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El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 12

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 12
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
Volume II, Number 12
El Malcriado (io«n
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER
________________________IN ENGLISH
aRSRB* Delano, California Thursday, August 15, 1968
TiAffHERs
DitiriALOuiDiD%
UNIONS


2/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August ltf, 1968
in this issue
More police inaction. . . .3
Education—For [/hat?. . .. .6 By Antonio Orendain
No City Keys for UFWOC.
Amigos. ................. .9
Now or Never Struggle ... 14
The Green Card Issue By Justicia Ganaremos .. 15
AURARIA LIBRARY
1)15701 7534751
EL MALCRIADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker, is published twice monthly by the UNITED FARM WORKERS ORGAN 121 NO COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in the United States and its possessions are $3-50 per year, and foreiqn, including Canada and Mexico, US $5.00. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC, AFL-CIO are included in monthly dues.
Editorial and business offices located, at the northwest corner of Oar-ces Hiqhway and Mettler Avenue, Dela-no, California.
Address all correspondence to: ,EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Application to mail at second-class postaqe rates is pending at Delano, California 93215-
For advertising rates, contact Federico ChSvez at (805)725-1337 or the mailinq address listed above.
EDITORS:
You-are welcome to reprint materia) from EL MALCRIADO, provided a copy is sent to us and the item is credited 'From EL MALCRIAD0--U.F.W.0.C."
El Malcriado says
By the Editor
EL MALCRIADO received a letter last week which I would like to share with our readers .
Dear Editor:
Several months ago I wrote requesting information about Chavez and the grape strike. I'm a VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) worker a-■mong the migrants here in —.
Lately I've received two issues of EL MALCRIADO: apparently someone has paid for my subscription, for which I’m grateful.
But now I have one request. Would it be possible to send EL MALCRIADO in a plain brown envelope or else folded up in brown paper imprinted with my address?
In a small agricultural town like — (pop. 1,500), too many people, such as the powerful farmers, will know I'm receiving EL MALCRIADO and they might start getting panicky!
I'm sure you understand that as a VISTA volunteer, I must be careful about receiving controversial literature.
Please let me know if it's possible to send me EL MALCRIADO in a brown envelope. Thank you.
Sincerely,
Name withheld VISTA VOLUNTEER
1 cannot decide whether such a letter needs a comment or not. Since it is extremely inconvenient for us to mail
The lady writes, you understand that
our paper in a' plain brown wrapper, we are cancelling the lady's subscription. We found that we had started it as a gift because her name appeared on a list of donors to our movement.
If indeed freedom in this country has deteriorated so much that receiving a labor u-nion newspaper is dangerous then we indeed sympathize with the lady.
However, we wonder how effective the VISTA program can be if the subject of labor u-nions for farm workers must be discussed behind a plain brown wrapper
"â– 'm sure as a VISTA volunteer, I must be careful about receiving controversial 1i terature."
We're sure that nobody would criticize her for receiving Fortune magazine, or the growers' trade newspaper, The Packer, but to read the workers' newspaper is dangerous. While she works in a federal program of aid to the poor, she still must fear the growers! .
We do not ask that VISTA volunteers organize for the U-nited Farm Workers, but we fail to see why keeping a-breast of our movement could be a crime.
Incidentally, there is a rumor about that J. Edgar Hoover reads The Daily Worker.
subscribe to EL MALCRIADO

EL MALCRIADO P.b. BOX 130 DELANO, CA 93215
More and more people are finding out that a subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don’t be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English__ Espanol__
ADDRESS-domicilio_ CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
i


EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/3
MORE POLICE INACTION
DELANO, Aug. 13--UFW0C post-? ed a silent vigil in front of Delano police headquarters tonight, less than an hour and a half after a veteran union member was trapped by three cars on a county road and severely beaten while his five children looked on.
By Wednesday night, the vig-* il had drawn several hundred supporters.
The victim was Manuel Rivera, 55. He spent several months in the hospital after a large truck ran over him on a picket line during the Goldberg ranch strike in November, 1966, This time Rivera's injuries were less serious. However, after being released from the Delano Hospital following emergency treatment Tuesday night, Rivera collapsed at work Wednesday and fell unconscious into an irrigation ditch.
UFWOC Director Cesar Chavez called for the vigil after un-s ion executives tried without success to induce police to arrest Rivera's attackers, Despite the contention of Union attorneys that each had grounds for immediate felony arrests, Delano Police, the California Highway Patrol and the Kern County Sheriff ell refused to act.
"i'll stay there until we get some justice," Chavez said at an emergency meetina called after the incident. "I'll conduct my office on the sidewalk."
Just before he took to the street, Chavez sent a telegram to U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark demanding federal protection for the strikers. It read:
"On behalf of the union membership and the Delano strikers, i must appeal to you to immediately send federal marshalls to Delano for our protection. We have been the vic-
ties of repeated acts of violence by persons who are fu11-tiem agents paid for by the employers to forment violence. Despite our plea to all local law enforcement agencies there has been no redress. We have lost all condifence in their ability to perform their duties, Furthermore, they even admit to us that they are unable to arresf or apprehend those whp threaten our lives and who Harrafs our wives and children. We believe that nonviolence serves the cause of justice and again we appeal to you for immediate redress."
Copies were sent to many legislators, including senators Kennedy, McCarthy, and McGovern.
Wednesday, during the'vigil, Chavez made it clear that far more than the most recent incident is involved. "We don't feel safe," he told EL MALCRt-ADO. "The Kern County Sheriff's Office and the Delano Police are so tied in with the growers that It Is impossible for them to administer justice in the case of the strikers."
When a Delano Record reporter told Chavez the police were watting for him to approach them with a complaint, Chavez snapped: "We've been approaching them with complaints for the last three years. We are not approaching them any more"
Then, the reporter demanded, how long would the vigil last? "Until we get help from the outside," Chavez replied. Delano is not a kingdom, you know,"
Rivera told his story Wednesday, after receiving treatment for his. injuries. A member of the Rubio family, he said, followed Rivera and his five children, ages 3 to 10, home from a UFWOC meeting at Filipino Hall. As he pulled into the driveway of his Asti
Street home, Rivera said, Rubio's car struck his from behind.
Rivera followed this Rubio as he fled, headlights off, ac-cross First Avenue and south on Albany Street.
(As he passed inffront of UF WOC headquarters, the Rubio car narrowly missed striking Chavez and Leroy Chatfield, director of the Service Center.)
On Albany, Rivera found six more men, including several members of the Rubio family, waiting in two cars. He was forced to halt, and all seven males emerged, brandishing sticks.
One of the men opened the door toRivera's car and began to beat him with a baton, the victim charges, (n the struggle that ensued, Rivera recalls being battered to the ground, struck with 'sticks and gouged with handful Is of dirt, while the two youngest assailants kept his own sons at bay with nail - studded sticks,
Rivera lost consciousness, he says, and came to to find Chatfield standing over him.
(Chatfield had become alarmed when he saw Rivera and his family following a Rubio, and decided to investigate.)
As the paper goes to press, law enforcement officials are still refusing to let Rivera swear out a complaint against his attackers, pending an investigation by the District Attorney's office in Bakersfield.
And, via his subordinates in California, Ramsey Clark's reply reached Chavez early Wednesday, The incident had been investigated by his office, he said, and dismissed as "just a brawl."


fr/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August
CANADIAN LABOR CONGRESS URGES BOYCOTT AID
OTTAWA, August 9—The struggle for the rights of farm workers became an international movement here today, as the Canadian Labor Congress resolved "actively to join in the international effort to with-old patroange from all nonunion California grapes."
Like the AFL-CIO in this â– country, the CLC speaks for Canada's major international .unions. The resolution, perhaps the strongest yet obtained by UFWOC, calls upon every member of CLC's affiliate unions "to refuse to purchase and to handle these (California) grapes.
"The CLC calls upon all provincial governments and other public institutions to refrain from purchasing non-union grapes," the resolution added.
After meeting in Ottawa with UFWOC staffers Marshall Ganz, Jessica Govea and Rudi Ahumada the CLC executive council a-greed that the California workers "have been shamefully ,exploited by California grape growers, working for substandard wages and inhuman working •conditions."
The toughly worded resolution also noted that "these workers face a lack of legal organizational rights by virtue of their exclusion from the NLRA and a lack of adequate protection against grower-instigated violence and the illegal importation ,of strikebreakers from Mexico."
Canadian consumers account for* some 16 percent of the market for California grapes.
WASHINGTON REPORT
WASHINGTON, Auqust 8—Michael McCarthy, 17-year-old son of presidential hopeful Senator Euqene McCarthy, joined the first UFWOC picket line to establish the grape boycott in the nation's capitol.
Also on the 30-man line in front of Washington's International Safeway Market was Ann Hart, McCarthy orqanizer and daughter of Sen. Philip A. Hart (d-Mich).
McCarthy has urged nationwide support for the fast-spread inq boycott.
UFWOC representatives assured the Washington press thev would picket stores in every food chain in the city.
15, 1968
Voz Mexicana
Courtesy "La
1
l


EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/5
Union files $50,000,000 suit
L.A. CONGRESSMAN PLEDGES SUPPORT
Congressman George E. Brown, r Jr., of Los Angeles, paid a visit today to the office of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee at 3016-1/2 j East First Street, Los Angel-i es, and pledged his "unquali-| fied support" to the organiza-j tion headed by Cesar Chavez ! and centered in Delano, Cali-| fornia.
I The Los Angeles Congressman ! toured the office, met the office Director, Mr. Joe Serda,
: and his enthusiastic staff,and ; accepted a bumper sticker with | the slogan "Don't Buy Grapes." ! Upon accepting the sticker, j Congressman Brown commended | the office workers and reiterated his support of the cur-' rent boycott of California
grapes. ,
Brown stated also that he would "continue to speak out in support of the organizing efforts of Cesar Chavez and his United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, both on the floor of Congress and wherever else it may be ehlpful to do so."
Congressman Brown continued, "There are those who feel that urban congressmen have no business expressing their views on this subject, but I want to point out that a large percentage of my constituents have a strong and natural affinity with their compatriots in the fields. I do also, and I will continue to speak out on this issue.
SAN FRANCISCO—Fifty Million dollars in compensatory and punitive damages are demanded of three Kern County growers in a suit filed by UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen in San Francisco last week.
The UFWOC suit alleges that Bruno Dispoto Company, Sabo-vich Brothers and John J. Ko-vacevich have sold scab grapes in boxes bearing a Union la-
bel.-
Cohen told a press conference of San Francisco newsmen the suit demanded damages because "the growers1 action put the existence of the Union in jeopardy,and that the value of a farm workers' labor union to the workers over the next decade would be many millions of dollars."
In response to a reporter's question, Cohen said he filed the suit with the purpose in mind of attempting to halt the false labelling, as well as to secure damages for the effect on the Union of the alleged fraud.
Cohen mentioned truth in packaging legislation and attempts to defraud consumers as basis for the suit.
DONT BUY j
Humphrey, Chavez meet in LA
LOS ANGELES---Vice-President
Hubert Humphrey met privately with Cesar.Chavez, Director of the United Farm Workers, in Los Angeles on July 28. After
Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota also gave his endorsement, and both candidates have also come out in favor of extending the National Labor Relations and
"I appreciate your detailed recitation of the negative impact of our immigration practices and enforcement policies on the efforts of farm workers
the meeting Humphrey announced to the press, "I am in sympathy with Mr. Chavez. I support his efforts."
Later, in a personal letter to Chavez, dated August 1, Humphrey wrote, "I want to wish you success with your national boycott effort. As more people know that the boycott is almost your only effective organizing device, more and more will support it." (For the full text of the letter, see page 11.)
Humphrey is the second major presidential candidate to endorse the boycott. Senator
Fair Labor Standards acts to protect farm workers.
Chavez and Humphrey discussed the policy of the federal government of allowing the growers to import unlimited numbers of Mexican citizens to break the strikes of the Union. Chavez has charged that the - Justice Department has deliberately aided the growers strike - breaking efforts. Humphrey, as the second highest official in the government, should be able to do something about this problem immediately.
As Humphrey wrote to Chavez:
to improve their lot. This-must be changed. If the fault is looseness in enforcement, the enforcement must be changed and tightened. If the fault is in national administrative policy, then that must be changed. I think you are correct in your analysis that no reasonable degree of fairness in recognizing the rights of farm workers, on a comparable basis with other American workers, can occur without substantive change in enforcement of immigration procedures to accompany the extension of NLRA to farm workers."


