Citation
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 19

Material Information

Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 19
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Volume II9 Number 19 Delanp* California Sunday3 December 13 1968
pi Mai rd i Ah*: CiVnH'tw â–  'lo^R/r'
El Molcriado
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER
10*
IN ENGLISH


iva y 9
in this issue:
Di Giorgio Sales Worry UFWOC P. 3
UFWOC Showdown With Bank of America P. 5
Farm Workers Begin Minimum Wage Collection P. 6 Thanksgiving Message from
EL MALCRIADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker , is published twice monthly by the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in die United States and its possessions are $3.50 per year, and foreign , including Canada and Mexico, US $5. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC
aro inr*1nHoH in mnnihln Hiioq
AURARIA LIBRARY
U1A701 7534ADA
Address all correspondence to: EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Second class postage paid at Delano, California.
For advertising rates, contact Jaime Reyes at (805) 725-1337 or diernailinjj^ddres^listej^bove^
EDITORS
You are welcome to reprint ma-terial from EL MALCRIADO, provided a copy is sent to us and die item is credited "From EL MALCRIADO—UFWOC.”
GIUMARRA "SOLVES” OUR PROBLEMS
suggestions extremely interesting.
BY THE EDITOR
We weren’t invited, but John Giu-marra Jr, spoke to die convention of the International Apple Association in Philadelphia two weeks ago.
According to a report in the “Produce News,” Johnny told the assembled apple growers an “industry -wide * organization should be organized to combat boycotts, but evidently he failed to mention that negotiations between the growers and the Union would end the boycott tomorrow. Mr. Giumarra, our phone number is 725-1314.
Giumarra also offered three suggestions for a “lasting solution," according to the Produce News Report:
“1. Increase die fedeal minimum wage... to place it on a par with industrial workers.” (The federal minimum wage is now $1.15. There is no state minimum wage for men in California.)
“2. Unionization will not solve the basic problems because of die seasonality of crops. The growers can do it by providing unemployment funds.
“3. Pass a Federal Farm Labor Act totally unrelated to the Federal Labor Relations Act and designed to protect workers and growers, and to prohibit boycotts."
EL MALCRIADO finds the three
If Giumarra thinks unemployment insurance is a good idea, why doesn’t he provide it for his workers? Under the umemployment insurance program in California, employers of farm workers who want their workers covered need only pay the cost of the program. Di Giorgio, which is under contract with the
United Farm Workers, pays the cost of the program, and Di Giorgio workers are covered by unemployment insurance when they are laid off. The unemployment benefits are one of die provisions of the contract.
Giumarra says he wants to end the boycott. He says laws are needed to prevent boycotts. For months he’s been saying the boycott doesn’t bother him. If it’s not hurting him, what’s he crying about?
The Giumarras and other growers persist in looking for the “real reasons,” the “incidious, diabolical” truth about die Union. They cannot understand that it boils down to the fact that farm workers in California are tired of being exploited, and want the voice of collective bargaining to aid them in gaining decent wages for die work they do.
If, as Giumarra says, die workers do not want a Union, why doesn’t he negotiate procedures for an election? The answer to that question is obvious.
EL MALCRIADO P.O. BOX 130 iDELANO, CA 93215
More and more people are finding out that ai subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don’t be left out—send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English___ Espanol_
ADDRESS-domicilio_
CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
Don't Buy California Grapes!
El guajalote grande is watching you.
1


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2", 1968/3
Dl GIORGIO SALE WORRIES UFWOC
LAMONT, November 22—UFWOC Representative Mack Lyons announced to several hundred assembled Di Giorgio workers tonight that the remaining Di Giorgio ranch in Kern County will be sold soon.
Lyons told the worjcers he would meet with them again on Monday, December 2,. to discuss the possible results of the sale for the workers, who are covered under a UFWOC contract.
Assistant Director Larry Itliong said the Union was preparing for any eventuality, but the protection of the existing Di Giorgio contract would remain a high priority for the Union, regardless of die pressures of die strike and boycott.
The new buyer of the Di Giorgio ranch has not been announced, and Di Giorgio officials have said they will not reveal the name of die new owner until the purchase is completed.
About 800 workers were employed on the ranch during die peak of the harvest this year. Most have been laid off in the lull between the harvest and the pruning season.
Di Giorgio’s holdings in Kem County have been producing a variety of crops, including cotton, peanuts, potatoes, wheat, asparagus, plums and wine grapes.
Of the 6,117 acres remaining in Di Giorgio’s possession, 2,525 acres are covered by a contract with the Secretary of the Interior which requires, under the 160 acres limitation law, the sale of excess acreage within a period of 10 years from the date of the contract.
The 160 acre limitation prohibits owners of more than 160 acres from using federally subsidized water for irrigation of the fields. A little more than ten years ago, federal officials required Di Giorgio to dispose of the excess acreage, since it was being irrigated with federal water. Since 1967, die company has been selling its land to comply with the contract it signed
ten years ago.
About 4,700 acres in the Delano area were sold in 1967. Most
of the remaining acreage is in the Arvin-Lamont area south of Bakersfield.
Mack Lyons (left) explains3 as Acting Director Itliong} attorney Cohen3 and workers listen.
TOYS FOR DELANO
LOS ANGELES, November 25— Joe Serda, UFWOC Boycott Director in Los Angeles has announced that a state wide drive to collect new or good quality toys for chil-dem of farm workers will be capped by a Christmas party in Delano on December 14. Caravans Los Angeles, Oakland, San Francisco and other areas of the state will carry food and toys to Delano.
A program will begin at approximately 11:30 and includes lunch, ‘movies and slides on the strike,
talks by Union leaders and a religious ceremony.
All friends of the Huelga are invited to join the strikers in Delano on December 14.
Food and toys are being collect ed at UFWOC headquarters in Los Angeles at 3016 1/2 East, First St. (phone 265-1584); in Oakland at 568 47th St. (phone 655-3256) or other UFWOC offices around the state. If toys are wrapped, they should be labeled as to what’s inside.


