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El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 18

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 18
Series Title:
El Malcriado
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United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Volume'll Number 18 Delano, California Friday, November 15, 1968
A El Malcriado (®)
\V3jC J THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER V J
in English
\


2/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1968
in this issue r El Malcriado says
V BY THE EDITOR opposition to the things which so
ITLIONG LEADS UFWOC____
Page 3
GROWERS HOPE FOR HOLIDAY SALES..............
Page 5
A PUZZLING PUNISHMENT.. Page 6
WETBACKS FLOOD CALIFORNIA...................
Page 9
A CHRISTMAS GIFT FROM
DELANO.................
Page 15
El; •> . M/00 MorKe 'i (>ut ' •. the ‘UStrSO fW COhMl i'VEK, API C
. Jcce < , , . twice in’
Workers os
SubUc’rie
the Unice.i States aiid it' oo are $3.50 per year, for*
"auraria library
U1B7Q1 753M7T3
..... correspondence to: EL HALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215.
For advertising rates, contact Federico Chavez at (805) 725»1337 or the mailing ad-res s listed above.
leave the analysis of what happened to the professionals. What we feel at EL MALCRIADO is a sense of deep sadness.
We have many visitors in Delano, and they usually stop by EL MALCRIADO’s office on their tour of the clinic and the Forty Acres.
Most of the people we meet are people with a profound sense of responsibility toward iheir disadvantaged brothers. Whether pacifists or not, they have deep concerns a-bout the war.
They know about, and are aware of the importance of “The Movement" which is growing in the linked States. The people who come to see us are people who know, at least in a general sense, why our black brothers and the browns, and the poor everywhere, are refusing to submit to the tyranny of hunger any longer.
So, we get a little complacent here. “Well,” we think, “everybody seems to know what’s happening. Everybody knows the danger of having a man like Johnson in the White House. There’s no danger...people will not permit the election of such a man...”
And then comes November 5.
Richard M. Nixon will soon be President of the United States.
He was elected on a platform of
He had himself photographed with his maw full of grapes.
He said the law is sufficient to protect farm workers.
He said we need more “law and order,” and intimated that rather than remove the causes of disorder, we must “enforce" order...a policy which history shows to be self-defeating.
The people of die United States, or at least a little more than 50 percent of those who vote, still do not understand.
Our struggle will continue. A union-busting song and dance man has been governor of California since 1966, and though he has tried he has not been able to put die United Farm Workers out of business. Black people, and Filipinos, and young people at the universities and La Raza still raise their voices in dissent.
Perhaps Nixon will see to it that the law is not reworked to protect farmworkers. Perhaps he will see to it that legal and illegal importation of strike breakers continue.
Whatever he does, we know he will be in favor of any measure to defeat us and against any measure which might benefit farm workers.
So, we are saddened, and worried,
CONTINUED ON PAGE 3
EL MALCRIADO P.0. BOX 130 More and more people are finding out that a subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS: FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English Espanol
ADDRESS-domicilio_
CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
Don't Buy California Grapes!
El guajalote grande is watching you.
i
I


EL MALCR1AD0, Friday, November 15, 1968/5
Stocked to the brim with grapes, these poor lit' 'cold storage piggy back trucks have no place to go.
Growers Hope for Holiday Sales
out a profit this year, despite boy-
UNSOLD GRAPES PILE UP AND UP
October proved to be a bad month for growers and shippers of California table grapes, according to a recent UFWOC research department report.
October shipments of table grapes were 21 percent lower than shipments during die same month last year, and 19 percent below a four-year average for the month, according to Market News Service reports.
Grape cold storage holdings are currently 48 percent higher than a year ago at the same time, according to reports of the California Department of Agriculture.
Prices of Ribier variety grapes were 50 cents per lug lower than they were last year, the Agriculture Department reports indicated.
The UFWOC report said the demand for table grapes has been very low during the last couple of weeks. In Los Anglees, grapes continued to sell below cost, based on FOB prices plus transportation.
principal cause of die poor market for table grapes this year is thought to be the UFWOC-sponsored consumer boycott of die fruit, which is produced on ranches where workers are denied Union representation.
Grape growers will attempt to unload nearly one fifth of this year’s total California grape crop during the Thanksgiving-Christmas season, if past years are any example.
As the holidays approach, cold storage units are stocked to die brim (the aisles runneth over) with grapes remaining unsold because of effective Union boycotting around the nation.
In some areas growers have broken through the boycott line, only to find prices plummet when these markets are flooded. In others, shipments have been cut down, and prices have sky-rocketed as agri-business tries to re-coup some of its losses on the struck produce.
Because grape sales drop immediately after the first of die year, and continue to decline until new crops are available in the spring, growers will jam fruit counters with not-so-fresh cold storage grapes in hopes that they can still squeeze
cott pressure.
This holiday season, if you see a red-nosed man with a dozen black eagles harnessed to a 1936-model sleigh, you’ll know it’s another "huelguista’’ spreading greetings of joy and a little message:
DON’T BUY GRAPES
Firm, but non-violent.


6/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1968
EDITORIAL
A PUZZLING PUNISHMENT
Most of our Union members are Catholic and in many of our Union meetings and picket lines we have had Catholic priests and nuns giving us their blessings and support.
Being a Union with a majority of Catholics in our membership, we seek the approval of the Church for our actions, and much of our strength comes from this approval and from the knowledge that all we are really trying to do is implement and practice the teachings of the Church.
That is Why we are lost trying to think of a good reason why Father John V. Coffield was withdrawn from his “faculties'as a priest” after picketing in front of a supermarket in support of our boycott of California table grapes.
From now on Father Coffield won’t be able to say mass, except privately, or preach. But he remains a priest for the rest of his life.
If all the reports are correct, the action against Father Coffield was taken because of his participation in “controversial issues.” James Francis Cardinal McIntyre has not made a public statement on the reasons for Father Coffield’s suspension. He does not need to, but for our own peace of mind, we would like to know if there were other reasons for suspending this priest besides his picketing activities in support of the consumer boycott of grapes.
We have received support from countless civic and religious groups. We seek and welcome this support. In our picket lines we have had Protestant ministers and Rabbis and Catholic priests marching to help die farm worker achieve better wages. It grieves and troubles us that it is a Catholic priest who is suspended for giving us a helping hand.
—J.R.-S.
BAY AREA CARAVAN
DELANO—The next caravan from the Bay Area to Delano is scheduled for Saturday, November 23. The caravan will leave in two sections: One departing at 7 a.m.
from 567 47th St., Oakland, and the other at 8 a.m. from the San Francisco Labor Temple at 2940 16th St., San Francisco.
Everyone is invited to come to Delano and talk to the people a-round. Food will be provided at the Filipino Hall, and if you want to stay overnight you are welcome to do so in the same Filipino Hall. Join the Caravan and come...for further information phone (415) 655-3256 after 7 p.m. or between 8 and 9 a.m.
Growers Prepare Anti-Union Campaign
WASHINGTON, D.C., November 9—Charles S. Toan, President of the National Council of Agricultural Employers, has called for an all-out effort on the part of growers to resist any new legislation designed to help farm workers in the newly-elected Congress, according to the November 9 issue of the Packer, a trade magazine for growers and shippers.
“The next few months will be as important as any period in die fight against the labor union in agriculture,” Toan said. NCAE members have supported a policy of " no unions in field or orchard under any circumstances,” he added.
Toan admitted that some growers believe support could be found for a bill that would be introduced with the specific problems of the agricultural employer in mind. Protection against strikes at harvest time would be the initial guarantee to gain grower interest, he stated.
Toan does not seem to be familiar with contracts wigned between the United Farm Workers and nine California growers, all of which include such a “no -strike” clause. But then again, if growers are dedicated to a policy of "no unions in field and orchard under any circumstances,” such a “no-strike* clause or any type of compromise with the Union would be rejected by them.
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EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1968/7
Eliseo Medina, leader of the UFWOC grape boycott in Chicago} checks out the new 1969 station wagon given to the Union by'the United Auto Workers.
Robert J. Sanchez Omer
The only completely Mexican Mortuary in northern California
SANCHEZ=HAIX MORTUARY
FRESNO
1022 "B" STREET TELEPHONE 237-3532
Services available everywhere, . ,No mat* ter where you live, our price Is the same . . .death notices in newspapers and on the radio, are Included, . . we can make arrangements for every economic situation Telephone 237-3532
KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE
car... life... fire
PHONES: 3222 East Mayfair Blvd. Office, 485-0650 Mayfair Shopping Center Residence, 266-1349 Fresno, Calif. 93703
Mr. Leap will be in the UFWOC Service Centery 105 Astiy DelanOy every Wednesday to serve U-nion members.
U.A.W. Helps Get Boycott Rolling
DETROIT~The keys to a 1969 Ford station wagon were given recently to Miss Lupe Anguiano, UFWOC boycott representative in Detroit by Walter Reuther, United Auto Workers President. Sister Anguiano, in turn, handed die keys to Brother Eliseo Medina, UFWOC’s Chicago representative, who will use the car in Chicago, and then drive it to Delano.
A total of $2,860 for the new station wagon was collected by UAW Local 600 officers, unit presidents, and local staff members, so that “the grape workers' cause could be better helped.”
In a letter of thanks to Walter Dorosh, President of Local 600, UFWOC Director Cesar Chavez wrote, “I want your membership to know that this is just the kind of support that keeps our struggle going.”
Growers Accused of Wage Fraiud
BAKERSFIELD, October 4— UFWOC attorneys filed suit today against Paramount Growers, Inc., after the firm made its. employees re-pack grapes and refused to pay them.
According to UFWOC attorneys. Paramount Growers, Inc., forced workers to re-pack grapes they had earlier picked and did not pay diem for the extra hours spent re-packing. In addition, the grower firm told workers that if they did not repack the grapes, they would not be paid at all for that day’s work, and only those grapes diat were re-packed would the growers count in making payment.


