggles for land and liberty.
$1.50, plus 254 handling. 5 copies for $5.00 ________
S'
VIVA LA REVOLUCION
"EL ESQUIROL" ("THE STRIKEBREAKER") "HUELGA EN GENERAL" ("THE GENERAL STRIKE"). 45 rpm record.
Two of the finest songs to come out of the Delano Grape Strike, sung by the Teatro Campesino, the Farm Worker Theater, Augustin Lira, Luis Valdez, David Alaniz, and Danny Valdez.
$1.00, plus 104 handling.
_____ HUELGAJ by Nelson $1.50 NAME
___ BASTA1 photos $2.50 ADDRESS
___ Zapata Posters ' - \n o CITY STATE
EL ESQU1ROL--HUELGA EN GENERAL ("The Scab", "The General. Strike", by the TEATRO CAttfimiifli. Make Farm Checks Workers payable to , Box 130, the United Delano, Ca
I


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ar Main st.
^r°ss from the Post Office
DELANO
IGRAND
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10 in the morning
till 9 at night
SA
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Radios
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918 MAIN — ACROSS FROM THE POST OFFICE
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COACHELLA STOCKTON
TRACY INDIO


Full Text

PAGE 1

El @ . IN ENGLISH 1 . I I , N umber I I

PAGE 2

2/E.l MALCRIAOO, Thu r :sday, _________________ , lri•Bii31it1 STRIKE SWEEPS KERN P. 3 1 SUBS I 0 1 ES P, 3 NEW 14AVE OF GROWER V I O LENCE P . 4 McCARTHY ENDORSES BOYCOTT P. 6 BREAKTHROUGH ON HEALTH PLAN P . ) GRAPE BOYCOTT P. 8-9 U18 701 7534573 ElliALCRIAOO,Th eVoiceoftheFarm Worker, ispublishedtwicemonthlyby the UNITED FARM WORKERS ORGANIZH!r. COMMITTEE,AFLCIO. Subscriptions i n theUnitedStatesanditspossessioos are$3.50pe r y ear,andforeiqo, in cludioqCanadaand M exico,US$5.00. Subscriptions formembers ofUFWOC, AFL-C"IOareincluded i n monthly dues. Editorialandbusiness officeslo at the no r thWest corner o f Gar ces Hiqhway and Hetthr Aven•e, Delano, California. Address all correspondence to: EL HALCf\IAOO,Post0ffi c eBox130,Delano,California93215. Application to mai 1 at postage rates lspendinq at Delano, Cal ifornia93215. Foradvertisingrates,cootactf"ed ericoChive:z:at (805)725-!337orthe El Malcriado says By the Editor The Delano Chamber of Com merce scheduled a dinner meet ; ng for Wednesday night, Ju 1 y 24, to discuss Delano's " I mage Gap." The Southern California Edison Company and the South ern Pacific Rai 1 road Company wer e scheduled to send thei r hotshots to the meeting to e x plai n what Delano needs to do to attract industry. The De 1 a no Reao"Pd has been runn ing plaintive articles a bout the poor publ i<;ity show ered on the town over the past three years. The Chamber of Commerce and "the City recentl y dropped a bundle on twO fancy new 1 ight ed signs at the northern and southern city 1 imits along the Highway 99 The signs feature the catchy and origi na l slogan "De l ano--We l come Any-time." Each s i gn has a large clock-a perfect t ie-i n wi'th the "Anyt ime" slogan. Hiqhway b i l lboards do a great deal to improve the landscape. At the same time that the city father are franticall y trying to overcome the ''image gap," they are. also screaming about their new "Don ' t Buy New York Products" campaign. The local paper is urging peop l e to write to thei r "Suppliers" in New York and tel l them that nobody in De! a _ no ain' t a gonna buy nothin' f rom New Yor k un ti 1 them city Fe llers start buyin' scab grapes again. While NeW York industrial i s t s tremble, the have not yet a n no unced which major in dustries they intend to re-lo cate i n Delano. Of course Delano has every thing to appeal to new indus try. The water is unsafe for infants. The work force is migratory as the result of low wages. The temperature soars above 100 deg rees in the sum mer. The local yokel s will be annoyed if potential industries buy anything from New York. A great town for new industries. If, however, the city fa thers and the growers (who oppose industr y because it raises the wage sea 1 e) wou 1 d get together and s i qn con tracts with the Untied Far m Workers to settl e the three year-old strike, Delano could become known as the Ca 1 i forn i a town which made history i n the struggle for justice. Propaganda is no substitute for a decent agricultural and industrial economy . I f the Delano "brain trust" woul d clean h o use a 1 ittle, some in dustries might come to town. Settling the strike woul d be a good start. Our phone num ber is 725 -131 4, mailing,address l iste d abov e . J...-----------------------4 subscribe to l EL MALCRIADO today EL MALCRIADO P.O. BOX 130 DELANO, CA 93215 Mor e and more p "eople are fin"ding O 'ut that a subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best to keep up 1vith the farm worker struggle. Don1t be left out--send in this coupon today! FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3, SO TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TOYOUR HOME EVERY .TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR. NMIE-nombre ___________ English_ Espanol_ ADDRESS-domicilio _______________ ---j C ITY-ciudad STATE-estado ZIP '