4/hL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, igb«
CLEVELAND—This picture of Joe, Johnnie, Carmen, Frankie and Brother Julio Hernandez appeared in Cleveland^ "Catholic Universe Bulletin" last month? Brother Julio, his wife Fina, and the kids are coordinating the boycott in Ohio. Hernandez and his family arrived in Cleveland in September, and have been working full time on the Grape Boycott ever s i nee.
Three Rochester Men Fast In Protest of Scab Grapes
ROCHESTER, November 21—Two young men from Rochester, N.Y., today were beginning the 13th day of a fast designed to bear “personal witness during the Thanksgiving season to the hunger and suffering faced by the nation’s farmworkers," while a third man, Dr. John Radebaugh, Director of Migrant Health Programs at die University of Rochester, was about to begin a fast “to further demonstrate the concern of community leaders over the continued sale of grapes in several Rochester chain stores.” The two young men, whose fast has been commended by Mayor Frank T. Lamb of Rochester, and by many religious and civic groups, have gone without food since November 7, while Dr. Radebaugh said he planned to fast “until every Rochester super-
market has removed California grapes from its shelves.”
In order that stores be brought into negotiations with die UFWOC lnterfaith religious services have been conducted in front of a leading Rochester chain stores, and individual customers have initiated lawsuits charging one chain with fraud, because the suit alleges,consumers were told grapes on sale were not from California when in fact they were.
As a result of the fast and the pressure brought on the stores which sell scab grapes by the Rochester community, one major chain has cancelled its order for grapes, and several others have agreed to discuss the boycott issue with community groups.
Birchers Fail to Cool Oregon UFWOC Support
KLAMATH FALLS, OREGON— Throw in a union audience viewing the film “Huelga,” six cups of John Birchers, add a dash of George Wallace supporters, stir well, bake for about two hours in a heated, but non-violent oven, and lo and behold!, you have a food caravan making its way to Delano.
This previously unknown recipe was discovered by Ed Chierra, UFWOC representative in Oregon, when he recently showed “Huelga” to an audience of members of the International Woodworkers Association (IWA).
“Birchers, armed to the teeth with copies of “The Grapes, Communist Wrath in Delano,” (a right-wing, American Opinion red-smear pamphlet) came in and set up information tables with House Un-American Activities Committee literature,” reports Irv Fletcher, vocal supporter of the UFWOC and president of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) in Klamath Falls.
According to Fletcher, die majority of people at the film-showing were Birches. They made a feeble attempt to persuade those present who were not members of their organization that the UFWOC was a "communist front” Union. (UFWOC Assistant Director, Larry Itliong, is suing the John Birch Society for $1 million for libel because they stated in "The Grapes,” that he was a card-carrying member of the Communist Party.)
In addition to die Brichers, die two co-chairmen of the Klamath Falls support group for George Wallace were also in evidence at the meeting.
The result of the meeting was a hearty endorsement of the farm workers Union by those AFT and IWA members present. They also decided to join the food caravan leaving Portland November 29.
V
\


