Citation
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 14

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 14
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Sunday, September 15, 1968


):
2/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968 I arnm^JSSStm LIBRARY
7534 7â„¢
Court Questions Poison
Injunction.................6
Special Benefits Fund
Bears Completion.........*8
Cranston calls for Workers' Bights ,
Catholic Leaders Shun Grapes...............
11
14
Our Cover: "El Peon AcasMIado" Woodcut by Arturo Garcia Bustos^
A few complete sets of EL MALCRIADO, Volume I, are available for collectors and historians. A complete set of the English edition, beginning with Volume I, number 17 (the first number printed in English) through the present, costs $400. This covers' the period from August, 1965 (a month before the grape strike began) to the present, except for August, 1967 until March of 1968, when no paper was printed. This collection offers the most accurate and complete history of the grape strike available anywhere.
The Spanish edition, Volume I, number 1 through the present, is available at^SSOO.' Volume I, number 1 was printed by Cesar Chavez in December, 1964, eight months before the grape strike began, and the early issues give an intimate look at the Union before .it began to get national publicity and assistance from outside.
Ask your organization or library to purchase one of these invaluable historical documents today.
Complete sets of Volume II, number 1 through number 15 are available in English or in Spanish for $5 a set.
For information, write to EL MALCRIADO, P.0. BOX 130, Delano, California 93215.
name____________________
address dity
state
Please send me Volume II,
in English in_______Spanish
El Malcriado says
San Franciscans have always been such strong supporters of La Huelga it was no surprise to see the numerous participants in last Sunday's- long march down Market Street from Dolores Park to City .Hall.
Some of us from Delano ac-companied Assistant Director Larry Itliong to the Bay Area for the event, and after the rally on the steps of City Hal 1,. we joined a picket line at the Mayfair Market on the corner of Geary .and Webster. Picket captains Lupe and Kathy Murguia^Nava impressed us with their well organized and effective peaceful picket In support of the consumer boy-, cq tt of California table gtapes.
A* few days later, Lupe was taken to the hbsp'ftal in an ambulance—because a manager of a Mayfair Market, and an armed "security" guard seemed to fee) that the answerf to the picket Vi he was to beat the-hell .out of the picket captain.
When Fred Ross, Jr. handed some leaflets" to.a consumer outside a store, a security guard fired his pistol in his direction.
Meanwhile, Purity Stores and the Berkeley Co-op mVrkets agreed ^to take California table grapes foff the shelves because they will not contrib-
ute to the oppression of farm workers.
Many months ago, on another boycott, the manager of a May-fair market in Oxnard was responsible for similar acts of violence, Kathy Murguia recalls.
On the home front, a man who run9 a business on Main Street in Delano made a $100 contribution to the Union.
For some reason, the most of the retail businessmen in this town oppose the Unionization of farm workers, when it is they who would most directly benefit form increased wages.
is difficult to understand sometimes.
When the San Francisco pa--rade was forming near the corner of 19th and Dolores, we saw a pickup truck parked on the corner, and a young man with long hair was peddling fresh fruit from the back of the truck.
While thousands of people lined up to protest the sale of scab grapes in San Francisco, this young man, wearing a "Love" button, sold grapes on the corner.
But -then, who should come up and ask him to put away the grapes, but a San Francisco policV sergeant.
We never know where support will come from.
EL; IVU.CRIADO, The Voice of the.Fern Worker, is published twice monthly by the UN I TED FARMWORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFl-CIO. Subscriptions In the United States end its possessions ere $3.50 per year, and foreiqn, including Canada end Mexico. US $5*00. ’Subscriptions for members of UFV0C, AFL-CIO ere Included In monthly dues.
Editorial1 end business offices located at the northwest corner of Gar-ces Highway and Mettler Avenue. Delano. California.
Address all correspondence to: EL HALCRIA00, Post.Office Box 130. Delano, California $3215*
. Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215.
For advertising rates, contact Federico Chavez at (80S) 725-1337 or the mailing ad-ress listed above.
EDITORS;
You. are welcome to reprint material from EL MALCRIADO, provided a copy is sent to us and the Item is credited MFrom EL MALCRIADO—U.F.W.O.C."
EL MALCRIADO More and more people are finding out that A P.0. BOX 130 subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way
DELANO, CA to keep up with the farm worker struggle.
9321S Donft be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English__ Espanol
ADDRESS-domic ilio_ CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
A


Students at the California State Fair in Sacramento passed out information on the strike and grape boycott to all visitors to the Kern County exhibit-----â– â– â– â– â– â– 
Federal Plot
to Bust Boycott
WASHINGTON, D.C., September 15—Grape exports to South Viet Nam rose from $32,000 in value in 1965 to $21*1,000 in 1967 and an estimated $500,000 in 1968, according to statistics complied by a UFW0C researcher in Washington, D.C. Almost all of these grapes were purchased by the Federal Government or its agencies for Americans living or stationed in South Viet Nam. Viet Nam is the third largest importer of California grapes.
The statistics raise the fear that once again the Federal Government may act to break the strike and crush the farm workers' movement. In opening the border to unlimited "immigration" from Mexico during the Texas and Coachella Valley strikes, the Justice Department and the Federal Government dealt a death blow to the efforts to force growers to the bargaining table through traditional striking and picket line activity. Now, through government purchasing, the government may be deliberately seeking to break the consumer boycott of California grapes, which is proving increasingly effective throughout the country.
NEW SUPPORT FOR GRAPE STRIKERS
DELANO, September 13—UFW0C Assistant Director Larry It1i“ ong reports that active support of the UnionJs consumer boycott of California table grape's has been assured by three new group‘d.
Gene Navarro, president of the Seattle Cannery Workers Union in Seattle also pledged the support of his group, It-1 long said.
The Fi1ipi no-American Political Association (FAPA) with headquarters in San Francisco has asked its members to participate fully in support of the boycott. Emil Heredia is president of t-the national group; UFW0C Vice President Phillip Vera Cruz is president of the Delano chapter.
The American Gl FORUM passed a resolution at its national convention in early August supporting two important goals of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, according to an article in the Forum's newspaper, the Forumeer.
The resolution "petitioned the Congress of the United States to extend the National Labor Relations Act to cover farm workers so that they may have the protection as well as the restraints inherent in that law and asked the Department of Justice to deny entry into the United States to aliens on green card visas if those aliens are engaged on any farm where a strike is in progress as certified by the US Department of Labor."
The Gl FORUM is a national organization of Mexican-Ameri-can veterans.
ELECTIONS
AT PAUL MASSON
Elections to select the ranch committee at the Soledad Ranch of the Paul Masson Company, were held recently, Toribio Salbado was elected President, with 25 votes in his favor.
Jose Serrano was named Vice-President with 18 votes; secretary, Homovia Vella with 17 votes; and sargeant-at-arms, Esteban Ochinag with 15 votes.
The elections were held in a democratic spirit and its results represent the workers' will, according to UFWOC's assistant director, Larry It-1iong.
Paul Masson signed a collective bargaining agreement with the workers two weeks ago.
a reminder from the CREDIT UNION...
SAVE NOW FOR
wasffiM
MONTHS
FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P.O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215 OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER


I
8/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968
Special Benefits Fund Nears Cunpletion
Sunday, September 15, 1968, EL MALCRIADO/9
LeRoy Chat field, Administrator of the Special Benefits Fund.
1 FRESNO, September 4--The Board of Trustees of the Farm Workers Special Benefits Fund met today and seemed close to agreement on many major issues, according to LeRoy Chatfield, administrator for the Special Benefits Fund. "It was a very good meeting," he told EL MALCRIADO. "I think both Union and Company representatives are eager to get this program into operation. We should have the program finished before the pruning starts, by November, l hope.
Representing the Union at the meeting were Cesar Chavez, Larry Itliong, Phillip Vera Cruz, and Chatfield. Companies represented at the meeting were Schenley, DiGiorgio, Perel1i-Minet-ti, Gallo, and Christian Brothers. Almaden and the Novitiate Vineyards did not send representatives to this meeting, but were represented by the other growers.
The trustees admitted two new companies into the program. The companies, Paul Masson Vineyards and Franzia Vineyards, had both recently signed contracts with UFWOC and had both agreed to pay 10 cents an hour per worker into the Special Benefits Fund.
"Nothing is final, yet," Chatfield stressed, "but tn general, we agreed that coverage should include the worker and his wife (or husband) and children. We estimate that the companies will contribute about $10 a week for the average worker, which would be enough to set up an insurance program covering the worker and his family for most normal medical, expenses. We would like to see the plan covering x-ray and lab test charges, normal doctor1s visits, maternity care, children's sicknesses and the normal medical expenses of the family. It looks like there will not be enough money in the fund to pay for hospitalization costs in most cases. Most families don't need this coverage and the worker himself is covered for injuries suffered on the job by the State Accident and Workmans Compensation Law which provides an automatic insurance program. The Union's Special Benefits Fund will probably be unable to pay for extended illness, or for dental or eye care at the outset.
Chatfield invisions the plan working like a bank account. Each hour that a worker works un-
der contract?*-account (tfrl worked a mi* ' fami 1 y are ance progr*p quits or is credit for out of his the insurance union ranches? by the insim cents per hop If the pro|: system, it v& up enough cr|’ by the insurjj* through the 4 Permanent ft than they nfe any medical it tended, or eft of the year! just discussfr field said, | final decIs I® ideas. Whatf program that! sonal worker^, permanent woi^i penses."
Many problcfe Giorgio contrai his workers, their accounts same number 61 bly not be erij si on program ment with loci they wi11 hanft able rates. | they hear a | Members who gcj Puerto Rico,| live in oth| program, if their accounts) for workers wfl
wis building up credits in his •* company pays). After he has «| number of hours, he and his optically covered by the insur-3 months or 6 months. If he r •» program if they paid the 10 ijjto the fund.)
ijftas this type of "bank account" Enable seasonal workers to build Muring the season to be covered fiprogram over the winter or even [year.
j^jers, who build up more credit V, or workers who did not have â– j, could have their coverage ex-fit a "health bonus" at the end Wording to Chatfield. "We are tthese things right now," Chat-fjthe Union members will make the to handle some of these trying to do is work out a |jgive maximum coverage to sea-their families, and be fair to ^and those with low medical ex-
ui
if.
just still be worked out. DI-is only five cents an hour for lose workers will have less in lan other workers, after the irs worked. There will proba-money in the fund for any penis time. Some kind of agree-3ctors may be worked out, where till Union members for reason-doctors increase charges when fir is covered by insurance.) *j.k to Texas or other states, or Jlthe winter, or whose families sjates, will be covered by the wave built up enough credit in ut the problem about insurance back to Mexico, or whose fa-
p how
|e
mi lies live in Mexico, has not been solved.
There are many problems Involved in setting up such a program, and that is why it has taken so long to reach agreement. Now that there is a-greement on the basic parts of the program, the hard parts, the details and those problems u-nique to farm workers must be worked out. "By November, the program should be completed," Chatfield noted, "and some farm workers will atr last be covered by the type of insurance that most industrial workers have had for years."
==MAJ0R AIM OF THE SPECIAL BENEFITS FUND—health insurance for our wives, our children.
'Wo'v&z'i aa, 6o«ci
SCHE
Y INDUSTRIES, INC.
HLANO. CALIFORNIA
•
FIN DE PAGO OIAS TRABAJADOS HORAS REGULAR HORAS OE CONTRACTO UNIDAD OE CONTRACTO UNIDAD DE BONUS SUELDO DE HORAS SUELOO DE CONTRACTO SUELDO OE BONUS SUELDO TOTALES . F. 1. C. A. S. D. 1. 1 UOTA DE JNION COMIDAS OEPOSITO *Y* REEMBOLSERO MISCELLANEOUS SUMA | CODIGO NOMBRE DE EMPLEADO \ FECHA NUMERO DE EMPLEADO NUMERO DE CHEQUE NETO
PERIOD ENDING DAYS WORKED REGULAR . HOURS PIECE WORK HOURS PIECE WORK UNITS BONUS UNITS REGULAR HOURLY EARNINGS PIECEWORK EARNINGS 80NUS EARNINGS GROSS EARNINGS ] E D U C T 1 O M 5 NAME OF EMPLOYEE DATE CLOCK NUMBER CHECK NUMBER AMOUNT j
F. 1. C. A. S. D. 1. i ; JNION ues a ESSMTS MEALS EQUIP. DEP. _ AN0 * REFUNDS O MISCELLANEOUS
AMOUNT CODE
AUC2\6& 6 48.00 58.465 210.72 210.72 9.27 24.1 £0 MANUEL ACEVEDO UG2\ 66 >C o flP 16,760
THIS IS A STATEMENT OF YOUR EARNINGS ANO PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS. DETACH BEFORE CASHING CHECK.
CODIGO:
(6) UNION DG CREOITO* FRESNO
(7) ASEGURANZA (0) UTIUDAD
(SOI I UNION OE CREOITO DE TRA8AJORES AGRlCULTO
CODE:
(6) CREDIT UNION - FRESNO
(7) INSURANCE UTILITIES
(SOI) CREDIT UNION • FARM WORKERS
Acevedo worked 48 hours, a 8-day week, and earned a total of $210.72. Deductions were for Social Security and Workmen's Compensation. Union dues of $3.50 were also deducted (a once-a-month deduction) plus a $1.00 contribution to the strike. Sr. Acevedo's check after deductions xoas for $194.84.
In addition, Schenley Industries contributed $4.80 to Sr. Acevedo's account in the'Health and Welfare Fund (see above). ____________