PAGE 3

E L MAlCRlADq, Thursday, AUgust 1, 1968/:f: Strike Sweeps Kern Count y ARVlN-lAHDNT , July 29 -\./ith the addition of 15 new ranches to the l ist of certified s trikes, 90 percent of Cal i fornia' s table grapes are bei ng produced by struck compa n ies. Union organizers reported this week. As the campaign reached out t o ' add the five remain' ing large ranches in the ArvinLamont area to the certified s t r i ke 1 ist , the fol low ing ranc hes wer e activel y struck: Kovacov itch, Moses ian, Sabovitch, El Ranc h o Farms, N a l bandian, Ba i nco, Ma 1 ov itch, Gages ian, Russo, Cal Fame, Fredlo, Giuderra, Kern Valley Farms, Arvin Grape Growers Co. {Fox). Coun t y L a n d Com pany, 'd Giumarra. The ,f ive rema ining ranches a r e Sandrin i,Johnson, T ozzi, Bidart, and Haddad. All are lar g e corporate farms, and some o f t h em, such as Kern County land, Giumarra, and B i anco, control tens of thousands o r hundreds of thousands of acres. The new wave of strikes was touched off after growers unanimously refused to discuss wages , contracts, or even Uni o n recognition, I n an e lection i n lamon t on July 9, w orkers voted 1,658 to 16 to strike all ranches in t h e area w here t h e ranchers. refused to a l low negociatiOns.The vote was taken by secret ba llot, and onl y worke r s employed on Kern County ranches were allowed to vote, observers said. Union officials sai d they had mor e than 2,000 signed authorization cards on file,qiving the Union the go-ahead to act as collective bargaining agent for the workers i n the area. In early July the Union offered to present the cards as p roof of. representation, but, as i n Delano and Coachella, growers refused to answe r Uni on communications. An offer of secret ballot elections foll owed. Growers responded w ith pub! ic refusals to hold e lections. Union officials say the strik e and boycott of all Cal ifornia table g rapes is t h e r eply to the g rowers' refusal to follow any more orderl y procedure . 1 ( New huel q istas sign up. Over 2000 new qrape workers have s igned Unio n cards since Jul y I. Growers Fight Strike with Federal Subsidies Among 20 Kern County farms added to 1 ist of struck growers in the last month are i nc l uded some famous names in California agriculture. County Lan d Company, a subs 1 dar y of the Tenneco Cor porati o n , o wns 350,00 0 acr'es i n Kern C ount y alone, plus h o ldings in other parts of California, t h e Southwest, and Australia. l t manufact uring companies in Mississippi and Hawaii, producing farm equ ipment, auto parts, and a variety of other products. Kern County L and collected S838, 130 in direct fedefal payments for NOT p roducin g cotton in 1967. Anthony Bianco and Sons,also on page 4 i \