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, 1968/5
UFWOC SHOWDOWN WITH BANK OF AMERICA
SAN FRANCISCO, November 21— The United Farm Workers Organizing Committe today called on the mammoth Bank of America, one of the largest banks in the world, to recognize the UFWOC as bargaining agent for those workers who harvest grapes on more than 5,000 acres of land owned by the bank near Ducor, in Tulare County, California. '
Bank of America officials have refused to negotiate with the Union, and have refused to study proof submitted by the Union that it did, indeed, represent die workers.
The bank also refused to discuss a secret ballot election to determine if the workers wanted the Union to represent them.
UFWOC has announced die Union and thousands of individual farm workers will withdraw their funds from die bank if its officials continue to refuse to negotiate.
The dispute can be traced to September 21, 1965, when whole crews at the ranch, then owned by P. J. Divizich, joined the strike, which was certified by the California Department of Labor.
During the next two years, the Union called on Divizich to negotiate several times.
Divizich, reportedly the owner of the largest contiguous vineyard in the nation, refused to discuss elections or any kind of negotiations with die Union.
On January 10 of this year, in a forced sale at the Tulare County Courthouse in Visalia, the Bank of America bought the Divizich holdings. It was reported that the sale was made to cover debts which Divizich had to the Bank of America.
In February, Agribusiness Investment Co. suddenly appeared, with, as its president, an attorney for Bank of American. It is die “employer” and runs the property, but the bank retained direct ownership of the land, according to
It appears that bank officials continue to make major managerial decisions about the operation of die
According to UFWOC organizers Manuel Uranday andWilliamChandler, who signed up the workers during a three-month organizing drive beginning in September, the Bank of America and AIC hired many of the workers directly. In other cases,
labor contractors were employed and they recruited and hired the workers.
In still other cases, grapes were sold "on the vine” to other local growers, who brought their own workers in or used the AIC’s employees to harvest the crop.
On October 24, a telegram was sent to die B of A by Cesar Chavez, who notified them that UFWOC represents a majority of die workers and asked for negotiations with the
bank and its agricultural subsidiary.
Bank officials at first claimed that they did not control AIC, and that the Union would have to deal with that company.
It turned out later, however, that attorneys for B of A were also the attorneys for, or officials of, AIC,
Vice President Iverson of die Bank of America admitted that the bank owned and controlled die land, but that they planned to sell it. Iverson agreed to meet with Union rep-resentatives, but later they telephoned to say they would not negotiate, recognize the Union, or allow elections for the workers.
They claimed they were not legally obligated to do so, since farm workers were excluded from the National Labor Relations Act. Second , claimed one high B of A official, “We don’t want to lead the parade...this is a social revolution.”
Bank officials also reportedly said , “We have more important business to attend to."
At press time, die Union was waiting for a final answer from the bank before proceeding with further action.
Viva ia Causa Y
El Progreso
(? TKcxccm,-
f4*MfUCOH
rftZvwecf
Fresno California


6/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, 1968
milliones of doilars involved1
FARM WORKERS BEGIN TO COLLECT
MINIMUM WAGES
SACRAMENTO, November 20— Nobody knows how many women and children will be cheated out of their farm wages this year, according to officials of the. State Division of Industrial Welfare.
Several months ago, the State Industrial Welfare Commission announced new minimum wages of $1.65 an hour for women and $1.35 per hour for minors, to become effective February 1.
In typical agri-business style, growers immediately went to court to block payment of the new minimum wages.
On September 10, Judge Leonard Friedman of the Third District Court of Appeal ruled that the minimum wage was applicable to farm workers just like anybody else, and ordered growers to pay the wages retroactive to February 1.
Now comes the problem of how to enforce the ruling.
Attorney Jay Linderman of the Industrial Welfare Division estimates there are "tens of thousands of workers and millions of dollars involved."
Asked how many workers have back wages due them, Mrs. Virginia Allee, chief of die division said "We don’t have the vaguest idea.”
What She does know is that the Industrial Welfare Division has 48 people available to investigate cases of growers who refuse to pay die back wages.
Until cases are reported however, Mrs. Allee says the Industrial Welfare Division will rely on "grower self-discipline” on a kind of honor system.
In the meantime, thousands of migratory, seasonal farm workers have left California to return to their homes or to continue >yorking in other states.
Thousands more, who do.not speak English or read die newspapers probably have no idea whatever
that they are owed back wages for every hour they worked since February 1 at wages below the minimum.
The California Grape and Tree Fruit League was the organization which temporarily blocked die payment of the minimum wage in the Courts.
In 1963, when minimum wages of $1.30 for women and $1.05 for minors were announced, it was the same organization that blocked die new minimum in die courts.
Now attorneys have filed suit to determine what the minimum wage should have been from 1963 until February 1, 1968. If it turns out; the $1.30 was legal, who is going to see to it that back wages be collected by thousands of migrants who may have worked for 50 dif-J ferent employers during that period.
The 48 investigators of the State Division of Industrial Welfare?
And that is why farm workers need a Union.
GIFT SUBS FOR XMAS--$3.50 i
JET
NOW ALSO IN
LAM0NT 11121 Mai
IAMIXI
" st. | Bakeries
FOUR LOCATIONS TO SEftVE SOU IN KERN COUNTS
BAKERSFIELD WASCO DELANO
630 Baker St. 1000 "F" St. 407-llth Ave.
323-4294 758-5774 725-9178
Egg Bread and Paetriee All Kinde of Donute Cakee for all Oaaasione French Bread
We have a large Selection of Spanish Magazines, Books, and Records.
LAtmtAMO Mr,

a reminder from the
CREDIT UNION...
ARE YOU A MEMBER OF YOUR FARM WORKER CREDlf’uNION?
SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY ASIDE DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY TO SPEND DURING THE WINTER.
COME IN TODAY, AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE MONEY AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE.
FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P.Q BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215 OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER
J05 Asti St.i Delano, Ca.