1 l« ' *" ■ '1 - - - -
FOUR WAYS TO BREAK A STRIKE
Articles in EL MALCRIADO refer to many kinds of immigration programs and permits. In answer to many questions about the meanings of such terms as "wetback" and "green carder," we print the following descriptions of the ways that farm workers can come
to the United States.
L. GREEN-CARDHOLDER: The green card or “Alien Registration" (Form 1-151) is a permit to immigrate to the United States. Presumably the immigrant will settle in the United States, pay taxes, and have all die rights and duties of American citizenship except the right to vote. Many, if not a majority, of Union members are or were green card holders and the Union supports a liberal policy permitting anyone who genuinely wants to immigrate to the United States to be allowed to do so.
Some Mexican citizens, however, obtain green cards widiout having any intention to “immigrate.” They continue to live in Mexico and use the immigration permit to travel and work in the U.S. Such temporary workers are often used by the growers to depress wages and break strikes.
TTie Union is strongly opposed to allowing this category of green carders to break strikes, and the Secretary of Labor has declared such action illegal. Some green carders actually live in Mexico and com mute daily*to jobs in the U.S. border areas. Living in Mexico, they can afford to work for a wage which a person in die United States simply could not live on. Others “immigrate" for a month or two of work and then return with their earnings to Mexico. Many are recruited as strike breakers before they ever leave Mexico. While these people are clearly violating the spirit and intent of the law, die government has deliberately closed its eyes to
these practices. Growers have in effect used the green carders to replace the outlawed bracero program.
2. BRACEROS (literally “arms”): Braceros are Mexican citizens who were not immigrants, who were brought into the United States for temporary farm work under a special U.S. government-financed program. The program was terminated by Congress in 1965 because of die outrageous exploitation of the workers and the adverse effect die bracero program had on the U.S. labor force and wages.
Under various loopholes growers received braceros in 1965, 1966, and 1967. With Nixon slated to enter die White House, growers can be expected to try to revive the program eidier directly, with new legislation in Congress, or through backdoor manipulation of Labor and Justice Department regulations and loopholes, as was done under the Johnson administration.
3. 72-HOUR PASS HOLDER: A 72 hour pass is given to Mexican citizens to visit friends and relatives in the U.S. or to shop in the U.S. This pass is often used to gain admission to the U.S., after which die pass-holder illegally takes employment and remains in the U.S. after die pass expires.
4. MOJADO (literally “wet”, from swimming across die Rio Grande River) and “ALAMBRISTA” (literally “fence jumper”): A “wetback” is someone who has illegally entered the U.S. without permit or papers of any kind.
H I
When an important stotdbreaks, EL MALCRIA-DO's star reporter Jaii|sleyes is always Johnny on the Spot. It's hartfiijfe, sometimes, rushing out at all hours ofMje day and night, but Jaime always bounces bl | He's a real brick.
WETBACKS FLOOD CALIFORNIA
FRESNO, November 3—At least 20,000 to 30,000 “wetbacks,” people who illegally entered die U.S. from Mexico, are working on San Joaquin Valley ranches this fall, according to a report by Ron Taylor in the November 3 Fresno Bee.
More than 17,106 illegals have been caught in the Valley in the past nine months, but some officials estimate apprehension rates at only 15- percent of the total number of "illegals” in die area, die report said. There has been a 70 percent increase in the hiring of illegals over the 1966 season, when the grape strike began to have a major impact on wages and working conditions in die Valley.
“Wetbacks" are viciously exploited, paid miserably low wages, cheated by die growers and contractors and foremen. They are often charged up to $200 or more for the privelege of being smuggled into the U.S. and given a job on some ranch, according to Taylor. Some Union members claim that it is not uncommon for a grower to work a wetback crew for an entire season, providing only room and board, but promising the big "bonus” paycheck at the end of die season. Then, a few days before the promised payday, the grower calls the boarder patrol and has all these “illegals” picked up.
Taylor notes that some growers and contractors prefer wetbacks over legal workers. “These are very poor people,” one foreman admitted frankly. “They need money desperately, or they would not be here. They expect to get caught, sooner or later, so they do nothing but work, eat and sleep. They
don’t complain and they put out a lot more work.”
Ironically, there are no penalties for die growers who recruit and employ wetbacks. Taylor describes the “rules" of die game, rules which' in effect encourage the growers to recruit and hire wetbacks widiout fear of punishment;
“Rule 1,” states Taylor, “It is not a crime to employ an illegal alien.
“Rule 2—While it is illegal to harbor a wetback, die prosecution must prove intentional concealment.
"Rule 3—The captured wetback normally is not deported, but sugns a voluntary repatriation authorization that carries no stigma, should he or she wish to return legally.
“Rule 4—Any wetback captured with a smuggler may be detained as a material withness, and he can be employed by local farmers, but half his wages will be witheld pending trial, to insure his appearance.”
While the government spent $1,200,000 in 1968 to transport wetbacks back to Mexico, growers bear none of the burden of this cost.
The 'system leaves die wetback without any protection of the law, at the mercy of venal and cheating contractors and growers. By accepting low wages widiout complaint, the wetback depresses the wage rate and lowers die standards 'and conditions of the legal workers who are competing with him for jobs.
The “lawnorder-lovin’” growers will almost certainly convince President Nixon's new “lawnorder-lovin'” Attorney General that this is an area where new laws and order are not needed.


10/EL MALCR1AD0, Friday, November 15, 1968
$333,127,695 TO THE SUPER RICH
Congress OK’s Unlimited Subsidies
Small independant farmers re-
Viva la Causa Y
El Progreso
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rftH&UCOH
s4tZon*tey
Fresno California
Defend Your Rights,
Redskin-Style
We read this article in the Christian Science Monitor last week, and thought some of our readers would enjoy it.
Picketers around the country, take noticel
WINNEMUCCA, NEVADA—S h 0-shone Indians, in full war paint and carrying rifles, are creeping up on white hunters and ordering them off the reservarion.
"They looked up and saw us, and that was enough," said John Pope, an Indian also know as "Rolling Thunder, * as he described one “raid." "One man’s mouth was moving but nothing came out. I gave them 15 minutes to get off die reservation. They made it! ”
Mr. Pope, a spokesman for the Shoshones, says the white hunters are “wasting deer while our people go hungry."
The Shoshones, led by Chief Frank Temoke, began the scare technique last week. Mr. Pope said five groups of white hunters have been Tun off the reservation in the Ruby Valley, near Elko, Nevada.
ceived a sharp rap on the knuckles recently, while mammoth corporation agri-business got the OK for more e nor mo us government subsidies, as the result of political finagling of a Congressional minority.
Several weeks ago the House of Representatives passed a bill placing a $20,000 ceiling on a farm subsidy to be paid to a single farmer.
However, two old men of Congress, rep. W. R. “Bob" Poage of Texas, and Senator Allan Ellander of Louisiana, managed to finagle a one-year extension of the existing farm subsidies program, which has no maximum figure.
Under the existing law, a farmer is paid a certain amount by the government for not growing specific crops. The purpose of die scheme is to maintain a steady price for the commodities. If the market were flooded with a particular crop; die argument goes, prices would plunge.
The $20,000 limit would in effect save the government millions by reducing the wallet bulge of corpor-
ate farmers.
Hie subsidy program ends up paying millions to already rich growers and .a pittance to poor farmers who don't own vast amounts of land.
In 1967, the subsidies over $25,000 totalled $333,127,693. Yet at the same time the government was helping die rich to become richer it was doing little to aid the poor farmer.
Even so, not all big farmers are happy with tiieir government six-figured checks. Some growers in-volved in large agri-business complain they're loosing money on the fallow lands, even with die government allotments, and that the lands now under subsidy could be put to use growing money-making crops.
According to Dean Porter, Texas grower, "If we’re not smart enough to raise something to sell, then we’re too stupid to be farmers.”
So while the bulge in the hip pocket of a few continues to grow, and the government puts off for another year the plight of the poor, and a few complain that the subsidies aren’t bringing in any profit, small farmers are left holding the bag.