PAGE 4

4/EL MALCRI A D 0 , Thurs . day, , A u o u s t 1 , I ::;too SUBSIDIES Continued f rom page 3 strUck, own 7,000 acres in Kern County, plus orchards and packinq houses in Tulare, Fresno, and santa C lara count ies. They c i t rus orchards, v ineyards. and lettuce and cotton fields in Arizona. Their cotton subsidy last year was $50.000, according to the Congr>esSiona't R ecord . Other struck farmers who re ceive cash handouts from the federal gover nment on the cot ton they do not grow are Bi dart Brothers ($131, 147), Kern Valley Farms ($123,809), and Fredlo F arms ($58,651), Giuma rra, wit h more than 12,000 acres under tion, collected $278,721 in cotton payments l ast year. It is difficult to explain sometimes why the government subsidizes a struck farmer to the tune of a quarter of a mi 11 ion dollars and refused to protect the rights of farm workers to organize,but I ife' s l 1 ike that. i V IVA LA SCABI r.i !bert Rubio was released on $625 bai I by Del ano-McFar land Judicial District John "'cNally after he was a rrested on charqes of brandishing a firearm "in a threateninq man ner. ' ' Rubio, who fancies himself a leader of anti-Union forces i n the Delano area, appeared a t a (iiumarra picket I ine on Wed nesday Jul y 3, and t hreatened p ickets with a r ifle. UFI-If)C general counsel Jerome Cohen told L MALCRIAOO Rubi o's action was one of a number of instances of violence or potentia l v i o lence emanating from the Agricultura l Worker s F r eedom t o Work Associati on , a newly -for med group which O!) poses the organization of farm workers by the United Farm Workers Orqan izinq Committee. The charqes against Rubio and h i s arrest stem from a complain t by UFWOC picket V ic tor Ortiz, who witnessed the incident July 3. No t r ial d ate was set by J udge McNall y , b u t a court cler k said i t was expected the date for t rial would be an nounced early this week . Steve Be 'tcher Union vo 1-un is carried to an ambu 1-anoe after being ru n dot.m by a n unidentified l"a n ch empl-o y ee. Be t.ohel" was treated in Bakel"sfield Hospita l an d latel" re'teased. Kem County District Attorney Kit N et.aon has so far refused to accept any com pl-aint ol" fil-e any charges. The oattern of viot.ence against" the Union in Lamont is simi tal" to grOJ.Jer> tactics in Coachelt.a, states Union attor ney David Avel'b uc k . The son o f gr>ower Uit.liam M osesian jwrrped off a truck and aacost ed Fathel' !.fal'k Day in one incident. In a caP bearing a "Don't Buy New York Products" stickel' sweroed at l-east four> feet off the 1'0l'OJ.Jly missed being kiUed. The growel' then shouted obscenities at M r s . Mul'guia . Kel"11 County official-s Nj'use to pl'Otect the str>ikers and l'ej'use to make arr>est$ of the criminal element employed by the gl"'WSrs. That's "LAW AND ORDER" in Kern County.

PAGE 5

Delano Labor Day Parade DELANO, July 3D--Delano City Manaqer r.erald Minford told EL MALCRIADO today that a deci sion on UFWOC's appllcatiC'In for a Labor Day parade permit will be made some time next week. UFWOC applied for the permit on Tuesday, July 23, in a letter which stated that tS-30000 persons were expected to i n Delano for the event. Several days later, the Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association (a scab orqanization), requested a permit for a parade of similar size on the same day. Minford said he would meet with the chief of pol ice and the city attorney before a decision was made on the confl ictinq permits. He said officials would make an attempt to honor both _requests if possible. He said. that city ordinances require, however, that the earliest request received take priority. He mentioned the poss ibn i ty of one pa rade beinq scheduled for 10 AM on Labor Day, and the other for 4 PM the same day. UFWOC's parade, called a 11So1 idarity March,11 is expected to include _u!lion leaders, churchmen, Political leaders, and union member s from all parts of California and the rest of the country, acCording to Director C6sar Chiivez . EL Thursday, August I , 196815 CrtoWe'rs Attack Church Publl/ication FRI:.SNO, Ju 1 y 3D-Advertising .in "the Central California Register>, a weekly newspaper published by the Roman Catholic diocese of Fresno' have p 1 agued the paper as a result of pressure frqm an ti-Union forces, according to Managing Editor Girard She rry, Sherry told EL MALCRIADO that a letter signed by Jose Mendoza was sent to a 11 the Register's advertisers, advising them that any who continued to advertize after Au-: gust 1 would be picketed .. 111 believe that there is a _tie-in between Mendoza and some of the growe r s and farm ers,11 Sherry said. 111n several instances our advertisers have been approached e ither by telephone or personally by farmers and growers who appear to know i n advance that the Mendoza letter had been sent out,11 the editor said. "The growe r s urged that the particular business take their ads out of the Register>, and many such advertisements have been cancelled." The editorial position of the Register has been neutral in the three year-old UFWOC strike against California grape growers, though Sherry said the paper's position is that "both sides have the right to organize if the!rma jority of their members it that way. "The Farm Workers Union ha'S never been given the chance to hold elections to p rove that a majority of the worker. s wish to be organized in a labor Un ion.'' In informal elections (without legal standing) conducted recently i n Coachella and Bakersfield, results showed c learly that workers did in.deed desire representation by the United Farm Workers Organ izing Committee, AFL -C IO. In the Coachella vote, conducted on June 15 and 16, by impartial church, government, and trades union leaders, workers voted 1,138 to 27 i n favor of the Union. Sherry said approximately one-third of the Register's weekly retail advertising was lost because of growerI inked pressures. The paper supports National Labor Relations Act coverage for farm workers. "This is a pol icy of the California Bishoos," Sherry said. "He follow the guide! ines set by them in ou r editorial pol ic'f Tih' reat 1 U ' nion Attlor i n ; eYis He sai d several advertisers had voiced the positive intention to continue advertising in the Register. In a letter to the editor, pharmacist-grower J. Martin W inton told the Register> he had no i ntention of being intimidated. " 1 expect you to run our adver t isement as you have for many years," the lettei' said. DEL ANO, July 22-UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen and attorney Davi d Averbuck were threatened in their office by an unidentified man with a pistol about 9 PM tonig ht, ac cordIng to a report they made to Delano pol ice. Cohen and Averbuck were working late in their office when a man in a white T-shirt appeared a t the window. "I'm going to get you bastards," the man said, and brandished a pistol. Cohen sai d the man evidently changed hIs mind and ran off, either throu gh a back alley or across neighboring yards. Cohen said the incident oc-cured so quickly and the 1 ighting was so bad he was unable t.o identify the man. He appeared to be of Latin American descent, was clean. shaven, and was5 th. 11 in. or 6 ft. tall. Cohen estimated the man weighed between 185 and 1 90 pounds. Cohen said the incident was only one of several threats of violence received recently. Jose Mendoza of the scab Ag r i -cultural Workers Freedom to Work association threaten-ed a law clerk with a gun in front of the same building several days before. t:ohen said the night-time threat was probably made by a different Sherry said growers were giving the Register> a "hard time' ' long before thecurrent campai_gn. "They have refused to help us, and they have deP .rived us of perhaps $6,000 worth of special advertising in the last year." "An ironic thing," Sherry said, "is that our latest 'Good Wi 11 Issue' had to be postpOned, There seems to be very little good will around these days."