EL MALCRIADO,

On Thursday, November 28, all America—except the pool will thank God for the abundance of good things this earth has produced. Little will they know that the poor will be celebrating a different kind of Thanksgiving, a .Thanksgiving of hope for the future when they, too, will enjoy similar blessings. It is ironic that those who till the soil, cultivate and harvest the fruits, vegetables and other foods that fill your tables with abundance have nothing left for themselves. This is very poignant at Thanksgiving.
The farm workers today (California grape pickers) are trying to share in that abundance so they too can have a happy Thanksgiving in years to come. This is why they are asking you to join with them in passing up grapes this Holiday Season and until such time as their rights as laborers are recognized. Indeed, this is a small sacrifice to ask.'
We are certain God wills that all men share in the good things this earth produces. Remember the poor this Holiday Season. DON'T BUY GRAPES.'
Cesar Chavez.
GRAPE BOYCOTT HITS
LONDON, November 22--UFWOC representatives in London, England, reported growing support for the international boycott of California table grapes.
On November 16, the U.S. Board of Trade, using the facilities of the Department of Agriculture branch of the U.S. Embassy in London, held a press conference to advertise for winter sale in Great Britain the “Best of the Southwest," fruit displays including California grapes.
The Embassy conference was picketed for three hours by the "London Grape BoycottCommittee," carrying signs reading “Don't Grape Great Britain," and “Reject the Grapes of Wrath."
Members of the Committee passed out leaflets to British importers and press officials raising questions about the exploitive labor conditions under which non-union grapes are picked, and called attention to the UFWOC strike against California grape growers.
The previous week the British Porter's Union, angered over the fact that they were not informed that they were handling scab grapes,
and not wanting to become involved in a labor dispute, sent an angry letter to die U.S. Embassy protesting die Embassy's plan to use color photos showing British porters unloading red California Em-porer grapes as advance publicity for the press conference.
Sunday, December 2, 1968/7
Farm Workers Average $l,247/year
America’s more than two million “full-time” farm laborers worked an average of 129 days in 1967, earning about $1,247 for that year ($9.65 daily), according to die September 1968 report of die U.S. Department of Agriculture on the “Hired Farm Workers Force of 1967."
Migratory farm workers in the Western U.S. were die best paid, earning $12.85 a day, while farm laborers in the South were the worst paid, earning about $8.15 daily, during a season which amounted to less than four months.
The figures show that migratory farm workers living in the West (Arizona, California, Oregon, and Washington) earned yearly about $1,657, while those in the South earned only $1,051.
ENGLAND
In addition, die Covent Garden porters, who handle all produce at London’s largest market, have sent letters to the American Embassy, local produce wholesalers, and the British Importers Association expressing their solidarity with striking California farm workers and declaring their refusal to handle California grapes.
The Covent Garden porters have presented a resolution to the Transport and General Workers Union, a trade union federation of more than 1,500,000 workers, calling for a complete blockade of California grapes by dockworkers, truck drivers, store clerks, and produce terminal porters.
MMK Don't Buy
qIP Grapes! clip


8/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, 1968
Growers Violate Child Labor Laws
Of nearly 14,000 youngsters found by investigators to be employed in violation of child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, 1555 were employed in agriculture, according to the Wage & -Hour and Public Contracts Division of die U.S. Department of Labor.
TTie 1555 children were found to be under 16 years of age, and working during school hours. Of these, according to the report, 240 were nine years old or younger; 738 were between 10 and 13 years old; and 573 were between 14-15.
Child labor provisions affecting agriculture make it illegal for children under 16 to work during die hours school is in session.
This explains why a majority of those minors caught were enrolled
in classes below normal for their age.
The Labor Department did not speculate on die number of child labor violations which went undiscovered.
White children toil in the fields to enrich the growers, these youngsters B picket so that their pa- B rents can win decent wa- §f| ges and a better future.. B
[A?

m
A



Raul Anguiano
THREE MEXICANS KILLED SMUGGLING "ACCIDENT" IN TEXAS
Serviano Cervantes, Alfredo Quentin and Jose Ochaoa, together with 43 other Mexican citizens, decided one day to try their luck finding work on the northern side of the Rio Grande. They left their families behind, hoping to return before long with a little extra cash.
Each of diem had $100 or so with them, and we can imagine what it took to raise die money for the trip in the rural areas of Mexico.
When they got to Piedras Negras, at the border, the 46 men were picked up by a “contractor." That was on September 29.
They were crammed into a closed truck of the type used for furniture deliveries. The driver took them to a private house at 2330. West Huisache, San Antonio, Texas. He left the 46 men inside die truck and went inside to sleep.
At dawn, the men were still inside the truck.
There was a shortage of oxygen, and they began kicking at the sides j of the truck, hoping to draw some attention to themselves. Several I tried to punch holes in the roof.
When the truck was finally opened, I one man was dead. Two morel died at Robert B. Green hospital I in San Antonio. Cervantes, Quentin I and Ochoa never got back to Mexico. I
The 43 who lived were shipped! back to Mexico by die immigration I authorities. A decent burial fori die three who died was provided! only because of the intervention! of Father Charles Grahman, direc-l tor of a Catholic cemetery in San| Antonio.
So far as EL MALCRIADO ca learn, the “contractor" has not been! found.
VIVA LA CAUSA DEL CAMPE-| SINO.


