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El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 13

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 13
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Photo by George Ballis

Epifanio Camacho
t
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wmomm
ElMalcriado (m)
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER V V
**5®s' in English
Volume 11, Number 12 Delano, California Friday, November 1, 1968


in this issue
Delano:
UFWOC for Humphrey.
Delano:
Scabs face $650,000 suit. ......
Puerto Rico:
.W I T C H E S' ? . .
Texas:
Rangers on trial. .
Los Angeles:
LA blacks protest oppression. . . .
San Francisco:
Petition demands NLRA. ......
Canada:
Pickets challenge a train-...........
1-1*
15
9
EL MALCRIADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker, is published twice monthly by -the UNITED FARMWORKERS ORfiANIZINfi COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in the United States and its possessions are $3-50 per year, and foreiqn, Including Canada and Mexico, US $5.00.
*â– >' members of UFWOC,
LIBRARY
Jdia.701 7S3V777'
no, California 9321$.
Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215.
For advertising rates, contact Federico Chavez at (805) 725«1337» or the mailing ad-ress listed above.
that old
IMpARTlAL
JUSTICE
mmzz
BY ANTONIO 0RENDAIN
“The law is impartial!”
Please do not tell me that a-gain, my stomach hurts from my laughing so much.
These two pictures show how impartial die cops are.
A police sergeant was telling me how impartial they were, when that guy in the picture showed up. Then the sergeant ordered him to photograph all the people in our picket line.
The cop started taking pictures immediately, and to be even more impartial, accepted an invitation of the store manager and started taking our pictures from inside the store.
In the second picture, we show him relaxing and satisfied with his difficult mission. He took pictures of all the women, children and men in our non-violent picket line.
So that is what they call im-parciality.
EL MALCRIADO P.0. BOX 130 'DELANO, CA 93215
More and more people are finding out that ai subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to. keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don’t be left out--send in this coupon todayl
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS' FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English Espanol____
ADDRESS-dom ic i1io_ CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
Don't Buy
El'.Romano Grande is watching you.
ft


EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968/3
UFWOC for Humphrey
Senator, in rural areas of the state. Valley, Salinas valley, and San Ben-concentrating on the San Joaquin ito County.
WIRTZ VISITS CHAVEZ
DELANO, October 19—The United Farm Workers Organizing Committee voted overwhelmingly this week to support Hubert Humphrey for President of the United States. In a series of elections held at union ranches throughout the state during early October, Humphrey had the support of over 90 per cent of those workers who expressed a preference. George Wallace came in second, edging out Nixon for the handful of votes not going to Humphrey.
A large contingent of Union members also volunteered to campaign for Humphrey during the last ten days of the elction. The farm workers' main efforts will be to send a large group of volunteers to work in the Mexican-American barrios of East Los Angeles, UFWOC members will also spearhead drives for votes for Humphrey and Alan Cranston, whom the Union endorsed for
BY JAIME REYES SANCHEZ
DELANO, October 18—U.S. Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz visited Cesar Chavez at his home in Delano today. The two discussed ways of stopping die illegal use of green card immigrants as strike breakers.
Wirtz, who came to Delano especially to talk to Chavez, said he was not aware that many Mexican nationals visited the country on temporary 72-hour visas. UFWOC officials have charged for a long time that persons holding such shortterm permits are hired by growers for farm work.
Wirtz said 19,000 illegals were apprehended in the fields of Ari-
zona and California during the first nine months of 1968.
The secretary of labor added that “maybe the growers should be made responsible for the people they hire. I realize it cannot be an absolute responsibility, but a check should be made and there should be penalties if a check is not made by the growers before hiring immigrant workers.”
During die conversation, Chavez said several times that UFWOC is not opposed to Mexican nationals coming to die United States with immigration visas (green cards), but, he said, “a distinction should be made between those who come to Continued on page 4.
"THIS MAN HAS SHOWN CONSISTENT CONCERN FOR THE FARM WORKERS’ PROBLEMS. WE ARE PROUD TO ENDORSE HIM, AND URGE HIS ELECTION. WE ARE MOST ANXIOUS TO SEE THE DEFEAT OF MAX RAFFERTY, WHOSE CANDIDACY REPRESENTS ONE OF THE MOST SERIOUS THREATS THE FARMWORKERS HAVE YET ENCOUNTERED."
Bedridden Cesar Chavez discusses politics with Alan Cranston.
Vote for MM (U
FRIEND OF THE FARM WORKER
__ __________(Paid Advertisement)
CHAVEZ ENDORSES ALAN CRANSTON
FOLLOWING UNANIMOUS ENDORSEMENT OF DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE ALAN CRANSTON FOR U.S. SENATE BY UFWOC, CESAR CHAVEZ SAID DURING A VISIT WITH CRANSTON AT HIS HOME, THURSDAY, OCTOBER I0:


SCAB CLIQUE FACES $650,000 SUIT
SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIF., October 28—Jose Mendoza, sometime shoe salesman, radio announcer, fired OEO employee, and officer of the on-again, off-again Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association was in for a small surprise tonight.
â–  He showed up for a debate at the San Luis Obispo campus of California State Polytechnic College (Cal Poly) and was promptly served with a UFWOC complaintwhich asks $650,000 damages for his Union-busting actibities.
The papers were served by Jane Brown, who had gone to San Luis to take the place of the Rev. James Drake, administrative assistant to
Cesar Chavez. Drake was originally slated to speak to a group of students, but was unable to attend.
As the discussion between Mrs. Brown, representing UFWOC, and Mendoza, representing die growers and Tio Tacos, continued, it soon became obvious to many observers that most of those assembled had not intention of listening to any useful discussion
Several hundred students, many of them agriculture majors and the children of growers, hooted and booed as Mrs. Brown attempted to speak.
One man, who claimed to be a farm worker who could pick 15 boxes of table grapes per hour
(a physical impossibility--the average is three-four boxes) marched up on the stage to harangue the UFWOC representatives without objection from the chairman, a student who by this time was seated next to Mendoza holding a scab bumper sticker in his hands.
The papers Mrs. Brown served on Mendoza are part of the legal action which the United Farm Workers attorneys are taking against the AWFWA, which allegedly violates State laws which prohibit the organizing of workers by "unions” which are financed or controlled by the employers.
Mendoza recently announced on die radio that the AWFWA was being dissolved. At the San Luis meeting he told die students "harassment by federal labor and immigration officials” was responsible for the dissolution of die organization.
Mendoza said at the meeting Monday night he had "other ideas” about the reasons for Chavez's recent confinement to bed, but declined to make specific charges. Hie 41-year-old director of UFWOC was hospitalized for weeks with severe back trouble.
WIRTZ...
Continued from page 3. the U.S. to live and work and those who cross the border only to work a short time in die United States and return to Mexico."
“Many of those who come from Nuevo Leon and Chihuahua even own farms there,” Chavez said. "They are workers here and employers over there."
Wirtz said the boycott has helped to make people aware that many workers in this country do not even enjoy the advantages of collective bargaining. “Chavez and the Union have done more for collective bargaining in this country than I have done this year,” Wirtz commented.
He said he would ask the cooperation of the Department of Justice in correcting some of die problems which face the Union.
Jose Mendoza3 anti-union agent3 appears in costume at a UFWOC rally in McFarland. Mendoza3 who looks like a clown3 waves flags3 yells and screams. Here he hums a paper flag with a hammer & sickle on it.
H
i


EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1; 1968/5
323. Calavcra of the Female Dandy
October was the month of ghosts and skeletons and witchcraft. And if you're one of those skeptics who says that all of that is kids' stuff, read this shocking expose of how witchcraft was used to control these poor workers...
w ITCHES/
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO—Add "witchcraft" to the reasons an employer can think up for objecting to an election won by a union.
The regional director for the National Labor Relations Board found the charge so unusual that he made public a “white paper" on witchcraft filed here by General Cigars de Utardo along with objections to a representation election won by the Machinists in die mountain village of Hato Rey.
The cigar firm wants the election set aside. It asked the NLRB to hold hearings into such mysterious goings-on.
For example, the company charged that a female employe who was an IAM leader came to work one morning with a bottle containing a “magic potion which would cast a spell on the employes.” The potion, she reportedly said, had been prepared by a remarkable "espiri-tista” or sorcerer with magical powers. Smelling it or rubbing a bit on the forehead and neck would have the effect of "nullifying the will of the employes” to vote in any
other way than for the IAM, the employer charged.
The company cited odier unusual happenings; "exactly the minute that the election began, a heavy rain started to fall and the skies turned black;” "some employes felt terribly ill while in the process of voting, but the illness disappeared after they voted;” others reported that "a short time after they left the voting area they just didn’t know which way they had voted.”
Summing up, the company said the “laboratoryconditions” required by the NLRB for a valid election were “completely destroyed” by the occult shenanigans. Attached to its list of objections was a 13-page report on the history and practice of witchcraft in Latin lands.
The Machinists’ members greeted a reading of the charges “with great hilarity and derision." They told the NLRB they won fair and square.
Not once, said IAM Rep. Juan Maldonado, did he ride a broom from San Juan to Hato Rey. He always drove a Ford, he claimed.
CHAVEZ IS IMPROVING
DELANO, Ocotber 26—Cesar Chavez, Director of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee is slowly recovering from the painful back injuries that have kept him in bed for the last two months.
Chavez attended the regular Friday union meeting and gave a forceful talk to the members, and stayed for the showing of the movie “What Harvest for the Reaper?” Though walking without a cane or assistance, Chavez moved slowly and with obvious effort.
The UFW OC Director has been staying at home since he left the hospital in late September. Peggy McGivern, the Union’s registered nurse, has been helping the Chavez family in caring for him.
Grapemobile on the Prowl
Special report from the San Francisco Bay Area:
The Grapemobile continues to prowl the streets of the East Bay in search of scabby grapes from the notorious San Joaquin Valley. Equipped with two huge loudspeakers, a loan from the Contra Costa Labor Council, and a carful of eagle-eyed huelguistas with picket signs at the ready, the Grape Patrol zeroes in on stores that still carry scab grapes and quickly educates the unwary public in song and words about the three-year-old grape strike.
Roy Valdez and Irene Terrazas were instrumental in cleaning up East Oakland and Fruitvale, while Pat Bryan, Gayle Garbers, and Can-dido Feliciano did the job in Berkeley. .