S.F. Judge Dismisses Grower Suit
SAN FRANCISCO, November 4— An attempt by grape growers and shippers to halt the UFWOC consumer boycott of California table grapes was foiled today, when a $75 million suit against the Union was dropped by the plaintiffs.
Attorneys for the Ballantine Produce Company, die California Fruit Exchange, the Mendleson - Zeller Company, and the Royal Valle) Fruit Growers dropped the suit, which was filed originally on September 30.
The grower-shipper group had also asked for an anti-boycott injunction, which would have halted the boycott operation.
Federal District Court Judge Lloyd Burke refused to grant the
Another legal blow was dealt to large agribusiness recently, as two farm laborers successfully sued respective companies where they were employed, charging diem with failure to provide required sanitary facilities in the fields, including toilet and hand-washing facilities, both mandatory under state law.
Judge Walter Osborn of the Superior Court of Kern County in Bakersfield recently upheld David Garcia's suit of Bianco Fruit Coor-poration, and Julio Ibarra's suit against Guidera Farms. The code stipulates that sanitation facilities must be provided in the fields where farm laboreres are employed.
UFWOC attorney David Averbuck, lawyer for Garcia and Ibarra, claims that this is a significant victory for farm laborers. "Because of the courage of Mr. Garcia, Mr. I-barra, and many others who eager-
injunction, however.
UFWOC Assistant General Counsel David Averbuck said die Union has filed a counter-suit against the growers and shippers, charging them with conspiracy and price-fixing in violation of the Sherman Anti-Trust law. The UFWOC suit says die United Farm Workers have
iy gave information in support of the case, Mr. Ibarra and Mr. Garcia have managed to successfully win a sanitation suit against large agribusiness in California, something that had never previously been done," Averbuck explained.
The two farm laborers sued for $4,000 a piece, plus $5,000 in punitive damages.
In addition to upholding the suit, Judge Osborne ruled that Garcia and Ibarra, besides suing on behalf of themselves, could sue on behalf of all other workers employed at that time on the two ranches.
"The UFWOC is also suing D.M. Steele and Co., Guimarra Vienyard Corporation, and the David Freeman and Co., of which Lionel Steinburg is the president, for violation of the same code," the Union lawyer noted.
sustained $125,000 in damage to the boycott as the result of alleged illegal practices on the part of the growers.
Averbuck said the possible result of the case is that the growers may have to pay $375,000 in damages to the Union if the Court finds the growers guilty of the charges.
CHICANO LAWYERS
LOS ANGELES, November 7—
A Mexican-American and Indian Law Students Association, which will concentrate its efforts on bringing more Mexican-American and Indian students to the law schools of UCLA, the University of Southern California, and Loyola, has been organized in California according to a recent announcement.
The new association has a starting membership of 24 students who have committed themselves to return to the barrios and reservations after graduation to try to bring social change through legal action.
Members of the new association are already negotiating with agencies such as anti-poverty programs concerned mainly with Mexican-Americans and Indians to find out the possibilities for the kind of active involvement they are looking for.
Chairman of the Association is Ralph Ochoa. Loreta Sifuentes, the first Mexican-American woman law student at UCLA, is the secretary.
Unsanitary Growers Taken to Count


)
Beaten Picket Suffers Coronary
SALEM, OREGON, November 6— UFWOC sympathizer Robert J. Schaaf suffered a heart attack Tuesday, October 29, after he was allegedly assaulted and beaten by the owner of the Central Market in Salem, where he was picketing in support of UFWOC’s boycott of California table grapes.
According to reports in Oregon newspapers, store owner Rupert B. Syracuse, 43, and meat cutter Robert C. Yocom, 50, were arrested after die incident. Syracuse was charged with assault, and Yocom was accused of disorderly conduct.
UFWOC boycott representative Nick Jones, a member of the Migrant Ministry, said Schaaf and Mrs. Bema Wingert were picketing the store when Syracuse came out and dragged Schaaf from the parking lot, striking him in the process.
Mrs. Wingert said Yocom pushed her and twisted her arm while forcibly removing her from the parking area.
Schaaf was taken to die coronary unit of Salem Memorial Hospital immediately after the incident.
Syracuse did not appear in Court the following day, although he was expected to have shown up to sign formal trespassing complaints a-gainst Schaaf and Mrs. Wingert.
Later, students and faculty members of Mount Angel College continued picketing the Central Mar-'ket, and a 24-hour yigil lasting several days was held to mark support • for the boycott and to protest Syracuse alleged beating of Schaaf.
Mt. Angel College student David Jon-Mikel, 23, announced last week he would fast until November 12, the date set for hearings on an injunction limiting picket activities requested by Syracuse.
Pickets were served with a temporary restraining order on Tuesday, October 29, in which Judge Douglas Hay placed a limit of four on the number of pickets which would ber permitted at the Central Market.
Hearings on the order and a per-
manent injunction were scheduled for Tuesday, November 12.
Priest Canned For Strike Action
Father John V. Coffield was relieved of his priestly duties last Tuesday, November 28, after picketing an El Monte supermarket a-gainst California table grapes, according to a report of the Los Angeles Times.
The priest, who was suspended by James Francis Cardinal McIntyre, said the action was taken against him because of his participation in “controversial" activities, but that he picketed in front of the supermarket last week because he felt that "educating people to the purposes of the grape strike is definetely a priestly activity."
The suspended priest added that from now on “I cannot say mass, except privately, or preach, but I am still a priest, and expect to be one until I die.” He believes that in time to come his position will be more acceptable and he will be fully reinstated. Meanwhile, he said, he would support himself by
Fresno Lutherans Visit the Strike
DELANO, November 12—After a day of touring UFWOC operetions in Delano and meeting with striking farm workers, a group of Lu-teran ministers returned to their parishes in Fresno County with a broadened outlook on the problems facing California farm workers. U-FWOC’ s acting Director Larry Itliong met with the group, whose churches have many growers but practically no farm workers as pa-rishoners, and later complimented the group for coming to Delano and listening to die other side.
One minister admitted frankly that “We know die growers' problems and we sympathize with diem. They are our friends and neighbours, and members of our churches.”
Itliong commented, "Some of diem seemed a little hostile when they first arrived, but they really tried .to open their minds and see both sides. We told, diem that as long as die growers refused to negotiate, we have no alternative but to strike and boycott. They seemed to understand.”
Other protestant churches, which are so hasty to condemn the farm workers and the strike and the boycott, should follow the example of these Lutherans and come to Delano and listen to the farm work-
social work and other means.
era siue oi tne controversy
N. Y. Benefit to Aid UFWOC
Alan King and Peter, Paul and Mary will headline a benefit performance December 4 at Carniegie Hall for California grape workers and the UFWOC.
Union New York representatives report that Senator Edward Kennedy is honorary chairman of the benefit committee. Others on the committee include Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz, President of the New York Labor Council Harry Van Ars-dale, Senators Jacob Javits, Eugene McCarthy, George McGovern, Char-;
les Goodell, and Harrison Williams, as well as numerous Congressmen.
UFWOC Vice President Dolores Huerta reports that Cesar Chavez, National Director of the UFWOC, will attend the benefit concert.
Tickets for the performance run $3, $5, $15, $25, and $50, and are tax deductable. For information and reservations regarding the bene fit concert for strikeing California grape workers, write; UFWOC/ Tickets, Room 914, 515 Madison A-• venue, New York City, N. Y. 10022


EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1968/3
ASST. DIRECTOR ITLIONG HOLDS DOWN FORT
Itliong to Head Union During Chavez's Absence
DELANO, November 5—UFWOC Assistant Director Larry Itliong told assembled strikers tonight that Director Cesar Chavez will be absent from Delano "from three weeks to a month" because of his need for rest and quiet during convalescence from a back ailment*
Chavez, who was hospitalized in San Jose for nearly a month with severe back pain, returned to Delano in late September*
While convalescing at home, he continued to participate actively in the administration of the Union. He was in traction, and on a special diet*
Chavez went to San Jose for a check up recently, and was advised by his doctors that his condition had not improved, and that a month’s complete, rest was necessary for his recovery*
The UFWOC Director is now being cared for in Santa Barbara* No visitors are permitted.
Itliong will lead the Union in Chavez* absence.
LET US ALL BE NAMECALLERS
It is imperative that we in the radical movement know exactly who our oppressors are. That means, among other things, calling names-especially the names of those key money-powers and their servants who attempt to remain invisible behind the screen of their power apparatus. One such figure, brought recently to the attention of the Guardian, is the man above: Dr. John S. Foster, Director of Defense Research and Engineering for the Defense Department. His job? To hand out more than $60 million per year for scientific research on behalf of U.S. imperialism. One of his interests, indeed, is the "motivations" of the Columbia rebels. In a future issue of the Guardian therefore, you will I earn more about him, including his address.
Among other of our recent and regular features: Da two-page diagram of the power structure that dominates Columbia' University O a detailed breakdown of U.S. military arms manufacturers â–¡ regular dispatches from Southeast Asia and Paris by Wilfred Burchett Q former SNCC-member Julius Lester's popular column Onew lef' analysis by Carl Davidson â–¡ book, film and record reviews â–¡ nuch more in 20 to 24 pages tabloid
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EL MALCRIADO SAYS CONTINUED FROM PACE 2
about the decision made by the voters of the United States of America. We had hoped that people were
finally beginning to understand*
Yet, we know that there are many who DO understand, that they will continue to help us, and that in the end they will be a majority.
The Union will keep fighting until that day comes.
Okay. Enclosed is $_____for a:_____one-year regular subscription (52
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upr968