December 2, 19bb/9.
EL MALCRIADO
Wfat'd- (Zoofaty I at 0?iilfeitta ^faitT
mapoleon once said, "An Army moves on its 1stomach." La Huelga is no exception,
mhown here are some of the Union's cooks: pisters Carmen Reyes, Leona Guzman and Es-beranza Pulmano. Below: the kitchen gar-pen at Filipino Rail is harvested for bquash.
Esperanza Pulmano
Carmen Reyes and Leona Guzman
t
51
]\
I
I
||
l!
(
J
!|

George Ebale, Tom Ddhilig and Martin Galaport


10/EL MALCRIAQO, Sunday, December 2, 1968
RUERTO RICANS OBJECT
TO "BLOOD TAX"
MENDOZA'S GRAND TOUR
Jose Mendoza, former officer of the now defunct Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association, was met by a tumultuous crowd of 15 or 20 students at a recent lecture at Fordham Uhiversity, a Catholic New York City University.
Mendoza, ecstatic at the mass turn-out for his talk, has set Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, as the next stop for preaching his tirade on the illegality and futility of a union for farmworkers.
Since both Universities are mammoth, and have enrollments of more than 10,000 each, 15-20 doesn’t seem like such an awesome audience.
If Mendoza's luck continues, someday he may hit an overflowing, standing-room-only crowd of 25.
SAN JUAN, P.R.—The trials of more than 100 Puerto Rican men who have refused induction into the United States Army were scheduled to begin on Tuesday, November 12, with Jose del Carmen Garcia Miranda being the first defendant.
It is expected the trials will last into February.
While citizens of Puerto Rico cannot vote for President, nor do they have representation in die Congress of the United States, they are subject to £he U.S. draft.
While the doctrine of taxation without representation protects them from having to pay taxes to the United States, they Eire not exempt from paying what one reporter has called the “blood tax.”
Judge Hiram H. Cancio, chief judge of die United States District Court for Puerto Rico, ruled August 20 that the Selective Service Act is applicable to Puerto Rico, and has said that the only evidence that may be submitted at the trials is whether the. accused deliberately refused to submit to the draft, knowing it was required, or did he unknowingly fail to submit.
The draft issue has become a cause celebre in Puerto Rico recently. After die University of
Rio Piedras made ROTC voluntary in 1960, registration has dropped from 100 percent of able bodied males to 6.3 percent of the male students, one report indicates.
bwnperstickersbumperstickers BOYCOTT GRAPESB0YC0TT GRAPES five for $1.00five for $1.00
The only completely Mexican Mortuary in northern California
SANCHEZ-HAIX MORTUARY
FRESNO
1022 "B" STREET
TELEPHONE 237-3833
Robert J. Sanchez Omer
Services available everywhere. . .No matter where you live, our price is the same . . .death notices in newspapers and on the radio are included.’ , . we can make arrangements for every economic situation Telephone 237-3532
Henry R. Tafoya, Jr.
Life insurance Office, 222-3727 |
Res., 222-7544 He salth Insurance
FRESNO
CALIFORNIA