6/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968
w TEXAS RANGERS
. BROWNSVILLE, 'rEXAS, October 22—The trial of the Texas Rangers on charges filed by United Farm Workers organizers in south Texas was slated to resume on Tuesday, October 22 in Brownsville.
The trial, which began on june 11 and later recessed, is being conducted by a three-judge panel in the U. S. District Court, where a challenge to six Texas statutes in being presented by the Union.
The statutes, which gover mass picketing, disturbing the peace, use of abusive language, and obstruction of public roads, were allegedly used by the Rangers last year to snuff out a farm workers’ strike directed against Starr County melon growers.
Between May 11 and June 1 of 1967, 43 strikers were arrested on ciminal charges. Most of the cases have never come to trial.
At the time the strike began, some workers were earning as low as 65 cents per hour for agricultural labor in die area.
At times, trains carrying scab melons were "guarded” by cops with machine guns mounted on railroad cars. The Texas Rangers were out in force in Rio Grande City, center of the strike area, driving "unmarked” cars easily identifiable by their license plates, which begin with the letters RKK.
A. Y. Allee, captain of die Rangers, reports directly to the governor of Texas. He and other rangers, haveddenied allegations of brutality and "strike-breaking” made by strikers;
Judge Reynaldo G. Garza of Brownsville, one of the trial judges, said the trial was being resumed for the presentation of oral arguments by attorneys.
Other judges are John R. Brown of New Orleans and Woodrow Seals of Houston. Garza is justice of the District Court in Brownsville.
Captain Allee and the Rangers have
been accused of several beatings, including those of Magdaleno Dimas and Benny Rodriguez, both Starr. County strikers.
Six Rangers and six Starr County officials are named defendants
HIDALGO COUNTY, Texas, October 25—The Hidalgo County Chapter of the Political Association of Spanish Speaking Organizations (PASO) unanimously passed a resolution condemning Richard Nixon, Republican candidate for President, for his support of the California grape growers and his opposition to the efforts of the United Farm Workers to gain a better living for farm workers.
Speakers at the PASO meeting noted that the majority of grape pickers are Mexican-Americans.
Discrimination against farm workers, exclusion of farm workers from the protection of national labor laws, and the low wages and deplorable conditions in farm labor have been a major cause in keeping Mexican Americans in poverty,
ON TRIAL
in the suit, which charges conspiracy to deny UFWOC members their constitutional rights and challenges the constitutionality of the Texas anti-labor laws under which they were arrested.
they said. By siding with the growers, Nixon has taken a clear stand against the farm workers and the Mexican-American people.
The group also voted to support Hubert Humphrey for President. Abel Ochoa of Edcouch, leader of the Valley group, noted that while many members were not enthusiastic for Humphrey, and had serious criticisms of both President Johnson and the Democratic Party, especially in Texas, the group was unanimous in agreeing that Nixon and Wallace were much worse than Humphrey.
PASO is also urging the election of Republican Paul Eggers as Governor. PASO noted the anti-labor record of Lt. Governor Preston Smith, the Democratic candidate,as a major reason to vote Republican this year in Texas.
EL MALCRIADO has published a special 32 page booklet on the farm workers strike in Texas. The book-. let, “SONS OF ZAPATA", with over 50 photographs, gives a shocking look at the conditions of life and work in Texas, and chronicles the heroic struggles of the Union during 1966 and 1967 to bring justice to that arid and hostile land. The strike succeeded in winning the-immediate demand of $1.25 an. hour. But the struggle to build a union and bring true justice to South Texas has made painfully slow progress. Read of the victory and defeat, the hopes and dreams, of these Sons of Zapata._______________
SONS OF ZAPATA...
75 P.A.S.O. DENOUNCES NIXON


EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968/7
Growers3 confident that they are above the lccw3 refuse to pay the new $1.65 minimum wage. Now the City of Delano has a $1.00 an hour wage. J. Lewis photo
HIGH WAGES IN DELANO?
tif n
DINUBA, CALIF.—“The advice of the California Grape and Tree Fruit League and other farmers’ service organizations to their members has been ‘to make no changes in their payroll calculations in spite of the Court of Appeals opinion upholding die Industrial Welfare Commission's orders governing wages and hours for women and minors as agricultural workers,” according to a recent newsletter of die Central California Farmers Association.
The “advice” amounts to telling growers what tiiey want to hear: "To hell with the law of the State. You can pay women and minors any damn thing you please."
Farm workers are not the only ones who suffer from a refusal by employers to pay the minimum wage. See the story on the City of Delano’s wages, appearing on this page Of EL MALCRIADO.
CITY TO PAY $1.00 AN HOUR
by Justicia Ganaremos DELANO, October 23—The City of Delano may be violating the State minimum wage law, EL MALCRIADO has learned.
Despite a State law guaranteeing wages of $1.65 an hour for women, and $1.35 an hour for male and female minors under 18, die City Council hired two new female employees Monday night, October 21, at die rate of $1 per hour. The hiring was done on the recommendation of City Manager Gerald D. Minford, who suggested the hiring and the $1 wage in a memorandum dated October 21.
While it is not known if die two new employees, Diana Bernido and Jennie Velasco, are minors, an official of die State Department of
Industrial Welfare told EL MALCRIADO Wednesday tiiat $1 per hour would be illegal whetiier they are minors or not.
Minford said the two were hired as part-time "recreation aides” for which the salary range is $1-$1.20 per hour.
He said he did not know how many odier female employees were receiving $1 an hour, but diat he. assumed there were odiers.
“The job is not very hard,” he said, and “our whole recreation program would fall apart if we had to pay $1.65," the city manager told EL MALCRIADO in a telephone interview Wednesday.
Asked if the wages were a violation of the State minimum wage law for women and minors, Minford
said he did not know. “Your question has piqued my curiosity though, and I will check into the matter,” he added.
According to the Industrial Welfare Department official, municipal employees are not exempt from the minimum wage, and women must be paid $1.35 or $1.65, depending on whetiier or not they are over 18 years of age.
City Clerk FayC. Short confirmed that Minford's recommendation was accepted by the City Council and officially passed as a resolution on Monday night.
Minford said he will check into the matter, but in the meantime, it appears that the City of Delano is, and has been, violating the law of the state.


a ns
otest„Scab Grape Train
8/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 19&8
INJUNCTIONS FAIL TO SLOW BOYCOTT
Injuctions prohibiting picketing at docks and markets in San Francisco and Los Angeles, respectively, filed by growers, shippers and chain stores, have fallen leagues short of their intent to legally prohibit UFWOC demonstrators from leafletting and picketing.
In San Francisco, growers and shippers obtained a temporary restraining order restricting picketing to within 50 yards of the dock area.
Growers complained that demonstrators were blocking the entrance to the docks. Union official have repudiated this claim, pointing out that it was the scab drivers who were creating hazzards. One of the truckers ran into Herman Gallegos a non-union member on the picket line recently.
UFWOC attorney Jerome Cohen said that "no one from the union was notified about the injunction hearing and there were no UF'WOC representatives there.”
However at an October 18 hearing, in which Cohen explained the purpose of the picketing, and appealed the injunction, Judge Eyman of the Superior Court of San Francisco limited the force of the injunction, allowing two pickets to be placed 15 feet on either side of each entrance to the docks.
"In addition, the court is presently determining if pickets will be allowed to demonstrate on the docks,” according to attorney David Aver-buck.
In Los Angeles, an injuction prohibiting Union picketing was issued at the request of 17 different chain stores on October 23. The following day the injuction was appealed and the judge ruled that four pickets could be placed at store entrances, four at store driveways, and that a bullhorn could be used 25 feet from the store.
Fred Ross and Joe Serda, UFWOC organizers in L.A., feel that the injunction order will be easy to comply with, as it still permits a good number of pickets.
The Facts About INFLATi|ON
You know the old saw about unions being inflationary. Here are some interesting statistics from the Wall Street Journal.
Prices have risen most rapidly over the past ten, years in the following areas: hospital service, theater admissions, maid service, car and property insurance rates, and men’s haircuts.
Only ten per cent of the employees in these industries, except for insurance, belong to labor unions. Two per cent of insurance employees are organized.
Prices have declined most markedly over the past ten years in the following industries: radios, TV sets, appliances, automobiles. Union members form from 33 to 70 per cent of the employees producing these goods.
Conclusion of the Journal: "Today’s inflation, to a remarkable extent, reflects factors that have little direct connection with labor costs.”
Farm Bureau, please note.
,“We want more schoolhouses and less jails; more books and less arsenals; more learning and less vice; more leisure and less greed; more justice and less revenge; in fact, more of the opportunities to cultivate our better natures, to make manhood more noble, womanhood more beautiful, and childhood more happy and bright.”
Samuel Gompers
Growers’ Lavish Propaganda
"A full page ad, aimed at breaking the strike of California grapewor-kers, that recently appeared in a number of daily papers would make the late Nazi propoganda minister Goebbels green with envy,” according to California AFL-CIO official Thomas L. Pitts.
The ad, sponsored by the California Grape & Tree Fruit League, pictures a grape picker claiming his average paycheck for a two-week pay period is $2.18 per hour, more than farm workers receive in any other state.
Pitts stated that die ad was “clearly misleading since it implies that many workers regularly average such earnings. It is used in the ad in an attempt to maintain that it is a fiction rather than a fact ‘farm workers.are underpaid, mistreated and don’t enjoy the normal benefits.’”
Pitts also pointed out that the "prevailing hourly wage rate of grape pickers is $1.50-$1.65 an hour," as stated in the weekly Farm Labor Report of the California State Department of Employment, and that some farm laborers "have annual earnings, including whatever nonfarm employment they can find, of less than $1,500 a year.”
"If the growers who are paying thousands of dollars for these ads were so confident that their workers were satisfied with their wages and working conditions, they would have no reason at all to object to a representational election among their workers,” the State AFL-CIO official noted.
The full page two-color advertis-ment runs into thousands of dollars .for publication by a single newspaper . Multiplied by the many papers which ran the ad, it appears that the growers claiming the boycott has failed and who don’t have a worry in the world, are spending a lot of their time and money trying to combat its effects.
EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968/9
SARNIA, ONTAR1 jlNADA, October 21—A group] 30 workers protested the im| bn bf scab grapes into Cana® j; forming a picket line across 1 ilroad tracks to block a train can ft car loads of scab grapes ne| s Southern Canadian town. Pq moved and
•' --‘31 |Tv ■ . ’.■
bodily removed the protestors.
The demonstration, organized by ufwoc members Marshall Ganz; and Jessica Govea and by Canadian sympathizers including William MacDonald and members of the Canadian U.A.W., brought nationwide attention to the boycott of California grapes.
Dear United Farm Workers,
I think you should give these poor people about $109 a week at least. Most of my friends and friends’ friends don’t buy your California grapes.
I think you should buy them at least three pieces of good furniture. Try and get their homes looking like your home, and so that they don’t have to cry all the time.
Please try to do these few things for them, it’s not hard to do. And I think if 1 were you 1 would do these things so nobody would have
Hat
$tft.mi
to be said of the poor people.
1 got this idia from looking at the picture of the little girl sitting on the torn up bed with the garbage pail with clothes in the garbage pail. 1 got this picture from the democratic rally.
P.S. Please write back Thank you.
Yours truly, Josslyn Gordon age 8-1/2 Woodland Hills, California Oct. 20, 1968