6/EL HALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968
Education-For What?
by Antonio Orendain Treasurer,UFW0C
"There are wise men whose only book is that of -l ife, and in whose wisdom there is more science than is found in the wisdom of the literature. And when they were tested they always measured up."
The growers should stop trying to . impress us with the old story that we have no education. They should stop threatening to replace us with machines. They are not, as they say, giving us jobs out of pure charity.
They say to us, "Work in our fields in the daytime, and go home and study at night. Someday you may have a ranch like ours, and then you will understand all our problems.
"If you demand more money," they tell us, "we will go out of business, or we will replace you with machines. Then you will never become educated. You will just starve to death."
But I ask these growers,what happened to those of us who once cut sugar beets, or those who picked your potatoes'' I have searched for those friends who worked in those fields with me, in California and all over this . country. Their children tell me, "They are in a better life," But they mean that they are dead, not in retirement with a decent pension.
Those poor workers never recieved any pensions. The growers found it cheaper to harvest with machines. The growers never gave a damn for our jobs. They thought they had been doing us a favor.
Perhpas the only thing they were right about is. our lack of education. But the land doesn't worry about who cultivates it. The only thing she needs is care.
What would happen if all of us were educated
and nobody wanted to cultivate the land0 Would she produce anything by herself0 Or maybe it is because of their diplomas that the growers have the right to steal what we win with our work.
I would also like to tell the growers not to ask the governor to intervene. If he wants to help them, he should follow the footsteps of Governor Brown, who found out what was wrong between growers and workers, and solved the problem.
We want Reagan to remember that we too are human. He should remember that all the Indians he used to kill in his cowboy movies were his fellow workers. After work he took a coffee break with them.
We want a coffee break too, even if we don't have the honor of sharing it with the governor. But we still invite him to come and see these fields, to share with us the hot sun who gives us ideas that seem "activist."
The governor should know that the sun he enjoys on his summer patio is the same sun we feel on our backs every day. It is this sun that makes us curse half the world each day, from e-leven in the morning to four in the afternoon.
We don't want alms. We want respect for our work. We want to solve our own problems. With the boycott, we are fighting many powerful people. Pancho Villa and Zapata fought many people too. The only difference is that they used 30-30*s. We don't do that. We cannot afford to lose our leaders on the battlefields. This way, you will never be able to enslave us again.
Remember that the only solution is very simple. Don!t do us any more favors. Give us what is just for our work.
(Translated from the Spanish)
our new bumfer-yttdwr... order ftvtn IlMAUftWO 9 for
BOYCOTT
CRAPES
1 ffevo
DELANO

THE STORY OF THE CALIFORNIA GRAPE STRIKE by John Dunne
Enclosed is $5. 20. Please Send me a copy of DELANO
Name___________________
Address ______
$4. 95 plus 25£ handling from; m FARM WORKER PRESS » Box 130
DELANO, CALIF. 93215 *** send today!***
City, State

sssaas
popmo
sssssaa


EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/7
UFW LAWYERS
ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! ATTACK FILTH
In four separate civil suits, each stemming from violence or threats of violence against union members and supporters, UFWOC lawyers have filed for damages totalling a painful $515,070.
The larqest claim has been filed on behalf of Bill Richardson, the young Seminarian who was brutally beaten in a Coachella Valley vineyard July 2. Richardson is demanding $1*10,000 in actual and punitive damages from Ralph S. Jacobs and David Freedman £ Co., a major Coachella grower. In his complaint, Richardson said he jumped onto the hood of a truck that was apparently attempting to run him down o') a picket line. The truck carried him into the fields, where he was held by scab workers until two ranchers arrived. Richardson charges that the ranchers beat him, breaking his nose.
UFWOC lawyers Jerry Cohen and Dave Averbuck are also representing Peter Williamson, a law student volunteer who has alleged that Jose Mendoza pointed a rifle at his head in front of the union headquarters July 18. Mendoza, self-styled organizer of the scab union, Agricultural Workers Freedom P5 Work Association,is frequently seen cruising the street in front of UFWOC headquarters. Damages sought in this case total $30,000.
Fr. Mark Day is seeking $28,000 in damages for an alleged assault and battery on him at the Mosesian ranch near Arvin, July 16. The defendants are William Mosesian Co. and Mike Mosesian.
Dale Van Pelt, a member of the migrant ministry, has filed a $20,000 suit charging
he was struck by Milton Freedman while marching on a picket line in the Coachella Valley.
LA BOYCOTT
Sometimes the picketing in Los Angeles goes very well...
And sometimes there ewe problems. On the left is L, A. Boycott leader Joe Serda.
UFWOC attorneys Jerome Cohen and David Averbuck have filed suit on behalf of four California grape pickers charging their employers with failure to provide private, sanitary toilets and hand washing facilities in the fields.
Each of the four pickers is suing for $9,000 "on behalf of himself and all other workers similarly situated."
The workers charge that they a.re forced to perform bodily functions in the fields where they work, and suffer personal discomfort, humiliation, and mental anguish as a result. The suits also charge that the public health is threatened. Grapes from the ranches involved, it warns, are an avenue for dangerous parasites and communicable disease. By. avoiding the expense of the sanitary facilities required by law, the suit adds, the defendants are in unfair competition with the growers who do provide them.
The four defendants are D.M. Steele and Son, Virginia Guide ra, Giumarra Vineyards, and David Freedman £ Co.
"The suits reach from Co-chella all the way up the Valley," Averbuck noted. "And there will be more coming, thanks to the reports we get from the members on the conditions in the fields."
KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE
car.*. Jife.*e.fire
PH0NES. 3222 East Mayfair Blvd.
Office, 485-0650 Mayfair Shopping Center
Residence, 266-13*»9 Fresno, Calif. 93703
Mr. Leap will be- in the UFHOC Service Center (105 Asti, Delano) every Hednesday to serve Union members.


S/EL MALCRI ADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968
L.A.' TIMES SAYS:
Growers May Be'Crippled'
"The boycott being pushed by Chavez and his AFL-CIO United Farm Workers Organizing Committee," the Los Angeles Times reported Monday, "could cripple California's multi-million dollar grape industry which provides nearly all of the table grapes eaten by Americans."
This bit of good, but hardly surprising news was the essence of a long, thoughtful
article by Harry Bernstein, the Times' labor editor.
To Bernstein, "the most Impressive aspect of the boycott, making it different from others backed by Unions, is the broad cross section of support it has received."
!The boycott is supported by church groups, civil rights organizations, and political leaders ranging from the mayors of half a dozen cities to both candidates for the Demo-
Courtesy "La Voz Mexicana," CPA
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And Bernstein reports, "While they hope and expect the boycott will flop, growers no secret of their fears it may succeed."
The reporter quotes (iiumarra Jr., lawyer and heir apparent to Giumarra Fruit Co. as saying, "If our workers went on strike, they could have us at the bargaining table to make some kind of a deal within a week."
The Giumarra memory is short. When the strike was called August 3 of last year, 70 percent of Giumarra's workers left the fields.
The article also outlines a new "Inter-Faith Coalition for the Grape Boycott" which is now being formed in Los Angeles. On it are the Rev. James Jones, president of the Los Angeles City School Board, Sister Mary Corita, the famous artist in residence at Immaculate Heart College, and Rabbi Albert Lewis, social action chairman of the Southern California Board of Rabbis.
WOODVILLE TENANTS SUPPORT BOYCOTT
WOODVILLE, August 8--A unanimous resolution supporting the UFUOC grape boycott was passed today at the general meeting of the Woodville Independent Tenants Association.
In announcing the resolution, the members emphasized their objection to the growers' refusal to allow collective bargaining rights for the workers.
Noting that farm workers have none of the protection afforded industrial workers, the association said it wished to congratulate Chavez and his followers for their great courage and perseverance and offer them a helping hand."
The Tenants Association is a delegate agency of the Tulare County Community Action Agency.


EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/9
NO CITY KEYS FOR UFWOC AMIGOS
DELANO, August 5—Police Chief James Alles today denied UFWOC a permit for a Labor Day solidarity parade, which, according to Director CSsar ChS-vez, would bring as many as 25,000 supporters to the city.
For a city that worries a-bout its "image gap," Delano is a remarkably inhospitable place.
Given the depth of the support Chavez has been getting around the country, this number would certainly include many political and reliqious biqwiqs whom most towns would welcome with the key to the city. But Delano wants them to stay home.
UFWOC announced this week that it would appeal Aile's decision to the city council.
City Manager Gerald Minford, who recommended the denial, told EL MALCRIADO that police and sanitary facilities are too scarce in Delano to handle a crowd of this size. "If they cut it down to somewhere in the neighborhoood of 10.000," Minford said, "we might be a-ble to handle it."
But the major problem, Minford suggested, was the Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association, a scab "union", made a request for a parade with the same number of people over the same route scheduled for the same day.
Minford did not say, however, that the city had to either grant both requests, or deny both. Since the UFWOC applied first, he explained, the city could have denied AWFWA a permit on the grounds that another parade was already scheduled.
"But we had to face the fact that they (the AWFWA) were probably going to be there anyway," Minford added. "As public officials we have to assume there would be a large anti-union faction in town. We have an obligation to protect the citizens."
Protect them from what"
Well, said Minford, "ChSvez has indicated in past demonstrations that his qroup is not going to create a problem. And that is probably true of
the other qroup as wel1. But if they were both here together, the leadership might have trouble handling them."
How many people show up for the October 5 Harvest Holidays parade7
"I don't know the answer to that," says Minford. "But at Harvest Holiday people come here for festivities,for fun. It's a completely different climate."
But this year, Delano's reputation as California's fun city may be jeopardized by political reality. If its appeal to City Council is denied, the UFWOC is considering inviting those 25,000 sympathizers to the Harvest Holidays.
EL MALCRIADO submitted an a-pplication this week to have a float in the Harvest Holidays parade.
Union officials were considering inviting the 30,000 spectators and participants expected for the Labor Day parade to the Harvest Holidays i nstead.
Viva la Causa Y a reminder from the
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10/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968
Henry R. 1 fafoya, Jr.
1 Life Insurance Office, 222-3727
Res., 222-7544 ||| ialth Insurance 1
FRESNO CALIFORNIA |
OHIO OFFICE ESTABLISHED
OTTAWA, OHIO—The Farm Workers Organizing Committee of Northwestern Ohio has opened a permanent office at 10 N. Walnut St., in Ottawa, Ohio **5875 (telephone 4l9-523-3965) according to a recent report.
Regular meetings are held on Sunday afternoons and members, farm workers, and visitors are all we I come.
The Union is launching * major drive among sugar beet and onion workers, for the second summer in a row. There are over 50,000 farm workers, migrants and permanent workers,
in Ohio during the harvest seasons, Union officials say.
Main target of the organizing drive are certain labor contractors and big companies, packers and shippers, who buy the crops. In many cases in Ohio and throughout the Midwest, the growers are often small farmers who sell their crop "on the vine" to the big companies. The companies then hire labor contractors to pick the crop. Thus packers tend to control both the price of the crop as well as wage rates, Union officials report.
CRLA SUIT
The Internal Revenue Service was restrained from attaching 100 percent of a taxpayer's wages recently, after California Rural Legal Assistance filed suit in federal court on behalf of Mrs. Elisa Beltran,a Spanish-speaking lettuce picker from Salinas.
Attorneys said she faces e-viction, loss of her job, car and furniture, because the Internal Revenue Service.has attached ALL of her wages for payment of a back tax bill while she believes that part of it may have been paid by her estranged husband.
She offered to pay installments on the bill, and did turn over one paycheck of $75 to the tax collector. Follow^ ing that, the Internal Revenue Service demanded her next two complete paychecks. The third week, she kept only $3 to buy six boxes of tortillas and a can of beans for herself and her two children.
Attorneys said Mrs. Beltran is completely illiterate, and is the sole support of the children.
According to reports, the Internal Revenue Service is the only agency which is permitted to seize 100 percent of a person's wages. Every state prohibits this practice, and President Johnson recently called for a law limiting attachments to $7 of the first $100 of weekly wages to protect workers in all states.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, between 100,000 and 300,000 people lose their jobs every year because of wage attachments, and that there are more such cases than there are of people who lose their jobs because of police records.
The restraining order which prohibits the 100 percent levy pending outcome of the Beltran suit was issued by Judge William T. Sweigert after the suit was filed by attorneys Robert L. Gnaizda and Martin R. Glick of the CRLA's Salinas office.


EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/11
Humphrey's letter endorses boycott
THE VICE PRESIDENT
WAS HINGTON
August If 1968
Dear Mr• Chavez:
I want you and your fellow officers to know how very much I appreciate your meeting with me in Los Angeles last Sunday on the problems being encountered by farm workers as they attempt to organize to bargain with their employers. Indeed, they.are national problems. They deserve national attention.
Your remark that farm workers "want no special favors — merely the chance to build a union to help themselves," sets the direction for a sound national policy for farm labor.
I have long been committed to the extension of the National Labor Relations Act to cover agricultural workers. To exclude them from any protective labor legislation just does not make sense. Your briefing reassures me. It gives me additional insight. I shall redouble my efforts to encourage the enactment of that legislation now before the Congress to extend coverage.
Most particularly, I appreciate your detailed recitation of the negative impact of our immigration practices and enforcement policies on the efforts of farm workers to improve their lot. This must be changed. If the fault is looseness in enforcement, the enforcement must be changed and tightened. If .the fault is in national administrative policy, then that must be changed. I think you are correct in your analysis that no reasonable degree of fairness in recognizing the rights of farm workers, on a comparable basis with other American workers, can occur without substantive change in enforcement of immigration procedures to accompany the extension of the NLRA to farm workers.
I want to wish you success with your national boycott effort. As more people know that the boycott is almost your only effective organizing device, more and more will support it.
As you know, I have spoken out in behalf of your movement many times in recent years — at last year's conference in El Paso, in connection with the Poor People's Campaign, and at other times. My endorsement of the drive to extend the National Labor Relations Act to farm workers was published several weeks ago in a letter to the editor of the New York Times.
In light of this, my support for your endeavors should be self-evident. However, I want to make it clear that I do endorse your efforts and I hope you will feel free to use that endorsement and the contents of this letter in any way you feel will best serve "La Causa."
numpnrey
Cranston Urges NLRB Coverage
LOS ANGELES—U.S. Senate nominee Alan Cranston recently urged all California members of Congress to support HR1601** to give farm workers collective bargaining protection under the National Labor Relations Act.
In a telegram to Rep, Cecil King, head of the California Congressional delegation, Cranston said, "There is no reason why these most exploited of American workers should not have the same rights that the NRLA gives to other workers."
The bill extending the NLRB to cover agricultural workers is now pending in the House.
"Some argue," Cranston continued, "that it is difficult to provide such protection for farm workers because theirs are seasonal jobs, but canning workers and lumbermen, to name just two other fields, both enjoy such protection,
"The resistance by employers and employer groups to this extension of the NLRA is unbelievable," he said. I'll find it hard to comprehend why the farm worker should continue to subsidize the prices of vege-. table and fruits through low wages and deplorable working conditions."
Cranston also pointed out that the AFL-CIO has recently launched a nationwide drive in support of the pending bill, and that many chruch groups have also recently banded together in an organization to support this and other measures designed to protect farm workers.


12/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968, _____________
IN CLEVELAND
UNION, MARKETS REACH NOVEL TRUCE
CLEVELAND, August 8r-The major supermarket chains here have agreed to display large signs over their produce counters, informing customers of the grape boycott.
The signs read^
TO THE CONSUMER:
PLEASE DON'T BUT CALIFORNIA TABLE GRAPES HELP THE CALIFORNIA GRAPE WORKERS
BETTER THEIR LIVING CON-DITIONS4 .
The signs represent a compromise between UFWOC and local union nembers who are promoting the national boycott, and Cleveland's supermarket owners who say they are committed to purchase and sell California qrapes for the rest of the year.
In addition to displaying these signs wherever they sell California grapes, the store owners have aqreed not to advertise or promote sale of the graces. The owners even a-qreed to pay for one half-paqe newspaper advertisement to oromote the Cleveland boycott.
And, perhaps most important in the long run, the markets have warned California growers that things will get still worse if they refuse to sit down with UFWOC this year.
In' the agreement they signed with the UFWOC and the Cleveland Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, the market owners said they "will qive serious consideration to not buvinq and/or selling California table qrapes if the consumer boycott is still in proqress." ble grapes at all in 1969 if the consumer boycott is still in progress."
UFWOC director CSsar ChSvez, in Cleveland to witness ' the signing of the agreement, was welcomed personally by Mayor Carl Stokes. "In keeping with the national policy to challenge and eradicate poverty wherever it may exist,": Stokes said, "I commend the efforts to gain recognition of the right of the California qrape pickers to seek a decent standard of living."
Newspaper reports said that Campbell had promised to pay farmers the cost of growing the unharvested tomatoes plus a "reasonable profit/' but no one seems to know how much that will be, and the open market is glutted.
Thomas J. Moore, manager of the New Jersey Agricultural Marketing Association, said the price of a basket of tomatoes had dropped from 75 cents to 45 cents in five days. Since contracted laborers were promised 20 cents per basket for picking, it was probable that much of the crop would be left on the vine.
Growers expected they could sell about 15 percent of the crop on the open market, leaving about 6 million bushels to be plowed under.
While the strike continued in the processing plant, farmers and workers alike wait to see if Campbell will settle with the Machinists, Meatcut-ters, and Teamsters. Unless they do, Campbell will have been successful in using a labor demand to damage suppliers
Cleveland boycott leader Julio Hernandez.
and farm workers, as yet unorganized.
More than 250 tomato farmers and 10,000 workers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania are facing serious economic problems as the result of a strike a-gainst the Campbell Soup Company by members of the Meat-cutters, Machinists, and Teamsters Unions.
According to reports in Philadelphia newspapers, Campbell had contracted to buy 300 million pounds of tomatoes this year for its Camden, New Jersey plant, now closed because of the strike.
After the shut-down was announced, Campbell cancelled orders with the 250 growers, who had contracted 8,000 Puerto Rican workers at $1.45 per hour for a 40-hour week.
The dependence of small farmers on the large processors such as Campbell's, may mean that the tomato crop will be left to rot in the fields, reports indicated.
Observers have noted that the tremendous economic power of the canners, packers, and processors often catch the small growers in a squeeze which accounts for the substandard working conditions and wages for farm workers.
Organizers of farm labor unions in Wisconsin report a similar situation in that state, where Libby, McNeil and Libby dominate the cucumber crop.
At last reports, farmers in the New Jersey - Pennsylvania area were attempting to negotiate with Campbell Soup for the undelivered crop.
Soup Strike Hits Farms


EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/13
Letters
Mr. Tony Jackson
KTLA, Channel 5
Los Angeles, California
Dear Tony Jackson,
I watched with interest your interview with John Giumarra on "Open for Discussion" Sunday, August 4.
The enclosed copy of EL MAL-CRIADO may shed some light on the whole problem, especially the article, "Growers Fight Strike with Federal Subsidies1,1 which starts on p. 3 and continues on p. 4, I have marked this in red.
A subsidy of $278,721 to Giumarra from the Government would seem to suggest that something is wrong somewhere.
Cordially,
Hugh J. Hamilton Claremont, California August 8, 1968
JAMAICAN CANE WORKERS SUE
Eighteen British West Indies farm workers who were brought to Florida to work in the cane fields and summarily deported for participating in a labor dispute have filed suit a-gainst sugar cane growers, Florida police, and the British West Indies Central Labour Organization, according to published reports.
The complaint alleges that the men were deprived of their right to peaceful assembly and petition for a redress of grievances, and charges false arrest and false charges on behalf of 32 men who were charged with inciting to riot.
The workers also claim they were not paid the federal minimum wage for sugar cane cutters, that illegal deductions were taken from their wages, and that they did not receive a fair hearing of their complaints.
According to the reports,the day after the workers voiced their grievances, "71 members of the Palm Beach County Sher-1 iff's Department arrived on the scene, heavily armed with carbines, shotguns, tear gas guns, other weapons and dogs. They were joined by other law enforcement officers and a fire truck."
Editor:
Although lack of transportation as well as lack of strenqth dims any effort to do store work as you indicate, I may have helped some by placing every piece of printed matter you have sent me into the hands of a different resident 'in this community of 410 retired persons, all well educated and well meaning, requesting that the recipient move the material on to someone else. -I’m sure we have done something helpful.
I felt it was too early to ask for contributions. I may get an approach to that later. It may come as mine have come, just from hearing from our Unitarian Church that some of our people were taking things over.
As both a newspaper writer and a school teacher, I can push words to help you. Be free to call on me for anything I can do.
Elizabeth McGregor Pomona, California August 7, 1968
PERSONAL NOTICE N.L. Barron, Elsa Duran, Silvia Barron, and Sonia Barron, please get in touch with UFWOC Treasurer Antonio Oren-dain about paychecks which are being held for you. Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215 or by phone to (805)725-0375.
OlRENDAIN ARTICLE IN KENNEDY BOOK
A memorial tribute to the late Senator Robert F. Kennedy written by UFWOC treasurer Antonio Orendain is to be included in A Tribute to Robert F. Kennedy, a book to be published by Doubleday 6 Co. on October 18.
Orendain's article, entitled "Our Friend, May He Rest In Peace," first appeared in EL MALCRIADO for June 15.
Material for inclusion in the memorial book was selected by representatives of the Kennedy family, and the proceeds of its sale will go to the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Fund, according to information furnished by the publishers.
Bay area caravan planned for Aug. 24
The Bay Area Food Caravan will make the trip from Oakland and San Francisco Saturday, August 24. Departure from Oakland will be at 7 AM from 568 47th. Street. The group will leave the San Francisco Labor Temple, 2940 16th. Avenue at 8 AM.
If you'cannot come to Delano on the caravan, but want to help, leave your food donations at the Labor Temple in San Francisco.
If you plan to come down, please cal-l 655-^3256 in Oakland after 7 PM to leave your name.
V/e’ll see you here in Delano!
HEYl
"Leggo my leg!! I’m gonna send my $3.50 for a year's subscription to EL MALCRIADO."


1VEL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968
'NOW OR NEVER’ STRUGGLE
DELANO, August 15--An urgent call for an all-out boycott action on the part of UFWOC supporters in cities across the United States and Canada was issued today by UFWOC Director Cesar E. Chavez.
Chavez said the peak period of the Delano harvest would arrive by the second week in September, which leaves three weeks for complete preparations for halting the sale of California table grapes.
The UFWOC boycott, which covers all California table grapes, has become the principal weapon of the Union's organizing drive since violence and injunctions limited the effectiveness of picket lines. He also cited the virtually unlimited supply of strikebreakers across the Rio Grande as another cause for switching emphasis to the boycott.
Chavez called on all supporters of the Union to volunteer to assist the boycott. He said the Union would accept collect telephone calls from any part of the United States outside of California from concerned individuals and organizations â– who wish to assist the cam* paign.
Chavez, who has headed the three-year-old strike against California grape growers since its beginning, suggested the following plan of action for boycott supporters:
"1. ,Go to your local supermarkets and stores, since you
will probably be most, effective at the stores where you are a regular customer.
"2. Look for the table grapes Almost all grapes for sale at this time of year are.from California, and should be boycotted.
"3. Approach the manager of the store and tell him to remove the table grapes from his counters. Tell him that the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee is conducting a consumer boycott because Cali for nia growers have wrongfully denied them Union recognition. The growers have steadily refused to negotiate with the U-nion," Chavez said.
"4. If the manager refuses to remove the grapes, feel free to tell him that you will be unable to shop at his store until he does so. Tell him that informational picket lines may soon be set up at stores that carry grapes in your citv.
"5. Contact your friends and concerned individuals and have them do the same thing. If you can, form small delegations and follow the same pattern. The more delegations that you • can form, and the more stores that. you. can visit, the more support there will be for the boycott.
"6. Contact the Delano office of the United Farm Workers for the address and phone number of your nearest boycott office. Collect calls
STEEL CITY SUCCUMBS
PITTSBURGH, Auqust 8--In a statement issued today, the Mayor of Pittsburgh announced, "I am in complete support of the national effort to boycott California grapes."
f'l would ask all citizens to refrain from purchasing California grapes," the Mayor added, "and to urge their grocers to refuse to stock them until the grape growers recognize the rights of farm workers to unionize."
The Mayor welcomed the boycott as "a significant deve-lopement in the three - year battle of the UFWOC against the grape growers and their lobbyists who have excluded farm workers from the provi-sions of the National Labor Relations Act, . the minimum wage law, and the Taft Hartley Act."
With his statement, the Pittsburgh official joined the mayors of such major Eastern cities as Detroit, Toledo, New York, Buffalo, Baltimore, and Cleveland in supporting the table grape boycott.
GROWERS DUCK CONGRESSMEN
DELANO, Aug. 15—Members of a Congressional Labor and Education subcommittee was scheduled to convene in Delano High School this morning to hear public testimony on the strike.
The strikers were to be represented by CSsar Chavez, UFWOC director, and witnesses with testimony on anti-union violence, illegal strikebreakers and unsanitary conditions in the fields.
A key witness is Manuel Rivera, victim of a vicious beating just south of Delano last Tuesday night.
Although they were invited to attend, the struck growers will not testify. Their spokesman, Martin Zaninovitch has charged that, since two of the congressmen have endorsed the grape boycott, the hearings are rigged.
The Congressmen are John Dent (Dem,^Pennsylvania), Philip Burton (Dem.-San Francisco), Agustus Hawkins (Dem.-Los Angeles) and Alphonzo Bell (Rep.-Los Angeles).
Continued on Page 15
Courtesy :'La Vos Mexiaana, " CPA


___________________EL MALCRIAPO, Thursday,. August 15, 1968/15
The GREEN CARD Issue
By Just5eia Ganaremgr
One of the most important legal fights of this season ended in a Los Angeles federal courtroom August 2. It ended in a victory for the workers—but an expensive victory in a battle that should never have been fought.
The battle began early this year when Immigration officials began to enforce the federal regulation which prohibits "green carders" coming into the U.S. to work in struck fields. Ten workers were charged with violating the regulation, arrested, and released on bail.
The impact of Immigration's action on Giumarra and the strike-breakers in his fields was put in black and white by the grower himself. What follows is from the brief he filed in Los Angeles in hopes of obtaining a court order barring the deportation of the 10 men:
"The green card holders in the neighboring a-rea, who do the harvest work for us, are refusing to work, because of the fear of arrest by the Immigration and Naturalization Service," Giumarra said.
If the court upholds Immigration's action, Giumarra continued, ''I would anticipate that our normal work force will be reduced by 25 percent of our anticipated harvest work force of 3,000 workers, with the resulting loss to Giumarra Vineyards of $2,200,000."
In simple terms, the law was on the books, Immigration was finally enforcing it, and Giumarra was hurting.
Giumarra did not mention, of course, that he would have all the workers he needs if he would sit down with their Union and sign a contract.
He might have been reduced to that, save for-a temporary restraining order issued by Federal Judge Pelrson Hall, enjoining Immigration "from doing any act in regard to the operation, enforcement or execution of the challenged regulation." Immigration's hands were tied and green-carders could cross the border as they pleased.
Hall's ruling was a triumph for Giumarra, of coursfe, but its real impact was felt in Coachella, where the Thompson Seedless harvest was ripe, and a new UFwOC strike getting underway.
Cesar Chavez and his organizers led 1,200 strikers out of the fields. 8ut now there was nothing to stop the growers 'from driving 130 miles south to the border and picking up 1,200 more green carders.
Ironically, while the outcome of the case of immense importance to striking farm workers, UFWOC Counsel Jerry Cohen was never permitted to state the Union's case in court.
Temporary restraining orders are supposed to last 15 days. But Judge Hall got sick, and it wasn't until July 11 that Judge Manuel Real lifted the order, pending his final decision.
And that, when it came, was another masterpiece of irony. Neither Giumarra nor the 10 workers, he ruled, had been in any position to bring the suit to court in the first place.
Therefore, "Judgement for the defendants." (The federal officials who had tried to enforce the law were the defendants.)
Real's wording is not easy to follow, but it seems that he decided that Immigration's action was, legally, none of Giumarra's business. As for the 10 workers, the Judge suggested that they were so obviously not guilty of violating the green card regulation that they had no business challenging its constitutionality.. When Immigration had finally been moved to fire its first shot against green carders, it had missed by a mile.
And so it goes in the courtroom. By taking a case he could hot win to court, Giumarra won 22 invaluable days during which growers could import all the strike breakers they needed, while the strikers watched in hunger from the picket 1i nes.
And they ask, why do we boycott?
Continued from Page 14
STRUGGLE
from outside California will be accepted at (805) 725-1314. Ask for the boycott chairman."
Chavez said the Union's boycott office hoped to reach 50 additional cities during the remainder of August, in addition to the 28 which have full-time representatives and field offices.
He said that the 50 new cities would be dependent on vo-lonteers who heeded the latest call for assistance, and said he hoped Union sympathizers and readers of EL MALCRIAD0 would call In to offer their time for what he termed "the most vital campaign In the U-nion's history to date."
r
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LAUREANO ESPARZA, Prep.