10/EL MALCRtADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
Letters
♦♦
♦♦
Editor,
Piedmontr'Oakland Bulletin Dear Sir:
Your "canned" editorial on "The Grapes Boycott" disturbs me. IM1 never understand why you so often print these handouts from special interest groups. Certainly you have the right to air your editorial viewpoint, but one would expect you to look a little before making such a blind leap as you did in regard to the farm workers.
I am going to Delano tomoi— row with a carload of foodstuffs for the families of the strikers; I have been there before; I shall go again. I have seen the picture first hand. How it is you fail to record-the fact that men have been brought in from Mexico to help break this strike of American citizens'* (Incidentally, they take their wages back to Mexico without paying income taxes in this country.)
I was surprised to find you quoting "The Packer" newspaper with its loaded words and phrases, sweeping generalities, and other tricks of the propaganda experts. This, thing you quote says that there are "some very wel1 known communists" on the side of the strikers. There are also some very.prominent bishops, particularly the Catholic Bishop right on the scene--and he is supported by the Fresno Council of Churches! Heavens, you have barely scratched one side of the surface, but you have accepted and thereby promoted a number of false statements. Please be a little more perceptive in the future; you can disagree with something without all the smearing and namecalling.
Sincerely,
Ted Wum
Oakland, California August 27, 1968'

Editor:
I have been wanting to write to you for some time, t am a family farmer with seven children. So far I have been able to hold on to my small farm. How much longer, who knows?
Having been a truck driver for many years I have come to know the problems of the migrant worker pretty well. I believe every American should earn his bread if he is able. In doing so he shall walk in the dignity bestowed upon him by God. He shall never be asked to bow his head in tribute to any state or man who would seek to enslave him.
In order tcrhave this dignity, labor must have collective bargaining and also the family farmer.
We need industry, labor, and the family farmer-hands joined in collective bargaining.
May we as fellow Christians and Americans work together for the greater Glory of God and a better America.
Yours truly,
Bernard J. Gronniger Elkland, Missouri
August 30, 1968
Sunset Magazine
Menlo Park, California
Gentlemen:.
Being much in support of California as you are, I feel your prominent article on .California's grapes and the use of them was in very poor taste considering the grape pickers who have suffered for three years now to obtain better working conditions. My family of eight has not eaten grapes for a solid year in support of these farm workers who up til now have been so exploited by California's landowners. To encourage your readers to purchase grapes and thus support the greedy grape growers was a mistake.
I would like to see in a subsequent issue a statement supporting the cause of the strikers to counteract the benefits the growers will reap by your article.
Sincerely,
(Mrs.) Barbara J. Leetak Northridge, California September 5, 1968
Larry Itliong Speaks Out
Mangga Kababayan:
I tong ating Welga naglng a-pat na taon na at sige parin. Kung kail an pa tayo mananalo hindt natin pa alam. Pero da-hil sa maramin hirap at mangga sacrfficlo na, sa mangga kababayan at mangga kasama natin na ibang lahi, hindi na maarin ihinto hangang hindi tayo mananalo.
Ang kinakailangan natin nga-yon ay sa pa pagguitan natin na magkakaisa tayo. limutin natin iyong nakaraan na di-prencia natin. Ang isipin natin. Ang isipin natin ay sa ihaharapin na panahon at kabu-tihan natin. Pumasok tayong lahat sa atin Union at dumalo tayo sa mi ting.
At kung maarl tumulong tayo sa ating mangagawa pala-kag na kabutihan, tumulong hanggan manalo tayo. Kung gusto kayo mag - donation nang kunting kwarta maaari din.
Kay malaki ang gastos sa pag-palakad sa Boycott. Sa hapon nang kada biernes mayron mi-ting tayo. Magda Io tayong la-hat para alam nating ang manga balita at palakad sa Welga. Huwag tayo mahiya o matakot man kay walang mag-disturbo sa atin. La long nasaya na itong mangga kababayan natin na nasa picket line kung makita tayo sa mi ting.
Kina kailangan narin ngayon na maipa kita natin sa mangga trabahoan natin na hindi tayo natatakot sa kanila. At maru-nong din tayo na mag - intindi ang ating katuwiran. At isapa maskailangan nila itong ating lakas at dunong sa panarabajo nating. Parang mayron tayong lakas at respeto mag kaisa tayo na ngayon.
Salamat sa inyong lahat.
Larry Itliong
As ist'ente Di rektor


Sunday, September 15, 1968, EL MALCRIADO/3
(actual size)
our NEW BUMPER STICKER/15 Inches long l/luminescent colors/5 for $1
S BOYCOTT GRAPES
Viva La Causa Button $1/ea.; 5/$3.75 Organizense Baza Button 50c/ea.
HueIga Delano Button $1/ea.; 5/$3.75 Boycott Grapes Bumpersticker 5/$l
order from: EL MALCRIADO, PO BOX 130, Delano, California 93215
name ___________________________ address______________________________________
city__________________________. state______________________ zip_______________


VEL MALCRIADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968
$1.65 MINIMUM UPHELD
• SACRAMENTO, September ]0--Women and minor8 working in California Agriculture must be paie $1.65 an hour minimum wage, the Third District Court of Appeal ruled in a 46 - page opinion issued today,
Justice Leonard Friedman ruled that the $1.65 minimum wage, ordered by the State Industrial Welfare Commission on February 1, 1968, was "justified as one applicable to California Industry generally. The Commission chose, as a matter of policy, to impose minimum rate parity between industry and agriculture." The court dissolved a number of injunctions and restraining orders obtained by growers to delay payment of the minimum, wage, The court demanded that growers begin to pay the $1.65 an hour minimum IMMEDIATELY, even if growers appeal the decision or try other legal tricks to avoid paying the wage.
The Court also ruled that women and minors who have worked between February 1 1968 up t.o the present, and were paid less than $1.65, can colw lect the difference in back wages,
The ruling also requires that women and minors must be paid tiem and a half when they work more than 8 hours a day, or more than 40 hours a week.
The State Industrial Welfare Commission had ruled last winter that $1.65 should be the minimum wage. Larry Itliong, Assistant Director of the United Farm Workers and a member of the Commission noted that It is almost impossible for a working woman to support herself on less than $1.65 an hour. "This is a rock-bottom minimum for the women to lead a decent life, and we see no reason why the wage should be lower for women working in agriculture than those working in industry,"Itliong said.
The fiery long-time organizer also noted that the California Grape and Tree Fruit League fought against the minimum wage and tried through court injunctions to avoid paying it. "These same growers claim in their propaganda that they
Continued on page 12
f
see page 12 for information on how* to collect back wages
EQUAL PAY FOR MEN?
The new state minimum wage of $1.65 is Just for women and minors, and does not cover men, according to the recent court decision. The Federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 says that there should not be discrimination between men and women. CRLA attorneys suggest that male farm workers ask their employers for the $1.65 wage. Tell your boss about the nmumun^waq^^fot^womer^
and tell him that it is illegal to pay men less than women for doing the same work. If your boss still refuses to pay you $1.65, contact the nearest CRLA office (McFarland, Modesto, Gilroy, Salinas, El Centro, Madera, Marysville, Santa Rosa, and Santa Maria), or the nearest UFWOC office (Lamont, Bakersfield, Delano, Par-lier, Livingston, Hollis-ter) for help.
The new minimum wage of $1,6$ an hour must be paid, regardless of the piece rate, â–  to all women and minors employed in farm labor=
CHAVEZ HOSPITALIZED
SAN JOSE, September 15—"Cesar Chavez, director of the U-nited Farm Workers Organizing Committee, is making satisfactory progress and will soon be out of the hospital,"announced Jerry Lackner, his personal physician. Chavez has been in the hospital in San Jose for two weeks for severe back pain that had almost paralyzed him. After release from the hospital, Chavez will have to continue physical therapy and exercises and eat a more balanced diet to completely regain his health, Dr. Lackner said.
He explained that the back injury was caused by lack of sufficient protein over an extended period of time, and
lack of proper exercises. Part of the problem can be traced to the 25-day fast that Chavez made last spring. As the muscles became weak, it put a strain on his back. The bones in his back bone began rubbing against each other, causing intense pain, so that Chavez was unable to move his back at all, the dofctor reported.
In the hospital, Chavez was put in traction, which stretches out the back and separates the bones, so that the disks and muscles have an opportunity to heal.
Messages and cards may be sent c/o Helen Chavez, Box 894 Delano, California 93215, Union officials report.
I