10/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 19&8
A BUREAUCRATIC HORROR STORY
Nightmare in Tijuana
The last issue of EL MALCRIADO reported on charges by the California Rural Legal Assistance that the 0. S. Consuate in Tijuana was guilty of rude and degrading treatment of Mexican citizens applying-for immigration visas to the United States.
The Justice Department is allowing tens of thousands of Mexican farm workers to cross the border on green card immigration permits for temporary work in the United States, often at ranches where the resident workers have gone out on strike. But Mexicans who abide by the spirit and intent of the immigration laws, and xoant to become permanent residents of the United States, are subject to discrimination and harrassment.
Here is one of the cases sighted by CRLA,an example of the terrible hardships and suffering caused by the Consulate in Tijuana and the Immigration Department's callous and inhuman treatment of Mexicans,
“Mr. Pablo Cortes, 62, was born in Mexico. Since the age of four Mr. Cortez has resided in California—a total of over 50 years’ residence in the United States. Ma-nuela Cortez, his wife, is an American citizen. She is diabetic and disabled. Mr. and Mrs. Cortez have seven children, all American citizens. Mr. Cortez is the sole support of his wife and two youngest daughters.
“Although the Immigration and Naturalization Service had never contacted Mr. Cortez about his status, Mr. Cortez decided to present himself to the INS with the goal of obtaining a permanent non - quota immigrant visa, so that he could reside permanently in die U.S. witli-out difficulty. Mr. Cortez got a month’s leave from his job and, though in poor health, undertook the trip to the American consulate in Tijuana.
“He took with him all documents required for a non-quota immigrant visa; a document of voluntary jurisdiction from the Mexican Court system (in lieu of a birth certificate), a Mexican passport, proof of his wife’s U.S. citizenship, a police clearance certificate, a letter of employment, an affidavit of support from one of his sons (note that there is double proof that Mr. Cortez will not become a public
charge), income tax receipts for the last three years, and proof of voluntary departure from the United States.
"Mr. Cortez obtained an interview at the consulate in Tijuana. At the first appointment in March of 1968, however, the Consular Officer demanded the Social Security Record of all die earnings of Mr. Cortez. After about three weeks Mr. Cortez was able to obtain the records, dien made a second appointment at the consulate. (Note that Mr. Cortez could not return to his family in the U.S. in the meantime.)
“At the second interview the consular officer stated (for the first time) that the income tax receipts were inadequate and that Mr. Cortez would have to present income tax receipts which had been certified. Mr. Cortez sent for the documents and made a third appointment. One month passed.
“At die third interview Mr. Cortez presented once again all the documents demanded plus the certified income tax receipts. At this interview the consular officer demanded letters from two relatives who would testify that tiiey knew the circumstances of his birth and that there was no birth certificate. This demand is truly disgraceful. Continued on page 15.
Camacho Says Juries Stacked
BAKERSFIELD—Epifanio Cama-cho-Baez argued recently in the Superior Court of Kern County that jury selection in Kern County is unfair. Camacho, charged with malicious mischief, growing out of a February 5 complaint, felt he would not be judged by a jury “of his peers" as guaranteed by the Constitution.
Camacho argued that juries are selected from voting lists of registered voters, and although 25 percent of the citizens in Kern County are Mexican-American, only an average of 12 1/2 per cent appear on the lists from which juries are drawn.
Attorneys for Camacho feel that until all sections of die registered voting population of Kem County are represented, Camacho, as well as anyone else, will be denied a fair trial by their peers.
Kern County Superior Court Judge P. R. Borton has not yet made a decision on Camacho’s case.
Viva la Causa Y
Ei* Progreso
(fowtieAy o/ a
"Ittexica*-
rfUtoUKetf,
Fresno California



1
Lai iRIaiza,Castro Viictlorious in
L.A. School Row
LOS ANGELES, October 4—Sal Castro, Chicano Los Angeles school . teacher was re-instated today in his teaching position at Lincoln High School in East L.A. by a Board of Education vote of 5-1.
The board’s decision came after more than a month of intense pressure to return Castro to his teaching duties, and was climaxed by a week-long sit-in in the offices of die L.A. Board of Education by Mexican-American students and their parents, and later by the arrest of 35 Chicano demonstrators.
Castro, who had been transferred to a non-teaching role by the Board was informed that he could immediately return to his teaching duties.
Castro’s removal from die classroom came after he was indicted by the county grand jury on felonious conspiracy charges for allegedly helping plan die walk-out of Mexican-American students last March at four East-side, L.A.high-: schools.
However, in Castro's dismissal, the Board did not abide by rules governing diem. According to the regulations-, a teacher can only be transferred when accused in court of a felony involving morals or narcotics. Castro’s charged involved neither.
In addition to re-instating Castro, the Board also passed a proposal allowing teachers charged with a felony to appeal to the Board of Education if administrators attempt their transfer from a teaching position.
According to the October 15 issue of La Raza, Castro was hailed by the Mexican-American community because he had become a "symbol for minority teachers everywhere and for all teachers who seek, but are denied the right to do*what is good for their students and for the community they serve.”
EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968/11
WHAT ARE THE POLITICIANS TRYING TO HIDE FROM US?
afl^J|Pa SUBSCRIBE TO EL MALCRIADO TggF FOR A FRIEND FOR CHRISTmAS
WASHINGTON, D.C.—Leading democratic and Republican U.S. congressmen are protesting secret meetings by congressional committees, it was reported this week.
According to the Christian Science Monitor, nearly half of all the committee meetings held during the last Congress were held behind closed doors—more than any other Congress since the early 50* s.
In 322 secret meetings, the House Appropriations Committee considered budget requests totalling $144,000,000,000—no public, no press allowed.
The House Agriculture Committee, held more than half its meetings in secret. The Senate Ethics Committee will not even say how many meetings it has had.
The Legislative Reform Act of 1946 requires that no secret hearings be held by House and Senate committees unless a majority of the members of the committee vote to bar the public- at a specific meeting.
Nevertheless, House committees held 956 meetings, the Senate held 358, and joint committees, consisting of both Senators and Representatives, held about 15 closed meetings
during the current congress.
The members of Congress seem to feel themselves above the law.
BERKELEY PROTEST
Continued from page 14.
hire a Mexican-American who will work to increase student aid and find ways to admit more Mexican-American students on special programs.
The president said the university would work for an expansion of the Agricultural Extension Program to make it "more relevant to die problems facing our rural disadvantaged” and create a new center ter at Berkeley for Mexican-American studies, similar to one at UCLA.
Manuel Delgado, MASC chairman said Hitch's concessions constituted a major victory.
The controversy began on Friday,
October 4, when a UC purchasing agent had announced that the university supported die UFWOC grape boycott and would no longer purchase scab grapes.
The next day President Hitch announced the University would take no stand on the matter and that grape purchases would continue.
Four thousand students participated in a rally in support of the 11 arrested die following Tuesday. Later a group of several hundred were turned away from the Berkeley Court House, where they had gone to view proceedings against the e-leven arrested grape boycotters.
jr


12/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968
UFWOC DEMANDS POISONS RECORDS
UFWOC attorneys filed suit a-gainst Kern County Agricultural Commissioner Sheldon Morly and the Kern County Superior Court shortly after Union attorney Jerry Cohen was denied the right to examine pesticide records in the Kern County Agricultural Commissioner's office in Bakersfield.
UFWOC attorney David Averbuck explained that pesticide records are open to the public's investigation.
“We want to see the records," Averbuck said, "as a means of protection for farm laborers from harmful or toxic insecticides. In addition, it is important to have these records so that Union con-
tracts can be properly drawn.”
The UFWOC is suing both Agricultural Commissioner Morley for not allowing Cohen, on June 20, access to public records, and the Kern County Superior Court for issuing an injunction the following day, prohibiting Cohen's examination of the pesticide records.
Averbuck said the Union filed a writ of mandate in the Federal District Court in Fresno, which, if the court allows, orders Cohen's access to the files.
“I feel the court will either grant the writ, or will allow us to argue it in front of a Superior Court,” Averbuck said.
Giumarra Charged --’’Consumer Fraud"
CHICAGO—William G. Clark, Attorney General of the State of Illinois, filed suit last week against the Chicago distributor of Giumarra grapes for selling falsely labelled grapes. Clark charges in the complaint, “To avoid the impact of the boycott, Giumarra entered into an agreement with other grape growers to use their brand names and labels.”
Selling these mislabelled grapes is in violation of the state consumer fraud act. The Belsamo Company of Chicago, Giumarra’s distributor in Illinois, is selling these illegally labelled grapes. The Attorney General's suit seeks to enjoin Balsamo from "inducing customers to purchase the mislabelled grapes."
EL. MALCRIADO is publishing a beautiful
MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR
to raise funds for the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, and its educational, informational, and organizing activities.
The Calendar features woodcuts, engravings, and pen and ink drawings by some of the finest Mexican and Mexican-American artists. The art is taken from covers of EL MALCRIADO which have appeared over the past three years.
$2.00 plus 50$ for postage and handling
tl Nlaluiado
-; : octa
UNIQUE AND BEAUTIFUL GIFTS
EL MALCRIADO'8 1969 Mexican Graphic Arts Calendar makes a.beautiful and memorable Christmas gift. Order yours now3 and solve the problem of finding suitable Christmas gifts3 while contributing to the farm workers' struggle for justice.
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS GIFT OFFER.. 6 CALENDARS FOR $10.00
Please send me _____
each plus 50$ for postage and handling:
of your Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars & $2.00
NAME
ADDRESS__________________________________________________________
CITY ______________________ STATE _________________ ZIP ________
(Make check or money order payable to United Farm Workers3 Box 130 3 Delano3 Calif. 93215)


EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968/13
Editor;
As a subscriber to EL MALCRIADO, I should like to have some comment on the charges of Senator Harmer.
We have been saving clothing and looking forward to a trip to Delano, but perhaps we have been misled by the picture of the lovely but bedraggled child in the poster you recently reproduced. Come to think of it, although I grew up on farms (my father was a Japanese grower) when the prevailing wage was at best 35 cents per hour, I don’t recall seeing any child, black or white or Japanese, without more adequate clothing.
Although in summers past we have consumed, as a family, pounds and pounds of Thompson seedless grapes, we ignored them this year because we certainly support the desire of farm workers to live in dignity. We know that eventually the cause will be won.
But if you don’t need the clothes you should say so.
Yours very truly,
Mrs. Anthony DeSoto Los Angeles, California October 11,1968
Mrs. DeSoto; There are several points which EL MALCRIADO would like to make in reply to your letter.
L We have read the reports of what Harmer has been saying. We are used to. distorted reports of our activities, and we are glad you ask us for clarification.
2. The picture which accompanied the article you read showed boxes of clothing stored in a Union-owned building. We recently received a shipment of tons of winter clothing gathered by the A-malgamated Clothing Workers Union in New York. The boxes in
the picture were part of that shipment.
3. There are two ways we could distribute the clothing which is donated to us. One way would be to dump it out on the floor and rummage through the pile looking for what we need. Even the poor have some dignity, though. We prefer to wait a week or two until the clothing can be sorted, put on hangers, and divided according to men’s, women's, and children's items.
All the clothing which is given to us is put on "display” in our “clothing store” and strikers and others are welcome to use what they need.
For strikers, the clothes are free. For anybody else who needs used clothing, and there are many, many such people in this area, the clothing is sold. Top price for any item: 50 cents. Average price: 10 cents.
Nobody is refused what they need for lack of money.
4. We do not apologize to Senator Harmer or anybody else for having, for the time being, enough food and clothing. As long as our friends continue to help us, we will continue to have enough. Senator Harmer seems to feel we should be cold and hungry before we ask for assistance.
5. The money raised from the sale of the clothing is sent to strikers who have gone “on boycott* to the cold cities in the north and east. Their children too need warm clothes for school.
Thank you for writing us with your questions, and thank you for boycotting scab grapes. Do make that visit to Delano, and be sure to visit the clothing store and the office of EL MALCRIADO. We would like to meet you.
—The Editor.
Editor:
I have received my first issue of your paper, and I have read it with much interest. The daily papers do not carry much news of your work, but 1 have read something of it in my Catholic papers here and in San Francisco.
I have come to admire Mr. Cesar Chavez and the way he conducts himself and the strike. I never buy grapes from any place; for one thing I don’t much care for them, but I wouldn’t do it now for anything. But I am puzzled what to do about buying grape wines.
I am very fond of wine, which I drink with my meals, but I don’t want to patronize companies which you have no proper agreement with. Can you help me on this?
I don’t make enough money to offer any sizeable donations, but there must be other things I can do...Meanwhile I will be looking forward to- further issues of your paper.
Sincerely in the Sacred Heart,
Mary McPherson .
Long Beach, California October 26, 1968
UFWOC has collective bargaining agreements in force with the following wine makers: Gallo, Christian Brothers, Almaden, Franzia, Paul Masson, Perelli-Minetti (E-leven Cellars), Novitiate Vineyards, and Schenley (Cresta Blanca, Roma).
—The Editors
Editor:
I am just writing to let you know that we are very aware of your struggle up here in Colorado. Colorado State University, a large purchaser of California grapes, has decided to join the grape boycott. We wish you every success.
We are engaged in a similar farm worker struggle here.
Viva La Causa,
DeVL I sham Ft. Collins, Colorado October 20, 1968
k


1VEL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968
LOS ANGELES, October 24--Twenty-two Negroes have filed suit agains; Los Angeles Chief of Police Thomas Reddin and the city ol Los Angeles alleging that Los Angeles police have subjected Negroes to a "systematic pattern” of violence, brutality, surveillance, false arrest, harassment, humiliation and intimidation.
The suit, filed on Thursday, October 24 in federal District Court of Los Angeles, asks $189,000 in actual jlamages and $428,000 in punitive damages of the 22.
The plaintiffs include Roygene Robinson, a member ol the administrative staff of the Black Congress and a Board of Directors member of the Opportunities Industrialization Center; Ronald Wilkins, Los Angeles director of. the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC);. Ron Karenga, founder and chairman of US; Henry Edwards, an employee of the state service center in Venice; and Hubert E. Wesson, a Marine Corps private and Vietnam veteran.
The suit also asks the federal court to issue injunctions barring police from infringing the rights of Negroes in the city; ordering the chief to locate and transfer or
dismiss officers whose prejudicial attitudes make them unfit to police the ghetto; compelling the Board of Police Commissioners to hold open hearings on all complaints of police misconduct filed with it; and ordering die city council to hold hearings before summarily turning down complaints for damages.
The complaint details 12 separate instances over a three-month period of false arrest, physical and verbal brutality, illegal searches, and rousts, including the gunfire punctuated end of the Watts Festival.
Nine of the black protesters charged that Los Angeles police struck them; the widow of another accused police of killing her husband.
Ten were arrested at different times on charges ranging from kidnapping to possession of marijuana; none of die charges was brought into court. All ten were released without prosecution.
Fourteen were stopped by cruising squad cars and interrogated at gun point, allegedly because police knew some were members of militant black organizations.
Five charged police with making illegal searches.
NO MORE GRAPES AT U.G. BERKELEY
BERKELEY, October 21—University of California PresidentCharles Hitch requested leniency today for 11 students arrested for a sit-in in his office October 14. In addition, he largely acceded to demands presented to him by the Mexican-American Student Confederation (MASC), of which die 11 were members.
The sit-in and subsequent arrests grew out of Hitch’s October 5 statement that die University, as a public institution, could not take a stand on the California grape boycott, as die boycott was a “complex social, economic, and moral issue.” According to Hitch, grape purchases by die university could only discontinue if there was no demand for grapes.
In reaction to Hitch’s statement a committee of MASC representatives entered the UC president's office on October 14 with five demands, number one on die list being an immediate endorsement of the grape boycott and a refusal by the University to buy scab California grapes.
After being told Hitch was “unavailable" to meet with MASC representatives to discuss the organization’s demands, die 11 students sat down in Hitch’s office where they stayed until arrestee^ eight'hours later.
They refused bail offered by die bail fund of the Associated Students of die University of California, and said they would fast until such time as the Umiversity meets their demands.
Hie eleven are Fernando Garcia, 22; Steve Bingham, 26; Daniel M. Siegel, 23; Sheldon S. Sarfan, 23; Ysidro R. Macias, 24; Manuel R. Delgado, 27; Solomon W. Quintero, 21; RichardC. Rodriguez, 22; Thelma H. Barrios, 21; Nanette R. Kripke, 22; and Dorothy A. Jacobson, 20.
Hitch also said on October 21 he would agree to MASC demands to
Continued on page 11.


EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1,1968/15
Petition Demands Labor Law Coverage for
Farm Workers
SAN FRANCISCO—A 20,000-signature petition in support of the extension of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) coverage to farm workers was recently presented to California Congressman Philip Burton by San Francisco UFWOC rep--resentatives Mr. & Mrs. LupeMur-gia, and Pete Velasco, and Anne iDraper, Citizens for Farm Labor secretary.
Burton, who introduced a bill in Ithe House of Representatives during the last session of Congress which the NLRA told those who presented die petition, “It is unfortunate we could not get this bill passed in die just concluded session of Congress but there are still powerful forces in Washington, D.C., seeking to block Ithis most vital piece of legislation.”
Mrs. Draper called upon Burton to conduct an investigation of die increased Federal Government purchases of scab California grapes.
She pointed out that in the last three years the U.S. has shipped increasing amounts of grapes to servicemen in Vietnam, the 1968 figure reaching of $214,000, $180,000 more than the 1965 amount.
Burton called the increasing government purchases of scab grapes "outrageous,” and added, “I have long contended that the government in general and the Defense Department specifically are the greatest anti-organized labor establishment in the country. They should not be doing business with any firm that does not have collective bargaining agreements."
Hie local congressman warned that unless California growers recognize the right of farm workers to organize and bargain collectively "they are going to suffer long-term if not irreparable damage,” from the UFWOC national grape boycott.
Ann Draper, left3 looks over petitions signed by over 20.000 Bay Area residents calling for equal rights for farm workers. Cathy Murguia and Pete Velasco of UFWOC look on.
Continued from page 10.
“Mr. Cortez had presented a Mexican passport which certified his birth as well as a document of volontary jurisdiction from the Mexican courts. Nevertheless, he obtained the letters in the hope that the consul would then be satisfied. He made a fourth appointment. At this fourth interview the consular officer once again raised an objection which he could have raised at an earlier interview, and once again he made a demand which is totally unjust. He demanded a certified birth certificate for each of the seven children of the Cortez family.
Since the preference status of Mr.
Cortez was amply established by the citizenship of his wife, these documents were not in any way relevant to the granting of die visa.
Five months had passed since die first interview in March of 1968.
“Meanwhile, the delaying tactics of the Tijuana Consulate have caused immense hardship to the Cortez family.
Mrs. Cortez, disabled and diabetic had been forced to deplete all the family savings to supporther children and her husband, since Mr. Cortez had no income in Tijuana.”
“Moreover, because he was detained in Mexico for more than one mondi, Mr. Cortez host his job in California and Mrs. Cortez and her two daughters have now been forced onto welfare.”
“Mr. Cortez, who had lived for over 50 years in this country, would have never gone to Mexico, except that he believed that he could easily obtain an immigrant visa. To date he has been separated from his wife and children, stranded in Tijuana for over five months, with no prospect of ever being allowed to return.
“The consul in Tijuana now states that Mr. Cortez may never return to the U. S. because his family received child support payments from Welfare after his departure from this country.
I


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Full Text

PAGE 1

in English Vo 1 ume 11 , Number 12 Delano, California Friday, November 1, 1968 Epifanio Camacho Photo by George BaUis