16/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968
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Full Text

PAGE 1

Volume. II, Number 12 Delano, California T hursday, IS, 1968

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2/EL MALCR I ADO, Augus t 1 ) , 1968 in this issue I El Malcriado says More poLice inaction. . . 3 Education --For-r-lhat?. . . 6 By Antonio Orendain N.o City Keys for> UFWOC. Amigos . • . • • . .9 NOI.J Ol' Nevel' Stl'ugg le . 14 The Green Car-d Issue By Justicia Ganaremos • 15 U18701 7534751 Sy the Editor EL MALCRIAOO received a letter last week whi ch I would like to share with our readers. Dear-Editor: Sever-at months ago I wr-ote r-equesting information about Chavez and tlw gr-ape str-ike. I'm a VISTA (Volunteer-s in Ser-vice to Amer-ica) bJOr>kera mong the migr-a11ts her-e in ---. Lately I've r>eceived two issues of EL !4ALCRIADO. : appar> ent ly someone has paid formy subscription, for' which I'm gr-ateful . our paper in a' plain brown f wrapper, we are cancel! ing the? lady's subscdption. 1/e found I that we had started it as a gift because her name appeared on a 1 ist of donors to our movement. If indeed freedoni in t his country has deteriorated so much t hat receiving a labor union newspaper is dangerous then we indeed sympathize with the lady . t But now I have one r-equest. llould it be possible to send EL f1ALCRIADO in a plain b"t'oi.Jn envelope Or' else folded up in brown paper impr-inted with my address? However, wonder how e ffective t h e V ISTA program can be if the subject of labor unions for farm workerS must be discussed behind a plain brown wrapper, The lady writes, "I'm s ure you understand that as a V ISTA volunteer, I must be careful about receiving controversial 1 iterature." ',N El MALCRIAOO, The Voice of the Farm Worker, is pub I ish e d twice monthly by th" e UNITED FARM\.IORKERS ORt;ANIZINf; COMMITTEE,AFL -C IO . Subscriptions in theUnitedStatatur>e. 11e're sure that nobody would criticize her for receiving For>tune magazine, or the g row ers 1 trade newspaper, The Packer>, but to read the workers' newspaper is dangerous. l e she work s in a federal program of aid to the poor, she still must fear the grow ers: Subscriptions formember s ofUFWOC, AFL-C\Oareincluded in monthly dues. Editorial and business offices located,atthenorthwcstcorneroff.ar ces H iqhway and Hettler Avenue, D ela no, California. Address all correspondence to:.EL HALCRIAOO, ?ostOffice Sox 130, no,Californi.l9)115. Applicationtomailatsecond-class postaqe rates ispendinQ at Delano, California93215. Foradvertisinqrates,col)tactfedericoChiivezat {805)725 -1337orthe mai linq address l i.sted above. EDITORS: Youtare welcome to reprint material from EL /ALCRIADO, provided a copy is sent to us and the item i s credited '"From E L HALCRIADO U F 0 C ' --you . Z.et me knowifit's to sen d me EL MALCRI a br>own enve Z.ope. Thank SincePely, Name withheld VISTA VOLUNTEER I cannot decide whether such a letter needs a comment or not. Since it is extremely inconvenient for us to mai I He do not ask that V ISTA volunteers organize for the United Farm Workers, but we fail to see why keeping abreast of ou r movement could be a crime. Incidentally, there is a rumor about that J. Edgar Hoover reads The Daily Wor>ker>. subscribe to EL MALCRIADO EL 1'-IALC]{ I ADO More and more people are fi"nding out that a P.b. BOX 130 subscription to EL 1'-IALCRIADO is the best DELANO, CA to keep up with the farm worker struggle. 93215 Don't be left out--send in this coupon today! FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND I T WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL 1-IAL CRIADO , SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY T\'10 \'lEEKS FOR ONE YEAR. NAME-nombre English_ ADDRESS-domicilio r CITYciudad STATE-estado ZIP l

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MORE POLICE INACTION DELANO, Aug. post-: ed a silent vigil i n front of Delano pol ice headquarters tonight, less than an hour and a half after a veteran union member was trapped by three cars on a county road and severely beaten while his five children looked on, 8y Wednesday night, the i I had drawn several hundred supporters. The victim was Manuel Rivera, 55. He spent several months in the hospital after a large truck ran over him on a picket I ine during the Goldberg ranch strike in November, 1966, This time Rivera's injuries were less serious. However, after being released from the Delano Hospital following emergency treatment Tuesday night, Ri vera collapsed at work Wednes .... day and f ell unconscious into an irrigatio n d itch. UF'WOC Oi rector Cesar Chavez called for the vigi 1 after ion executives tried without suCcess to induce pol ice to arrest Rivera' s attackers, Despite the contention of Union attorneys that each had grounds for immediate felony arrests, Delano Pol ice, the California Highway Patrol and the Ker n County Sheriff ell refused to act. "I'll stay there until we get some justice," Chavez said at an emergency meetina called after the Incident. " 1111 duct my office on the side-walk." ' Just before he took to the street, Chavez sent a telegram to U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark demanding federal protection for the strikers. It read: "On beha 1 f of the union membership and the Delano strikers, I must appeal to you to immediately send f ederal marshalls to Delano for our oroteet ion. W'e have been the vic-ties o f repeated acts of violence by persons who are fu 11-tiem agents paid for by the employers to forment violence. Despite our p lea to all local law enforcement agencies there has been no redress. \.le have lost all condlfence in the! r abi 1 ity to perform their dut i es, Further:nore, they even admit t o us they are unable t o arres• or apprehend those who thrt'atcn our 1 ives and who wives and children. We : u.:l !eve that non violence se:-ves the cause of justice an•I again we appeal to you for immediate redress." Copies were sent to many legislators, including senators Kennedy, and M cGov ern. Wednesday, during the 'vigi 1, Chavez made it clear that far more than the most recent incident i s involved. ''We don't feel safe," he told EL MALCRIAOO, "The Kern County Sher iff's Office and the Delano Po l ice are so tied in with the g rowers that It i s impossible for them to administer justice in the case of the strikers." When a Delano Record reporter told Chavez the pol ice were waiting for h i m to approach them with a complaint, Chavez snapped: ''We've been approacl:l ing them with complaints for the last three years. We are not approaching them any more" Then, the reporter demanded , how long woul d the vigil last? "Untilweget h elp from the outside, " Chavez replied. Delano is not . a kingdom, you k now.' ' Rivera told hls story Wednesday, after receiving treat ment for his. injuries. A member of the Rubio family, he said, followed Rivera and his five chi Jdren, ages 3 to 10, home from a UF\IOC meeting a t Filipino Hall. As he pulled into the driveway of his Asti Street home, Rivera said, Rubio's car struck his from behind. R ivera followed this Rubio as he fled, headlights off, accross First Avenue and south on Albany Street. (As he passed inffront of UF WOC headquarters, the Rubio car narrowly missed striking Chavez and Leroy Chatfield, director of t h e Service Cen ter.) On Albany, Rivera found six more men, including several members of the R ubio fami ly, waiting in two cars. He was forced to halt, and a 11 seven males emerged, brandishing sticks. One of the men opened the door toRivera's car and began to beat him with a baton, the victim charges. tn the struggl e that ensued, Rivera reca II s being battered to the ground, struck with sticks and gouged with hand.fulls of dirt, while the two youngest assai !ants kept his own sons at bay w ith nail -studded sticks. Rivera lost consciousness, h e says, and came to to find Chatfield s t anding over h im. {Chatfield had become alarmed when he saw Rivera and his family following a Rubio, and decided to investigate.) As the paper goes to p ress, law enforcement officials are stil l refusing to let Rivera swea r out a comp laint against his attackers, pending an investigati on by the D istrict Attorney's office in Bakersfield. And, via his subordinates in California, Ramsey Clark's reply reached Chavez early Wednesday. The incident had been investigated by h i s office, he said, and d ismissed as "just a b rawl."

PAGE 4

4 / El HALCRJAOO, Thursday, _IC<5 ,_ , CANADIAN LABOR CONGRESS URGES BOYCOTT AID OTTAIM, August 9-The struqg l e for the rights o f f arm workers became. an international movement here today, as the Canadian labo r Congress resolved "actively to join in the international effort to withold patroange from all nonunion California grapes." Like the AFL-CIO in t his country, t he CLC speaks for Canada ' s major international . unions. The resolution, perhaps the strongest yet obtained by UFWOC, calls upon every member of CLC'. s affiliate unions "to refuse to purchase and to handle these _ (Ca lifornia) grapes: "The CLC ca II s upon a 11 provincial governments and other p ub! ic institutions to refrai n from p ure has i ng n on-union grapes," the resolution added. After meeting in Ottawa w ith UF\40C staffers Marshall Ganz, Jessica Govea and Rudi Ahumada t h e C L C executive counci 1 a greed that the Californi a "have been shamefully ,exploited by Californi a grape growers, working for subs tandard wages and inhuman workinq -conditions." The toughly wor ded resolution also noted that "these workers face a lack of leqal organiza tional rights by virtu e of their exclusion from the N LRA and a lack of adequate pro tection against grower-instigated v iolence and the i ! legal impo rtati9n .. of strikebreakers from Mexico .11 Canadian account fof some 1 6 percent of the market for California grapes. WASHINGTON REPORT WASHINr.TON, Auqus t 8.....:...Mi chael McCarthy , 17-year-old son of presidential hopeful Senato r Euqene McCarthy , join ed ttie first UFWOC picket 1 ine to establish the g rape boycott i n the nation' s capitol. Also on the 30 -man 1 ine in front of Washinqton's International Safeway Market w a s A nn H art, McCarthy o rganizer and daughter of Sen. Phi I ip A. Hart (d-Mich). McCarthy has urqed nationwide suppor t for the fastspreading boy cott. U F\.IOC representatives assur ed the t.lashinqton press the" woul d picke t stores in every food chain in the city. 'GRAPE SALES SCAB GRAPES PILE UP Grape growers in Kern County s hipped 1!00,000 fewer lugs of grapes in the first 30 days of the current picking season than they did in the same harvest period last year. At the e n d of July, 77,810 lugs were In California cold storage sheds, up some 72,000 I ugs frorri that tim e last year. These figures, which come from marketing .officials in the Fe de ra 1 Department of Agriculture, indicate the effect of the internationa l boycott. Shipments are down 20 percent from 1967, which itself was a bad year. Compared with an average year, the g rowers' plight looks even worse. With t heir markets shrinking as t h e boycott spreads , grow ers are stacking t h eir ware s in storage In unprecedented quantities. The UFWOC research department also reports that wholesale prices in recent wee ks h a v e been one to two dollars lowe r than normal. Wholesale prices in Los Anglees have already sunk below f.o.b. quotations in Bakersfield. I ndustry and trade sources have been predicting growers wi II dUJ!ll their unsold grapes on the market below cos t in a last ditch attempt to break the boycott.