Sunday, September 15, 1968, EL MALCRIADO/5
Mayor of San FIrancisco Offers mediation
SAN FRANCISCO, September 6— Mayor Joseph Alioto said today his offer to mediate the dispute between the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO and California's grape growers is still open, despite unofficial rejections of his offer, according to San Francisco newspaper reports.
"There are some growers who are talking reason to the o-thers," Alioto was quoted as saying. "They ought to be willing to at least sit down and discuss the fight. We've had worse disputes between labor and management and they've been settled."
HOLLISTER D.A. vs.
U.S. SUPREME COURT
HOLLISTER, September .16—The UFWOC has demanded an apology from San Benito District Attorney Bernard McCullough, and dismissal of trespassing charg es against two Union members in a case that arose during a picket line in Hollister August 30. UFWOC members had begun an informational picket line in front of K ( S Market in Hollister, asking shoppers not to buy grapes, and two members of the Union, Francisco Uribe and Gilbert Tijerina, both 17 were arrested for trespassing.
"This was clearly an illegal arrest," charged UFWOC attorney David Averbuck. "And on top of. the arrests, the cops refused to let Uribe and Tijerina phone their parents or attorneys, and did not advise them of their constitutional rights.
Averbuck pointed out the famous Supreme Court decision of Amalgamated Food Employees U-nion Local #590 vs. Logan Valley Plaza, Inc., handed down on May 20, 1968, as establishing the right of people to picket stores either on the sidewalk or, if there is a shopping center or large parking lot, directly in front of the store entrance, But McCullough refused to recognize this decision and went ahead with trespass charges, -.which will be brought in Juvenile Court within 30 days. "This guy is trying to rewrite the Constitution," said Averbuck of the D.A. "But we'll fight him all the way to the Supreme Court, if necessary, to establish our legal right to picket.
Alioto publicly supported the demand that farm workers be given the right to collective bargaining.
Allan Grant, head of the California branch of the National Farm Bureau Federation, announced recently that the federation would not hold its 1972 convention in San Francisco because the mayor was supporting a proposed ordinance to prohibit the city's purchasing of non-union goods. Alioto labelled the Farm Bureau statement "almost childish."
The mayor said at a press conference that his offer of mediation, made a month ago, had been unofficially rejected by most growers, but that he had not received official replies^from any of them...
NEW YORK CITY, September 13--Huntington Hartford, 55-year-old heir to the ASP fortune, demonstrated with farm workers in their consumer boycott In New York City today. Hartford appeared at the picket line of the ASP general offices at 420 Lexington Ave. to show his support for the grape pickers' boycott of California table grapes.
Hartford said, "I came here to express my support for the boycott of California table grapes in the name of my late uncle, John Hartford. I specifically want to urge ASP to reconsider their policy of buying these grapes. In days past when my late uncle ran ASP, his relationship with his own workers, regardless Of their level of employment, was always excellent, In the memory of his own employment policy in his own excellent relationship with his employees, I hope ASP will cease to purchase table grapes."
KANSAS-MISSOURI BOYCOTT VICTORY
KANSAS CITY, September 4— ( Mayor tlus W. Davis of Kansas City, Missouri announced today that he was joining with Mayor Joseph H. McDowell of Kansas City, Kansas in calling on all citizens to boycott California grapes. Both mayors have called on city agencies to refrain from buying grapes, and both mayors have called on local citizens to support the efforts of the farm workers to win decent contracts and justice.
As a result of the mayors' statements and support from Churches, Unions, and citizens groups, both Kansas Cities are almost completely clean of grapes, reports Robert Bustos, 26-year old leader of the UFW 0C-efforts in Kansas and Missouri. Bustos is aided by Richard Allen, a member of the Migrant Ministry, and a seminary student from Connecticut. Bustos reports that Krogers is the only remaining chain in the twin-city.area still carrying grapes, but that even there, the newspaper, TV, and radio publicity have cut grape sales down to a trickle. Kansas City joins Boston and New York, other metropolitan cities where grape sales have been cut 75% or more, as a result of the boycott.
BOSTON CHAINS CLEAN OF SCAB CALIFORNIA TABLE GRAPES. . .
BOSTON, September 16—Last week National Tea and Star stores decided not to sell California grapes anymore. With the endorsement of the boycott by these two important chain stores, Boston is virtually closed to the sale of grapes. Marcos Mufioz, an organizer for the Union, had the most important part in this new stage of the boycott. With the help of eligious and civic groups, and local unions, Murioz made a very active campaign that taught the people of that city the goals of the boycott.
Art’s Automotive Service 1033 W. FRESNO ST., FRESNO. CALIF.
GENERAL ENGINE REPAIR • BRAKE SERVICE MOTOR TUNE-UP • TRANSMISSION OVERHAUL V^SjOUlP^
art Dominguez, owncr 405-9630
A&P heir
expresses support


6/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968
UFWOC SUIT CHARGES:
'GROWERS CONSPIRE WITH PHONEY UNION
BAKERSFIELD, September 11-Damages of $650,000 are asked in a suit filed by the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee against several grape growers and the scab Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association (AWFWA).
The suit charges violations of the Labor Code and what a-mounts to conspiracy to deny farm workers the right to organize.
Named in the suit are growers Jack Pandol, Giumarra Vineyards, the AWFWA, and two of its heads, Gilbert Rubio and Jose Mendoza.
UFWOC attorneys told EL MALCRIADO their suit was based in part on Section 1122 of the California Labor Code, which provides:
'â– Any person who organizes an employee group which is financed in whole or in part, interfered with, or dominated or controlled by the employer or employer association shall be liable to suit by any person who is injured thereby7 Said injured party shall recover the damages sustained by him and the costs of the suit."
UFWOC attorneys said the A-gricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association is "clearly a ‘company union,1 financed partly or totally by the growers, and created to harass and Intimidate UFWOC members."
"Agents of the AWFWA have performed numerous acts of violence, made threats, and in general acted maliciously and oppressively to subvert and undermine UFWOC‘s right to organize as guaranteed by Section 923 of the Labor Code."
It is expected that Pandol, the Giumarras, Rubio, Mendoza, and others will be called in to make sworn depositions a-bout the financing and activities of the AWFWA.
"We have proof that the AWFWA pays pickets up to $25 per day; Rubio and others have new cars, expense accounts, bank accounts... The AWFWA finances fiestas and b..rbecues and radio - TV advertising. Where is the money coming from'’ We allege Jack Pandol and the Giumarras are directly involved and, if that is true,
they and the AWFWA are breaking the law," one attorney said.
Delano's police chief has publicly stated that he is unable to protect Union members from these people, the attorney noted.
Among other charges, the complaint alleges that the AWFWA has engaged in violence, threats, and harassment of U-nion members and that this has seriously interfered with the right of workers to organize a union.
"In the absence of the federal rights granted by the National Labor Relations Act (from which farm workers are
excluded), agricultural employees who comprise the UFWOC must use the picket line and the boycott as the only tools with which to build their Union... As a result of the concerted violence, which the AWFWA has contributed to, the UFWOC was ’forced to abandon its picketing activity. This left UFWOC with only one tool--the boycott—with which to force the employees to the bargaining table," the complaint states.
UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen said Pandol and the Giumarras would be called in for depositions "in the near future."
COURT QUESTIONS POISON INJUNCTION
FRESNO, September 6—In a rare legal move, the Appellate Court in Fresno has demanded that the State Department of Agriculture and our "favorite" Judge J. Kelley Steele appear before it on October 16 and "show cause" why they should not allow UFWOC representatives to study public records dealing with poisons and dangerous chemicals used on grapes.
The case had Its origins on August 22 when Judge Steele of Bakersfield granted a temporary restraining order forbidding Kern County Agriculture Commissioner' Sheldon Morely from showing public records to UFWOC attorney Jerome Cohen. Cohen had specifically asked to see records dealing with the spraying and application of poisons and dangerous chemicals on grapes. "We are concerned about health and safety hazards that these types of chemicals might create for the grape workers," explained Cohen. "We want to know what is being used, so that we can protect the workers under contract with adequate safety
provisions."
Judge Steele and Morely took a different view, and acting on a petition hurriedly drawn up by Atwood Aviation. Company and other grower interests, issued the injunction sealing the public records. Atwood and Morely are clearly acting for the benefit of the big grape growers, Union officials charge. Atwood claims that the information on poisons used on grapes might be used In the grape boycott.
The Appellate Court hearing in Fresno will, in effect, be putting the injunction and Judge Steele on trial, demanding that the Judge explain why this injunction was granted. "And it is strange that, at this time, Judge Steele and the State Department of Agriculture are both being represented by the growers' and a-viation companies' lawyers," commented a spokesman for the UFWOC legal staff. Or is it really so strange that these three groups should all be teamed up together against the workers.
Cheers For New Cohen
BAKERSFIELD, September 13— Union attorney Jerome Cohen and his wife Mandy are the proud parents of a new baby girl, Laura, born Friday the
13th of September. It was a lucky day for Mrs. Cohen, who gave birth to the 10-pound baby in Bakersfield Memorial Hospital.