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6/EL MAL.CRI AD. O , Thursday; August 1 ; Me Carthy Backs SAN FRANCISCO, July 26--Dem-cause the tactics of the grape ocratic Presidential candidate gro11ers ... coupled with govern-Eugene J. McCarthy pledged mental failures at both the full support of the United State and Federal levels have F arm Workers organizing driVe and the nat ion-wide boycott of California table grape s in a statement issued today. McCarthy also accused Gover nor Ponald Reagan of supportinq 1<1hat the candidate termed ""strike-breaking in the Cali forni a grape pickers' strike." "I urqe all those who are concenred with human dignity and determined to 1 ift the burden of poverty from out land to support the boycott,'' McCarthy said. "A victory in their strike w i 11 brinq both dignity and income so vital to workers whose 1 i vi nq and wor k ina conditions are the sha!'le of our nation." He S7id that he believed the boycott to be legitimate "tie-UNION ASKS FOR JURY TRIAL FRESNO, July 10-UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen reported today that an extension of time for further consideration of arguments was granted today' by Presiding Judge Con ley of the District Court of Appeals in the c-ase of the Giumarra Corporation's suit against UFWOC for alleged violations of an anti-strike inj unction. T he case dates from late February, when UFWOC and individuals were charged with contempt of an injunction issued las August by Bakersfield Superior Judge Court Judge J. Kelly Steele, The injunction required pickets to remain SO feet apart, and for awh ile the use of bullhorns prohib i t ed, although that order was later rescinded, Cesar Ch&ivez, . Epifanio Cama cho, and the U nion were accus ed of twelve counts of violat ing the injUnction. When they first appeared for trial in Bakersfield six months ago, more than 2,000 UFWOC members and supporters accompanied them in a silent demonstration, I n the appeal court, Cohen argued that the Union had the right to a jury trial, since the case could i nvo I ve heavy fines or imprisonment, Giumarra attorneys John Giumarra, Jr. and William A. Quinlan maintained that there was no right to a jury trial. Cohen said the Union's lawyer and t he opposition would present further arguments in writing for the consideration of the three-judge court. The trial of the Union on contempt charges wi II not come about un til t he constitutional question of the jury is decided, he said, Cohen said that if the Court of Appeals rules unfavorably, the case will be appealed to the State Supreme Court, and to the Federal Supreme Court in Washington if that becomes necessary. DELANO, August large number of attorneys across the United States have offered free legal assistance to boycott of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO, stationed in numerous cities around the :::ouritry. Legal department officials said the assistance of local attorneys greatly facilitated the work of the boycott, and added that support from t h e legal profession was f;:ir qreater than expected. The assistance of four law students who are spending the sunmer i n D elano as law clerks was a I so mentioned in the an noun ceme nts, The students, Nan Kripke, Pete Raeder, Pete Janiak, and Pete Williamson work under the supervision o f attorneys Jerome Cohen, genera 1 counse 1 , and David Averbuc k .