PAGE 2

in this issue DeZano : Humphre_y. Scabs face $650,000 s u j t .... Puer-to Rico: WITCHES.?, Texas: Rangers on trial. Los Ang e Zes: LA blacks protest oppression . . . 14 San Francisco: Petition deman ds N LRA. • 1 5 Canada : Pickets challenge a train-•... EL The Voice of fhe Farm \lorker, h tw ic:e monthl y by t h e U NITED fAR K WORKUS ORf.ANIZINr. COIII'IITTH, AFL CIO. Subscriptions i n theiJnitedStatesanditspossessions a r e $3.50 pEr year, anembers of Second class posta ge pa id at Delano, California 93 215, For advertising rates, contact Federico C hvez at (805) or the ma iIi ng ad ress 1 is ted above. THAT OLD IMPARTIAL JUSTICE BY ANTON 10 ORENDA iN "The law is Please do not tell me that a1lle cop st8.rted taki ng picrures immediately, and to be e ven mo r e impartial, accepted an invit a tion of the store manage r and started gain , my stomach hurts from my taking o ur picrures from inside laugh i ng so much. the store. 'I11ese two picrures show how In the secondpicture,weshowhim impartial the cops are. relaxin g and satisfied with his dif -A police sergeant was telling me how impartial they were, when that guy in the picture showed up. 'I11en the sergeant ordered him to pho t ograph all the people in our picket line. ficult mission. He took pictures of all th e women , children and men in our non violent picket line. So that i s wha t they call i m parcialiry. E L MALCRIADO p.,o . BOX 130 ' DELANO, CA 93215 More and more people are finding out that al subscription to EL MALCRIADO is t h e best way to. keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don't b e left in this coupon today! FILL OUT THIS CARD SEND IT WITH $3 . 50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS• FOR A YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO E L MALCRIADO, SENT . TO. YOUR HOME EVERY "TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR, ' NAME-nombre ___________ ,English_ ADDRESS-domicilio--,-----------------CITY-ciud.ad STATE-estado ZIP __ Don't Buy California Grapes I Et :-Hii'l'IYig7W Grands ie watching you. l .

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EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November I, 1968/3 UFWOC for Hump-hrey DELANO, October 19--TheUnited Senator, in rural areas of the state, Valley, Salinas valley, and San Ben-Farm Workers Organizing Comconcentrating on the joaquin ito County . mittee voted overwhelmingly this week to support Hubert Humphrey for P resident o f the United Stares. WIRTZ VISITS CHAVEZ In a series of elections held at union ranches throughout the state BY JAIME REYES SJ\NCHEZ zo na and California during the first during early October, Humphrey DELANO, October 18--U.S . Sec-nine months of 1968. had the support of over 90 per retary of Labor Willard Wirtz vis TI1e secretary o f labor added that cent of thoseworkerswhoexpressed ired Cesar Chavez at his home "maybe the growers should be made a preference. George Wallace came i n Delano wday. The t\VO dis-responsible for the reopletheyhire. in second, edging out Nixon for the cussed ways of stopping the illeg I realize i t cannot be an absolute handful of votes not going to Huma! usc of green card immigrants responsibility, but a check should phrey. as Strike breakers. be made and there slwuld be penAlargecontingentofUnionmem-Wirtz, who came to Delano esalties if a check is not made by !Jers also volunteered to campaign pecially to talk w Chavez , said he the growers before hiring immifor Humphrey during the last ten was not aware that many Mexican grant workers." days of the elction. The farm wor-nationals visited the country on During the conversation, Chavez kcrs' main efforts will be to send temporary 72-hour visas. UFWOC said several times that UF\\'OC a large group of volunteers to work officials have charged for a long is not opposed to Mexican nationals in the MeXican -American barrios time that persons holding such shortcorning ro the United States with of East Los Angeles, UFWOC memterm permits are hired by growers immigration visas (green bers will also spearhead drives for for farm work . but , he said, "a distinction votes for Humphrey and Alan Cran\Virr.: said 1 9 ,000 illegals were be made between those who come to sron, whom the Union endorsed for apprehended in the fields o f Ari -Continued on p age 4 . CHAVEZ ENDORSES ALAN CRANSTON FOLLOWING UNANIMOUS ENDORSEMENT OF DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE ALAN CRANSTON FOR U.S. SENATE BY UFWOC, CESAR CHAVEZ SAID DURING A VISIT WITH CRANSTON AT HIS HOME, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10: "THIS MAN HAS SHOWN CONSISTENT CONCERN FOR THE FARM WORKERS' PROBLEMS. WE ARE PROUD TO ENDORSE HIM, AND URGE HIS ELECTION. WE ARE MOST ANXIOUS TO SEE THE DEFEAT OF MAX RAFFERTY, WHOSE CANDIDACY REPRESENTS ONE OF THE MOST SERIOUS THREATS THE FARM WORKERS HAVE YET ENCOUNTERED." Bedr>idden Cesar> Cha vez discusses politics with Alan Cranston . Vote for AlAN CRANSTON FRIEND OF THE FARM

PAGE 4

___ .... '' S ICAB CLIQUE FACES $650,0100 S /UITSAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIF., OcCesar Chavez. Drake was originalcaber 28--jose Mendoza , sometime ly slated co speak to a group of shoe salesman, radio annoWtcer, srudencs, but was unable to attend. fired OEO employee, and officer As the discussion between Mr:-s. of the on-again, off again Agricul-Brown, representing UFWOC, and rural Workers Freedom toW ork AsMendoza, representing the growers sociation was in for a small sur-and Tio Tacos, continued, it soon prise tonight. became obvious to many observers He showed up fo r a debate at char most of those aSsembled h"ad the qan Luis Obispo campus of not intention of listening to any California State Polytechnic College useful discussion (Cai Poly) and was promptly served Several hundred students, many with a complaintwhichasks of them agriculrure majors and the $650 , 000 damages for his Unionchildren of growers, hooted and busting actibities. booed as tvlrs. Brown attempted The papers were served by Jane to speak. Brown, who had gone to San Luis one man, who claimed to be a to take the place of the Re v. james farm work"er who could pick IS Drake, administrative assistant to boxes o f table grapes per hour Jose Mendoza, anti-union agent, appears in oos-' tume at a UFWOC rally in MoFarland. Mendoza, who looks like a olown., waves flags, yells and sor:eams. Her>e he burns a paper flag with a hamner & s1-akle on (a physical impossibility--the average is three-four bo?'es) marched up on the stage to harangue the UFWOC representatives withoutobjection from the chairman, a stud em who by this time was seated next to Mendoza holding a scab bumper sticker in his hands. The papers tvlrs. Brown served on Mendoza are part of the legal action which the United Farm Work e r s attorneys are taking against the AW FWA, which allegedly viola res State laws which prohibit the org anizing of workers by Hunions" which are financed or controlled by the employers. Mendoza recently announced on the radio that the AWFWA was being dissolved. At the San Luis meeting he told the srudents by federal labor and immigration officials" was responsible for the dissolution of the organization . Mendoza said at the meeting Mon day night he had "other ideas" about the reasons for Chavez's recent confinement to bed , but declined ro make specific charges. The 41-year-old director of UFWOC wa _ s hospitalized for weeks with severe back trouble . WIRTZ ••• Continwd from page 3. the u.s. to live and work and those who cross the border only to work a s hort time in the United States and rcrurn to Mexico." •Many of those who come from Nuevo Leon and Chihuahua even own farms there," Chavez said. "They are workers here and employers over there." Wirtz said the boycott has helped to make people aware that many workers in this country do not even enjoy the advantages of collecti ve bargaining. "Chavez and the Union have done more for collective bar gaining in this country than I have done this Wirtz commented. He said he would ask the cooperation of the Department of justice in correcting some of the problems which face the Union.

PAGE 5

EL MALCRIADD, Friday, November 1; 1968/5 October was the month of ghosts and skeletons and witchcraft. And if you're one of those skeptics who says that aU of that is kids' stuff, read this shocking expose of how witchcraft was used to con tr>ol these poor> workers ... SAN JUAN , PUERTO R ICO--Add other way dlan for the !Mv!, the "witchcraft" to the reasons an em-employer charged. p layer can think up for objecting TI1e company cited od1er unusual ro an e l ection won by a union. happen in gs : the minute The r egional director for the that the election began, a heavy National Labor Re lations Board rain started to fall and the skies found the charge so unu sua l that turned black;" "some employes felt he made public a "white terribly ill while in the process on \\ritchcraftfileclhereby General of vot in g , but the illness disappeared Cigars de Utardo with ob-after they voted ;" others reported jections to a representation election that " a short time after they left won by the Machinists in the moun the voting a rea they just d i dn ' t r a in village of H ato Rey. know which w"ay they had The c igar firm wants the election Summing up, the company said set aside. lt asked the NLRB to the •taboratoryconditions'"required h o l d hearings into such mysterious by the NLRB for a valid electi on goings-on. were '"completely destroyed• by the For example, the company charged occu l t shenanigans . Attacl\ed to its that a female employe who was an list of objections was a 13-page IAM leader came to work one report on the history and practice morning with a bo ttle containing a of witchcraft in Latin lands . " mag i c potion which would cast a T1Je' Mach inists'membersgreeted s pell on the employes." The po-a reading o f the charges "with t i on , she reportedly said, had been g reat hilarity and derision." 'n1ey prepare d by a remarkable "espiritold the NLRB they won fai r and tista• or sorcerer with mag ical pow -square. ers. Smelling it or rubbing a b i t Not once, said!AMRep.JuanMalon the forehead and neck would have donado , did he ride a broom from the effect of "n ull ifying the will san juan to Hato Rey . He always of the employes" to vote in any drove a Ford, he claimed. ' CHAVEZ IS IMPROVING DELANO , 26-Cesar Chavez, Director of the United Farm Wor k e r s Organizing Commit tee is slow l y recovering from the painfu l bcick injuries that have kept h i m in bed for the last two months . Chavez attended the regular Friday union meeting and gave a forceful talk to the members, and stayed for the show ing of the movie "What Harvest for the Reaper?" Though walking without a cane or assistance, Chavez m o ved slow ly and with obvious effort. The U F W OC D irector has been staying at home s ince he left the hospital in late September. Peggy McGivern, the Union's registered nu rse, has been helping the Chavez family in caring for h i m . Grapemobile on the Prowl Special report from the San Fronaisao Bay Area : TI1e Grapemobile continues to prowl the streets of the East Bay in search of scabby grapes from the notorious San joaquin Valley . Equipped w ith two huge loud speakers, a loe strike. Roy Valdez and Irene Terrazas were instrumental in cleaning up East Oakland and Fruitvale, while Pat Bryan, Gayle Garbers, and Can-