Sunday, September 15, 1968, EL MALCRIADO/11
CRANSTON CALLS FOR WORKERS’RIGHTS
LOS ANGELES, September 7--US Senate nominee Alan Cranston today placed the blame for the. United Farm Workers' consumer boycott of California table grapes squarely against "a few giant corporate grape growers whose stubborn refusal to bargain has made the boycott imperative."
Cranston's statement was made at a press conference after a tour which included the Woodvill Farm Labor Camp.
Cranston called for a four-point program "to bring a speedy end to this dispute and an early improvement in the entire economy of California, including an end tp the boycott through immediate agreement of both sides to sit down at the negotiating table."
The four-point program included (T) inclusion of farm workers within federal minimum wage legislation, (2) extension of the National Labor Relations Act to farm workers-, (3) a "review of the whole a-gricultural marketing process
A Confused Nixon Condemns Workers
SAN FRANCISCO, September 5~ Republican presidential candidate Richard M. "Tricky Dick" Nixon called the UFWOC boycott of California table grapes "unnecessary" today, because "we have laws on the books to protect workers who wish to organize. . .a National Labor Relations Board to impartially supervise the election of collective bargaining agents, and to safeguard the rights of oi— ganizers."
Union officials promptly pointed that Nixon is evidently unaware that national labor legislation does not protect farm workers.
Democratic candidate Hubert Humphrey and UFWOC officials have pointed out that the National Labor Relations Board does not have jurisdiction o-ver farm labor disputes, and that growers have repeatedly refused tp allow elections or collective bargaining with the farm worker's Union.
Nixon urged Humphrey to withdraw his support of the boycott. •
to insure that. . .the farm worker. . .gets a decent annual wage for hi.s labor, and (4) the agreement of growers to negotiations with the Union in order to end the boycptt.
Cranston noted that welfare costs are above the state a-verage in many San Joaquin Valley communities and that most of the welfare cases come from farm labor families."When farm workers are better paid, welfare costs will go down, one property tax burden will, be eased, and there will be more money to spend in the stores of Valley Communities," the candidate said.
He acknowledged that the boycott, which he supports, may have hurt some small growers. Cranston said he regretted this but that the "'corporate growers' switching of
labels and use of .false 'pick'ed by union1 labels left the Union no alternative but the boycott."
CARAVAN TO DELANO SAN FRANCISCO, September 15-A caravan of Huelga Supporters from the Bay Area to Delano is islated for Saturday, September •28, according to Pete Velasco of the Agricultural Support Committee. The Caravan will leave from the corner of 24th and Alabama, San Francisco, at 7 AM. Information is available from Velasco at 655-3256.
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12/EL MALCR1AD0, Sunday, September 15, 1968
$1.65 Wage...
Continued from page 7
pay $2.00 or $2.50 an. hour, but in fact they refuse to sign contracts with a $1.90 minimum and refuse to pay even the state minimum of $1.65," Itliong charged.
The September 10 decision enforcing the $1.65 minimum wage was a victory for the California Rural Legal Assistance, which had filed suit in behalf of two farm workers to force growers to pay the wage after its enforcement was enjoined. The farm workers are UFW0C member Judy Graham of Sutter County and Angelina Rivera of Stanislaus County.
CRLA was established two years ago to aid the poor, especially farm workers, with legal problems. "This is one of their most important victories," said Itliong, who a-long with Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez is a Board Member of CRLA. The organization was largely responsible recently for preventing Governor Ronald Reagan from destroying Medi-Cal, a program to provide assistance to the poor for medical care which they otherwise could not afford.
HOW TO Collect Your Back Wage
The Courts have ruled that California growers should have been paying women and minors $1.65 an hour since February 1 of this year. If you were getting only $1.40, for example, your employer owes you an additional 25 cents per hour for every hour that you have worked since February.
First, go to the grower and ask him for your back wages. Tell him that the courts were very clear in saying that he must pay $1.65. If he refuses to
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pay, warn him that you may have to take him to court. If he still refuses to pay, contact CRLA or the Union for help in filing a"small claims" case against the grower. Have your pay check stubs or work book available to prove how many hours you worked for the grower and how much he paid you. (This is a good example of the reason for saving old pay check stubs, and of keeping a record of how much you work and how' -much you are paid.)
OPEN LETTER TO THE GOVERNOR & GROWERS
turn QBQBfflDIBA&inFSF ©IF &IPIPILI11
By Jim Drake Administrative Assistant
As the boycott of California's grapes has tightened, the farmers have been reduced to giving monotonous squeaks, like mice with taiIs caught in a trap. Ronald Reagan and his favorite farmers, the Alan Boys (Grant and Mills) come out with pious phrases—"The boycott is evil, immoral, and illegal" they whine, in harmony. And the Great Stuffed Shirt, Martin Zani-novich bluster forth: "The boycott is an act of desperation." •
Evil and Immoral, Ronnie? Such a damning statement should be used with care. Are you saying that those who prefer apples to grapes are living in sin, forever condemned to hell0 That sort of thing could get you into'a lot-of trouble—damning cardinals, priests, nuns, rabbis, not to mention fellow Republicans, such as Mayor Lindsay in New York.City.
And .illegal0 Is this the new society you have in mind for us, Emperor Ronald: one in which those who choose not to eat grapes and publicize it are to be prosecuted7 Have we come to this, a society in which the governor and his rich
•farmer friends can determine our diets?
And as for the Acts of Desperation, great patron Martin, how could the people you have beaten to the ground engage in desperate acts now that • they have a union? During the days before the strike, before the boycott, there was desperation. But days of dispair are forever gone.
These enraged squawks are not going to make us vanish. Even now our brothers in far away cities are digging in for a long winter of boycott. Their children are in new schools and friends are providing warm clothing for the cold months ahead. They are committed to a long, hard struggle, and through the strike they have grown patient and experienced. They are not a-fraid of mice that roar.
Farmers, don't be deceived by false prophets in Sacramento. The public is not taken in by their shallow terms, such as immoral, illegal, evil, desperate. Witness your grape sales!
Remember, you brought this boycott on yourselves by refusing to talk to your workers. You can make it disappear in only one way...
NEGOTIATE, NOW!


_________________________Sunday, September 15, 1968, EL MALCRIADO/13
CLAPPING ILLEGAL IN COACHELLA?
COACHELLA—Four UFWOC supporters may spend 120 days In jail as the result of a decision announced Thursday, September 5 by Tom Cross, judge of the Coachella Justice Court Cross handed down the 120-day sentences after a Jury found James S. Caswell of Indio; Raul Loya, Indio High School teacher and president of the Mexican-American Political Association of Indio; Albert Figueroa of Blythe, a MAPA leader; and Thomas Kay, UFWOC organizer; guilty of disturbing a public assembly. The incident occurred on July 4 in Coachella, where Congressman John V. Tunney was delivering a speech.
The defendants told EL MAL-CRI ADO they had planned to picket Tunney for his failure to support the UFWOC boycott of California table grapes, but that when Tunney agreed to meet with them later in the day, the picket was cancelled.
During he course of Tunney*1 s speech, Figueroa raised a UFW 0C sign "so that Tunney would
Contracts in Ohio
OTTAWA, Ohto, September 8— Tomato pickers in Ohio won a historic victory this month as 20 farmers in Lucas and Ottawa counties signed contracts with the Farm Labor Organizing Committee.
Baldemar Velasquez, leader of FLOC, announced that the contracts call for a raise in wages from 15 cents to 16 cents per bucket of tomatoes, with an extra 1/2 cent incentive pay for transportation home if the worker stays until the end of the harvest in mid-October,
The contract also provides for a grievance procedure and growers agreed not to discriminate against Union members. FLOC is recognized as the exclusive recruiter and bargaining agent for the workers, and the contracts also cover conditions in the labor'camps and the quality of tomato picking.
The contracts were signed after a three-day strike.
Ted lorio, coordinator for the Union in Lucas County, commented, "We feel they are very equitable contracts."
know we were still there." The crowd began to applaud spontaneously when the sign was raised, Figueroa said.
About two weeks later the four men were arrested, accused of organizing a "clap-down" to drown out Tunney's speech, despite the fact, that Tunney aide Doug Wheland later said that the applause did not bother the speech.
American Civil Liberties U-nion attorney John Simon, who defended the four men, said the case would be appealed..
Caswell said the conviction was based on section 403 of the California Penal Code, which was passed in 1872.
The defendants were taken to Riverside County Jail in Indio but later released on $1,000 bail each pending the outcome of the appeal next
SACRAMENTO, September 7—The California Department of Agriculture has notified weights and measures officials in the State to tighten up on short weights in grape shipments, after a cradkdown by New York City inspectors,
A bulletin sent out by the California Department said, "In view of the very sensitive situation existing this year with respect to the sale of California Grapes in New York, we suggest that you call on the packers and shippers of grapes in your county and advise them of the situation and request that they be particularly careful in their packing practices so that short weight will no be a problem this year."
The chief inspector of New
month.
Caswell was one of the organizers of a march in . Palm Springs on Easter Sunday 1966, where UFWOC supporters tried to meet with Governor Edmund G. (Pat) Brown. Brown had refused to meet with farm workers who had marched to Sacramento from Delano to protest their working conditions, claiming he was going to spend the day in Palm Springs.
Principal witnesses against the defendants were the president of the Coachella Chamber of Commerce, the Chamber Secretary, City Manager Robert Mitchell, and Police Chief O'Neill.
A Mexican-American policeman, Arnold Jimenez, came all the way to Lamont to arrest Kay, Loya said.
York City has notified the growers that "any short weight containers of produce will be required to be reconditioned by being repacked to the marked net weight," the statement said.
Union officials observed that false information on grape boxes seems to be a chronic problem lately. Several suits were filed earlier this year charging the growers with mislabelling when the labels of non-boycotted grapes were used by Giumarra.
(The boycott was later extended to all California table grapes.)
HEARING ON LABEL SUIT SET FOR 23
DELANO, September 10—UFWOC charges against growers Bruno Dispoto, Sabovitch and Sons, John Kovacovitch and others for falsely labeling their grapes will be heard in San Francisco on Monday, September 23, according to Union General Counsel Jerome Cohen.
The $50 million suit alleges that the defendants falsely marked their grapes with Di Giorgio's label in an effort to mislead consumers into be-
lieving that the grapes were picked by workers under Union contract.
Since a certified strike exists on the ranches of all of the defendants, Cohen said, the complaint charges that these and other unspecified growers used the labels in a deliberate effort to confuse and mislead the public and break the consumer boycott of California grapes.
GROWERS WARNED ON SHORT WEIGHTS
i


1^/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968
Catholic Leaders Shun Grapes
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, September 1—Archbishop Robert Lucey of San Antonio has joined a lengthening list of Catholic priests, nuns, bishops, and archbishops who have voiced their support of the farm workers' consumer boycott of California grapes.
Archbishop Lucey endorsed the boycott and called bn Church institutions, schools, colleges, hospitals, and other Church - supported groups to join with him in shunning grapes, until California growers agree to negotiate with the Union and sign contracts for their workers.
Speaking of the grape pickers, Archbishop. Lucey said, "Their efforts to gain a voice in their employment, wages and working conditions have met with bitter opposition and hostility." The boycott is aimed at gaining for farm workers "the basic rights already freely enjoyed in other American industries," he said.
Archbishop James Casey of
Denver has urged Catholics in his archdiocese to refrain from buying grapes, as have Bishop John A Donovan of Toledo, Ohio and Archbishop Carl Alter of Cincinnati. The Michigan Catholic Conference, including all Catholic bishops in Michigan,unanimously backed the boycott. Sister Mary Co-rita of the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart in Los Angeles is a co-chairman of the Interfaith Coalition for the Grape Boycott. Priests, nuns, and laymen have been manning the picket lines from Boston to Santa Barbara.
The increasing support for the boycott from the Catholic Church in this country is especially meaningful for the Mexican-American and Filipino-American farm workers, most of whom are Catholics._ The Church is using its moral and its economic power to aid the farm workers, and in so doing puts itself in the forefront of the struggle for social justice in rural America.
Archbishop Backs Workers Rights
CINCINNATI—Archbishop Karl J. Alter of Cincinnati, Ohio has endorsed the farm workers' efforts to gain collective ,bargaining and a decent wage, according to a report from the San Francisco Diocese Monitor last week.
The archbishop's announcement was made three months after the Catholic bishops from the California dioceses asked Congress to apss legislation to extend coverage of the National Labor Relations Act to farm workers.
In his announcement, the Archbishop said, Grape workers are among the forgotten Americans suffering the privation and human indignity of poverty and social injustice."
"In a spirit of Christian charity and Justice we join the bishops of California in endorsing their cause."
The Archbishop also quoted from Vatican 111s Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity: "Wherever there are people in need of food and drink, clothing, housing, medicine, employment, education; wherever men lack the facilities necessary for living a truly human life...there Christian charity should seek them out and find them, console them with great solitude, and help them with appropriate relief."
National Council Takes Stand
HOUSTON, Texas, September 13—The Board of the National Council of Churches overwhelmingly endorsed the boycott of California grapes today, and called on "all Christians and men of good will" to join with them in supporting the farm workers' struggle for justice. Though the National Council,of Churches had never before taken a stand on the UFWOC boycotts, and remained technically neutral in the struggles to bring Schen.ley, DiGiorgio, and Perelli - Minetti to the bar-baining table, the group strongly urged action on the grape boycott and promised to publicize the boycott among the millions- of Christians affiliated with the NCC.
Statement by Sister Mary Corrita, Co-Chairman of the Inter-Faith Coalition for the Grape Boycott.
Although I have to be a-way from Los Angeles on August lZy I want to make known my whole - hearted support for Cesar Chavez and the Delano grape strikers. I am proud to serve as a co-chairman of the "Intepfaith Coalition for the Grape Boycott. " My art is intended to be an affirmation of life itself and of our solidarity with all our brothers no matter what their kind or condition. It is that same impulse that leads me to support those farm workers who are giving of themselves in this important non-violent struggle for dignity and for a more Oust and human future. T recognize that a boycott, though non-violents causes much economic disruption. This disruption is not necessary and it can end quickly if only agricultural employers will recognize the worth of their workers and bargain with them as men.