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Chatfield to i>"" Union Benefit Plan I, 1968/7 FRESNO, August 1-. A breakthrough i n neqotia tions occurred last n ight, when . LeRoy Chatfield, administrator of the National F arm Workers Ser vice Center, Inc., was n amed coordinatro of the Farm Workers Health and Welfare Fund Benefit Program. The appoint ment came at a meet ing of emp Ioyer representatives and union delegates, who were qathered to continue negotiations on settinq up the fund. Officiall y known as the "Agricultural Employers and UFWOC Health and Welfare Fund," the program is financed by employers who contribute 10 cents per hour for employee. Intended to provide health care, retiremen t benefits, and other welfar e items for Union farm workers, the fund is jointly administered by the employers and the Union. Negotiations had broken down ear lier over the question of hiring an outside firm to administer the benefit program . Unio n officials held out for appointment of a union representative rather than an outside firm. The Fund Board of Directors, chaired by UFVIOC vice president Mrs. Dolores Huerta, is scheduled to meet August for further discussions. Mrs. Huerta siad she is hopeful! the meeting will produce a budget and a timetable for getting the Benefit Plan into operation." "lt may still be several months before the Plan is completed," Hrs. Huerta said. "Due to the seasonal nature of farm work, it will be difficult to estimate costs. We want to provide all the workers, whether permanent em ployees or seasona J workers, with as broad cov eraqe and benefits as we can afford. "We cannot make COfM"Iittments that the contri butions to the fund cannot pay for. " Chatfield, a former parochial school admin i strator, has been with UFWOC for sever a 1 years. His wife Bonnie is secretary to the legal de partment. Board of Trustees for the Health and Welfare Fund include the following: Mrs. H u e rta, Chair man: Tom D ibbs ofi.all, co-chairman; Antonio Orendain, UFWOC treasurer; P hilip Vera Cruz, Uf'WOC vice president; UFWOC Director cesar E. Ch.:ivez; Jean Perelli-Minetti of Perelli-Hinetti Vineyards; Irwin Guyette of Christain Brothers; f.eorqe.Morrison of Almaden (National Distilleries); and Ira Cross of Oi Giorgio. "GREEN CARD" SYSTEM ON TRIAL SAN FRANCI SCO--Mex ican na tionals working on U.S. farms took an estimated $15 million to Mexico last year , accordinq to a suit filed in San Fran cisco by California ll.ural Le qal Assistance recently. T h e suit a lleqes that the State paid approximatel y $7 million in relief for perma nent residents thus displaced from their jobs. CRLA attorneys have echoed the Un i teO< Farm Workers' com olain t that many Mexican citi zens use an immigrant visa to enter the country though they have no intention whatsoever of becom i nq permanent res i dents. Union officials have cited numerous cases of such "green card" immiqrants being used as scabs and strike-breakers des pite federal regulations prohibiting their work on struck ranches. Federal Judge i.eorge B. Har ris is expected to hand down a decree on the CRLA suit in early August, it was reported. At a July 23 hearing, the lmmigration Service {a branch of the Deoartment of Justice) was ordered to show cause why it should not be ordered to keep "qreen carders" from the nation's farms. A 1965 federal immigration law requires that the secre tary o f labor certify a shortaqe of 1...0rkers before foreiqn laborers may be imported. lm miqration Service rules, now un-enforced, prohibit the i m portation of a\ lens for ;trike-breaking purposes. A recent UFWOC survey of 1,000 farm workers on struck ranches showed a high percent aqe of al lens in violation of the requlation. UFWOC qeneral counsel Jerome Cohe n said that while the Union is not directly involved in the CRLA case, it is keenly interested in the outcome. He said the Union is interested in protecting the riqhts of its members, many fo whom are resident aliens deprived Of jobs by the importation of temporary residents. The only completly Mexican mortuary in northern Cal ifornia SANCHEZ,HAL l illiORTUARY FRESNO I 022 STREET TEL.EPHONE 237 Services available everywhere. , .No mat ter where you l ive, our price is the same .. death notices in newspapers and on are inc luded. . we can make arranqements economic situation. Telephone 237-3532