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6/EL MALCRIADD, Friday, November 1, 1968 .. EXAS RANGERS ON TRIAL BROWNSV ILLE, TEXAS, October been accused of sev. e ral bea t ings , i n the suit , which char g e s conspir-22-The trial of the Texas Ranginclud ing those of Magdal en o D i mas acy t o d eny UFWOC m emb e r s their ers on charges filed byUnitedFarm and Benny Rodriguez, both_ Starr. constiru ti onal r ights and chall enges Workers organizers in south Texas County strikers. t he consti wtionalicy o f the Texas was s lated to resume on Tuesday, Six Rangers and six Star r Counan t i l abor l aws under w hi ch they Ocwber 22 in Bro wnsv ille . ry officials are named defendants were arrested. 111c trial, which began on june 11 and later recessed, i s be ing conducted by a threejudge panel in t he U. S. District Court, where a challenge to six Texas starures in being presented by the Uni on. The statutes, Wl1lch gover mass picketing , disturbin g the pea c e , use of abusive l angua ge , and obstruction of public roads, were allegedly used by the Rangers last year to snuff Out a farm workers ' strike directed Betwee n May 11 and june 1 of 1967, 43 strikers were arrested on cimina J charges. Most of t11e cases ha _ve never come to trial. At the time the Strike began , some workers were earning as low as 65 cents per hour for agricultural labor in the area. At times , trains carrying scab melons were by cops with machine guns mounted on rail road The Texa s Ra ngers were out in force in Rio Grande City, center of the strike area, dri v ing "unmark ed" cars easily identifiable by their license plate s , which begin with the leuers RKK. A. Y. Allee, captai n or the Rangers, reports directly to the governor of Texas . He and othe r r an gers, have dd enied allegatio n s of ralir:y and "strike-breakingH made by S trikers.; j udge Reyna ldo_ G . Garza of Brownsv i lle , one of the trial judges, said the trial was being resumed for t he present a t ion of oral argu -ments by att o r neys. Othe r judges are john R . Brown of New Orleans and Woodrow Sea l s of Hous t on. Garza is justice of the District Court in Brownsville. Capta i n Allee and the Ra nger s haVE P.A.S.O. DENOUNCES NIXON HIDALGO COUNTY, Texas, OCm be r 25--The Hidalgo County C h ap ter of the Political Ass ociati on of Spanish Speaking Organ! zations (PASO) unanim o usly passed a resolution condemning Richa r d Nixon, Repub lican cand i da t e for Pres ident, for h i s support of the Cali for nia grape growers and his op pos i tion to the effor t s of the United Farm Wor kers to gai n a better living for farm workers. Spea kers at the PASO meeting noted that the majority of grape pickers are Mexican Amer icans. D iscri mi n at ion agains t farm wor kers, exclus ion of farm workers f r om rhe protection of nat i onal l a bor laws , and the low wages and deplorable conditions in far m labOr have been a major cause in keep-workers strike In Texas. The bOok . let , "SOi'>JS OF ZAPATA" , wi t h over 50 photographs, gives a shocking look a t the conditions o f life and work in Texas, and c hronicles the heroic struggles of the Union during 1 966 an d 1967 to b r ing j us t ice to that ari d and hostil e l:&nd. The strike succeeded in winning the immedi a t e demand o f $ 1 .25 an. hour . B u t t he struggle to b uil d a union and bring true justic e to South t hey said. By siding wit h the growers, Nixon has tak e n a clear stand against the farm workers and the M e xican America n peopl e . The g r oup also vot e d to s upport Hubert Humphrey for P resi den t . Abel Ochoa of Edcouch , leader o f t h e Va lley group, noted tha t while many members wer e not enthusi astic for H umphrey , a nd h ad ser i ous cri ticisms of bot h P resi dent johnson and the Democratic Party. especially i n Texas, the group was unanimous in agreein g tha t Nixon and W aU ace were much worse than Humphrey. PASO i s a l so urging the e lection of Republican Pau l Eggers as Go vernor . PASO noted the anti labor record of L t . Covernor Preston Smi th, the Democra t ic cand i da t e , as a majo r reason to vote Republican Texas has made painfully s low proSONS OF ZAPATA ••• gress. Read o f the v ictory and ?S from MaLc>>iado" 1 defeat , the hOpes and dreams, of Box 130 _, De

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EL MALCRIADD, Friday, November 1, 1968/7 Growers .. oonfident that they aPe above the law .. Y'e fuse to pay the new $1. 65 minimv.m wage . Now the Ci ty of Delano has a $1. 00 an hour wage . ..1 photo HIGH WAGES IN DELANO? DINUB A, CALIF .--"TI1e advice of . the Californi a Grape and Tree Frui t League and other farmers' ser\'ice organization s co the .ir members has been 'to make no changes in t heir payroll calcul atio!ls in spite of th e Court of Appeals , o pini on upholding the Welfare Commission' s orders go\'crning wages and hours for women and minors as agricul tural workers," according to a recent newsletter of rhe Cent . ral California Farmers Associ •ttion . TI1e "advice" amoums to telling growers w ha t they want to hear: "To hell with the Jaw of the Sta te. You can pay women a nd minors any damn thin g you please." Farm worker s arc not the only ones who suffer from a refusal by employers ro pay the minimum wage. See the story on the of Delano's wages, appearing on thi s page of EL : \ lALCR IADO. CITY TO PAY $1.00 AN HOUR by r.anaremos JndustriJ I W c l f.1re t o l d EL MALsaid h e did not know . MYourques-DELANO , October 23--TheCityof C R IAOO W edn e s da y that $1 per h our tion has piqued my curiosity though, Del ano may be violating the State wot!ld be ille ga l whether the y are and I will check into the matter, " minimum wage Jaw, EL MALCRI A m inor s o r not. h e added . DO ha s learned. l\•linford said il1e two were hired Accordin g to the Industrial \Vel Despite a State l aw guaranteeing as p.lrt tirne aides" for fare Department officia l, munici wages of $1.65 an hour for women, which the sa lary range is Sl-$ 1.20 pal employees are not exempt from and $1.3 5 an hour for male and per hour. the minimum wage , and women must female minors under 18, il1C City He said he did not know how many b e pa i d $1.35 or $1.65 , depending Council hired two new female emother female employees were r e on whether or not they are over ployees Monday ni ght, Ocrober 21, cei ving S l an ho ur , but that he 18 years of age. at the rat e of $1 per hour. 1l1e assumed there were od1ers. City C lerk Fay C . Shortconfirmed hiring was done on the recommenMll1e job is not very hard," he that Minford's recommendation was dation of City Manage r Gerald D . said, and "our whole recreation pro-accepted b y the C i ty Council and Minford, who suggested d1e hiring gram would fall apart if we had officially passed as a resolution and the $1 wage in a memorandum t o JXlY $1. 65,"' the city manager on Monday night. dated October 21. told E L MALCRIADO in a telephone M i nford said he will check into While i t i s not know n if il1e two imerview Wednesday. th e matter, bu t in the meantime, new employees. Diana Bernido and Asked if the wages were a vio-it appears that the City of Delano Jennie Velasco , are minors, an lation of the minimum wage is. and has been, violat i ng the law official of the State Department of law for women and minors, Minford of the state.

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8/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November I, 1968 INJUNCTIONS FAIL TO SLOW BOYCOTT l njuc ti ons prohi biting picketing at docks. and markets' in San Fran cisCo and Los Angeles, respective ly , filed by growers, shippers and chain stores, have fallen leagues short or their intent to legally pro hibit UFWCX:: demonstrators from leaflettin g and picketing. In San Francisco, growe r s and sh ippers obtained a tempon:tty res traini ng order restdcting picket ing to within SO yards of the dock area. Growers complained that demon Strator s were bl ock ing the entrance to the docks. Union official have repudiated this claim, po inting out tha t it was the scab drivers w h o were creating hazzards. One of the truckers ran into Herman Gallegos a non union member on the picket line recently. UFWCX:: attorney jerome Cohen said that "n o one from the union was n o t ified abo u t the i nj unction hearing and the r e wer"c no UF'WOC representatives H owever at an October 18 hear i ng , in which Cohen explained the purpose of the picketing , and appeal ed the in j1\11.Ctio n, judge Eyman 6f the Superior Court of San F rancisco limited the force of t h e injunc tion , allowin g two pickets to be placed 15 fee t on either side of each entrance to the docks. •Jn addition, the court is presently determining if pickets will be allowed to demonstrate on the dock s ," according to attorney David Aver . buck . In Lo s Angeles , an l njuction prohibiting Union picketing was issued a t the reques t of 1 7 different chain stores on Octo.ber 23. The following day the injuction wa s appealed and the judge rule d that four pickets could be placed at store entrances, four at store driveways, and that a llullliorn could b e used 25 feet from !he store. Fred Ros s and joe Serda, UFWOC organizers in L.A . , feel that the injunction o:-der will be easy to comply with , o.s it still permits a good number of pickets. The . Facts About INFLATI ION You know the old S;lW about unions being inflati onary. are some interesting statistics from the Wall Street journal. Prices hav e risen most rapidly ov e r the past ten yciars in the f ol lowing areas: h o spit a I service, th ea1e r admissions, maid service, car .::md propeny insurance rates, and men ' s haircuts. Only ten per cent of the em ployees in these industJ;ies, except for insurance, belong ro labor unions. Two pcrcentofinsuranceemployees are o r gan i zed . Prices have declined most mar kedly over the past ten years in the f ollowin g indusrries: radios, TV s c t s, appliances , automobiles. Union members form from 33 to 70 per cent of the employee s producing these goods. Conclusion of the Journal: "Today's infl ation , to a remarkable ex rent, reflect s facro r s that have little direct connection with labOr Farm Bureau, please note . . "We want more schoolhouses and less jails; more and less arsenals; more learning and less v ice; more l e isure and less greed; more justice and less reveng e; in fact, more of the opporturiities to cultivate our better narures, to make manhood more noble , womanhood more beautiful , and childhood more happy and Samuel Gompers ?tot 1111,00. EL MALCRIADO, Fr N0vembe r I , 1968/9 Dc:1r United Farm Workers, to be said of the poor peop le. l think you should give these poor 1 got this idia from looking at peop l e about $109 a week at least. the picture of the little girl sitilclost of my friends and friends' ting on the up bed with the friends don' t buy your California garbage pail with clothes in the pail. 1 got thi s picture I think you should buy them at from the democratic rally. least three pieces of good furni-P.S. Please write back ture. Try and get their homes Io9k111 ank you . in g like your home, and so tl1at they don't have to cry all the time . Yours truly, P l e.:lse try to do these few things joss lyn ' Gordon for them , it's not hard ro do. i\nd age 8-l/2 TI1e "demonstration, organized by ufwoc members Marshall Ganz : and j cssica Govea and by Canadian sympathizers including William MacDonald and membersoflheCanadian U , A, W , , brought nationwide attention to the boycott of California grapes. Growers' Lavish .Pr . opaganda •A full page ad , aimedatbreaking dle strike o f California grapeworkers, that recently appeared in i number of daily papers would make the late Nazi propoganda minister Goebbels green with envy," according to Cal iforni a AFL-CIO official TI1omas L . Pins. The ad , sponsored by the California Grape & Tree Fruit League, picmres a grape picker claiming hi s average paycheck for a two-week pay period i s $2.18 per hour, more than farm workers receive in any other state. Pitts stated that the ad was ..clearly misleading since itirnplie \ that many workers regularly average S uch earnings. It is u sed in the ad in an attempt to ma i nta i n that it is a fiction rather than a fac t 'farm workers. are underpaid, treated and don ' t enjoy the normal benefits.'" Pitts also pointed out tha t the •prevailinghourlywagerate of grape pickers is $1.50 $1.65 an as stated in the wee kl y Farm La bOr Report of the Califor nia Sta te De partment of Em ployment, and that some farm labOrers •have annual earnings, i ncluding wha tever non farm employment they can find, of less than $1,500 a year." •!( the g row e r s w h o arc payin g thousands of dollars for these ads were so co nfident that their workers were satisfied with their wages and wor k ing conditions, they wou ld have no reason at a ll to objec t to a representationa l e I ec tio n among their workers," the State AFL C I O off icial noted. TI1e full pa ge two-color advertis ment runs into thousand s of dollars for publication by a single newspaper , lvl u lti pl ied by tl1e ma n y papers which ran the a.d, it appears that the growers claiming theboyeott has failed andwhodon'rh ave a worry in the wor'ld , a r e spend in g a lot of their time ond money tryin g to combat its C'ffccts .