Sunday, September 15, 1968, EL MALCRIADO/15
CRANSTON SQUELCHES 'THREAT’ FROM RIGHTTO-WORK GROUP
LOS ANGELES, September 10— U.S. Senate nominee Alan Cranston today answered a threatening letter from a California so-called right to work organization by promising he would work "with all the zeal I have to combat this hypocritical anti-labor scheme which is a threat not only to all organized labor but to the health of the country's economy. ,
Speaking at a Los Angeles Statler Hilton Hotel reception for labor editors and officials throughout Southern California, Cranston said:
"I have been saving this communication for your edification. It came on a letter from "Californians for Right to Work," with offices in Oakland and in Whittier, and it warned of dire political consequences to me if I should fall under the influence of—, and I quote--'A handful of irresponsible labor union professionals. . .who view compulsory unionism as a tool to extract countless sums of money from unwilling workers."'
Cranston said he noted "with irony" the fact that the orga-
nization apparently was so completely uninformed about "my union views and my knowledge of labor problems that it would believe I might swallow such juvenile propaganda."
The goal of "right to work" legislation, Cranston said, is of course to destroy unions and thereby break the power of organized workers to bargain successfully in their own be-halfl
"Thankfully, we have no such law in California," he said, "which is a paramount reason why wages and working condi-
tions have not suffered here as they have in every one of the nineteen states where 'right to work' legislation has become law."
The 'Right to Work' Organization has the support of many California growers who are seeking to destroy the growing power of the UFWOC. Delano iGrower Jack Pandol Ts Secretary Treasurer of the 'Californians for Right to W<7rk.' The 'Right to Work' laws are just one more trick used by the bosses to prevent the workers from building a strong union.
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Full Text

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I Cour>t Questions Poison Injunction. ... Special Benefits Fund Near-s Completion. c:rm:ston caUs for Y!or>ker-s 1 Rights . .6 . 6 . 8 11 • 14 1968 El Malcriado says La Huelga it was n o surprise to see the numerous pants in last Sunday's long march down Market Street from Dolores Park to City .Hall. ute to the oppression of farm workers. Many . mont hs ago, on another boycott, the manager of a Mayfair market in Oxnard was res Ponsible for similar acts of violence,. Kathy Murguia calls. On the home front, a man who runs a business on Main Street in Delano made a $100 contributJon to the Union. Some of us from Delano ac ... com'panied Assistant DirectOr Lal-ry It I long to the Bay Area for the event, and after tQe rally on the steps of -City a picket 1rne at Mayfair Market on the corner of Geary . and Webster . ins Lupe and Kathy Our Cover: "El Peon Acasillado11 Murguia_ ... Nava impressed. Us with Woodcut by Arturo Garcia .. , their well organized lE EVERY 'TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR. NAME-nombre _________ ,English_ Espa.nol CITYciudad STATE-estado ____ ZIP

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State Fail' Sacl'Cl11lento passed out infonnation on the st'Pike and grope boycott to all visitol's to the Kem County exhibit= Federal Plot to Bust Boycott WASHINGTON, September 15--Grape exports to South Viet Nam rose from $32,000 in value in 1965 to $214,000 in 1967 and an estimated $500,000 in 1968 , according to statistics complied by a UFWOC researcher in Washington, D.C. Almost all of these grapes wer e purchased by the Federal Government or its agen"cies for Americans living or stati o ned in South Viet Nam. Viet Nam is the third largest importer of California grapes. The statistics raise the fear t hat once again the Federal Government may act to break the strike and crush the farm workers1 movement. In opening the border to unlimited "immigration11 f rom Mexico during the Texas and Coachella Valley strikes, the Justice Department and the Federal Government dealt a death blow to the efforts to force grow ers to the bargaining table through traditional striking and picket 1 ine activity. Now, through government purchasing, the government may be del iberately seeking to break the consumer boycott of Ca I i forn i a grapes, which is proving increasingly effective throughout the country. NEW SUPPORT FOR GRAPE STRIKERS DELANO, September 13--UFWOC Assistant Director Larry itl i: ong reports that cictive supg "rape s has been "assured by" three new group\. Gene Navarro, president of the Seattle cannery 1-lorkers Union in Seattle also pledged the support of his group, lt-1 iong said. The Filipino-American Poli t ical Association (FAPA) with headquarters in San Francisco has asked its members to pa ,r ticipate fully in support of the boycott. Emil Herediais president of national group; UFWOC Vic e President Phillip Vera Cruz is president of the Delano chapter. a reminder from CREDIT UNION .. The American Gl FORUM passed a resolution at its national convention in early August supporting two important goa 1 s of the United Farm Workers Or ganizing Committee, according to an article i n the Forum1s newspaper, the Fot>Umeel'. The resolution "petitioned the Congre9s of the United States to extend the Nat iona 1 labor R e l ations Act to cover far m workers so that they may have the protection as well as the restraints inherent in that law and asked the Department of Justice to deny entry into the United States to aliens on green card visas if those aliens are engaged on any far m where a strike is in progress as certified by the U S Department of labor. " The G l FORUM i s a national organization of Mexican-American veterans. ELECTIONS "AT PAUL MASSON Elections to select t h e ranch convnittee at the Soledad Ranch of the Pau 1 Masson Company, were held recently, Tori bio Salbado was elected President, with 25 votes in h i s favor. Jose Serrano was na med ViceP resident with 1 8 votes; secretary, Homovi a Vel ia with 17 votes; and sargeant-at -arms, Esteban Ochinag 15 votes. The electi o n s were held i n a democratic spirit and its results represent the workers1 wi11, according to UFHOC1s assistant director, larry lt1 iong. Paul Masson signed a collective bargaining agreemen t with the worker s two weeks ago. the SAVE NOW FOR MONTHS FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P . O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215 OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER

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8/EL MALCR 1 ADO, Sunday, .September 15, 1968 Special Benefits Fund Nears C pletion 1 FRESNO, September 4--The Board of Trustees of J is building up credits in his the Farm 1-lorkers Special Benefits Fund met today company pays), After he has and seemed close to agreement on many major is-1 number of hours, he and his sues, according to LeRoy" Chatfield, administra-' ically covered by the insur-tor for the Special Benefits Fund, fl[t was a ; i months or 6 months. If he very good meeting,11 told EL MALCRIADO. "1 before accumulating enough think both Union and Company representatives are credit for •,rage, he can pay what he lacks eager to get this program into Operation. We 0,. n,.l, i shou l d have the program finished befor:e the " • " " pruning starts, by November, t hope. union rancherJ! hi.lld also presumably be covered Representing the Union at the meeting were Ceby the insu) L d program i f they paid the 10 sar Chavez, Larry ltliong, Phillip Vera Cruz, cents per h l the fund.) and Chatfield. Companies represented at the If the pr . : this type of 11bank account" meeting were SChenley, DiGiorgio, Perelli-Minet-system, it 's1rable seasonal to buil,d ti, Gallo, and Christian Brothers. Almaden and ubyp the Novitiate Vineyards did not send representa"'" iP• ,_, , " , , .. tives to thi s meeting, but were represented by through the f ' !year, the other growers. Permanent , tffers, who build up more credit 1 v: 1 n 1 fl: 1 r a wi to pay 10 cents an hour per worker into the Spejust discuss!: ;hese things right now," Chatcia! Benefits Fund, field said, 'ft' Union members will make 'the "Nothing i s final, yet," Chatfield stressed, final p how to handle some of these "but in general, we agreed that coverage should ideas. What1 \re trying to do is work out a include the worker and his wife (o . r husband) and program that ?!give maximum coverage to sea'child( eri. We estimate tha.t the companies will sonal lltheir families, and be fair to contribute about $10 a week for the average permanent wo ;and those with low medical ex-worker, which would be ' enough to set up an in-penses." V I surance program covering the worker and his fam-Many still be worked out. I'JIily for most normal medical expenses. We 1-10uld Giorgio contl ' b ooly Hve oeots oo hooc f .o' i i children's sicknesses and the normal medical ex-same number o worked. There will proba-penses of the family. It looks like there will bly not bee money in the fund for any pen-not be enough money in the fund to pay for hos-sion f'rogram i is time. Some kind of agree-pitalization costs in most cases. Most families ment with tors may be worked out, where don1t need t his coverage and the worker himself they wil l han 1p1 Union members for reason-' is covered for injuries suffered on the job by able rates. ij 1 r doctors increase charges when a i 1 a 1 i in R i :i 1 dental or eye care at the outset. program, if t H built up enough credit in milies live in Mexico, has not been solved. =MAJOR AIM OF THE SPECIAL BENEFITS FUND--heaz.th in-for our. our chi ldt>en. Chatfield invisions t h e plan workin' g 1 ike a their the problem about insurance There are many problems involved in setting up such a program, and that is why it has taken so long to reach agreement. Now that there is agreement on the basic parts of the program, the hard parts, the details and those problems unique to farm workers must be worked out. 11By November, the program should be completed," Chatfield noted, "and some farm workers will at last be covered by the type of insurance that most industrial workers have had for years." of bank Each _hour that a worker works un-for workers w [ back to Mexico, or whose faan INC suELoo F _ 1. c. A . I s . D•A S TRA B AJADOS ,= .. I=,_=O.=ll. t I E ' 0 r N AME O F EMPLOYEE AMOUNT 210.12 9.27 I __ ...L I _ _ _ L_/ __ / _ MANUEL ACEVEDO . uco1"' n,o4 1o.(oo :.194.a4 TH•S ISA STATEMENTOFYOUREARNINGS AND PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS OETA.CH BEFORE C ASHING CIked 48 hour's, 6-day and earned a total of $210.72. coo 1c;o: I Deduct'l-ons were for Soct-al Secur1,ty and Wor>kmen's Compensation . Uni on <&J UN>ON <>E CROOTOFRESNO IGI CREO,Y'UN,ONFRUNO dueS o_f libuted $4.80 to Sr. Ace vedo ' " account 1-11 tlw HeaZth and Welfare (see above). '