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, 1968/11
INCREASE SOCIAL SECURITY!
DELANO, November 16—Wilbur J. Cohen, the outgoing Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare told a University of Michigan conference on Social Security last week, he recommends a 50 percent increase in benefits, including a $100-a-month minimum in Social Secur-
ity payments.
Cohen, a government officail under the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, said, “We may not be able to do this all at once, but the first step should be a 15 percent across-the-board benefit increase, with an increase in the minr imum monthly benefit to $70 for a
with rising wages and to make the benefits inflation proof." *
2. Increase in the amount of earnings counted under Social Security, in stages up to $15,000, “to make die program more effective for those who earn somewhat above the average as well as for average and
3. Expanded medicare protection against the heavy cost of prescription drugs."
To strengthern his remards, the outgoing HEW secretary pointed out *hat social security- is already keeping 10 million Americans a-bove the poverty line and that a $100 monthly payment would lift 4.4 million more above it.
single retired worker or widow and to $105 for a couple."
Cohen said the new President “will have a unique opportunity to continue the progress that has been made" in the past eight years, but he anticipated disputes over Social Security improvements. He said that the new administration should take immediate action in three areas
1. Creation of a new mechanism to “keep the system up to date
PROGRESS IN OHIO
OTTOWA, OHIO, November 20— The Farm Labor Organizing Committee of Ohio has announced the end of the harvest season in O-hio and the successful negotiation . of 23 contracts with individual farmers during the 1968 season. A brief strike in die tomato harvest gained for the workers a small increase in wages and various improvements in working conditions and workers' rights.
Baldemar Valesquez, leader of FLOC, announced that the ' Union is hoping to enter into negotiations with major processors in the at %. during the winter months to establish collective bargaining procedures and hopefully involve the processors directly in the establishment of a “special benefits fund” for union members. Processors would contribute a certain amount per ton of tomatos processed, to be used in health insurance or workman’s compensations, which are not provided by the state of Ohio to farm workers.
Meanwhile, most of the migrants who harvest the crops in Ohio have returned to Texas, and FLOC and other groups are hoping to continue Union organizing in the Rio Grande Valley this winter to build the organization before next year’s season begins.
RECORD PROFITS FOR U. S. CORPORATIONS
NEW YORK, October 30—Soaring profits were again reported this quarter by 438 U.S. companies which give advance information to the Wall Street Journal.
The companies’ profits were $4.3 billion for the third quarter of 1968, a full 13.6 percent higher than earnings during the same period last year.
Predictions earlier this year said the third quarter of 1968 would be the beginning of a “profit squeeze,” but evidently the reverse was true, the Journal reported.


12/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, 1968
Cold Storage Holdings Increase 48 Percent
BY GUILLERMO SASTRE UFWOC RESEARCH DIRECTOR
DELANO, November 20—Cold storage holdings of unsold California table grapes were 7,088,210 boxes as of October 31, for an increase of 48 percent over the same time last year, according to figures released by the United States De-
partment of Agriculture’s office in Fresno.
Total grape sales for die season are so far 25,853,750 boxes, for a decline of seven percent from 1966, die last year for which complete figures are available.
Some 27 percent fewer shipments were received and unloaded in Bos-
ton during the 1968 season than in a comparable period in 1967. Between June 1 and November 14 of last year, 464 car lots were received and unloaded. This year die figure was down to only 341 car-lots.
Shipments to other East Coast cities are also off this year. Baltimore is down 16 percent; Buffalo, 18 percent, while New York City, the "dumping ground" for grapes this year, is down 1 percent. The only slight reduction in shipments to New York was gained at die cost of severe price depressions; growers evidently had to dump boycotted grapes in New York for whatever they could get.
When growers cannot sell their grapes for table use they turn them into wine. This season nearly 13 percent more grapes have gone to wineries located in die major table grape producing areas of the San Joaquin Valley than during the same period in 1967.
The total quantity of grapes used for winery purposes has already sur«* passed the total season mark for 1967 by 8 percent, and is nearly 3 percent above the total season mark for 1966.
Estimates of the cost of die boycott to the California table grape industry vary widely. In public, growers claim die boycott has been a flop—that it has not cost them a cent.
There does seem to be one grower who has lost some money, however. According to an interview published in the Los Angeles Times, John Kovacevich said he received 50 cents less per box of grapes this year. If other growers are in die same boat, then the grape business is reeling.
Some 18,878 carlots have been shipped this year. At 1,250 boxes per carlot, than 23,597,500 boxes. It all means that Kovacavich and other growers may have lost as much as $11,798,750 this season.
Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars, with illustrations drawn by contemporary Mexican and Mexican-American artists3 make handsome Christmas presents.
(See Advertisement Page 14.)
LET US ALL BE NAMECALLERS
It is imperative that we in the radical movement know exactly who our oppressors are. That means, among other things, calling names— especially the names of those key money-powers and their servants who attempt to remain invisible behind the screen of their power apparatus. One such figure, brought recently to the attention of the > Guardian, is the man above: Dr. John S. Foster,. Director of Defense Research and Engineering for the Defense Department. His job? To hand out more than $60 million per year for scientific research on behalf of U.S. imperialism. One of his interests, indeed, is the "motivations" of the Columbia rebels. In a future issue of the Guardian therefore, you will learn more about him, including his address.
Among other of our recent and regular features: Oa two-paye diagram of the power structure that dominates Columbia University O a detailed breakdown of U.S. military arms manufacturers â–¡ regular dispatches from Southeast Asia and Paris by Wilfred Burchett â–¡ former SNCC-member Julius Lester's popular column â–¡ new lefanalysis by Carl Davidson O book, film and record reviews â–¡ much more in 20 to 24 pages tabloid
Subscribe today.
Okay. Enclosed is $_____. for a:____one-year regular subscription (52
weeks) at 57.____one-year student or Cl subscription at $3.50 (include
name of school).____ten-week trial subscription at $1. On all but the ten-
week trial, please add $2 for Canada and Latin America. $3 elsewhere
Name—
Address.
City___
School—
. —State.
-Zip-
Guardian
independent 197 E. 4tti St. newsmeekly New York, N.Y. mmmmmm* ioboq