VEL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1968
A BAD DAY FOR FARM WORKERS
ELECTION RESULTS SPELL TROUBLE
by Y. A. Perdimos Malcriado Political Edi tor
The next two years will be difficult and dangerous ones for the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee as the result of state and national election results from November 5.
Most ominous of all for the Union is the fact that Republicans took control of both houses of the California State Legislature, which means Governor Ronald Reagan ought to have a cooperative rubber stamp for anti-Union legislation. The Union can expect the introduction of some kind of anti-boycott measures.
The State Senate will remain under the thumb of right wing "Democrat” Hugh M. Burns, president pro tern and a long-time Union foe who has repeatedly attempted to smear UFWOC with insinuations and redbaiting.
UFWOC had endorsed Hubert Humphrey before the elections, and participated in a massive voting drive in East Los Angeles, largely a Mexican-American area. Despite record turn-outs and huge majorities for die Democrats in minority areas, Humphrey lost the county by a tight 40,000 votes.
In Delano and other areas with numerous farm workers, Humphrey won, including Kings, Fresno, and San Benito counties. In Kern County, Wallace polled more than 10, 000 votes. Nixon carried die county, but without a majority.
A BRIGHT SPOT
One bright spot in the results was the victory of Alan Cranston as California’s new Senator. A-nothcr friend of the farm workers, Senator Ralph Yarborough ofTexas, succeeded to the chairmanship of the Senate Labor Committee, but the loss of several Senators, such as Clark of Pennsylvania, Gilligan of Ohio, Clark of Illinois, and Morse of Oregon will make passage of
National Labor Relations Act coverage for farm workers difficult in the 91st Congress.
AND THEN THERE'S NIXON
At the very least, President (!) Nixon can be expected to oppose the grape boycott and to work toward preventing the extension of theNLRA to farm workers.
Nixon at his worst could bring back braceros and open up the borders to even more strikebreakers. He could launch all kinds of har-rassing "investigations” of die Union and further increase the government’s purchases of grapes, already at record highs.
Nixon will be unable to destroy the Union, no matter how bad he
is. In die long run, the strength of the Union depends on the dedication and loyalty of its members— not on the opposition or support of politicians.
As UFWOC Assistant Director Larry Itliong said recently, "We have not had much sympathy or understanding from die present administration. Whether or not we win this strike depends on you, the members, and the amount of sacrifice you are willing to make to build the Union,” he said.
Me can break their haughty power: gain our freedom when we learn/ That the Union makes us strong.
— "Solidarity Forever"—
i


EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1968/13
TWINS IN TEXAS!
Editor and Brothers;
It’s been a long time and i hope you guys haven’t forgotten us here in Rio Grande. Today is the 22nd and the trial of the Rangers starts today. I was going to be present at the trial, but my wife had an unexpected visit from the stork and left us a pair of beautiful kids, a boy and a girl. So you see we have twins now.
By the way, I’m living in Weslaco now, and I hope to do some organizing here. I would like for you to send me a bunch of past issues so that I can distribute them among the people here.
This year 1 migrated north to Michigan and then to Ohio. I met Baldemar Velasquez and I was there when the strike began. I started thinking of the good old days, and we sang our songs.
I hope to hear from you soon. Viva la Causa,
Viva la Huelga,
Reynaldo de la Cruz
Weslaco, Texas October 22, 1968
"ESTOY CON USTEDES”
Editor:
In my neighborhood there is a Mayfair store which I patronize much of the time. Last week I found outside a picket line and went and talked to die people that were carrying the signs and smiled at them. Les salude de mano y les dije que yo estoy con ustedes— pero lo que no entiendo es porque the truck drivers deliver goods to such stores—
A union man no debe de cruzar la linea de pickets. Remito mi cheque para la proxima subscrup-cion.
Estov con ustedes,
Renaldo Alarcon
Montebello, California Ocotober 11, 1968
THANK YOU
Editor;'
I have been receiving EL MAL-CRIADO for some months and I appreciate it. Thank you so much.
I have been keeping up fairly well with the trials and tribulations of Cesar Chavez and the farm workers for several years through the Progressive and Ramparts magazines. I read a couple of books about your struggles, including "Delano.” I was privileged to watch two discussions on TV about your problems, hosted by Les Crane.
I want you to know I'm sorry there are such people as most of the big growers with so little compassion for these people who help make possible their big profits.
Robert Kennedy’s death was so sad. It is hard for me to really believe he is gone. Sure doesn't seem right, does it?
I wish you all, as I wish for all suffering humanity, a better life.
Sincerely,
(Mrs.) Sally Sirmerman
Sepulveda, California October 29,1968
t M
DELANO, November 13 — members of the United Far in Wor-feerd Organizing Committee wish to express to Mr’} and Mrs. Juan Gdvfea of Bakersfield their sym-* pathy at the November 8 los'$Nj| Mrs. Govea’s mother, Mrs. Maria de la Rosa.
Mrs. De La Rosa was the grandmother of Toronto boycott coordi-i nator Miss Jessica Govea. She yvas 72 $©ars old when she passed away, and is survived by thred living children and 13 grandchildren.' p Services''"were held Wednesday^ November 33, at St. Ann’s Chprcli in Porterville.
DELANO MAYOR HEADS AGRI-BANK
DELANO—Dr. Clifford Loader, now serving his sixth term as mayor of Delano, and for the past three years a bitter and vocal opponent of his city’s farm workers, has been elected Chairman of the Board of die National Bank of Agriculture. Loader succeeds Robert Setrakian, prominent Valley grape grower, who had previously held the post.
a reminder from the CREDIT UNION...
ARE YOU A MEMBER OF YOUR FARM WORKER CREDI'TUNION?
SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY ASIDE DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY TO SPEND DURING THE WINTER.
COME IN TODAY, AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE MONEY AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE.
FARM WORKERS
DELANO,
CREDIT UNION P.O BOX 894 CALIFORNIA 93215
OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER 105 Asti St.a Delano3 Ca.
I


JJ|/£ji_jj^j^j_ADOj__FrjjaYx_November 15, 1969
A Christmas Gift from
EL MALCRIADO AND THE "PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED FARM |jf»- WORKERS ORGANIZING. COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO
j»V •'^*.Jinvitei. you to took into the publications of .the United Farm Workers, for unique and meaningful gifts, and for new insight into one of the most significant labor struggles taking place in America today. The art, music, and literature offered here are an outgrowth of the strike by grape pickers in the vineyards around
8 Delano, California. The money collected from the sale of these
J:’ works goes directly to the United Farm Workers, to further the efforts to organize America's most exploited workers, the farm workers. We encourage you to put your money to work in this cause, and introduce your family and friends and neighbors to this courageous struggle by the farm workers for dignity and justice.
MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR
This beautiful calendar employs twelve great works by Mexican and Mexican-Ame-rican artists, which have appeared as covers on "EL MALCRIADO" over the last three years. All are in the graphic art tradition of Mexico, woodcuts, engravings, pen-and-ink drawings. This type of art was an outgrowth of the Mexican Revolution' (1910-1920) and represents one of the outstanding expressions of Revolutionary Art from Mexico. It remains very much a part of Mexican-Am6rl-can culture.
The calendar is 9 x 18, red ink on ochre stock.
($2. 00 gluts SO$ handling; 6 for $10.00)
BMotafa -V
Please send me ______of. your Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars & $2.00.
each plus SO4 for postage and handling:
NAME
ADDRESS ___________________. â–  ..
CITY . ____________ . STATE ZIP '
(Make check or money order payable to United Farm Workers, Box 130, Delano, Calif. 93215)


1

I
'll
1
I
j
THE FIRST 100 DAYS THE GREAT DELANO STRIKE, by Eugene Nel
HUELGA! " by Eugene Nelson mains tlie finest account yet lished on the early daysoof Delano Grape Strike. Nelson a picket line Captain (and later led the Union drive to organize the melon fields of Texas) and writes with intimate knowledge of the origins and beginnings of the strike. Nelson also includes a briefbiogra-phy and interviews with Cesar Chavez and other Union leaders, and a history of the National Farm Workers Association, the predecessor of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee.
(160 pages, with illustrations by George Ballis...$1.50)
"HuelgcT’Buttons
LARGE BUTTONS (2” diameter), black and red, with the UFWOC eagle and “Viva la Causa” or
"huelga—DELANO"...........
($1.00 each or 5 for $3.75)
Regular Buttons (1 1/2" diameter or smaller), black and red, with the UFWOC eagle and "Boycott
Grapes* or similar captions.
(50£ each or 5 for $2.00)
BASTA!
("ENOUGH"), THE TALE OF OUR STRUGGLE. Photos by George Bal1 is. .
"BASTAI * is a unique book, a photographic essay on the battle for dignity in the fields of California. The text is from the historic-.Plan of Delano, the proclamation of the farmwworkers which was sread at the rallies as the, farm workers marched from Delano to Sacramento in 1966. There is an introduction by Cesar Chavez. The photographer, George Ballis, has spent his life , in the San Joaquin Valley. He is a sensitive artist, .in the tradition of Dorothea Lange, who truly captures the spirit of the Movement. ($2.00 plus 50f for postage, handling)
BUMPER STICKERS, "Boycott Grapes" with the UFWOC eagle... 15" long ,
(5 for $1.00)
BLACK AND RED WALL POSTER, 17” x 23", of Emiliano Zapata, with the banner headline, "VIVA LA RE-VOLUCION". Zapata was the hero of the Mexican Revolution, who led the peasants of Central Mexico in their struggles for land and liberty. ($1.50, plus 25$ handling. 5 copies for $5.00)
VIVA LA REVOLUCION
Delano
EL MALCRIAD0, Friday, November 1/5, 1
HUELGA!