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i I r . , EL MALCRlADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/5 IUnion files $50,000,000 suit , . , • . . • SANFRANCISCO-FiftyMillion j " dollars in compensato r y and ! i n a suit filed by UFWOC Gen1 eral Counsel Jerome Cohen in ' San Francisco 1 as t week, LA. CONGRESSMAN PLEDGES SUP:PORT ' Conqressman George E. Brown, Jr., of los Ange les, pa i d a visit today to the office of the United Farm Worke r s Organizing Committee at 3016-1/2 East First Street, los Angel es, and pledged his "unqua l i fied support" to the organization headed by cesar Ch.3vez and centered in Delano, Cali fornia. The Los Angeles Congressman toured the office, met the of fice Director, Mr. Joe Serda, and h i s enthusiastic s taff ,and accepted a bumper sticker with the slogan "Don't Buy Grapes." Upon accepting the sticker, Congressman Brow n corrrnended the office workers and reiterated his support of the current bOycott of Cal iforni.o: grapes., Brown stated a 1 so that he wo!Jld "continue to speak out i n support of the o rganizing efforts of cesar Ch.3vez and his United Farm Workers Organ izing Corrrnittee, both on the floor of Congress and wherever else it may be ehl pful to do so.'' Con.gressman continued, "There are those feel that urban congressmen have no business expressing their views on thi s subject, but 1 want to poin t out that a large percentage of my constituents have a strorig and natural affinity with i:heir compatriots in the fields. I do also, and I will conti nue to speak out on this issue. The UFI-IOC suit all eges that Bruno Dispoto Company, Sabo vich Brother s and Joh n J. Kovacevi ch have so 1 d scab grapes in boxes bearing a Union ' la-bel. • COhen told a press conference o f San Francisco newsmen the suit demanded damages be cause "the growers' action put the existence of the Union in jeopardy,and that the value of a farm workers' labor union to the workers over the next dec ade would be m an y mi 11 ions of dol lars." In response to a reporter's question, Cohen said he filed the suit with the purpose in m ind of attempting to halt the false labelling , as well as to secure damages for the effect on the Unio n of the alleged f raud. Cohen mentioned truth in packaging legislation and attempts to defraud consumers as basis for the suit. Humphrey, Chavez meet in LA LOS ANr.ELES---Vice-President Eugene tlcCarthy of Minnesota " I appreciate your detailed Hubert Humphrey met privately also gave his endorsement, and recitation of the negative imCesar. Chavez , Director of both candidates have also come pact of our immigration prac-the United Farm Workers, in out i n favor of extending the tices and enforcement policies Los Angeles on July 28. After National labor Relations and on the efforts of farm workers the meeting Humphrey announced Fair Labor Standards acts to to improve their lot. This •to the press, "I am in sympa-protect farm workers. mus t be changed . I f the fault t hy with Mr. Chavez. I supChavez and Humphrey dis-is looseness i n port his efforts.'' cussed the policy of the fed-the enforcement must be Later, in a persona" ] letter era! government of allowing changed and tightened. If the to Chavez, dated August 1, the growers to import unlimi-fault is in national adminis-Humphrey wrote, " I want to ted n umbers of Mexican citi-trative policy, then that must wish you success with your na-zens to break the strikes of be changed. I think you are tiooal boycott effort. As the Union. Chavez has charged correct in yo u r analysis that more people know that the boy -that the Justice Department no reasonable degree of fair-cott is almost your only ef-has deliberately a i ded the ness in recognizing the rights fecti.ve organizing device, growers strike -breaking ef-of farm workers, on a comparamore and more will support forts. Humphrey, as these-ble basis with other American it." (For the fu 11 text of cond hi ghes. t offici a I i n t he workers, can occur without the Jet,tei-, see page 11.) government, should be abfe to substantive change in enforceHumphrey is the second major do something abou t this proment of immigration procedures presidential ca(!didate to en-blem immediately. to accompany the extension of dorse the boycott. Senator As H umph rey wrote to Chavez: NlRA to farm workers. "

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6/El I AD:), Thursday, August 15, 1968 Education--For What? by Antonio Orenda in Treasurer ,UFWOC "There are w ise men whose only book is that of life, and in Nhose w i sdom there i s mor e science than is found in the of the 1 i t e rature. And ,.,hen they were tested they ah.,ays meas ured u p.'' Th e gr01-.ers should stop trying to. impress us with the old story that we have no education. They should stop threatening to replace us with machines. They are not, as they say, giving us jobs out of pure charity. They say to us, "Hark in o u r fields i n the daytime, and go home and study at n ight. Someday you may have a ranch 1 ike ours, and then you will understand
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El HALCRIAOO, Thursday, August 1 5 , 1968/7 ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! U ,FW LA WYERS ATTACK Fll TH In four separate civi I suits, each stemming from violence or threats of violence against union members and supporters, UFWOC lawyers have filed for d amages tota 1 1 i ng a pa i nfu 1 SS15,070. The larqest c laim has been filed on behalf of Bill R ich ardson, the young Seminarian ,.,ho was brutally beate n in a Coachella Valley vineyard July 2, Richardson i s demanding S410,000 in actual and pun i tive damages from RalphS. Ja cobs and David Freedman & Co., a major Coachella In h i s complaint, Richardson said he jumped o nto the hood vf a truck that was apparently at tempting t o run him down O'l a picket 1 ine. The truck car ried h i m into the fields, where he was held by scab work e r s u ntil two ranchers ar rived. Richardson charges that the ranchers beat him, breaking his nose. UFWOC lawyers Jerry Cohen and Dave Ave rbuck a r e a I so representing Peter Williamson, a l aw student volu nteer who ha s a lleged that Jose Mendoza pointed a rifle at his head in f ront of the uni on headquarters July 18. Mendoza , selfstyle d organizer o f the scab union, Agricultural Workers Work Associat ion, is frequently seen cruising the street in f ront of UF\JOC head quarters. Damages sought in this case total $30,000. Fr. Hark Day is seeking $28,000 in damages for anal leged assault and batter y on him at the Mosesian ranch near Arvin, July 1 6 . The defen dants a r e Wi 1 1 iam Moses ian Co. and Hike Hoses ian. Dale Van Pelt, a member of t he migrant ministry, has filed a $20,000 sui t charging Sometimes the picketing in Los Angeles goes very well.,. And sometimes the:re a:re problems. On the left is L, A. Boycott leadez: Joe Serda, UFWOC
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U/EL MALCRIADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968 L.A: TIMES SAYS: Growers May "The boycott being pushed by article b y Harry Bernstein, cratic presidential nomination, Chavez a nd his A FL-CIO United the Times ' labor editor. VIce President Humphrey and Farm Workers Organizing ComTo Bernstein, " t he most im-Sen. Eugene . ..!. McCarthy." mittee," the los Ange les Times pressi ve aspect of the boy-And Bernstein reports, "While reported tionday, "could crip-cott, making it different from they hope and expect the boy-pie California's multi-million others backed by Unions, is cott will f lop, g rowers make dollar grape industry which the broad cross section of no secret of th.eir fears that provides nearly all of the support it has received." It may suCceed." table grapes eaten by Ameri -'The boycott is supported by The reporter quotes John cans • . " church groups, civil rights Glumarra Jr., lawyer and heir This bit of good, but hardly organizations, and political apparent to Giumarra Fruit Co. surprising ne1.,.s was the es-leaders ranging from the may-as saying, "If our workers sence of a long, thoughtful ors of half a dozen cities to went on strike, they could f o r every both candidates for the Demo-have us at the bargaining ta Courtesy "La Voz Me:rieana," CPA The only completly Mexican mortuary in northern .california MORTUARY FRESNO 1022 "8" STREET Services available everywhere. .No matter where you 1 ive, our price is the same .death notices in newspapers and on are included. . we can make arranqements economic situation. . Telephone 237-3532 ble to make some kind of a deal within a week." T he r.iumarra memory is short. the strike was called August 3 of last year, 70 percent of Giumarra's workers left the fields. The article also out! ines a new "lnterFai th Coa lition for the r.rape Boycott" whi ch is now being formed in los A ngeles. On it are the Rev. James Jones, president of the los Angeles City School Board, Sister Mary Cori ta, the famou s artist in residence at Immaculate Heart College, and Rabbi Albert lewis, social action chairman of the South ern California Board of Rabbis. WOODVILLE TENANTS SUPPORT BOYCOTT \.IOOOVILLE, August 8--A unanimous resolution supporting the UF\IOC grape boycott was passed today at the general meeting of the Woodvi lie Independent Tenants Association. I n announcing t he resolution, t he members emphasized their objecti on to the growers' refusal to a l low collecti ve bargaining rights for the worke rs. Uoting that farm workers have none of the protection afforded industrial workers, the association said it wished to congratulate Chavez and his followers for their qreat courage and perseverance and offer them a helping hand:" The Tenants Association is a delegate agency of the Tulare County Convnunity Action Agency.

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NO CITY KEYS FOR UFWOC AMIGOS DELANO, A ugust 5-Pol i ce Chief James Ailes today denied UFW'OC a permit for a labor Day solidarity parade, which, ac cordinq to Director Char CMi vez, would bring as man y as 25,000 supporters to the city. For a city that worries a bout its " image gap," Delano i s a remar kably inhospitabl e place. f,iven the depth of the sup port Ch.lve z has been getting around the coun t r y , t h i s num ber 1-.tOuld certainly include many political and reliqious b iqwiqs whom most towns would w e lcome with the key to the c ity. But Delano wants them to s tay home . UF4'0C a nnounced this wee k t hat i t would appeal Aile ' s decision to the city council. City Manage r Gerald Minford, who recom mended the de n ial, t o l d EL MALCRIADO that pol ice and sanitary facilities are too scarce in Delano t o handle a crowd of t h i s size. " I f they cut i t down t o some,.,.here in the ne i g hborhoood of 10 ,000," Minford said, "we miqht be a ble to handl e i t " V iva Ia Caus a y El Progreso efUt'ete41! a! a "Nteue41t-;'/ffle'Ue4#e ;'ittfJIZ#eetl Fr esno California But the major problen., Hi.n ford suqqested, was the Aqricult u r a l Workers Freedom to Work Association, a scab " union" , mad e a request f o r a parade with the same number of peopl e over the same route scheduled for the sam e day. M inford did not say, however, that the city had to either g rant both requests, or deny both. Since the UF\JOC applied first, he explained, the city could have denied a perm i t on the grounds that anoth er parade was a l ready schedu l ed. "Bu t we had to face the fact that they ( the A'WFWA) were probabl y goin q to be ther e a nyway," Minford added. " As pub! ic officials we have t o assume there would be a large antiunion faction in t01.,.n. W e have a n obl iqation to protect the citizens." Protect them from \lell , sai d M inford, ' 'Ch.iivez has indicated in past demonstrations that his q r o u p is not qoi nq to create a problem. And that is probably true of t h e o t he r qroup a s wel l . But i f they were both" here toqethe r , the leaders hip miqht have trouble hand ! inq t hem." H ow man y peop.le show up f o r the October 5 Harvest Hoi idays parade? '' 1 don't know the answer to that, " says Minford. "But at H arvest Hoi iday oeoole come here for festivities,for fun. It's a completel y d ifferent climate." But this year, Delano's reputation as California's fun city may be jeopardized by political reality. If its appeal to City C o un cil is denied, the l'F\-IOC is considerinq invi ting those 25,000 sympat hizer s to the Harvest HoI i days. . El MALCRIADO submitted an application thi s week to have a float in the H arvest Holidays parade. Unio n officials were considering i nviting the 30,000 spectators and participants expected for the Labor Oay parade to the Harvest Hoi idays i nstead a reminde r from the CREDIT UN ION .•. SAVE NOW FOR 9 . . MONTHS FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P . O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215 OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER

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10/El MALCRIAOO, Thursday, August 15, 1 968 McCarthy and the U .F.W.O.C. " I urqe all those who are concerned with human d ignity and determined to I i ft the burden of poverty from our land to support the boycott of table Qrapes from Cali fornia dec l ared by the United Farm Workers Organizing Corrmittee under the leadership of cesar Chvez." EuQene J . McCarthy Uni t'ed States Senator, Democra tic-FarmerLabo r Party MCCARTHY FOR PRESIDENT FRESN O CALIFORNIA OJ110 OFFICE ESTABLISHED OTTAWA, OHIO-The Farm Work ers Orqan izinq Committee of Northwester n Ohio has opened a permanent office at 1 0 N. St., in Ottawa, Ohio lf5875 (telephone 4 I 9-523-3965) according to a recent report. ll;equlcJr meetings are held on Sunday afternoons and members, farm workers, and visitors are all welcome. The Union is launching ,, major drive amonq s uqar beet and onion workers, for the second surrrner in a There are over 50,000 farm workers, m i qrants and permanent workers, in Ohi o during the harvest seasons, Union officials say. Main targ_et of the orqaniz inQ drive are certain labor contrac"tors and b i 9 companies, packers and shippers, who buy the crops. In many cases in Ohi o and throughout the Hidwest, the Q rowers are often smal l farmers who sell their crop "on the vine" to the b i g companies. The companies then hire labor contractors to p ick the crop. Thus packers tend to control both the price of the crop as wel l as wage rates, Union officials report. CRLA SUIT The I nternal R evenue Se r vice was restra i ned from attaching 100 percent of a taxpayer's wages recently, after Califor nia Rural legal Assistance filed suit in federal court on behalf of M rS. Elisa Beltran,a Spanish-speaking lettuce p icker from Salinas. Attorneys said she faces eviction, loss of her job, car and furniture, because the In terna l Revenue Service .has at tached All of her wages for payment of a back tax b iII while s h e b elieves that part of it may have been paid by her estranged husband. She offered t o pay instal l ment s on the b i II, and did turn over one paycheck of $75 to t h e tax collector. Following that, t h e Internal Revenue Service demanded her next two complete paychecks. T he third week, she kept only $3 tO buy s i x boxes of torti lias and a can of beans for herself and her two children. A ttorn eys said 11rs. Beltran i s completel y illiterate, and is the sol e suppor t of the children. According to r eports, the Internal Revenue Service is the on I y agency which is per mitted to seize 100 percent of a person's wages. Eve r y state prohibits this practice, a nd Pres ident Johnson recently called for a law limiting attachments to $7 of t h e f irst $ 100 of weekly wages to protect workers in all states. According to the U.S. Department of labor, between 100,000 and 300,000 people lose their jobs ever y year because of wage attachments, and that there are more such cases than the r e are of peopl e who lose their jobs because of pol ice records. T h e restraining order which prohibits the 100 percent levy pending outcome of the Beltran sui t was issued by Judge Wi 1-1 iam T. Sweigert after the suit was filed by attorneys Robert L: r,naizda and Martin R. G lick o f the CRLA's Salinas o ffice.

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c El MALCR1ADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/11 Humphrey's letter endorses boycott . "*" 0 0 "., ;"' August 1, 1968 Dear Mr. Chavez: I want you and your fellow officers to know how very much I appreciate your meeting with me in Los Angeles last Sunday on the problems being encountered by farm workers as they attempt to organize to bargain with their employers. Indeed, they,are national problems. They deserve national attention.Your remark that farm workers "want no special favors -merely the chance to build a union to help themselves," sets the direction for a sound national policy for farm labor. I have long been committed to the extension of the National Labor Relations Act to cover agricultural workers. To exclude them from any protective labor legislation just does not make sense. Your briefing reassures me. It gives me additional insight. I shall redouble my efforts to encourage the enactment of that legislation now before the Congress to extend coverage. Most particularly, I appreciate your detailed recitation of the negative impact of our immigration practices and enforcement policies on the efforts of farm workers to improve their lot. This must be changed. If the fault is looseness in enforcement, the enforcement must be changed and tightened. If .the fault is in national administrative policy, then that must be changed. I think you are correct in your analysis that no reasonable degree of fairness in substantive change in enforcement of immigration procedures to accompany the extension of the NLRA to farm workers. I want to wish you success with your national boycott effort. As more people know that the boycott is almost your only effective organizing device, more and more will support_ it. As you know, I have Spoken out in behalf of your movement many times in recent years -at last year's conference in El Paso, in connection with the Poor People's Campaign, and at other times. My endorsement of the drive to extend the National Labor Relations Act to farm workers was published several weeks ago in a letter to the editor of the New York Times. In light of this, my support for your endeavors should be self-evident. However, I want to make it clear that I do endorse your efforts and I hope you will feel free to use that endorsement and the contents of this letter in any way you feel will best serve "La Causa." Sincerely, Cranston Urges NLRB Coverage LOS ANfiELES-U.S. Senate nominee Alan Cranston recently urged all California members of Congress to support HRI 6014 to give farm workers collec bargaining protection under the National Labor Relations Act. In a telegram to Rep, Ceci 1 King, head of the California Congressional de legation, Cranston said, "There is no reason why these most exploited of American workers should not have the same r .ights that the NRLA gives to other work-ers," T he bi 11 extending the NLRB to cover agricultural workers is now pending i n the House. "Some argue," Cranston continued, "that it is difficult to provide such protection for farm workers because theirs are seasonal jobs, but canning workers and lumbermen, to name just two other fields, both enjoy such protection, "The res is tanc. e by emp layers and employer groups to this extension of the NLRA is unbe-1 ievable," he said. 1' 11 find it hard to comprehe"nd why the farm worker should continue to subsidize the prices of vegetable and fruits through low wages and deplorable working conditions." Cranston also pointed out that the has recently launched a nationwide drive in support of the pending b i 11 , and that many chruch groups have also recently banded together in an organization to support this and other measures designed to protect farm workers.

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12/E L HALCR I ADO, Thursday, August 15, 1968. IN CLEVELAND UNION, MARKETS REACH NOVEL TRUCE ClEVELAND, A ugust 8-:The major s u permarke t c h a i ns here have agr eed to d i sp 1 ay 1 a rge sign s over thei r produce coun ters, Informing customers of the grape boycott. The signs TO THE CONSUMER: PLEASE DOll''!' BUY CALIFORNIA TABLE GRAPES HELP THE CALIFORNIA GRAPE WORKERS BET'rER Tl!EIR IVIflG CONDITIONS, T he siqns represent a com-promise between and local union nembers who are pro motinq the national boycop, and C leve.land's supermarket owners who say they are Cc;.ll• mitted to purchase and sell Ca I i Forni a qrapes for the rest of the year. In add it ion to displayinq these s i qns rever they se 11 California qrapes, the store owners have aq reed no t to ad vertise or promote sale of the qraoes. The owners even aoreed to pay for one half-paqe newsp<1per advert i s,ement to oromote the Cleveland boycott. And, perhaps most important in t he long run, the markets have warned California g rowers that things wi 1 1 get sti II if they refuse to sit down with UFHOC thi s year. I n the aqreement they siqned with the UHIOC and the Cleve land Federation of labor, AFl-ClO, the market owners said they "wi l l qive seriOus cons i der<",t ion to not buv i nq and/or se I I i nq Ca 1 i forn ia ta ble qrapes if the consumer boycott is still i n proqress. " ble grapes at all in 1969 if the consumer boycott is still i n p rogress." UFWOC dIrec tor C6sa r C h ve z , in Cleveland to witness the s iqninq o f the a q reement, was welcomed p e rson ally by Mayor Car l Stokes: 111 n keepinQ wit h the national policy to chal lenqe and eradicate poverty wherever i t may exi s t ,•• stokes said, "I COIM!end t h e efforts to qai n recoQn ition of the r iqht o f the California qrape pickers to seek a decent standard of 1 ivinq.11 ft' *'.' \ ct.evetand boycott leader Julio Hel'YI(Uidez. Soup Strike Hits Farms reports said t h a t Campbell had promised to pay farmer s the cost of g rowi ng the unharvested tomatoes p l u s a "reasonable p rofit, " but no one seems to know how much that wi 11 be, a n d the o p e n market is glutted. Thomas J. Moore, manager of the !lew Jersey Agricultural t1arketing Association, said the price of a basket of toma toes had dropped from 75 cents to 45 cents in five days. Since contracted laborers wer e promised 20 cents per basket for picking, it was probabl e that much of the crop would be left on the vine. Growe r s expected they cou l d sell about 15 percent of the crop on the open mark,et, leav ing about 6 m illion bushels to be plowed under. Yhi l e the strike continued in t h e processing plant, far m e r s and workers alike wait to see if Campbell will settle the Jlachinists, Heatcutters, and Teamsters. !Jnless they do, Campbe l l wi 1 1 have been successful in using a labor demand to damage supp 1 i ers and far m workers, as yet unor ganized . . Hore than 250 tomato farmers and 10,000 workers in New Jer sey and Pennsylvania are facing serious economic problem s as t h e result of a strike a gainst ttie Camp be 11 S oup Com pany by member s of the Heat cutters, Machinists, and Team sters Unions. According to reports in Phi !adelphia newspapers, Camp be l l had contracted t o buy 300 mi 11 ion pounds of tomatoes this year for its Camden, New Jersey plant, now closed because of the strike. After the shut-down was an nounced, Camp be 1 1 cance 11 ed orders with the 250 growers, who had contracted 8,000 Puerto Rican workers at $ 1.45 per hour for a 40-hour week. The dependence of sma l l farm ers o n the large processors such as Campbel l's, may mean that the tomato crop wi 11 be left to rot in the fields, re ports indicated. Observers have n oted that the tremendous economic powe r of the canners, packers, and processors often catch the small growers in a squeeze which accounts for the substandar d working condition s and wages for farm wor ke rs. Organizers of far m labor un ions in Wisconsin report a simi Jar situation in that state, where libby, lkNeil and libby dominate the cucumber crop. At last reports, farmers in the New Jersey Pennsylvania area were attempting to negotiate with Campbell Soup for the undelivered crop.