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10/El MALCRI AOO, _ Sunday, September 15, 1968 Editor, Piedmo nt-.."Oa k l and Bulletin Dear Sir: Your "canned" editorial on "The Grapes Boycoti11 disturbs me. I ' . 1 1 never understa nd w h y you so often print t hese hand out s f rom special interest g roups. Certainly yo u ha v e the righ t to a i r your ed itorial viewpoint, but one woul d ex pect you to look a little be fore making such a blind leap as you did In regard t o the farm workers. I am going t o Del a n o tomor row with a carload of food stuffs for th. e families of the strikers; I have been there be fore; I shall go again. 1 have seen the picture first h and, How i t is you fail to record' the fact t hat men have been brou ght in from Mexico to he l p break this strike of American c itizens" (Incidentally, they take their wage s back to Mex i co without paying i ncome taxes in this country.) Edi tor: I have been wanting to wr i te to you for some time. I a m a fam ily farmer with seven chil dren . So far I have been able to hold on t o my small farm. How much longer , who knows? H aving been a truck driver for m an y year s I have come to know the probl ems of the mi grant wor ke r _pretty well. I be lieve every American should earn his bread if he i S able. I n doing so he shall wal k In the d i gnity bestowed upon h f m b y God. H e s hall never be asked to bow his head in tri bute t o any state o r mcin who would seek t o enslave him . I n order tcf"have this digni t y , labor must have collective bargaini ng and also the family farmer. We need industry, labor, a n d the fam ily farmer-hands joined in C'OJlective bar'"gai"ning. . ' Hay we as fel low Christ ians and Americans work together for the greater Glory of God and a better Plnerica. Yours truly; Be1'11al'd J . " Gr>onniger> E I k 1 and, Missouri A u g us t 30, 1 968 Swzset Magazine Menlo Pilrk, Califo r nia Gentlemen: Being much in support of Cali f ornia as you are, I feel you r prominent a rticl e on .Ca lifornia 1 s grapes and the use of them was in very poor tast e considering the grape picker s who have suffered for three ,years now to obtain better working conditions. My family of eight has not eaten g rapes for a solid year in s upport of these farm worker s who up ti 1 now hav e been so e x p loited by Cal ifornia1s l an downers. T o encourage you r readers to p ur chase grapes a n d thu s s up po r t t h e g reedy grape growers w a s a 1 would like to see in a sub sequent issue a statement sup porting t he cause of the strikers to counteract the benefits the growers w i 1 1 reap by your article. Sincerely, fMr>s. J Barbara J. Leatak Northridge, California September 5, 1968 I w a s surprised to find you quoting "The Packer" ne wspa per with its loaded words and ph rases_ , sweeping general i ties, and othe r tricks of the propaganda expert s . This. thing you quote says t hat there are " some ver y wel l k nown communists11 on the side of the strikers. There are also some very.prominent bishops, particu lar.y the Cathol"ic Bishop right on the scene--and he i s s u ppo rted by the Fresno Coun cil of Churches! Heavens, you have barely scratched one side of the s urface, b u t yo u have accepted and thereby p r omote d a n umber of false statements. Please be a 1 ittle more per ceptive in the future; you can d i sagree with something with out all the smearing and na me calling. Larry ltliong Speaks Out Oak I and, Ca 1 iforn i a 27, 19 68' Sincerely, Ted Wunn M angg a Kababayan: I t ong ating Welga naging a pat na taon na a t sige parln. Kung ka i 1 an pa tayo manana 1 o hindi nat in pa ala m . Pero da hil s a maramln h irap at mangga sacrif icio na, sa mangga ka ba bayan at m a ngga kasama nat in na ibang lahi, hindi na maarin ihinto h angang hi ndi tayo ma nanalo. Ang ki naka i 1 angan nat in nga yon ay sa pa paggu i tan na t i n n a magkakaisa tayo. limutin natin iyong nakaraan n a di prencia natin. Ang isipin na tin. Ang isipin natln ay sa : haharapin na panahon at kabu ' t i han natin. Pumasok tayon g lahat sa atin Uni on at du malo tayo sa mit i ng . At kung maari tum ulon g tayo sa ating man g agawa pa la kag na kabutihan, tumulong hanggan mana lo tayo. Kung gusto kay o mag -donatio n na ng kunting kwarta maaari din. K a y malaki ang gastos sa pag palakad sa Boycott. Sa hapon nang ka da b iernes mayron m i ting tayo . Magdala tayong !a hat para a lam nating ang manga bal ita at palakad sa Welga. Huwag tayo mahiy a o matakot man kay walang magd i s turbo sa atin. nasaya na itong mangga ka babayan natin nil nasa picket li11e kung ita tayo sa miting. kai Iangan narin ngayon na maipa kita na t in sa m angga trabat"loa n natin na hindi tayo natatakot sa kanila. At m a r u no ng din tayo na mag -intlndi ang ating katuwi ran. A t isapa maskai I ang a n ni Ia itong ating takas at dunong sa pan a rabajo nating . Paran g mayron tayong lakas at respeto ka isa tayo na ngayon . Sa lamat sa i n yong lahat. Larry Itz.iong 1 Asisfente O l rektor

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S unday, Septembe r 15, 1968, E L M A LCR I A DD/3 BUTT OM, BUTTON, big, beautiful . size) w H o on FLUORESCENT RED $1.00 each VwANTSA RAZA! _HueZga Delano Button $ 1/ea. ; 5 /$3.75 _ Boyaott Grapes B u m p e rsti cke r 5/$1 order from : EL MALCRIADD, PO BOX 130, Del a no, C alifornia 93215 name addr ess----------1 city state zi

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4/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968 $1.65 MINIMUM UPHElD SACRAMENTO, September 10--Wo men and minors working in Cal.ifornia Agriculture must be paie $1.65 an hour minimum IJ1age_, t he Third District C ourt of Appeal ruled in a 46 page opinion issued today , Justice Leonard Friedman ruled that the $1.65 minimum wage, ordered by the State In dustrial Wei fare Commission on February 1, 1968, was 11justi . fied as one applicabl e to Ca lifornia Indu stry generally. The Commission chose, as a matter of pol icy, to impose minimum rate parity between industry and agriculture,11 The court dissolved a number of injunctions and restraining orders obtained by growers to delay payment of the minimum . wage, The court demanded that growers begin t O pay the $1.65 an hour minimu m IMMEDI ATELY, even if growers appeal the decision or try other legal tricks to avoid pa y ing the wage. The Court also ruled that women and minors who have worked between F ebruary 1 196 8 up t_o the present, and were paid less than $1.65, can collect the difference in back wages, The ru 1 i ng a 1 so requires that women and minors must be paid t i em and a ha 1 f when they work more than 8 hours a day, or more than 40 hours a week. The Stat' e Indu strial Wei fare Corrmission had ruled last winter th<1t $1.65 should be the minimum Wage. Larry ltliong, Assistant Director of the United Farm Worker s and a member of the COfiYI'IissiOn noted that it is a l most impossible for a working woman to support herself on less than $1.65 an hour. 11This i s a rock-bottom minimum for the women to lead a decent 1 i fe, and we see no reason why the wage should be lower f o r women working in agriculture than those working in 1ndustry,111tl long said. The fiery lorig-time organizer a 1 so noted that the Ca.l i fern i a Grape and Tree Fruit League fought against the minimum wage and tried through court injunctions to avoid paying it, "These same growers claim in their propaganda that they Continued on page 12 EQUAL PAY FOR MEN? The new state minimum wage of $1.65 is just for women and mino rs, and does not cover men, accordin g "tt"'"the rece'nt court decision. The Federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 says that there should not be discrimination between men and women. CRLA attorneys suggest that male farm workers ask their employ ers for the $1.65 wage. Tell your boss about the minimum wqge for women, and tell him that it is illegal t o pay men less than women for doing the same work. If your boss st iII refuses to pay you $1.65, contact the neares t CRLA office (McFarland, Modesto, Gi 1 roy, Salinas, El Centro, Madera, Marysvi 11 e, Santa Rosa, and Santa Maria), or the nearest UFWOC office (Lamont, Bakersfield, Delano, Par I ier, Livingston, Hoi! ister) for he l p . see page 1 2 for information on how to co I I ect bock wages The new minimum wage of $1,65 an hour must be paid, rogard-Zeaa of the piece Nte, to all !.lOnen and minora emp toyed in farm labor= SAN JOSE, September 15--11C e sar Chavez, director of the U nited Farm Workers Organizing committee, is making satisfac tor Y p r ogress and wi II soon b e out of the 'hospital,11announced Jerry Lackner, his personal physician. Chavez has been in the hospital in San Jose for two weeks for severe back pain that had almost paralyzed him. After release from the hospita I, Chavez wi 11 have to continue phys i ca I therapy and ex ercises and eat a more balanced diet to completely regain his health, Dr. Lackner said. He explained that the back injury was caused by lack of sufficient protein ove r an ex tended period of time, and lack of proper exercises. Part of the p r ob lem can be traced to the 25-day fast that Chavez made last spring. As the muscles became weak, it put a strain on his back. The bone s in his back bone began rubbing against each other, causing intense pain, so that Chavez was unable to move his back at all, the doCtor reported. I n the hospital, Chavez was put in traction, which stretches out the back and separates the bones, so that the disks and muse 1 es have an opportunity to hea 1 . Messages and cards may be sent c/o Helen Chavez, Box 89lj Delano , California 93215, Union officials report. , ,