Discount Dept* Store
Delano
- QUUmSALE ~ 15 otfmVY
everything imaginable^, at lowest prices anywhere 7
Open SUNDAYS £7, $,
SO CO PS
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ONCE-A-YEAR CHANCE FOR BIG SAVING
NAME
ADDRESS^______________________________ . __________________
CITY STATE ZIP ______
(Make check or money order payable to United Farm Workers, Box ISOt Delano, Calif* 9321S)


Full Text

PAGE 1

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PAGE 2

2/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1 968 in this issue ITLIONG LEADS UFWOC ..•• Page 3 GROWERS HOPE FOR HOLIDAY SALES . . • ....••..••. Page 5 A PUZZLING PUNISHMENT • . Page 6 WETBACKS FLOOD CALIFOR NIA •......•....••.. .' .•• Page 9 A CHRISTMAS GIFT FROM DELANO .••.......•.... • Page 15 ! ;. 4( the. lin; " '"I i ,. 0)0• $3.50 per ;::: U1B701 7534793 ---v•• .. v rrespon,enee to'Et l'IALCRIAOO, Post Office 9oJ< 1)0, Oelano,Callforrlia9)215. Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215, For advertising rates, con tact Federico Ch.ivez at (805) or the mailing ad ress listed above. El Malcriado says f BY THE EDITOR opposition to the things which so 1l1e elections are over. We'll many of us are struggling for. leave the analysis of what happened He had himself photographed with to the professionals. What we fee l his maw full of grapes. at EL MALCRIADO is a sense of He said the law is sufficiem to deep sadness. protect farm workers. We have many v isitors in Delano, He said we need more •Jaw and and they usually stop by EL MALorder," and intimated th.::n rather CRIADO' s office on their tour of chan remove the causes of disorder, the clinic and the Forry Acres. we must "enforce" order ..• a policy Most of the people we meet are which history shows to be seH people with a profound sense of re-defeating. sponsibility toward their disadvanThe people of the United States, raged brothers. Whether pacifists or at least a little more than 50 or not, they have deep concerns apercent of those who vote, Still do bout the war . not understand. know about, and are aware OUr struggle will continue. A of the importance of "The Moveunion-busting song and dance man menc" which i s growing in the U has been governor of California nited States. TI1e people who come since 1966, and though he has tried to see us are people who know, at _ he has not been able to put the least in a general sense, why our United Farm Workers out of busi-black brothers and the browns, and ness. Black people, and Filipinos, the poor everywhere , are refusing and young people at the universities to s u bmit to the tyranny of hunger and La Raza still raise their voices any longer. in dissent. So, we get a little complacent here. Perhaps Nixon will see to it that "Well." we think, "everybody seems the law is not reworked co protect to know what's happening. Every-farm workers. Perhaps he will" see body knows the danger of havin g . a co ir that legal and illegal impor-man like johnson in the White House. cation of strike breakers continue. There's no danger • •. pcople will not Whatever he does, we know he permit the election ofsuchaman .• • " will be in f avor of any measure to And then comes November 5. defeat us and against any measure Richard M . Nixon will soon be which might benefit farm workers. President of lhe United States . So, we are saddened , and worried, ___ NUED ON PAGE EL MALCRIADO More and more people are finding out that a • p ,o. BOX 130 subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way ;DELANO, CA to keep up with the farm worker struggle. 93215 Don't be left out-send in this coupon t;.oday! FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS1 FOR A ONEYEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY "TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR. CITYc tado ZIP __ Don Buy California Grapes l EZ guajaZote grande is l.Jatahing you.

PAGE 3

UNSOLD GRAPES PILE UP AND UP October proVed to be a bad month for grower s and shippers of Cal Ifo r nia table grapes, according to a recent UFWOC research department repor t . October shipments oftabl e grapes were 2 1 percent lower than shipments dur ing the same mon t h last year, and 19 percent below a four year average for the month, according to Market News Service reports. Grape col d Storage holdings are currently 48 percent higher than a year ago at the same time , ac cor di n g to reports of the California Department of Agriculture. Stoaked to the brim with gr>apes, these poor Z.il' 'cold storage piggy back trucks have no place to go. P rices of R i bie r variecy g rapes were 50 cents per lug lower than Growers Hope for Holiday Sales Grape growers will attempt to out a profit this year, despite boy-they were last year, the Agricul un load nearl y one fifth of this year's con pressure. ture Department reports indicated. total Califor nia grape crop during the TI1is holiday season, if you see a The UFWOC report said the de-Thanksgiving-Christmas season, if red-nosed man with a dozen black mand for tab l e grapes has been very past years are any example. eagles harnessed m a 1936-model l o w during the last c o u p l e of weeks. As the holidays approach, col d sleigh , you ' ll know it' s another I n Los Anglees , grapes conti nued to storage units are stocked to the "huelguista" spreading greetings of sell below cost, based on FOB prices brim (the aisles runneth over) with joy and a l itt l e message: plus transpor tation. g r ape s remaining unsold because of DCX'>J'T BUY GRAPES Pri ncipal cause of the poor mar-effective Union boycott ing around the ket for table grapes this yea r is nati on. thought to be theUFWOC -sponsored In some areas growers have consumer bOycott of the fruit, which b r oken rhrou g h the bOycot t li ne, i s p r oduced on ranches where work-only to find "prices pl u mmet when ers are denied Union representa-these markets are flooded. In tion. o thers , shipments have been cut down, and prices have sky-rocketed as agri-business tries to re-cou p some of i t s losses on the struck produce. Because grape sales drop immediately after the first of the year, and continue to decline until new crops are available in the s pring, growers will jam fruit co unte r s with not -so-fresh cold storage grapes in hopes that they can still squeeze Firm, but n 'onv iolent .

PAGE 4

6/EL MALCRIADO, Friday, NJvember 15, 1 968 EDITORIAl A PUZZUNG PUNISHMENT Most of our Union members are Catholic and in many of our Union meetings and picket lines we have had Catholic priests and nuns giving us their blessings and support, Being a Union with a majority of Ca tholics in our membership, we seek the approval of thf! Church for our actions, and much of our strength comes from this approval and from the knowledge that all are really: trying w do is implement and practice the teachings of the Church. l11at is why we are lost trying to think of a good reason why Father John v . Coffield was withdrawn from his •raculties'a.s a priest" a frer picketing in front of a supermarket in support of our boycott o f California table grapes, From now on Fathe r Coffield won't be able to say mass, except privately , or preach . But he remains a priest for the rest of his life. If all the reports are correct, the action against Father Coffield was taken because o f his participation in "controversial issues." james cis Cardinal Mcl ncyre has not made a public statement on the reasons for Father Coffield's suspension. He does not need to, but for our own peace of mind, we would like to knO\X if there were other reasons for suspending this priest besides his picketin g activities in support of the consumer boycott of grapes. We have received support from countless civic and religious groups. We seek and welcome this su pport. I n our picket lines we have had Pro testant ministers and Rabbis and Catholic priests marching to help the farm worker achieve better wages. I t grieves and troubles us that It is a Catholic priest who is suspended for g ivin g us a help i ng hand, BAY AREA CARAVAN DELANO-The next caravan from the Bay Area to Delano is scheduled for sarurday, November 23. The car:avan will l eave in t\VO sections: One departing at 7 a.m. from 567 47th St., Oakland, and the other ar 8 a.m. from the San Francisco Labor Temple at 2940 16th Sr., San Francisco. Everyone is invited to come to Delano and calk to the people a round . Food will be provided at the Filipino Hall, and if you want co stay overnight you are welcome to do so in the same Filipino Hall. join the Caravan and come, • • for further information phone (415)6553256 after 7 p.m. or between 8 and 9 a.m. • Growers P repare Anti-Union Campaign WASHlNGTON, D.C., November 9 --Charles S. Toan , President of the National Council of Agriculrural Employers, has called for an allout effort on part of growers to resist any new legislation designed to help farrh workers in the newly-elected Congress, according to the November 9 issue of the Packer, a trade magazine for grow-ers and shippers. "The next few mo9 ths will be as important as any period in the fight against the labor unf ,on in agriculrure," Toan said. NCAE members have supported a policy of " no unions in field or orchard under any circumstances," he added . Toan admitted that some growers believe support could be found for a bill that would be introduced with the specific problems of the agricultural employer in mind. Pro tection against strikes at harvest time w o u 1 d be the initial guar antee to gain grower interest, he stated. To an does not seem to be familiar with contracts wigned between the United Farm Workers and nine California growers, all o f which include such a "no -strike" clause. But then again, if growers are dedicated to a policy of "no unions in field and orchard under any circumstan ces," such a "no-strike• clause or any type of compromise with the Union would be rejected by them.

PAGE 5

I EL F lriday, Npvember 15, 1968/7 Eliseo Medina , Leader of the UFWOC gr<;Pe boycott. in Chicago, checks out new 1969 stat'l.-on wagon g'l-ven to the Unio n by the Um .. ted Auto Workers . The on l y completely Mexican Mortuar y In northern Ca 1 i fornl a SANCHEZ-HALL MORTUARY 1022 "B" STREET Services available everywhere, . ,No ter w "here you 1 ive, our price Is the same death notices In newspap e r s and on , • we can make arrangements for every economic situation Tetepkone 23?-3532 KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE car ••• life ••• fire PHONES: Office, 485-0650 Res i 9ence, 2'66-1349 3222 East Mayfair Blvd. Mayfair S hopping Center Fresno, Ca I if. 93703 Mr. Leap be in the UI!WOC Service Center, 105 ASti .. Delano, everoy Wednesday to seMJe U nion members . U.A . W . Helps Get• Boycott Rolling DETROIT--The keys t o a 1969 Ford s tation wagon were given recently to Miss Lupe Anguiano, UFWOC boycott representative in Detroi t by Walte r United Auto Workers President. Siste r Anguiano, i n rurn, handed the keys to B rother Ellsco Medina, UFWOC' s represemative, who will use car In Chicago, and then drive it t o Delano . A total of $2, 86 0 for the new s t a tion wagon was collected b y UAW Local 600 officers, unit presidents, and l ocal s taff membe r s , so that •me grape worke r s ' cause cou l d be better helped." In a l e tter of thanks to \\' alter Dorosh, Prcsidem of Local 600 , UFWOC Director Cesar Chavez wrote, • 1 want your membership to know that this is just the kind of support that keeps our struggle go i ng.'" • Growers Accused of Wage Fraud BAKERSFIELD, OCtober 4UFWOC 3ttorncys filed s uit today against Paramo unt Growe rs, Inc., after the firm made its. employees. re-pack grapes an d rejused to _pay t hem. According to UFWCX::: attorneys, Paramount Inc., wOrkers to r e -paCk grapes they ha d earli e r picked and did not pa thein for the extra hours re-packi ng , I n addition, grower firm told work e r s that if .theY did not rePack the grapes, they would not be paid at a ll for that day's work, and only those grapes that were r e packed woul d the count in mak in g payment,