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E L MALCRIAOO, Thursday, August 15, 1968/13 Letters MI!IJI o : RENDAIN ARTICLE 1 : N KENNEDY BOOK Mr. T ony Jackson KTLA, Channel 5 Los Angeles, California Dear Tony Jackson, I watched with interest your interview with John Giumarra on "Open for Dis cussion" Sun day, August 4. The enclosed copy of EL MAL CRIADO may shed some 1 ight on the whole probl em, especiall y the article, "Grower s Fi9ht tinues on p. 4. I h ave marked thi s in red. A subsidy of $278,721 to Gi umarra from the Government wou 1 d seem to suggest that somethlnq is wrong somewhere. Cordially, Hugh J. Hamilton Claremont, C .al iforni a August 8, 1968 JAMAICAN CANE WORKERS SUE Eighteen British" West Indies farm workers who were brought to Florida to work in the cane fields and summarily deporte. d for participating in a labor disputehave filed suitagainst sugar cane growers, Florida pol ice, and t he British West Indies Central Labou r O rganization, according to pub I i shed reports, The complaint a! leges that the men were deprived of their r ight to peaceful aso;embly and petit ion for a redress of grievances, and charges false arrest and false charges on behal f of 52 men who were charged with inCiting to riot. The workers a lso claim they were not paid the federal minimu m wage for su9ar cane cutters, that i llegal deductions were taken from their wages, and that they did not receive a fair heari ng of their complaints. According to the reports, the day after the workers voiced their grievances, ' '7 1 members of the Palm Beach County Sher""' iff's Department arrived on the scene, heavily armed with carbines, shotguns, tear gas guns, ottier Weapons and dogs. They were joined by other law Editor: A lthouqh lack of tranSport.l tlon as well as lack of strenqth dims any effort to do store work as you indicate, I may have he 1 ped some by p 1 ac ing every piece of printed matter you have sent me into the hands of a different resi dent-in this community of 410 retired persons, all wel l educated and we I I meaning, re questing that t he recipient move the material on to someone e lse. r 'm sure we have done something helpful. I felt it was too early to ask for contributions. I may get an approach to that later, I t may come as mine !Jave come, just from heariog from our U nitarian Church that some of our people were taking things over, As both a newspaper writer and a school teacher, I can push words to he l p you. Be free to cal I on me for anythinq I can do. Elizabeth McGregor Pomona , Ca I i forn i a Auqus t _7, 1 968 PERSONAL NOTICE N.L. Barron, Elsa Duran, Si !via Barron, and Sonia Barron, please qet in touch with UFWOC Treasurer Antonio Oren da i n about paychecks which are being held for you. Post Of f ice Box 130, Delano, Cal ifornia 93215 or by phone t6 (805) 7250375. HEY1! "Leggo my leg!: I'm gonn a send my $3. 50 for a year's subscription to El MALCRI A DO." A memorial tribute to the late Senator Robert F . Kennedy w ritten by UFWOC treasurer Antonio Orendain is to be i n c 1 uded in A Troibute to Robe rot F . Kennedy, a book to be pub ! ished by Doubleday & Co. on October 18. Orendain' s article, enti tied "Our Friend, May He Rest In Peace," first appeared in EL MALCRIAOO for June IS . Material for inclusion in the memorial book was selected by representatives of Kennedy family, and the proceeds of its sale will qo to the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Fund, according to information furnished by the pub! ishers. Bay area caravan planned for Aug. 24 T he Bay Area Food Caravan wi 11 make the trip from Oak land and San Francisco Satu r day, August 24. Departure from Oakl and will be at 7 AM from 568 47th. Street. The group wi 11 leave the San Francisco Labo r Temple, 2940 16th. Avenue at 8 AM. If you cannot come t o De 1 a no on the caravan, but -want to help, leave your food donations at the L a bor Temple in San Francisco. ' If you plan to come down, please call 655 ... 3256 in Oak land after 7 PM to leave Your name. He'll see you here i n Delano! enforcement officers and a fire truck."

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1 4/EL MALCRIADO, T h ursday, August 15, 1968 'NOW OR NEVER' STRUGGLE DELANO, A ugust 15--An urgent call for an a ll-out boycott act ion on the part of UFWOC supporters in c ities across the United States and Canada was issued today by UFWOC Director Cesar E . Chavez. Chavez sai d the peak period of the Delano harvest would arrive by the second week in September, which leaves three weeks for complete preparations for halting the sal e of California tabl e grapes. The UFWOC boycott, which co vers all California tabl e g rapes. has become the p rinci pal weapon of the Union's organizing drive sinc e violence and injunctions limited the effectiveness of picket lines. He also cited the virtually unlimited supply of strike breaker s across the Rio Grande as another cause for switching emphas i s to the boycott. Chavez called on a l l suppor ters of the Union to volunteer to assist t he boycott. He said the Union would accept collect telephone calls from any part of the United States outside of California from concerned individua l s and organizations -who wish to assist the cam paign, Chavez, who ha s headed the three-yearold strike against California grape growers since its beginning, suggested the following p l an of action for boycott supporters: "1 . ,Go to your local supermarkets and stores, s i nee you wi 11 p robably be most effective at the stores where you are a regular customer. "2. L ook for the (abl e grapes. Almos t a l l grapes for sal e a t this time of year are. f rom Ca lifornia, and should be boycotted. "3. Approach the manager of the store and tell him to remove the tab l e grapes from hi s counters. Tell him that the United Farm Workers Orga nizing Committee i s cond ucting a con s u mer boycott because Ca I i for nia g rowers have wrongfully denied them Union recognition. The growe r s have steadily refused to negotiate" with the U nion," Chavez said. "4. If the manager refuses to remove the grapes, feel free to tell him that you w i 1 1 be unable to shop at his store until he does so. Tell hi m t ha t informati onal picket I ines may soon be set up at stores that carry grapes in your citv. "5 . Cor.t,:,ct your f riends and concerned individuals and have them do the same thing. I f you can, form smal l delegations and follow the same pa "ttern. The more delegations that you can form, and the mor e store s that. you . can v i sit, the mor e support there w ill be for the boycott. "6. Contact the Delano office of the United Farm Workers for the address and phone number of your nearest boy cott office. Col lect calls Continued on Page 15 "La Voz Me:cieana," CPA 1.: STEEL CITY SUCCUMBS PITTSBURGH, Auqust 8--ln tt statement issued today, the "'ayer of Pittsbur gh announced, "'l am in complete support of the lla tion a l effort t o boycott Californi a grapes." ; ' I would ask all citizens to refrain from purchasing Cali fornia grapes,'' the Mayor added , ''and to urge their grocers to refuse to stock them unti I the grape growers recognize the rights of farm workers to uni onize.'' T he Mayor we 1 corned the boy cott as "a significant developemen t i n t he three .., year battle of the against t he grape g r owers and their lobbyists who ha ve excluded farm workers from th" e provi. s ions of t he N a t i ona 1 Labor; Relations Act, . the m inimum wage law, and t he Taft Hartle Act.• With h i s statement , the Pittsbur gh official joi ned the York, Buffalo, Bal t imore, and C leveland in supporting the tabl e g rape boycott. GROWERS DUCK CONGRESSMEN DELANO, Aug. of a Congressional Labor a nd Education subcommittee was sche du l ed to convene in Delano Hig h Schoo l thi s morning to hear pub! i c testi m o ny on the strike. The strikers were to be re presented by cesar Chavez, UFWOC director, and witnesses with testimon y on anti-union violence, i I legal strikebreakers a n d unsanitar y conditions in the fields. A key witness i s Manuel Ri .. vera, victim of a v i c ious beating just south of Delano last Tuesday night. Although they were invited to attend, the struck growe r s wl 11 not testify, Thei r spokesman, M a rtin Zan i novitch has c harged that, since two o f the congressmen have endorsed the grape boycott, the hearings are rigged. T he Congressmen are John Oen t (Oem, Phi lip Burton (Oem.-.,San Francis co), Agustus Hawkins (Dem.-Los Angeles) and Alphonzo Bell (Rep.-Los A n gel-es).

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El MAlCRIADO, Thursday, A ugUst 15, 1968/15 The GREEN CA:RD Issue By Justicia r.anaremQII' One of the most important legal fights of this season ended in a los Ange les federal courtroom A ugust 2 . I t ended "in a victor y for the workers--but an expensive victory in a battle that should never _have been fought. The battle began early this year whe n Immigra t i o n officia l s began t o enforce the federal regulation which prohibits "green carders" coming into the U.S. to work in struck f i e lds. Ten worker s were charg e d with violating t h e regulation, a rrested, and released on bail. The i m pact o f Immigrat i on ' s action on r.iumarra a nd the strike-breakers in his fields was put in black and white by the grower h i mse l f . What f o l lows i s from the brief he filed in los Angeles i n hopes of obtaining a court o rder barring the deportation of the 10 men: '"The green car d holders in t he neighboring a rea, w h o do t h e har v est work for us, are ref using to work, because of the fear o f arrest by the Immigration and Natural ization Service," r.iumarra said. I f the court upholds Immigration's action, Giumarra conti nued, .,...oul d anticipate tha t our normal w ork force wi 1 1 be reduced by 25 percent of o u r anticipated harvest work force of 3,000 w orkers, with the resulting loss to Giumarra Vineyard s of $2,200,000. " In simple terms, t h e law was on the books , Im migration was finally enforcing it, and Giumarra was hurting. Giumarra did no t men tion, of course, that he woul d have all the workers he needs if he would sit down with thei r Union and sign a contract. He might have been reduced to that, save for.a tempo rary restraining order issued by Federal Judge Peirson Hall, enjoining Immigration "from do i n g any act in regard to the o p eration, enforcement o r execution of the challenged regulation." Immi g ration's hands were tied and greencarders could cross the border as they pleased. Continued from Page 14 STRUGGLE from o utside Calitornla will be accepte d at (805) Ask for the boycott chairman.'' Chavez said the U nion's boy cott office hope d to reach SO additional cities during the r emainder of August, in addition t o the 28 which have full-time representatives and field offices. Hall's rul ing was a triumph for Giumarra, of course, but its real impact was fel t in Coachel l a whe r e the T h ompson Seedless harvest was and a new UFwOC strike getting underway. Cesar Chavez and his organizers led 1,200 strikers o u t o f the fields. But now there nothin g t o stop the grcrvrers from drivi ng PO m i les south to the border and picki n g up 1,200 mor e green carders. Ironically, whi l e the outcome of the case of immense importance to striking farm workers, UFWOC Counse l Jerry Cohen was never permitted to state the U nion's case in court. Temporary restraining o rders are supposed to last 15 days. But J udge H all got sick, and it wasn't until July 11 that Judge Manue l Real lifted the order, pending his final deci sion . And that, when it came, was another masterpiece of i rony. f>iumarra no r t h e 1 0 workers, he ruled, had been in any position to bri ng the suit t o court i n the first pl'ace. Therefore, " Judgeme n t for the defendants." ( The federal officials who had tried to enforce the law were the defendants.) Real's is not easy to follow, but i t seems that h e deci ded that Immi gration's action was, legally, none of r.iumarra' s business. As for the 10 workers, the J udge s uggested that t hey were so obvious_l y not guilty of violating the g reen card regulation that they had no business cha llenging its constitutionality. When had fina lly bee n moved t o f ire its first shot against green carders, it had missed by a mi I e. And so it goes in the courtroom. By taking a case he could ilo t win to court, r.iumarra won 22 invaluable days during whi ch growe r s coul d im port a l l t h e strike breakers they needed, l e the strikers watched in hunger from the picket lines. And they ask, why do we boycott? MfXICANA He said that the 50 new cities would be dependent on vo l onteers who heeded the latest ca 1 1 for assi stance, and sai d he hoped Union sympathizers and readers of E l MAlCRIADO would cal l In to offer their time for what he termed "the mos t vital campaign in the u nion1s h istor y to date." Egg Broad a'l"ld Pastries AZZ. Kinds of Donuts Cakes for aU Occasions We have a ZaPge Se Zeotion of Spani sh Uagaaines, Books, and Rec ords. French 'Bread '

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