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8/EL MALCRIA00, Thursday1 August 1 , 1968 I EL T _hursday,_ August 1, 1968/9 ! i Grape Boycott Spr jds Coast to Coast and immediately began raising money. "Union representatives have begun working out details for sup UFtJOC representative Cardenas announces city school s a n d hospitals are considering cancelling all purchases of grapes. 11innesota Unions are uniting sol idly behind' the boycott. porting the grape boycott" reports ,,, lupe Murguia reports the Oreqon labor that the Alame da and San Press. Francisco Labor Counci I s are sol idly behind the boycott. Supervisor Jack Morrison asked San Francisco to take offi , cia I stand in favor of the boycott this week. look to the Bay Area for a boycott as solid and" successful a"s New say Union lead''We're onl y working days because the g rowers can't sel l their grapes" report workers in the Bake rsfield area. Kern Coun t'f is the center of the table grape harvest for July and August. i i Catholic and Episcopal Bishops of Detroit met the city's Mayor, Jerome Cavanaugh, arid to support of the boycott. "It is essential that citizens of Michigan refrain from eating Cali fornia table grapes and that stores remove these grapes from their shelves" stated Catholic Bishop Joseph Schoenherr. tion" in Phi !adelphia, reports "The Packer'", a qrower in its July 27 edition. The Phi !adelphia Food Counci 1, representing Meatcutters, Teamsters, Retai 1 Clerks,Sea farers, the Bakery Workers and other Unions unanimously backed the boycott. UFW'OC representative Frank Diaz, 19 year old former employee of r.iumarra Vineyards, is optimistic that the boycott will end the sale of the approximately 1126 car lots of (1 ,407 ,500) USUdl Jy sold in Phi 11

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10/EL HALCRIADO, Thursday, I , DELANO, July 25,.-Complete support and active participation in UFWOC1 s consumer boycott of California grapes was ann o un ced today by Leonard H . Carter, wes t coast regiorial director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peop le. Carter told a news conference in Delano, "Fiftynii'!e years a q o the NAACP started its lonq b attle against racial discri m ination. Manifestations of racism have been exhibited most dramatically in the a rea of economic exploitation. Twentieth century quasi-slavery of farm workers in the South and North is a contributing factor to the ol iqht of the California farm worker today.'' Carter said h i s office's endorsement of the boycott 1o1as made with the knowledge and consent of nation a 1 NAACP president Roy \Hlkens, who has been requested to make the move a national pol icy for. the association. He tol d reporters that 104 adult b ranches and 19 youth chapters, with a total membership of approximately 25,000 people in nine western states wer e represented by the western region. --Carter said these local qroups ltou l d be contacted and asked to assist Union representatives in their boycott acti v i t ies. "Our leadership in the target cities will "'ork closely with farm ,,'Orker fam i I ies who have already been d ispatched from Delano to these cities. They will plan meetings with a variety of groups and indiv i dua ls, distribute educational materials, and participate i n selected boycotting, " Car ter said. He nOted that Seattle, San Dieqo, San Jose, Portland, San francisco, Fresno ,6akersf i e ld, Los Angeles, and Sacramento \'/ere selected as the chief tarqet areas for NAACP participation in a meetinq held ear lier with Uf\JOC director cesar Chivez. Carter said there i s no NAACP group in Vancouver, British Columbia, but tHat the Seattle branch would make contact th UFWOC representatives in the Canadian city. "Mr. Chivez and the faithful foll 0\ers in this effort have pursued a long, difficult, non-violent effort to bring equality and dignity to the in the tie los of Ca 1 i-fornia. Every minority i n California is included among the farm workers. Some 15 to 20 percent of them are Ne groes, 1 1 Carter said. He saId that man y of the ghetto dwellers of t he c ities were former farm worker s driven into urban poverty by the terribl e conditions o f farm "Thus the impact: of our efforts to join with our brothers in the United F a r m Workers i n 'their efforts toward equality will surely be f elt in the cities." Chivez, who sat besid e Car ter as he made hia announcement, comment ed, "The NAACP is the larqest and oldest c ivil riqhts organization. They are the first to date to come forward as an organization wi t h all-out support of our fight. It isperhaps fitting that they have taken the lead. hope that many more who subscri be to t h e nonviolent belief and practices join us. We help under the terms and conditions of non-violence and the program of the United Farm Wor k ers Organizing Committee, Afl CI0.'1