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10/EL MALCRIAOO, Friday, November 1 , 1 968 . A BUREAUCRATIC j.JORROR STOR Y Nightmare in Tiiuana The last issue of EL MALCRIADO PepoPted on ohapges by the California RuPd Legal Assistance that the U . S. Consuate in Tijuana was guilty of rude and degrading treatment of Mexican citizens applying for immirrration visas to the United States. The ;Justice Department is allowing tens of thousands of Mexican far>m workers to cross the border> on green card immigration permits for temporary 'Work in the United often at ranches whet>e . the resident workers have gone out on strike. But Mexicans who abide b y the spirit and intent of the immigr>ation and 1Jant to become permanent Pes idents of the United -states, are subject to discrimination and harrassment . Here is one of the cases sighted by CRLA,an ex ample of the terrible hardships and suffering caused by the Consulate in Tijuana and the Immigration Department's callous and inhuman treatment of Mexicans .. "Mr. Pablo Cortes, 62, was born in Mexico. Since the age o f four Mr . Cortez has resided in Califor nia--a total of over 50 years' resi dence in the United State s . Manuela Cortez, his wife, is an Ame rican citizen. Slle is diabetic and disabled. Mr. and Mrs. Cortez have seven children, all American citizens. Mr. Cortez i s the s ole support of his wife and two youn gest daughters. .. Although the Immigration and Na turalization Service had never contacted Mr. Cortez about his status, Mi. C0rtez decided to present 11imseif to the INS w ith the goal o f obtaining a permanent nonquota i m migrant visa, so that he could reside permanently in the U.S. with out difficulty. Mr. Cortez got a month's leave from his job and, though jn poor health, undertook the trip to the American consulate in Tijuana. " He took with him all documents required for a non-quota immigrant visa: a document of voluntary jurisdiction from the Mexican Court system (in lieu of a birth certi ficate), a Mexican passport, proof of his wife ' s U.S. citizenship, a police clearance certificate, a letter of employment, an affidavit of support from one of his sons (note that there is doub l e proof that Mr . Cortez will not become a public charg e) , income tax receipts for me last three years, and proof of voluntary departUre from the Uni ted States. "Mr. Cortez obtained an interview at the consulate in Tijuana . At the first appointment in March o f 1968, however , the Consular Officer demanded the Social Securicy Record of all the earnings of Mr. Cortez. After about three weeks il.'!r. Cortez was able to obtain the records, then made a second appointment at the consulate. (Note rh::lt Mr. Cortez cou l d not return to his family in the U .S. in die meamime.) "At the second interview the con sular officer stated (for the first time) that die income tax receipts were inadequate and that Mr. Cor tez would have to present income ta'-: receipts which had been certified. tvlr. Cortez sent for the documents and made a third appoint ment . One month passed. "At die third intei-view Mr. Cor tez once again all die docu ments demanded plus the certified income tax receipts. At this inter view the consular officer demanded letters from two relatives who would testify that they knew the circum stances of his birth and that diere was no birlh certificate. This demand is truly disgraceful. Continued on page 15. Camacho Says Juries Stack ' ed BAKERSFIELD--Epifanio Cama cho Baez argued recently in the Superior Court of Kern County that jury selection in Kern County is unfair. Camacho, charged with ma m i schief, growing out of a February 5 compla int , felt he would not be judged by a jury "of his peers" as guaranteed by the Con ;titution. Camacho argued that juries are selected from voting lists of registered voters, and although 25 percent of the citizens in Kern County are Mexican-American , only an average of 12 1/2 per cent appear on the lists from which juries are drawn. Attorneys for Camacho feel that until all sections of the registered voting of Kern Cotu1ty are represented, Camacho, as well as anyone e lse, will be denied a fair trial by their peers. Kern County SuperiorCourtjudge P, R. Borton has not yet made a decision on Camacho's • Viva Ia Causa y El Progreso (3tUPete41f 6j a.-'ilteUeaH-Fresno California

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la1 i R ! a ,za,Castro Vi!Ctlorious in LA. I S'chool Row LO S ANGELES , OCtober 4 Sal Castro, Chicano Los Angeles sch ool reacher was re-instated today in his teaching position at Lincoln High Sc hool in East L.A. by aBoard of Educa t io n vote o f 5-1. The board's decision came after more chan a month of intense pres Sul"e to return Castro to his teaching duties, and was climaxed by a weeklong sit-in in the offices of the L.A. BOard ofEducationbyMex: ican-American students and their parents , and later by the arrest of 35 Chican o demonst:r,ators. Castro, who had been transferred c O a non-teaching role by dJe Board was informed that he could immediately return to his teaching duties. Castro's removal from the classroom came after he was indicted by the county grand jury on feloniou s conspiracycharies for alleg edly helping plan the walk out of Mexican-American students last March at four East-side, L.A. high schools . However, in Castro's dismissal, th e Board did nor abide by rules them. According t o the regulations; a teacher can only be transferred when accused in court of a felony involving morals or narcotics. Castro's charged involved neither. In addition to re-instating Castro, the Board also passed a proposal allowing teachers charged with a felony to appeal to . the Board of Education if administrators attempt their transfer from a teaching position. According to the OCtober 15 issue of La Castro was hailed by the Mexican-American community because he had become a •sym bol for minoritY teachers everywhere and for aH teachers who seek, but are denied the right t o do-what 1 is good for their students and for Lhe communicy EL HALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968/11 WHAT ARE THE POLITICIANS TRYING TO HIDE FROM US? WASHJNGT0i'l, D.C. --Leading durin g the current congress. democratic and RepUblican U.S. 11tc of Con&treS:> seem congressmen are protesting secret to feel themselves above the ta w. meetings by congressional comm ittees, it was reported tlti!? week. According to the Christian SCi ence Monitor, nearly half of all tlte committee meetings held during the lase Congress were hel d behind closed doors--more than any other Congress since the early SO's. In 322 secret meetings, the House Appropriations consid ered budget requests totalling $144,000 , 000,000--n o pub lie, no press allowed. The Agriculture Commit tee, held more t11an half its meetings in secret. TI1e Senate Ethics Com mittee will not even say how many meetings it has had • . The Legislative Reform Actofl946 requires that no secr e t hearings be held by House and Senate committees unless a majority of the mem bers of the committee vote to bar the public . ar a specific meeti ng. Nevertheless, House committees held 956 meetings, the Senate held 358, and joint committees, consisting of both Senators and Representa ti ves , held about 15 closed meetings ...... sUBSCRIBE TO EL 1'1\ALCRIADO FOR A FRIEND FOR CHRIST.t•AS BERKELE Y PROTES T Continued from page 14. hire a Mexican-American who will work to increase student a i d and find ways to admit more Mexican-American students on special programs. Tl1e president said the university would work for an expansion of the Agriculrural Extension Program to make it •more relevant to the problems facing our rural disadvantaged" and create a new center ter at Berkeley for Mexican-Amer ican srudies, similar to one a t UCLA. Manuel Delgado , MASC chairman said Hitch's concessions constituted a major victory. The conttoversy began on Friday, October 4, when a UC purchasing agen t had announced dJattheuniverSity supported the UFW OC grape boycott: and would no longer pur chase scab grapes. The next day President Hitch announced the University would take no stand on the matter and that grape purchases would continue. Four thousand smdcnts participated in a rally in support of the 11 arrested the following TUesday. Later a group of several hundr e d were turned away from the Berkeley Court House, where t11ey had gone to view proceedings against the e lev e n arrested grape boycotters.