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Sunday, September 15, 1968, EL HALCRIAD0/5 Mayor of San F r rancisco Offers mediation KANSAS-MISSOURI . BOYCOTT VICTORY SAN FRANCISCO, September. 6-1'\ayor Joseph A I ioto sai d today his offer to mediate the dis p ute between the United F arm Workers Organizing Coomi ttee, AFL-CIO and California' s grape growers is sti II open, despite unofficial rejections of his offer, according to San Francisco newspaper reports. "There are some growers who are talking reason to the o thers,'' AI ioto was quoted as saying. "They ought to be willing to at least sit down and discuss the fight, We've had worse disputes between labor and management and they 1 ve been settled." HOLLI STER D.A. vs. U .S. SUPREME <..OURT HOLLISTER, September .16--The UFWOC has demanded an apology from San Benito District Ates against two Unio n members in a case that arose during a picket I ine in Hoi I ister Aug ust 30. UF\IOC members had be gun an informational picket 1 ine In front of K & S Market in Holll_ster, asking shoppers not to buy grapes, and two members of the Union, Francis co Uribe and Gilbert TIJerina, both 17 were arrested for trespassing. "This was clearly an Illegal arrest," charged UFWOC attorney David Averbuck. "And on top of the arrests, the cops refused to let Uribe and Tijerina phone their parents or attorneys, a n d did not advise them of their constitutional rights. Aver buck pointed out the fa mous Supreme Court decision of Ama 1 gamated Food Employees U nion local # 590 vs. logan Valley P laza, Inc . , handed down on Hay 20, 1968, as establishing the right of people to picket stores either on the sidewalk or, if there is a shoppio.g center or large parking lot, directly in front of the store entrance, But McCullough refused to recognize this decision and went ahead with trespass charges, which wi 11 be brought in Juvenile Court within 30 days. "This guy is trying tQ rewrite the Constitution," said Averbuck of the D.A. "But we' 11 fight him all the way to the Supreme Court, if necessary, to esta blish our-legal right to picket. A I iota pub\ icly supported t . he demand that farm workers be given t he right to collective bargaining. Allan Grant, head of the Ca lifornia branch of the Nat ional Farm Bureau Federation, announced recently th
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6/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968 UFWOC SUIT CHARGES: " .GROWERS CONSPIRE WITH PHONEY UNION' BAKERSFIELD, September 11-0amages of $650,000 a r e asked in a suit fil e d by the United Farm Workers Organizing Com mittee against several grape growers and the scab Agricultural Workers Fr eedom to Work Association (AWFWA), The suit violations of the Labor Code and what amounts to conspiracy to deny farm worker s the right to orga{lize. Named in the suit a r e growers Jack Pando\, Giumarra Vineyards, the AIJFWA, and of its G i I bert Rubio and Jose Mendoza, UFWOC attorneys told EL MAL CRIADO their suit was based in part on Section 1122 of the Ca I i fern i a Labor Code, which provides: -'IA.ny pe:rson who o:rganizes an employee g:roup whiah is fi _ nanced in whcte o:r in par>t , inte:rfe:red with, o:r dominated o:r aont:rolt.ed by the employeP OP employe:r assoaiation shall be tiable to suit by any peP, son who is inju:red theroeby : Said inju:red pa:rty shall :reaove:r the damages sustained by him and the aosts of the suit. H UFWOC attorneys said the,Ag ricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association is "clearly a 'com pa ny unIon,' financed partl y or totally by the growers, and created to harass and intimidate UFWOC members." "Agents of the AWFWA have performed numerous acts of violence, made threats, and in general acted maliciously. and oppressively to subvert and u nde r mine Uf\.IOC's right to organize as guaranteed by Sec tion 923 of the Labor Code . " I t is expected that Pan "dol, the Giumar ras, Rubio, Mendoza, and others will be called in to make sworn depositions about the financing and activities of the AWFWA. "We have proof that the AWFWA pays pickets up to S25 per day; Rubio and others have oew cars, expense accounts, bank accounts ..• T he AWFWA finances fiestas and b .. rbecues and radioTV advertising. Where is the money coming from " We allege Jack Pando\ and the Glumarras are directly involved and, if that is true, they and the AWFWA are b reak i ng the law," o ne attorney said, Delano' s pol ice chief has pub! icly stated that he is unable to protect Union member s from these people, the attor ney noted. Among other charges, the complaint al.leges that the AWFWA has engaged in violence, threats, and haraSsment of U nion members and that this has seriousl y interfered with the r ight of workers to organize a union. "In the absence of the feder.al rights. granted by the Na t ional Labor Relations Act (from which farm workers are excluded), agricultur a . l employees who comprise the UFWOC m ust use the picket 1 ine and the boycott as the on 1 y too 1 s with which to bu ild their Union ... As a result of the concerted v i o lence, which the AWFWA has contributed to, the UFWOC was 'forced to abandon its picke.ting activity. This left UFWOC with only one tool-the boycott--with which to force the employees to the bargaining table," the com p laint states. Uf\.IOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen said Pando \ and the Giumarras would be called in for 'depositions "in the near future." COURT QUESTIONS POISON INJUNCTION. FRESNO, September 6--1 n a rare legal move, the Appellate Court in Fresn o has demanded that the State D "epartment' of Agriculture andour "favorite" Judge _J. Ke] ley Steele appear before it o n October 16 and 11show cause'' why they shoul d -not allow un.roc ' representa-tives to study pub! tc .records dealing with"poisot)s and dan.: gerous cheinical s used grapes. The case had its or.igins on August 22 when Judge 1Steele of Bakersfield g ranted a tempora ry restraining order forbid ding Kern County Agriculture Corrwnissioner ' Sheldon Mere l y from Showing pub I ic records to UFWOC attorney Jerome Cohen. Cohen had spec if i ca 11 y asked to seerecords dealing with the spraying and application of poisons and danger o u s chemicals on grapes. "We are concerned about health and safety hazards that these types of chemicals might create for the grape workers," explained Co hen. ' '\Je want to know what is being used, so that we can protect the workers under contract with adequate safety provisions." Judge S tee I e and More I y took a different view, a n d acting on a petition hurriedly drawn up by Atwood Aviation . Company and other grower interests, issued the injunction sealing the pub I i c records. Atwood and MerelY are clearly acting for the benefit of the big grape growers, Urli on officials charge. AtwooC! claims that the information on poisons used on grapeS .might be used in the grape boycott. The Appel late Cour t hearing in Fresno will, in effect, be putting the injunction and i this injunction was granted. "And it is strange that at thi s Judge Steel; and t he State Department of Agriculture are both being represented by the growers1 a n d a v iation companies1 l awyers,11 COIMiented a spokesman for the UFWOC legal staff. Or is it really so strange t hat these three groups should all be teamed up together against the workers. Cheers For.; New Cohen BAKERSFIELD, September 1 3 Union attorney Jerome Cohen and his wife Mandy are the proud parents of a new baby _girl, Laura, born Friday the 13th of September , It was a lu"cky day for Mrs. Cohen, who gave birth to the 10-pound baby i n Bakersfiel d Memorial Hospital.

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NSTON CALLS FOR WORKERS'. Rl . SAN FRANCISCO, .September 15-A caravan of Huelga Supporters = from the Bay Area to Delano is jslated for Saturday, September .28, according to Pete Velasc;o of the Agricultural Support Committee. The Caravan will leave , from the corner of 24th and Alabama, San Francisco, at 7 AM. Information iS avai I able from Velasco at 655-3256. LOS ANGELES, September Senate nominee Alan Cranston today placed the blame .for the United Farm Workers' consumer boycott of California table grapes squarely against 11a few giant corporate grape growers whose stubborn refusal to bargain has made the boycott Imperative." I ter a tour which included the I Woodvill Farm Labo r Camp. Cranston called for a fourpoint program "to bring a speedy end to this dispute and an early improvement in the entire economy of Ca 1 i fern i a, including an end t(:) the bOy cott through irrmediate agr.eement of both sides to s 1 t down at the negot i'ating table." The four•point program ineluded (r) inclusion of fann workers within federal minimum wage legislation, (2) extension of the National Labor Re lations Act to farm workers , (3) a "review of the whole agricultural marketing process A Confused Nixon Condemns Workers SAN FRANCISCO, September 5Republ ican presidential candidate Richard M. "Tricky Dick" Nixon called the UFWDC boycott of California table grapes "unnecessary" today, because "we have 1 aws on the books to protect workers who wish to o rganize. .a National Labor Relations Board to impartially supervi.se the election of collective bargaining agents, and to safeguard the rights of organizers." Union officials promptly pointed that Nixon is evidently unaware that national labor legislation does not protect farm workers. Democratic candidate Hubert Humphrey and UFWOC officials have pointed out that the National labor Relations Board does not jurisdiction over farm labor disputes, and that growers have repeatedly refused to allow elections or collective bargaining with the farm worker's Union. Nixon urged Humphrey to withdraw his support of the boycott. to insure that. : .the farm worker. , .gets a decent annual wage for hi.s labor, and (4) the agreement of growers to negotiations with the Union iA order to. end the boyc(;>tt. Cranston .that welfare costs are above the state average in many San Joaquin Valley corrrnunities and that most of the welfare cases come from farm labor fam i 1 ies."When farm workers are better paid, welfare costs will go down, one property tax burden wi 11 be eased, and there wi 11 be m qre money to spend in the stores of Valley Communities," the cand i daie said, He acknowledged that the boycott, which he supports, rna")! have hurt some small growers. Cra"nSton said hC regretted this but that the "1 cor porate growers' switching of labels and Use of ,false 'pick'ed by union' labels left the Union no alternative but the boycott." Vivo lo Causa y El Progreso {30ltltte4ef (J' a ?lteuUtFresno California ,, FRESNO 1022 "6" STREET Services avai I able everywhere. .No mat ter where you 1 ive, our price is the same .death notices in newspapers .3nd on are included. . w e can make arranqements Telephone 237-3532 lA Bakeries Egg B"!'ead and Pastries AU Kinds of Donuts Cakes for aU Occasions French Br>ead We have a Za"l'ge Se Zec tion of SpanishJfagazines, Books , and Rec ords.

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12/El MALCRIADO, , Sunday, September 15, 1968 $L65 Wage ... Continued ft'Om page ? pay $2.00 or $2.50 an hour , but in fact they refuse to sign contracts with a $1.90 m inimum a n d refuse to pay even the state minimum of $1.65," ltl iong char()ed. HOW TO Collect Your Back Wage The September 10 dec ision enforcin g the $1.65 minimum wage was a victory for the Ca lifornia Rural Legal Assistance, which had filed suit in beha 1 f of two farm workers to force growers to pay t h e wage after its e nforcemen t was en joined. The farm worker s are UFWOC member Judy Graham of Sutter County and Angel ina Rivera of Stanislaus Count y . The Courts have ruled that California growers s hou 1 d have been paying women a n d minors $1.65 an hour since February 1 of this year. If you were getting only $1.40, for examp 1 e, your emp 1 oyer you an additional 25 cents per hour for every hour that you have worked since February. pay, warn him that you may have to take him to court. If he still refuses to pay, contact CRLA or the Union for help in filing a"small claims" case against the grower, Have your pay check stubs or work book available to prove how many hours you worked for the grower and how much he paid you. (This is a good example of the reason for saving old pay check stubs, and of keeping a record of how much you work and how -much you are paid.) CRLA w a s established two years ago to aid the poor, especially farm workers, with legal problems. 11This is one of their most important vic tories," said ltliong, who along with Dolores Huerta a n d Cesar Chavez is a Soard Member of CRLA. The organization was largely responsibl e recentl y for preventing Governor Ronald Reagan from destroying Medi-Cal, a program to provide assistance to the poor for medical care which they otherwise could not afford. First, go to the grower and ask him for your back wages. Te l l him that the courts very clear in saying that he must pay $1.65. If he refuses to PHONES: KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE car •••• life •••• fire Office, 485-0650 Residence, 266-1349 3222 East Mayfair Blvd. Mayfair Shopping Center Fresno, Calif. 93703 Mr. Leap will be -ln the UFWOCServiceCenter (105Astf.t Oe1ano) every Wednesday to serve Unfon members. OPEN LETTER TO THE GOVERNOR & GROWERS By Jim Drak e Administrative Assistant As the boycott of Cal ifornia's grapes has tightened, the farmers have been reduced to giving monotonous squeaks, like mice with tails caught in a trap. Ronald Reagan and h i s favorite farmers, the Alan Boys (Grant and Mills) come out with p ious phrases-" The boycott is evil , immoral, a n d illegal11 they whine, in harmony. And the Great Stuffed Shirt, Martin Zaninovich blUster forth: 11The boycott is an act of desperation." • Evil and lm:noral, Ronnie? Such a damning statement s hould be used with care. Are you saying that those w h o prefer apples to grapes are living in sin, forever condemned to hell " That sort of thing cou l d get you into a lot of trouble--damning cardinals, Priests, nuns, rabbis, not to mention fe I 1 ow Repub 1 i cans, such a s Mayor Lindsay in New York . City. And illegal? Is this the new society you have in mind for us, Emperor Ronald: one in which those w h o choose not to eat grapes and pub! icize it a .re to be prosecute d? H ave we come to this, a society in which t h e governor and his rich farmer friends can determine our diets7 And as 'for the Acts of Desperation, great patron Marti n , , how could t h e people you have beaten to the ground engage in desperate acts now that they have a union ? During the days before the strike, before the boycott, there was desperation. But days of dispair are forever gone. These enraged squawks are not going to make us vanish. Even now our brothers in far away cities are digging i n for a long winter of boycott. Their children are in new schools and friends are providi ng warm clothing for t h e cold months ahead. They are committed to a long, hard struggle, and through the strike they have grown patient and experienced. They are not afraid of mice that roar. Farmers, don1 t be deceived by false prophets in Sacramento. The pub 1 i c is not taken in by their shallow terms, such as immoral, illegal, evil, desperate. Witness your grape sales! Remember, you brought this boycott on yourselves by refusing to talk to your workers. You can make it disappear in only one way ... NEGOTIATE, NOW!