PAGE 6

FOUR WAYS TO BREAK A STRIKE Articles in EL MALCRIADO refer to many kinds of immigration programs and permits. In answer to many questions about the meanings of such terms as 11wetback11 and 11green carder,11 we print the following descriptions of the ways that farm workers can come to the United States. L. GREEN-CARD HOLDER: 1l1c these practices. Growers have in green card or "Alien effect used the green carders to (Form 1-151) is a permit to immi-replace the outlawed bracero pro-grate to the United States. Pregram. sumably the immigrant will settle 2. 8RACEROS(literally"arms"): in the United States, pay taxes, and Braceros are Mexican citizens who have all the rights and duties of were not immigrants, who wer-e American citizen s hip except the hrought into the United States for right to vote. Many , if not a rnatemporary farm work under a special jority, of Union members are or U .S. gov ernment-financed program. were green card holders and the The program was terminated by Con Union supports a liberal policy pergres s in 1965 because of the out mining anyone who genuinely wants rag eous exploitation of the workers to immigrate to tJ1e United States and the adverse effect tl_le bracero to be allowed w do so. program had on the U.S. labor force Some Mexican citizens, howe ver, and wage s . obtain green cards without having Under various loopholes growers any intention to TI1ey r e c e ived braceros in 1965, 1966, continue to live in Mexico and use and !967. With Nixon slated to enter the immigration permit to travel d1e White House, growers can be and work in the U.S, Such ternexpected to try to revive the pro -porary workers are often usee ( by gram e it he r directly, wit h new legis-the growers to depress wages and !arion in Congress, or through back -break strikes. door manipulation o f Labor and jus-The Union is strongly opposed to tice Depr .nment regulations and allowing this category o f green carloopholes. as was done under the ders to break Strikes, and the Secrejohn son admini s tration. tary o f Labor has declared such 3 . 72-HOUR PASS HOLDER: A action illegal . Some green carders 72 hour pass is g i ven to J\• texican actually live in Mexico and commute citizens to visit friends and reladaiiy" to jobs in the U.S. border areas. tivcs in the U.S. or to shop in the Living in Mexico, they can afford U.S, TI1is pass is often used to to work for a wage which a person gain admission to the U.S., after in the United States simply could which thepass-holderillegallytakes not live on. Others "immigrate" employment and remains in the for a month or two of work and U.S. after the pass expires. then remrn wid1 their earnings to 4. MOJADO(literally "wet", fr'om Mexico . Many are recruited as Strike breakers be fore they ever leave Mexico. While these people are clearly violating the spirit and intent of the Jaw, d1e government has deliberately closed its eyes to swimm ing across d1e Rio Grande River) and (literally "fence A "wetb ack" is someone who has illegally entered the U.S. widlOut permit or papers of any kind. When an important s D01s star reporter on the Spot. It's ing out at all hours Jaime always bounces I EL MALCR I Aalways Johnny , rushday and night, but He's a real brick. WETBACKS FLO D CALIFORNIA FRESNO , November 3--At least" don't complain and they put out a 20.000 to 30.000 "wetbacks," people lot more work." who iilegally entered the U.S. from Ironically. there are no penalties Mexico , are working on San joaquin Valley ranches this fall, according to a report by Ron Taylor in the November 3 Fresno Bee. More than 17.106 illegals have been caught in the Valley in the past nine months. but some officials estimate apprehension rates at only IS.. percent of the total number of "illegals" in the area, the report said. There has been a 70 percent increase in the hiring of illegals over the 1966 season. when the grape strike began to have a for the growers who recruit and employ describes the "rules" of the game. rules which in effect encourage the growers to recruit and hire wetbacks with out fear of punishment: "'Rule I," states Taylor. "It is not a crime to employ an illegal alien. "Rule 2-While it is illegal to harbor a wetback. the prosecution must prove intentional concealment. "'.Rul e 3--The captured wetback normally is not deported, but sugns major impact on wages and working a voluntary repatriation authoriza-conditions in the Valley. tion that carries no stigma. should "'Wetbacks" are viciously ex-he or she wish to rerurn legally. plaited, paid miserably low wages. "Rule 4--Any wetback caprured with cheated by the P,owers and con-a smuggler may be detained as a tractors and foremen. They are material withness, and he can be often charged up to $200 or more employed by local farmers. but half for the privelege of being smuggled his wages will be witheld pending into the U.S. and given a job on trial. to insure his appearance." some ranch. according to Taylor. Some Union members claim that While the government spent it is not uncommon for a grower $1,200.000 in 1968 to transport wet-to work a wetback crew for an backs back to Mexico. growers bear e'ritire season, providing only room none of the burden of this cost. and board, but promising the big The 'system leaves the wetback "bonus" paycheck at the end of the without any protection of the law. season. Then. a few days before at the mercy of venal and cheating the promised payday. the grower contractors and growers. By ac-calls the boarder patrol and has cepting low wages without complaint, all these picked up. the wetback depresses the wage Taylor notes that , some growers rate and lowers the Standards '-and and contractors prefer wetbacks conditions of the legal workers who over lega l workers. "These are are competing with him for jobs. very poor people , " one foreman . ad-The awnorder-1ovin'" growers mitred fran kly. need money will almost certainly convince Pres-desperately, or they would not be ident Nixon's new " 1awnorder -lovin"" here. They expect to get caught. Attorney General that this is an area sooner or later, so they do noth-where new law s and order are not in g but work, eat and sleel>. They needed.

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10/EL MALCRIADO, Friday Viva Ia Causa . y El Progreso Fresno Californi a Defend Your Rights, Redskin -Style l November 15, 1968 "HANDOUTS WILL O NLY DESTROY YOUR INCENTIVE TO WORK ... " .$333,127,695 TO THE SUPER RICH CongressOK's Unlimited .Subsidies Small independam farmers r-eate farmers. We read this article ceived a sharp rap on the knuckles Tile subsidy program ends up in the Christian Sc ience Monitor I as t week, and thought some of our readers would enjoy it. P icketers around the country, take WINNEMUCCA, NEVADA--S h a shone Indians, in full war paint and canying rifles, are creeping up on white hunters and ordering them otf the reservarion. '"They looked up and saw us , and that was said john Pope, an I nd i an also know as •Rolling Thunder, " as he described one •raid." '"One man's mouth was moving but nothing came om. I gave them IS minutes to get off the reservation. They made it! Mr. Pope , a spokesman for the Shoshones, says the white hunters are " wasting deer while OW' people go hWlgry." 'J1le Temoke, began the scare techn i que last week. Mr. Pope said five of white hunterS have been Tun off the reservation in the Ruby Valley , near Elko, Nevada. recently , while mammoth paying millions to already rich grow-ation agri-business got the OK for ers and . a pittance to poor farmers mor e enormous governmen t subwho don't own vas t amounts of land. s idies, as the res u 1 t of political In 1967, the subs idies over $25,000 finagling o f a Congressional mi totalled $333,127,693 . Yet at the noricy. same time the government was help-Several week s ago the House of ing the rich to become richer it was Representatives passed a bill plac-doing little aid the poor farmer. in g a $20,000 ceiling on a farm Even so, not all b ig farmers are subsid y .to be paid to a single far happy with their g o vernmen t six-figured checks. Some growers in-However , two old men of Congress, valved in large agri-business rep. W. R. " Bob" Poage of Texas , complain they 're loosing money on and Senator Allan E llander of Louisthe fallow lands, even with the goviana, managed to finagle a one-ernment allotments , and that the . year extension of the existing farm lands now under subs idy could be subsidies program, which has no put to use growing maximum figure. crops. Under the existing law, a farmer According to Dean Porter, Texas is paid a certain amount by the grower, "If we're not smart enough government for not growing specific to raise something to sell, then we're crops. The purPQse of the schenie too stupid to be farmers. " is to maintain a steady price for So while the bulge in the hip poethe commodities . If the market were ket o f a few continues to grow, and flooded with a particular cropphe the government put s off for another argument goes, prfceswouldplunge. year the " plight of the poor , and a Th e $20,000 _limitwould in effect few complain that the subsidies save the government millfonsbyre-aren't bringing in any profit, small clueing the wallet bulge of corpor-farmers are left holding the bag.