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12/El MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968 UFWOC DEMANDS POISONS RECORDS Gi.umarra Charged --"Consumer Fraud ' " CH ICAGo-W illia m G. Clark, Attorney General of the State of IIUFWCX::: a u orneys filed suit a gainst Kern County Agricu l rural Commissioner Sheldon Mor l y and the Kern County Superior Cour t shortly after Union attorney jerry Cohen was denied the right to examine pesticide records in the Kern County Agricultural Commission er' s office in Bakersfield. UFWOC a ttorney David Averbuck ex p la ined that pesticide records are open to the pUblic's investigat ion . "We wam to see th e A ve r buck said, "as a means of protection for farm laborers from harmful or toxic insecticides. I n addition, . i t is important tO have these records so that Union con-tracts can be properly d r awn . " linois, Hie d suit last week against Th e UFWOC is suing b oth Agthe Chi cago d istributor of Giumarra ricultural Commissioner Morley for grapes for sellin g falsely labelled not a llo w i ng C oh e n, on June 20 , g rapes. Clark charges in the com-access to p ublic records, and the pl a i nt, •To avo i d the impact of the Kern County .9J.per ior Court for isboycott , Giumarra entered into an su in g an injWlCtion the follow i n g agreement w ith other grape growers day , prohib i tin g Coh e n' s examina-to use their brand names and c ion of the pesticide records . Sell in g these mislabelled grapes Averbuck the Union filed is in violat ion of the state con-a writ of mandate in the Federal sumcr fraud act. The BelsamoComO istrict Court in Fresno, which, pany of Chicago , Giumarra's dis-if the court allows, orders Cohen's tri butor in Illinois , is selling these access to the files . illegally la be lled grapes. Tite A t feel the court will e ith e r grant torney General's suit seeks to enthe writ, or will allow us to arjoin Balsamo from •inducing cusguc i t i n front of a Super i o r Court, " tomers to purchase the m islabelled A verbuck said. g rapes." EL. M A LCRIADO i s ishi ng a beautiful MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR to raise funds for the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, and its educational, informational, and organizing activities. The Calendar features woodcuts, engravings, and pen and ink drawings by some of the fines t Mexican and Mex ican-American artists. The art i s taken from cOvers of EL MALCRIADO whi ch have appea r ed ov"er t he past th-;ee years. $2.00 plu s for postage and handling UNIQUE AND BEAUTIFUL G IFTS EL MALCRIADO's 1969 Mexican Graphic Arts CaLendar makes a .beautiful and memorable Christmas gift. Order yours nw, and solve the problem of finding suitable Christmas gifts, while contributi ng to the farm work ers' struggle for justice. SPECIAL CHRISTMAS GIFT OFFER..... 6 CALENDARS FOR $10.00 Please send me __ of your Mexican Gr>aphic Arts Calendars @ $2.00 each plus 50 for postage and handling: NAME ------------------------ADDRESS----------------------CITY STATE ZIP {Make aheck or money order payable to Un-z,ted Farm Work.ei>s, Box 130, Delano, Calif. 93215)

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' ' ! ' EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968!13 Letters II!IJ Eduor: As a subscriber to EL MAL CRIADO, I should lik e to have some comment on the charges of Sena tor Harmer. We have been savin g clothing and lookin g forward t o a trip to Delano, but perhaps we h ave been misled by the of the lovely but bedraggle d child i n the poster you recently reprod uced. Co me to think of it, a l dlough I grew up on farms (my father was a japan ese grower) when the prevailing wage was at best 35 cents pe r h our, I don't recall seeing anychUd , b l ack o r white or japanese, withou t more adequate c l othing. Although in summerspastwehave consumed, as a famUy, pounds and pounds o f Thompson seedless grapes, we ignored them thi s year because we cer tain l y support the desire of farm workers to live in dignity. We know that eventually the cause will be w on . But if you don't need th e clothes you s hou ld say so. Your s very truly, Mrs. Anthony DeSoto Lo s Angeles, CaUfofnia October 11, 1968 Mrs. DeSoto : Th e r e a r e several points w hi ch EL MALCRIADO wou ld lik e t o make in repl y to your leuer. 1. We have th!! reports of what Harmer has been saying. We are used t o . distorted reports of our activities, and we are glad you ask us for c l a r ifica ti on. 2. The p icture whic h accompanied the article you read showed boxes of clothing stored i n a Un ion-owned buildin g. W e recently received a shipment of to n s of winter c loth in g gathered by the A malgamated C l oth in g Workers Un ion in New York. The bOxes in the picture were part of that shipment. 3 . There are two ways we could distribute the clothing which is don ated to us. One way would be to dump it out on the floor and rummage through the pile looking for what we need. Eve n th e poor have some dign ity, though . We prefer to wait a wee k or two until the clothi ng can sorted, put on hangers, and divided acco r ding to men's, women's, and children' s items. All the clothi n g whic h i s to us is put on "displ ay" i n our "clothing store" and strikers and others are welcome to use what they need. For srrikers, the c lothes a r e f ree. For anybody else who needs used clothing, and there are many , many such people in this area, the clothing i s sold. Top price for any item: 50 cents. Averag e price: 10 cents. Nobody is refused what they need for lack of money. . 4. We do not apologize to Senator Harmer or an ybod y else for having , for the time being, enough food and clothing. As long as our friends con t i nue to help us, we will conti nue to h ave enough. Senator H armer seems to feel we s h ould be col d and hungry before we ask for assi s tance. 5 . The money r a ised from the sale of the c l othing is sent to srrikers who have gone "on boy con• to the cold cities in the north and cast. Their c hildre n too warm clothes for school. TI1ank you for writing us with your questions, and thank you for boycotting scab grapes. Do that v i sit to Delano, and be sure to visit the clothing store and the office of EL MALCRIADO. We would like to meet you. --'The Editor. Editor: 1 have receive d my first issue of your paper, and I have read i t with much interest . The daily papers do not carry much news of your work, but I have read somethin g of it in my Catholic pa pers h ere and in San Francisco. 1 have come to admire Mr. Cesar Chavez and the way he con ducts himself and th e srrike. I never buy grapes from any place ; for one thin g I don't much care for them , but 1 wouldn't do it now for anyth in g . But I am puzzled what to do about buying grape win es. I am very fond of wine , which I drink with my meals, but I don't want to parronize companies which you h ave no proper agreement with. . Can you hel p me on this? I don ' t make enough money to offe r any s izeable donations, but there must be other things 1 can do ... h1eanwhile I will be looking forward t O furthe r issues of your paper. Sincerely in the Sacred Heart, Mat>y McPherson Lon g Beach , California Oc cober 26 , 1968 UF\VOC: has collective bargainin g agreements in f orce with the follow in g wine makers: Gallo, Chris tian Brothers, A l made n, Franzia, Paul Masson, Perelli-Minetti (E l even Cellars), Novitiate Vineya rds, and Schen ley (Cresta Blanca , Roma). ---The Editors Editor: I am just writing to let you know that we are very awa r e of your stru gg l e up here in Colorado. Colorado Stat e University, a large purchaser of California grapes, has decided to join the grape boyco t t . We wish you every success. We are e ngaged in a similar farm wor ker srruggle here. Viva La Causa, Den Isham Ft. Collins, Colorado October 20, 1968

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LO<, 1\o"'G:.:.LL'>, O< 1 o her 21-. dis. m iss officer s whose prejudicial Tw
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EL M ALCRIADO, Friday, November 1, 1968/15 P :etitio: n De; m : ands Labor Law Cover . age for SAN FRANCISCo-A 20,000-sig nature petition in s upport of the ex tension of the National Labor Re lations Act (NLRA) coverage to farm workers was recently presented to California Congressman Philip Burton by San Francisco UFWOC representatives Mr. & Mrs. Lupe Murgia, and Pete Vel asco , and Anne ioraper, Citizens for Farm Labor secretary. Burton, Who ino-oduced a b111 in l the House of R epresentati ves during the las t session of Congress which the N LRA told those who presented the petition, •It is unfortuna te we could not get this bill passed in the just concluded sess ion o f Co ngress but there are still power f ul forces in Washington, D.C., seekin g t o b lock \ this most v i tal piece oflegislation." Mrs. Draper called upon Burton to conduct an investigation of the increased Federal Government pur-. chases of scab California grapes. She pointed out that in the last three years the U .S . has shipped increasing amounts of grapes to ser vicemen in Vietnam, the 1968 figure reaching of $214,000, $180,000 more than the 1965 amouni:. Burton called the i nc reasing government purchases of sCab grapes "outrageous: a nd added, r ha ve Iong contended that government in general and the Depart ment specifically. are the greatest l abo r est ab li s hment in the country.. They s hould not be doing bus iness with any firm that does not have collective ba r ga ining agreements. • The local congressm a n warned that unl':ss California growers re. cognize the right of farm workers organize and bargain collectively ."they are going to suffer long-term if not irreparab l e from the UFWOC: national grape boycott. Ann D:ruper_, left_, looks over peiitions signed by .over 20.000 Bay Area residents calling for equal rights for tJOrkers. Cathy Uurguia and Pete V e lasco of UFWOC look on. Continued from page 10. Mrs. Cortez,disabledanddiabetic •Mr. Cortez had presented a Mexi can passport which certified hi s b irth as well as a document of volontary jurisdiction from the Mexican courts. Nevertheless, he obtained the letters in the hope that the con sul would then be satisfied. He made a fourth appointment. At this f<;IUrth interview the consular officer once again raised an o b jection whic h h e could ha ve r a ised at an earlier interview . an d onc e again he made a demand which is totally unjust. He demanded a certi fied birth certificate for each of the seven children of l:he Cortez fam ily. Since the preference status of Mr. Cortez was amply established by the citizenship of his wife, these documents were not in any way relevant to the granting of the visa. Five months had passed since the first interview in March of 1968. the delaying tactic s of the TijuanaConsulatehavecaused immense hardship to the Cortez fa mily. had been forced to deplete all the fa mily savings to supportherchildren an d her husba nd, since Mr. Cortez had no income in Tijuana." • Mor eover, because he was de tained in Mexico for more than one month, Mr. Cortez host his job in California and Mrs. Cortez and her two daughters have now been forced o nt o welfare." • Mr. Cortez, who h a d lived for over SO year s in thi s countrY, would h ave never gone to Mexico , except that he believe d that he could easily ob1ain an im migrant visa. To date he has been separated from i"tis wife and children, stranded in Tijuana for over five months, with no prospect of ever being allowed to return. •The consul in Tijuana now states that Mr. Cortez may never return to the U , S . because his family received child support payments f r om Welfare after his deparrure f r om d 1 i s co untry.

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Discount Dept. Store 918 Main St. Delano I S 0/11 AfoJf.l everything imaginable at lowest prices anywhere Open SUNDAYS BIG ClOSf-OUJ VAlUfS ONCE-A-YEAR CHANCE FOR BIG SAVING 8@@'0 Discount Dept. Store 9111 Main st. DELANO across from the Post Office ALSO IN: COACHELLA STOCKTON INDIO TRACY