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u M7\LCRIAD_O, Thursday, A ugust I , 1968/J , l Co lorado farm workers on Strike BRIGHTON, COLO, ,July 1 --Fifty-eight wor kers at the Kitayama Brothers Green House in Brighton, Colorado, went on strike July 1 for hi gher wages and Union recognition, according to organizer Jim Garcia. The workers are represented by the fledgling Nationa l Floral Workers O r ganization, as yet unaffi I iated w ith the United Farm Worker s Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO. K itayama is Colorado' s largest growe r of carnations, t he stat e ' s ninth largest crop by value. The same firm a lso owns an ifllllens e cut-flower farm outside Union City, Cali fornia, near D .akland. According to a state ment by the w orkers, conditions at t he Col orado farm are deplorable, with a single drinkin g f oun tain for 12 0 workers at t he peak of the season, and a s i n gle rest room which often has three inches of dirt a nd mud on the f loor. Many of the workers are women . . Pre-strike wages were 80 cents per hour, according to reports, w ith a nine or ten h ou r day and a s ix-da y week the standard. I n what workers termed a strike-breaking move, Kitayama raised wages to a top of $1.20 pe r hour and hi red numerous A nglo students eage r for summer jobs after t he strike began. Brighton is an agricultur
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August clinic schedule DELANO, Auqust 1--The Rodri qo Terronez Memorial C\ i oper.lted by the United 1./orkers for its members, remain o pe n despite the departur e of D r . James Kniqht, who formerly ser ved director of the clinic. Mrs. Lourdes Dahi 1 ig of clinic staff said phys wi II serve the cl ini voluntary basis, medical care on the for farm workers. Mrs. Oahi I iq said ther e wi 1 be a doctor In the clinic Sunday, Auq. 4; Saturday Sunday. Auq. 10 and 11; and Sunday, August 18. The clinic wi II be open f 10 AM to 4 PH on Saturday I to 5 PM on Sunday. She said the clinic is in need of volunteer and dentists. dentists who a r e help i nq the c linic shoul tact Service Center or l eRoy Chatfield, she Chatfield's address is Office Box 671, Delano, Cali fornia, 932 15. The cl ini telephone number is 725-1281. Dr. McKni ght, who served clinic for several months, return ed to the San F ranci Bay a rea. His resiqnati o n for personal reasons, he Union offici.als have voi r eq ret at his departure. Viva Ia Causa y El Progreso {3tUVetw, a! a "HteUeaHFresno California "Sanitary conditions prevail in the fields including chemical toilets and washing faci 1 ities are under the constant supervision of the Kern County Health Department. laborers are provided modern, a ir-conditioned housing which have hot water showers and other conveniences s " uc h as sanitary. cooking faci 1 i ties i n modern k i "tchen s . " -From a resolution praisi grape growers passed recently by the Kern County Board of Supervisors. Sisk Opposes School Lunch Program FreSno's cong r essman Bernie S i s k one of 78 votes aga inst a bi II to provide free or inexpensive school lunches for needy children which was passed b y the House of Repre sentatives 274-78 recently. The new law, HR 17873, provi des funds to he 1 p feed children between the ages of 3 and 17 whose fami 1 ies earn less than $3,00 per year. While approximatel y 20 mill ion children participate in school lunch programs, and a bout' 2.5 mi 1 1 ion receive f ree or reduced-price meals, "mil l ions of those most i n need do not have access to iny p ro according to Congress-610 10TH ST. man Perkins of Kentucky . "The primar y objective of this bill is to see that some four-mi 11 i on -plus youngsters in pre-sch ool, elementary, and secon'dary schools of this country who need free or reduced-price meals get t hem, " Perki.ns said. S i sk s i ad he was opposed to the bi I I on "proccedural grounds." That's the same reason he gave for voting against the civi I rights b ill earlier this year. S isk' s support among farm workers i s expected t o be minimal i n the Novembe r elections, observers indicate. DELANO

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I I I i I I I I ll , .. 11• I I li l ' , Every California grape I you buy helps keep this l i child hungry. i I II j ' j UFWOC boycott represe-ntatives across the United and in Canada need t h e assistance of loc people who want t o help in the organization Jjof America's farm workers, according to a re-1 [quest issued today by t h e boycott coordination J roffice. ! Pressure from cons u mers can force chain stores t Jto stop selling scab California grapes in you r the request said. Pickets are neede d , as o1!wel 1 as interested people to he l p in the many 1 ltasks necessary for the s uccessful operation of 3 !the boycott. / To assist you in getting in touch with the ' !boycott representative ir your area, E L HALCRIA :J DO q ives you the addresses and phone numbers of ' ! people you should contact lf you want to help ..• and we ask for vour help. . i These are the I atest loffices to open. More rnext issue. l"llloOOO.,(-IiJHl .. , ............. . . -.., ......... -"' .... .... .,, .... ,_ .... ) .. ... ,