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S.F. Judge Dismisses Grower Suit SAN FRANCISCO, November 4-An attempt by grape growers and shippers to halt the UFWOC consu mer boycott of California table grapes was foiled today , when a $7S million suit against the Union was dropped by the plaintiffs. Attorneys for the Ballantine duc;e Company, the California Fruit Exchange, the Mendleson -Zeller Company , and the Royal Valle) Fruit Growe r s dropped the suit, injunction, however. which was filed originally on Sep' UFWOC Assistant General Coun -tember 30. sel D av id Averbuck said the Union The grower-shipper group had has filed a counter-suit against also asked for an ami-boycott the growers and shippers, charging junction, which would ha v e halted them with conspiracy and price-the boycott operation. fixin g in violation of the Sherman Federal District Court judge Anti -Trust l aw. The UFWOC suit LJoyd Burke refused to grant the says me United Farm Workers have sustained $125,000 in damage to the boycott as the result of alleged illegal practices on the part o_r the growers. Averbuck said the possibl e result of the case is that the growers may have topay$375,000indamages to the Union if the Court finds the growers guil ty of m e c harges. ...-------Unsanita ry Growers Taken to Count Another le gal blow was dealt to Jy gave information in support of large agribusiness recently, as two the case, Mr. Ibarra and Mr . Gar.:. farm l aborers successfully sued cia have " managed to successfully respective companies where they win a san itation suit against were employed , charging then1 with agribusiness in California, failure to provide required sanithing that had ne ver previously been tary facilities in the fields, includin g . done,• Averbuck exp lained. toilet and facilities, The two farm laborers sued for both mandatory unde r state Jaw. a piece, plus $5 , 000 in pu -judge Walter Osborn of the Sunitive damages. perior Court of Kern County in I n addition to upholding the suit, Bakersfield recently uph e ld David judge OsbOrne ruled that Garcia Garcia's suit of Blanco Fruit Coor-and Ibarra, besides suing on be p oration , and julio Ibarra's suit half of themselves, could sue on against Guidera Farms. The code behalf of all other workers employStipulates that sanitation facilities ed at that time on the two ranches. must be provided in the fields whe r e •Th e UFWOC is also suing D .M. farm laboreres are emplo yed. Steele and Co., Guimarra Vienyard UFWOC attorney David Averbuck , Corporation, and the David Freeman lawyer for Garcia and Ibarra,claims and Co., of which Lionel Steinburg that thi s is a s ignificant victory is the president, for vio lation of for farm laborers. •secause of the same code; the Union lawyer the courage of Mr. Garcia, Mr . 1noted. barra. and many others who eagerCHICANO LAWYERS LOS ANGE LES, November 7-A Mexican-American and Indian Law Students Association, which will con centrate its efforts on bringing more Mexican -American and Indian Stu dents to the law sch oo l s of UCLA , the UniversitY of Southern Califor nia, and Loyola, has been organized in California according to a recent annOWJcement. The new associ ation has a starting membership of 24 students who ha ve committed themselves to return to the barrios and reservation s after graduation to try ro bring social change through legal action. Members of the new association are already negotiating with agenc ie s such as anti-poverty programs con cerned mainly with Mexican-Americans and Indians to find out the possibilities for the kind of active involvement they are looking for. Chairman of the is Ralph O..:hoa. Loreta Sifuentes, the first Mexican-American woman law student at UCLA, I s the secrc

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Beaten Picket Suffers Coronary Fresno Lutherans SALEM, OREGON, November 6UFWOC:: sympathizer Robert], Schaaf suffered a heartattackThesday, October 29, after he was allegedly assaulted and beaten by the owner of the Central Market in Sa lem, where he was picketing in support of UFWOC's boycott of Cal ifornia table grapes. According to reports in Oregon newspapers, store owner Ruper-t B. Syracuse, 43, and meat cutter Robert C. Yocom, 50, were arrested after the incident. Syracuse was charged with assault, and Yocom was accused of disorderly conduct . UFW OC boycott represents t i v e Nick jones, a member of d1e Migrant Ministry, said Schaaf and Mrs. Berna Wingert were picketing the Store when Syrac use came om :md dragged Schaaf from the parking lot, striking him in the process. Mr s . Wingert said Yocom pushed her and twisred her arm while forcibly removing her from the park-ing area. Schaaf was taken to the coronary unit of Salem Memorial Hospital immediately after rhe incident. Syracuse did not appear in Court the following day, although he was expected to have show n up to sign formal tre'spassin g complaints a g3inst Schaaf and Mrs. W i ngert. Later, students and faculty members o f K.!owll Angel College continued picketing [}1(! Central 4kct, and a 24hour yig il lasting sev era! days was held 10 mark supporl for the boycott and to protes t Syracuse alleged beating of Schaaf, Mr. Angel College student David jonMikel, 23, announced last week. he would fast until November 12, the dare ser for hearings on an in juncrfon li miting picket activities requested by Syracuse. Pickets were served with a tem porary restraining order on Tuesday, October 29, in which judge Douglas Hay placed a limit of four on the number of pickets which would ber permitted at the Central Mar-kcr, Hearings on the order and a permanent injunction were scheduled for TuesdayrNovember 12. Priest Canne , d For Strike Action Father john V. Coffield was relieved of his priestly duties last Tuesday, November 28, after picketing an El Monte supermarket against California table grapes, according to a report of the Los Angeles Times. TI1e priest, who was suspended by James Francis Cardinal Mcintyre, said the action was taken against h im because of his participation in "controversial" activities, but char he picketed in front of the supermarket last week because he felt that "educating peoPle to the purposes of the grape is dcfinetely a priestly activity ... The suspended priest added that from now on "I cannot say mass, except privately, or preach, but I am still a priest, and expect to be one until I die." He be lieve s th.::n in t ime to come his position will be more acceptable and he will be fully reinstated. Meanwhile, he said, he would ..>upport himself by social work and other means. Visit the Strike DELANO, November 12--After 'ii day of touring UFWOC operetions in Delano and meeting with striking farm workers, a group of Lu teran ministers rerurned to their parishes in Fresno County with a broadened outlook on the problems facing California farm workers. UFWOC' s acting Director Larry !tHong mer with the group , whose churches have many growers but practically no farm workers as parishoners, and later complimented the group for coming to Delano and listening to the other side. One minister admitted frankly that "We know the growers' problems and we sympathize with them. They are our friends and neighbours, and members of our Itliong commented, "Some of them seemed a linle hostile when they first arrived, but they really tried to open their minds and see both sides. We told, them that as long as the growers refused to negotiate, we have no alternative but to strike and boycott. They seemed to understand ... Other protestant churches, which are so hasty to condemn the farm workers and the Strike and the boycott, should follow d1e example of these Lutherans and come to De lano and listen to the farm workers' side of the controversy. N.Y. Benefit to Aid UFWOC Alan King and Peter, Paul and les Goodell, and Harrison Williams, Mary will headline a benefit peras well as numerous Congressmen. forrnance December 4 at Carniegie UFWOC Vice President Dolores Hall for California grape workers Huerta reports that Cesar Chavez, and the UFWOC, National Director of the UFWOC, Union New York representatives will attend the benefit concert. report that Senator Edward Kennedy Tickets for the performance run is honorary chairman of the bene-$3, $5, $15, $25, and $50, and are fit committee. Others on the com tax deduccable . For information mittee include Secretary of Labor and reservations regarding the bene Willard Wirtz, President of the New fit concert for Strikeing California York Labor Council HarryVanArs-grape workers, write: UFWOC/ dale, Senators jacob Javits, Eugene Tickets, Room 914, 515 Madison McCard1y. George McGovern, Char:--= venue , New York City, N . Y. 10022.

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EL M ALCRIADO, F r iday, N ovember 15, 1 9 68/3 ASST. DIRECTOR ITLIONG HOLDS DOWN FORT ItUong to Head Union During Chavez 's Absence DELANO, November 5--UF'WOC Assistant Director Larry !tHong told assembled strikers tonight that Director Cesar Chavez will be ab sent from Delano "from three weeks to a month • because of his need for rest and quiet during convales cence from a back ailment. Chavez, who was hospitalized in San jose for nearly a month with severe back pain, returned to Del ano in late September. While convalescing at home , he continued to part icipate actively in the administration of me Union, He was in traction, and on a spec ial diet. Chavez wem to San jose for a check up recently, and was advised by -his doctors that his condition had not improved, and that a month's :omplete rest was necessary for h i s r ecoverY . The UFW OC Director is now being cared for in Santa Barbara. No visitors are permit ted. l tliong wil1 lead the Union in C h avez ' absence . E L MALCRI ADO SAYS CONTINUED FRcJ-1 PAGE 2 about the decision made by the voters of the United States of America. We had hoped that peop l e were filia ll y beginning to understand . Yet, we know that there are many who DO underst and, that they will conrinue to help us, and that in the end they w , ill be a majority. The Union will keep {lghting until that day comes. LET US ALL BE NAMECALLERS I t is imp e rative that we i n t h e r a dk: a l mov e m ent know eJtactly who ou r oppressor s are. That m ea ns, a mong othe r thinQs, calling nalt'lflespacially the name5 of those k e y mo ne y pow ers and their serv a nts who attempt to rem ain invis i ble behind the sc:r"n of the ir po-r apparatus . On e su ch fi(jure, br ou9h t recently t o the attention of the Gu•dia n, is the a bov e: D r. John S . Foster , Director o f Def e nse RIMa r ch and Engineering f or the D ef en se D ep1 rt me nt. His jo b ? T o hand out mo r e tha n $60 mill ion per y ear for sc ienti fic: researc h on beh a lf of U .S. imp erill l ism , O ne o f h b interes ts , i n deed, is t he " motivation s " of the Columbill rebel s. In a future i$$Ue o f the Gu ar dian theref o re, you will l ea r n m o r e a bou t him , inc luding hi s addr81:S. Among other of our recent and regu l ar features: O a two.paye diagram of the power Structure that dominates Co lumbia University O a deta i led breakdown of U.S. military arms manufacture r s 0 regular dispatches from Southeast Asia and Par i s by Wilfred Burchett 0 former SNCC member Julius Lester's popular column anew lef analysis by Car l Davidson 0 book. film and record reviews o n •xh m ' ore i n 20 to 2 4 pages tabloid Subsc r ibe todly. Okay. Enclosed is$ __ [01' a : __ one-year regu/01' subsc r iption (52 weeks) at"$ 7. __ one-yea r student 01' G/ subscription a t $3.50 (include nam e o [ school) . __ r enweek trial subscriptio11 at $ 1 . On all bu t t h e ten week trial. please add $2 [or C anada and L atin Ameri c a , $]el sewhe r e Nom A d dru City Guardi a n t a t t---Zip _ _ _ 1 97 E . 41h St. newsv.eekly N•:w York, N.Y. 1CJ(J(J9