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Sunday, September 15, 1968, El HALCRIAD0/1 3 CLAPPING ILLEGAL IN COACHELLA? COACHELL A--Four UF\mC supporters may spend 120 days in jail as the result of a decision announced Thursday, Sep tember 5 by Tom Cross, judge of the Coachella Justice Court. Cross handed down the 120day sentences after a jury foun d James s. Caswell of In dio; Raul loya, In dio Hig h Schoo I teacher and president of the Mexican-American Pol itical Assoc iation of Indio; Albert Figueroa of Blythe, a HAPA leader; and Thomas Kay, UFWOC organizer; guilty of disturbing a pub! ic assembly. The incident occurred on July 4 in Coachella, where Congressma n John V, Tunney was deliver ing a speech, The defendants told EL HAL CRIADO they had planned to picket Tunney for his failure t o support the UFWOC boycott of California table grapes, but that when Tunney agreed to meet with them later in the day, the picket was cancelled, During he course of T unney'1s speech, Figueroa raised a OC s i gn 11so that Tunney would Contracts in Ohi o OTTAWA, Ohio, September 8 Tomat o pickers in Ohio won a historic victor y this month as 20 farmers in Lucas and Ottawa counties signed contracts w ith the F arm labor Organizing Com mittee, Baldemar Velasquez, leader of FLOC, announced that the contracts call for a raise in wages f rom 15 cents to 1 6 cents per bucket of tomatoes, with an extra 1/2 cen t incentive. pay for t ransportation home if the worker stays unti 1 the end o f the harvest in mid October, The contract also provides for a grievance procedure and growers agreed not to discri minate against Union members. FLOC i s recognized as the exclusive recruiter and bargaining agent for the workers, and the contracts also cover conditions in the labor•camps and the quality of tomato picking. The contracts were signed after a three-day strike. Ted Iorio, coordinator for the Unio n in Lucas County, corrwnented, 11We feel they are very contracts.11 know we were sti 11 there." The c rowd began to applaud spontaneously when the sign was raised, Figueroa said. About two weeks later the four men wer e arrested, accused of organizing a "clapdown" to drown out Tunney1s speech, despite the fact that Tunney aide Doug Wheland later said that the applause d id not bother the speech. American Civil Liberties Union John Simon, who defended the four men, said the case wquld be appealed. Caswell said the conviction was based on section 403 Of the California Penal Code, which was passed in 1872. The defendants were taken to .Rivers i de County Ja i I in Indio but later released on $1,000 bai 1 each P.ending the o utcome of the appeal next month . Caswe 11 was one of the organizers of a march in _Palm Springs on Easter Sunday 1966, where UFWOC supporters tried to meet with Governor Edmund G. (Pat) Brown. Brown had refused to meet with farm work e r s who had marched to Sacra mento from Oelano to protest their working conditions, claiming he was going to spend the day i n Pal m Springs. Principal witnesses agai.nst the defendants were the pres i dent of the Coachella Chamber of Commerce, the Chamber Sec retary, City Manager Robert Mitchell, and Pol ice Chief 0 1 -Nei II . A Mexican-American pol iceman, A rn o l d Jimenez, came all the way to Lamont to arrest Kay, Loya said. HEARING ON LABEL SUIT SET FOR 23 DELANO, September 10--UFWOC charges against growers Bruno Oi spoto, Sabo"vi tch and Sons , John Kovacov itch and others for falsely lube! ing their grapes wi 11 be heard in San Francisco on Monday, Sep tember 23, according to Union General Counsel Jerome Cohen . The $50 million suit alleges that the defendants falSely marked their g r apes with Oi Giorgio1s label in an effort to mislead consumers into be 1 ieving that the grapes wer e picked by workers under Union contract. S ince a certified strike exIsts on the ranches of all of the defendants, Cohen said, the complaint charges that these and other unspecified growers used the label s in a deliberate effort to confuse and mislead the pub! ic and break t h e consumer boycott of Cal Jfornia grapes. GROWERS WARNED ON SHORT WEIGHT : s SACRAMENTO, September 7--The Ca 1 i forn i a Oepa rtment of Ag r iculture has notified weights and measures officials in the State to tighten up on short weights in grape shipmen ts, after a cradkdown by New York City inspectors, A bulletin sent out by the Ca 1 iforn i a Department said, 111n view of the very sensitive situation existing this year with respect to the sale of Califor nia Grapes in New York , we suggest that you call on the packers and shippers of g rapes in you r county and advise them of the situation and request that they be particularly careful in their packing practices so that short weight wi I I no be a problem this year." The chief i .nspector of New York City has notified the growers that "any short weight containers of produce will be required to be reconditioned by being repacked to the marked net weight," the statement said. Union officials observed that false information on grape boxes seems to be a chronic problem lately. Several suits were .filed earlier this year charg1ng the growers with mis ing when the labels of non-boycotted g rapes used by Giumarra. (The boycott was I ater extended to all California table grapes.)

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14/El MALCRI ADO, Sunday, September 15, 1968 Catholic Leaders Shun Grapes SAN ANTON I 0, TEXAS, Septem. ber \--Archbis hop Robert Lucey of San Antonio has joined a lengthening 1 ist of Cat hoi ic priests, nuns, bishops, and archbishops who have voiced their support of the farm wor'kers' corisumer boycott of California grapes, Archbishop Lucey endorsed the boycott and ca !led bn Church institutions, schools, colleges, hospitals, and other Church supported groups to join with him in shunning grapes, until California grow ers agree to negotiate with the Union and sign contracts fOr their workers, Speaking of the grape pick ers, Archbishop. Lucey said, 11Thei r efforts to gain a voice in their emp 1 oyment, wages and working conditions have met with bitter opposition and hostility." The boycott is aimed at gaining for farm workers ''the basic rights al ready freely enjoyed in other American industries," he said. Archbishop James Casey of Denver has urged Cat hoi ics in his archdiocese to refrain from buying grapes, as have Bishop John A Donovan of To ledo, Ohio and ArchbishOp Carl Alter of Cincinnati. The Mi chigan Catha! ic Conference, including all Catholic bishops in Michigan,unanimously backed the boycott. Sister Mary Co rita of the Sisters of the Im maculate Heart in los Angeles is a co-chairman of t he Inter faith Coal it ion for the Grape Boycott. Priests, .nuns, and laymen have been manning the picket I ines• from Boston to Santa Barbara. The increasing support for the boycott from the Catholic Church in this country is"es pecially meaningful for the Mexican-American and Fi 1 American farm -workers, most of whom are Catholics. T he Church is using its moral " and its ec onomic power to aid the farm workers, and in so doing puts itself in the forefront of the struggle for social justice in rural America. Statement by Sister Mary Corrita, Co-Chairman of the Inter Faith Coal it ion for the Grape Boycott. Although I have to be a!Jay f"rom Los Angeles on August 13, I !Jant to make kno!Jn my whole hearted support foP Cesa r Chavez and the Delano grape strikers. I am proud to serve as a co-chairman of the "Intt>-;rfaith Coalition for the Gt>ape Boycott." My at>t is intended to be an affirmation of life itself and of oUt' solidarity with aU our bt>others no matter tJhat theit> kind or condi tion. It is that scone impulse that leads me to support those farm workers who are giving of themse Zves in . this important nOn-violent struggle for dignity and for a more just and hwnan futUJ"'e. r r>ecognize that a boycott, though non ... violent, causes much economic disruption. This disruption is not necessary and it can end i{uickly if only agricultural employers mzz recOgnize the worth of theit> tJrkers and bargain liiith them as men. Archbishop Backs Workers Rights CINCINNATI--Archbishop Karl J. "Alter of Cincinnati, Ohio has endorsed the farm workers 1 efforts to gain collective ,bargaining and a decent wage, accOrding to a report from the San Francisco Diocese Monitor last week. The archbishop 1 s announce ment was made three months af ter the Catholic bishops from the Cal ifo.rnia dioceses asked Congress to apss legislation to extend coverage of the Nationa! Labor Relations Act to farm workers. In his announcement, the Archbishop said, Grape work ers are among the forgotten Americans suffering the priva tion and human indignitY of poverty and social i njustice." "In a. spirit of Christian charity and justice we join the bishops of California in endorsing their cause.11 The Archbishop a 1 so quoted from Vatican ll's Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity: "Wherever there are people in need of food and drink, cloth ing, housing, medicine, em ployment, education; wherever men lack the facilities neces sary for 1 iving a truly human life ... there Christian charity should seek them out and find them, console them with great solitude, and help them with appropriate rei ief." Notional Council ' Takes Stand HOUSTON, Texas, September 13--The Board of the National Counci 1 of Churches overwhelm ingly endorsed the boycott of Ca I i forn i a grapes today, and called on "all Christians and men of good will11 to join with them in supporting the farm workers' struggle for justice, Though the National Council of Churches ha d never before en a stand on the UFWOC boy cotts, and remained technical ly neutral in the struggles to bring Schen.ley, DiGiorgio, and Perell i -Minetti to the bar baining table, the group strongly urged action on the grape boycott and promised to pub I icize the boycott among the millions of Chr'istians affiliated With the NCC.

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Sunday, September 15, 1 968 , EL MALCRI A .00/15 CRANSTON SQUELCHES 'THREAT' FROM RIGHT-TO-WORK GROUP LOS ANGELES, September 10-U.S . Se nate nominee A l an Cran ston to.day answered a threatening letter from a Cal ifornfa l so-calle d right to work cir ga 1 [ nization b y promising he would 1 work a l l the zeal I hav e , 1 to combat thi s hypocritica l tl, anti -labor scheme which is a l threat n o t o n l y to all orga n i zed labor but to the health of the cou ntry1s economy. Speaking at a Los A ngeles Statler Hilton Hotel reception for l abo r editors and officials throughout Southern Ca l iforn!a, Cranston said: ! ( 111 h a ve been sav ing thi s com :u munic ation for your edifica tion. It came on a lette r ! •frori1 ''Californians for Right I t o Work,11 with offices in Oak land a n d in Whittier , and it of dire political conru and I quote-I A h and f u 1 o f ! D i rresponsible labor union p ro'I t ract cou ntless s ums of money ,) from unwilling workers.'" J. Cra nston said he noted "with J irony" the fact tnat the orga1 [! nizati on apparentl y was so completely uni nformed about 11my union v iews and my knowledge of labor p rob lems that it would be lieve I might swallow s uch j uvenile propaganda." The goa l of "right to work " legislation, Cranston said , is of cou rse to destroy unions an d thereby b reak the power of o rganized work e r s t o bargai n successf ul l y i n their own behalf. "Thankfully, we h ave no such law i n California," he said, "which is a paramount reason why wages and con di-t ions have n o t suffered here as they ha ve i n ever y one of the nineteen states where 'right to work' legislatio n has become law. " The 'Righ t to Work' Organization has the support of many California g rowers who are seeking to destroy the growing power o f t h e UFWOC. Delano i Grower Jack Pando ! Is Secretar y Treasurer of the 'Califor nians for Right t o W<1rk.' T h e 'Right t o Work' laws are jus t one mor e trick used by the bosses to prevent the workers from bui a strong . un ion. DELANO I W. A. Thompson i i : 1 , , ' I I , , I ' ' I , , ' I I I!, l i i \ i refuses to sign a contract with his drivers DO NOT BUY COORS, FALSTAFF OR COLT 45 BEERS HELP THE TEAMSTERS ACHIEVE JUSTICE (paid advertisement)

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