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14/El MALCR,IADO, Thursday, Augus t I, .1968, DEL REY TO INCORPOIRATE, FRESN-O, Auqu st\ ].,....A g roup o f residents of Del Rey, California were scheduled to appear before the Board of Super-v isors and the County Local A gency Formation Corrmission sometime this week to request incorporation of the town as a city. Because we are "t-ired of people outside of Del Rey makinq all the decisions affectinq the future of our town," one resident said, "we are requesting incorporation, which wi l l allow us .to elect our own ' town "officials and administration'.' The town of Del Rey, with approximately 1,200 residents, most of them Mexican Americans, i s " currently administered as a part of Fresno county. The largest employer in the town is Heqqe blade-Marquleas,, which operates a packing shed in Del Ray. The move to incorporate the city began last spring, according to Sa l Gonzales,a former farm Top: Citizens of Del Rey, California, assemble worker and member of the United Farm Workers. On fo"t' thei"t' mai'ah to the F"t'esno County Cou."t'thouse. May 22 , about" 50 residents marched from Del Rey The huge Heggebl.ade PaakinrJ Shed in th13 back to the Fresno County courthouse to p resent the g"t'ound dominates the town . petition for incorporation. Enedino "Nipo" Perez, chairman of the Del Rey Bel.O!J The ma"t'ahe"t'S head for F"t'esno. Symbol. Corrmittee for Better Government, led the march for the movement is an owl and the insa"t'iption, and was also responsible for a voter registra""JUSTICE." tion campai gn that netted hundreds ot new vot_ e rs. Both Perez and r.o nz a les p redict hurdles for Del Rev . T houg h the poor are allowed to vote, only pPoperty ownevs are permitted to s i gn the petition. Heqqeb lad e and Ma rgu leas, therefore, may be able to b lock the petition. San Joaquin Valley officials have been reluctant to include large blocks of Mexican-American voters in incorporated cities. In Pari ier (population 1,300) for example, the aol.onia is outside the city I imits, t hough an integral part of the area . . Observers in Del Rey have calculated that a substantial increase in municipal services. coul d be provided if taxes now levied by the countY were transfered to the incorporated city. Almaden Expands Jose Luna, UFLIOC representative for the Hoi I isterSan Benito County area, reports that A l maden Vineyards, Inc. has arranged to purchase the Ferry Morse Seed Company ranch in the Hollister a rea. Luna said he be 1 i eved the transfer of property would take olace in Septeoiber and that A l maden was purchasing about 2,000 acres whit.h will be turned into vineyards. Almaden ooerates about 5,400 acres of vineyards in the area luna reports that about 80 additional workers will come under the coverage of the S1.80 oer hour Almaden con-tract as a result of the purchase. Further detai Is wi 11 be reoorted in the August 15 issue of EL MALCRIADO. FRESNO CALIFORNIA

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EL HALCRtA00, ihursday, August I, Books & Records of the Strike " , The Tale o f Our ancr-s""i)"inT shtext:"" Balli s. unique book, a rhoto essay on the battle for dig the fields of California, The text is from the historic Plan o f Delano, the proc lamation of the farm workers which read at the rallies as farm workers marched fror:1 Delano to Sacramento in 1966, There is an introduction by Cesar Chavez, The photographer, George 3allis, has srent his life in the San Joaquin Valley. He is a sensitive artist, in the tradition of Dorothea lanqe, truly captur)es the spirit of the Movement. $2.00 "El ESQUI RDL" ("'THE STPI KEBREAKER" ) "HUELGA EN GENERAL" ("THE r.ENERAL STRIKE"). 45 rpm record. Two of the finest songs t o come out the. Delano Grape Strike, sunn by Teatro Cam pesino, the Far m Uorker r, lira, luis Valdez, d Alaniz, and Oannv Valdez. by Ne I son $1.50 BASTA! photos $2.50 Zapata Posters 51.50 EL ESQUI ROL--HUELGA EN GENERAL {"The Scab", "The GeneraL Strike", by the TE ATRO lfe"TS"On .----. "HUELGA!" by Eugene Nelson remains the yet published on the early da y s of the Delano Grap e Strike, Nelson was a picket llne Captain (and later led the Union drive to oraanize the melo n fields of Texas) and with intimate know1edge of the origins and " beginnings of the strike. Nelson also. includes a brief biography and interviews with Cesar Chavez and other union leaders, and a history of the llational Farm Workers Association , the predecessor o f the United Farm Workers Organizing ComJTtittee. 160 with illustrations by BaZ.Z.is, In English only. $1. 50. 5 copies VIVA LA REVOLUCION NAME ___________ _ ADDRESS-----------CITY _____ STATE _____ _ Make Checks payable to the United Farm Bo::c Ca

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., OPEN: 10 in the morning till 9 at night every day INCLUDING SUNDAYS B E E ' S ACROSS FROM T H E POST O F F I CE/BEE ' S ACROSS FROM THE POST O F F I CE/BE E ' S ACROSS FROM THE POST 918 MAIN • • • ACROSS FROM THE POST OFFICE ALSO IN I :