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2,1968/13
Editor;
I have been a supporter of die grape workers strike and a subscriber to EL MALCRIADO, and have learned many shocking facts of life of the California farm workers which my life in Michigan, where I come from, did not teach me.
In last month’s issue I read die story of the cruel treatment by the U.S. Consul in Tijuana of a Mexican man who, after fifty years in this country, is being held there because he sought to legalize his status.
If he is still held, I wonder if there is something I can do to help bring his story to die public
Editor:
I have read in the pages of your magazine of the struggle of the farm workers, also I have heard about it first hand from people connected with it. Last month I was privileged to meet your leader Cesar Chavez.
Now I must tell you of the success of your boycott. A woman who works with me here in San Francisco gave me some grapes as we sat eating our lunch. "Where did these come from?" I asked, not wanting to eat them if they had been purchased over the
and to find some legal help for him.
I would appreciate having a few extra copies of the story.
Thank you,
Mrs. Marvel Burns San Diego, California
Editor's replyi
The story you refer to was brought to our attention by an organization which has lawyers a-vailable to assist such persons, and the man you read about is receiving help from them.
Thank you for your interest in die welfare of die farm worker. The Editor
counter in defiance of die grape boytcott.
Well, the grapes had belonged to a friend of her son who has a vineyard near Lodi. She had been given a great quantity of diem. He' told her that this year he is feeding-his grape harvest to his hogs!
If' ranchers are forced to do this because they cannot sell their grapes, it is clear that you strikers will win. I wish you success.
Sincerely,
Judith Stevenson San Francisco, Calif.
November 15,1968
The following was written to the Portland Oregonian in reply to an anti-hoyoott letter-to-the-editor which they had printed.
Editor, The Oregonian;
Grapes are delicious and nutrici-ous , yes. But so are apples, oranges, pears, grapefruit, bananas and lemons, which are in abundant supply at the grocery stores where Gail Brown buys her so-called "boycott brand” grapes. I read her letter in your paper with interest, wondering if by chance she could be one of the bodies from a science thriller frozen many years ago and in need, not only of nutrution but of education in die current century as well.
It is true that the consumer boycott against California table grapes (which I support) has had help in its program of educational leaf-leting from long haired and bearded young men. In the days of Christ tere were many such concerned about human suffering. Would Mrs. Brown have called them "wild haired and scroungy?"
The consumer boycott against California table grapes means "Don't buy these grapes.” Why? Because there is a forgotten segment of workers on the great grape ranches of California who are denied wages sufficient to feed, house and educate their children.
The housewife purchasing grapes produced under these conditions and the grocer offering such grapes for sale are parteners in the exploitation of human beings. I am shocked at die insensitivity of Gail Brown and die owner of the store where she bys her grapes.
Lois Stranahan Portland, Oregon November 12,1968
Dear Readers:
Happy Thanksgiving.
Los Maloriados
Send your letters to EL MALCRIADO, United Farm Workers> P.0. Box 130 3 Delano3 California 93215.
i


t4/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2. i960
A Christmas Gift from
EL MALCRIADO AND THE PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED FARM WORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO
invite you to look into the publications Of the United Farm Workers, for unique and meaningful gifts, and for new insight into one of the most significant labor struggles taking place in America today. The art, music, and literature offered here are an outgrowth of the strike by grape pickers in the vineyards around Delano, California. The money collected from the sale of these wprke goes directly to the United Farm Workers, to further the efforts to organize America's most exploited workers, the farm workers. We encourage you to put your money to work in this cause, and introduce your family and friends and neighbors to this courageous struggle by the farm workers for dignity and fustics.
MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR
This beautiful calendar employs twelve great works by Mexican and Mexican-Ame-rican artists, which have appeared as covers on "EL MALCRIADO" over the last • three years. All are In the graphic art : tradition of Mexico, woodcuts, engrav- j ings, pen-and-ink drawings. This type of art was an outgrowth of the Mexican j Revolution (1910-1920) and represents j one of the outstanding expressions of Revolutionary Art from Mexico. It remains very much a part of Mexican-Ameri- l can culture.
The calendar is 9 x 18, red ink on ochre stock.
($2.00 each plus 50$ handling 6 for $10.00. plus $1.00 handling)
* 1 ^ , » j ^ ^ I ^ " 1 ** 1 •* I * j ~ U Lr
Please send me ______of your Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars 9 $2.00
each plus 50$ for postage and handling:
NAME
ADDRESS^______________________________________________________________
CITY ___________________________ STATE ________________ ZIP
(Make check or money order payable to United Farm Workers, Box 130, Delano, Calif. 93215)
I