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4/EL M A LCRIADO , Friday, November 15, 1968 A BAD. DAY FOR FARM W ' ORKERS ELECTION RESULTS SPELL TROUBLE by Y. A. Pe rd i mos Malcriado Political E ditor The next tv.o years will be difficult and dangerous ones for the United Farm Workers Organizi ng Committee as the result of state and national electi on results from Novembers. ominous of a ll for the Union is t he fact that Republicans took control of bOth houses of the California State Legislature, which me an s Governor Rona l d Reagan ought to have a cooperative rubber stamp for antiUnion legislation. The Union can expect the introduction of some kind of amibOycott The State Senate will remain under the thumb of right wing Hugh M. Burns, president pro. rem and a long-time Un i o n foe who has repeatedly attempted to smear UFWOC with insinuations and redbai ting. UFWOC had endorsed Hubert Humphrey before the electi ons , and participated in a massive voting drive in East Los Angeles, largely a Mexican -American area. Despite record turn-outs and huge majorities for the Democrat s in rninority areas, Humphrey lost the county by a tight 40,000 votes. I n Delano :lnd other areas with numerous farm wolkers , Humphrey won, includin g Kings, Fresno, and San Benito counties. I n Kern Co unty, Wallace polled more than 10, 000 votes. Nixon carried the county, but widlOU a majority. A BRIGHT SPOT One bright spot in the results was tile victory of Alan Cranston as California's new Senator. Another friend of the farm workers, Senator Ralph Yarborough of Texas, succeeded to the chairmanship of the Senate Labor Committee, but the loss of several Senators, such as Clark of Pennsylvania, Gill i gan of Ohio , Clark of Illinois, nnd Morse of Oregon will make passage of J National Labor Relations Act coverage for farm workers difficult i n th e 9lst Cong ress. AND Ttl EN TtiERE 1 S NIXON At the very least, President (!) Nixon can be expected t o oppose the grape boycott and to w Ork toward preventin g the extension o f theNLRA to farm workers. N ix on at his worst could bring back braceros and open up dte borders to even more strikebreakers. He coul d launch all kinds o f harrassing of the Union and further increase the government' s P,urchases of grapes, already at record highs . Nixon will be unable to destroy the Union , no maner how bad he is. In the long run, the strength of the Union depends on the dedication an d loy alry of its members-not on the opposition or support of politicians. As U FW OC Director Larry ltli ong said recently, •we have not had much sympathy or understanding f r om the present administration. Whether or not we w i n this strik e depends on you , the members, and the amount of sacrific e you are willing to make to build the Union , " he said. We aan break their haughty power _ : gain our freedom when we lear>n/ That the Union makes us strong. --''Solidarity Forever"-EL PRESIDENTE

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Letters TWINS IN TEXASI . Editor and Brothers: It's been a long time a nd I hOpe you guy s haven't forgotten u s here in R i o Grande . Tod ay i s the 22nd and the rrial of the Rangers starts today. 1 was going t o be present a t the trial, but my wife had an unexpected visit f r om the stork and left us a pai r or beautiful kids , a bo y and a girl. So you see we have twins now, By the way , I'm living in Wes laco now, and I hope to do some o r ganizing here, 1 would like for you to sen d me a bunc h of past issues so that I can distribute them among the people he re. This yea r 1 m i g r ated north to M ichig an and then to Ohio . I me t Baldemar Velasquez and I was there whe n the strike began. I started thinking o f the good old days, and we sang ou r songs . 1 hope to hear from you soon. V iva Ia Ca usa, Viva Ia Huelga, Reyna l do de la Cruz Weslaco, Texas October 22, 1968 "ESTOY ,coN usTEDES" Editor: In my neighborh ood there is a Mayfair store which I patronize much of the time. Last week I found out s ide a picket lin e and we m and talked to the people tha t were carrying the signs and smiled at them. Les salude de mano y les dije que yo est oy con ustedes-pero l o que no entiendo es porque the truck drivers deliver goods to such s to resA union man no debe de cruzar Ia linea de picket s . Remito mi ch e que Ia proxima subscrupc i on . Estov con ustedes, Renaldo Alarcon Montebe llo, California Ocotober II, 1968 Editor: I have been receiving EL MAL CR IADO for some months and I appreciate it. Thank you so much. I have been up fairly well w ith the trial s and tribulations of Cesir Chavez and the t3rm workers for severa l years through the Progressive and Ramparts maga z ines. 1 read a coup le o f books about your strugg les, i ncluding "De lano . • I was privileged to watc h two discussions on TV about your prob lems, hosted by Les Crane. I want you t o know I'm sorry there are .such people as most o f the b i g growers with so little compassion for these people who help _ make possi b l e their big profits . Robert Kennedy's death was so sad. It i s hard for me to really believe he is gone. Sure doesn't seem right, does it? 1 wisti you all, as 1 wish for all s u ffering humanity, a better life. S incerely, (Mrs.) Sally Simmerman Sepu lv eda , Ca!Hornla 29, 1 968 croanberr>ies si Uvas no DELANO MAYOR HEADS AGRI-BANK DELANO--Or. Clifford Loader, now servin g hi s sixth term as may or of Delano, a n d for the past three years a bitter and vocal op pone n t of h i s city's farm workers, has been elected Chairman o f the Board of the National Bank o f Agriculture. Loader succeeds Robert Setrakian, prominent Valley grape g rower, who h ad previousl y h e ld the post. a reminder from the CREDIT UNION ... YOU A MEMBER OF YOUR WORKER IN TODAY, AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE MONE PQLAN FOR THE WORKERS CREDIT UNION P . O BOX 894 o DELANO , CALIFORNIA 93215 OFFICES AT SERVICE CENTER 10 5 Asti St. Ca.

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14/EL HALCRIADO, Friday, November 15, 1968 A Christmas Gift from EL MALCRIADO AND THE PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED FARM WORKERS ORGANIZING. COMMITTEE, AFLCIO invite you to into the publications of the United Farm Work er"s, foro unique and meaningful. gifts, and for new insight into one of the most significant labor st!'Uggles taking place in Ame rica today . The art, music, and literature offered heM are an outgrowth of the str>ike by g r a p e pickers in the vineyards aro un d DeZ.ano, California. The m oney c ollected from t he sale of these works goes directly to the Unite d Farm Workers , to further> t he effor>ts to organize A meri ca's most exploited worokers, the farm wor>kers. We enaour>age you to put your money to work in this cause, and introdu ce your [ami ly and friends and neighbors to this cou rageous by the farm workers for dignity and justice. MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR This be autiful cale nd a r e mploys t welv e great works b y Mexican and Mexican-Ame .rican artis ts, whic h have appeared as covers on 11EL M ALCRIADD11 over the last three yea r s . All are in t h e graphic art traditio n o f Mexico , woodcuts, engrav ings, pen-and-ink drawings . This t y pe of art V.:as a n outg rowth o f the Mexican Rev o lutio n (19 1 0 1920) an d represents o ne o f the outstanding expressions of Revolutio nary A r t from Mexico . I t r e mains ver y muc h a part o f Mexican-American culture . The calendar i s 9 x 18, red ink on ochre s tock. ( $2. 00 50 handling; 6 for $10. 00) . . ' . . : PZease send me __ of your Me:ciaan Graphia Arts Calendar s @ $2.00 eaah plus 50 for postage and handling: , NAME ADDRESS-------------'-----------......,.. CITY STAT-E ZIP _{Make check o r money order payable to Un: z.ted Pa.nn Delano, Calif. 93215)

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"Huelga "Buttons LAR GE BUTTONS diameter), black and red, with me UFWOC eagl e and " Vi v a Ia o r "huelga-DELANO" •••• • ••••••••••••• ($1 .00 each or 5 for $3 . 75) Regular Buuon s ( I 1/2" diamete r or smaller) , black and red, with the UFWCX:::: eag l e and Grapes" or s i m il a r capdons ••. . •. (SO each or 5 for $2.00) BUMPER. ST I CKE R , $ , "Boycot t Grapes• widl the UFWOC eagle ••• I S " lon g 1 (S for $ 1.00) BLACK AND RED WALL POSTER, 1 7" x 23" , of Emiliano Zapata, w ith the banner headline, "VIVA LA RE VOLUCION". Zapata was Ole hero of the lvlex i can Revolution, who led the peasams of Cemral Mexico in th e i r St
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Discount Dept. Store 918 Main St. Delano . IS ON AfoJf! '1--everything lowest prices anywhere , Open SUNDAYS BIG ClOSf-OUT VAlUfS . '"' ONCE-A-YEAR CHANCE FOR BIG SAVING 0 . _ _ ..... . ....... . eacn pt.us oU9 and handting: N AME _______ _ ADDRESS ____ C ITY STAT-E ZIP (Make check or money oraBr payable to Un1.-tea Fcmn WoJ-keios, Delano, Catif. 93215)