BASTA!
("ENOUGH"), THE TALE OF OUR STRUGGLE. Photos by George Ballis.
'BASTA! " is a unique book, a photographic essay on the battle for dignity in the fields of California. The text is from the historic Plan of Delano, the proclamation of the farmworkers which was sread at the rallies as the farm workers marched from Delano to Sacramento in 1966. There is an introduction by Cesar Chavez. The photographer, George Ballis, has spent his life in the San Joaquin Valley. He is a sensitive artist, in the tradition of Dorothea Lange, who truly captures the spirit of the Movement. ($2.00 plus 5Q£ for postage, handling)
EL MALCRIADO
HUELGA! by Nelson BASTA! photos by Ballis Zapata Posters 'Huelga en General"
Large Huelga Buttons Small Buttons Bumper stickers
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
(Make checks payable to the United Farmworkers, Box 130, Delano, Ca.)
LARGE BUTTONS (2" diameter), black and red, with the UFWOC eagle and 'Viva la Causa" or
"huelga—DELANO”................
($1.00 each or 5 for $3.75)
Regular Buttons (1 1/2" diameter or smaller), black and red, with the UFWOC eagle and 'Boycott Grapes" or similar captions......
(5Q£ each or 5 for $2.00)
BUMPER STICKERS, "Boycott Grapes" with the UFWOC eagle... 15" long (5 for $1.00)
Delano
"Huelga"Buttons
BLACK AND RED WALL POSTER, 17" x 23", of Emiliano Zapata, with the banner headline, 'VIVA LA RE-VOLUCION". Zapata was the hero of the Mexican Revolution, who led the peasants of Central Mexico in their struggles for land and liberty. ($1.50, plus 25£ handling. 5 copies for $5.00)
t


BEE'S
Discount Dept Store
918 Main st. DELANO across from the Post Office
Everything at low Discount Prices
toys
DECORATIONS CLOTHING
>buR
fJS
SHOES
SOCKS COSMETICS
Novelties Housewares Jewelry Radios General Merchandise
Open SUNDAYS


ALSO IN: COACHELLA STOCKTON INDIO TRACY


Full Text

PAGE 1

1="1 Ml\lf'OJI\n'h c:.,,..,,.. ... ., n ... El @ IN ENGLISH

PAGE 2

-, .. ,.,,._.,.,,,,-,..,,...,, ..OU!IUay 1 L.II; .... I;IIHJI;I .! I .I:JVV in this issue: Iii Gior:gio SaZes Worry UFWOC F. J UFWOC With Bank of Ameriaa P. 5 FaT'Iil Wol"kel"s Begin Mini mum Wage CoUecti
PAGE 3

EL MALCR I ADD, Sunday, Decem be r' ' 2', " J 96B73' Dl GIORGIO SALE WORRIES UFWOC LAMONT, Novembe r 22-UFWOC ten years ago. of the rerri.aining acreage is in the Arvin-Lamont area sOuth of Bakers-Representative Mack Lyons annou.iced to several hundred assembled Di Giorgio workers tonight that the remaining DiGiorgio ranch in Kern County wi.ll be sold soon . Lyons told the wor.kers he would meet wil:h theni. again on Mon day , December 2 , : to discuss the possi ble results or the sale for the workers , who are covered under a UFWOC: contract. Assistant Director Larry Itliong said the Union was for any evenrua llcy, but the proteCtion of the existing D1 Giorgio contract would remain a high priorh] for lhe Union, regardless of the pressures of the strik e and boycott. The new buyer of the Di Giorgio ranch has not been announced, and Di Giorgio officials have said they will not revea l the name of the new owner until the purchase is completed. AbOut 800 workers were employed on the r anc h during the peak of the harvest this year. Most have been laid otr in the lull between the harvest and the prtu1ing season. Di Giorgio's holdings in Kern CoWlty have been producing a variety of crops, including cotton , peanuts, potatoes, wheat, asparagus, plums and wine grapes. Of the 61117 acres remaining in Di Giorgio's possession1 2,525 acres are covered by a contract with the Secretary of the Interior which requires, under the 160 acres limitat ion law, the sale of excess acreage within a period of 10 years from the date of the contract. The 1 6 0 acre limitation prohi bits owners of more !han 160 acres from using federally subsidized water for irrigation of the fields. A little more than ten years ago, federal officials required Di Giorgio t r) dispose of the excess acreage, since it wa s being irrigated with Mack Lyons (teftJ explains, as Acting Director> ItZiong, attorney Cohen, and worokeros listen. talks by Uni on leaders and a religious ceremony. All friends of the Huelga are invited to join the strikers in Delano on December 14. Food and toys are being ed at UFWOC headquarters in Los Angeles at 3016 1/2 East, First ' St. (phone 265-1584); in '' Oakland at 568 47th St. (phone 655 3256) federal water. Since,I967, the com-or other UFWOC: offices arotu1d pany has been selling land to the state. If toys are wrapped, comply with lhe contract' i t signed they sho u ld be as to what's and . slides on the strike, inside.

PAGE 4

C LEVELAND--This picture of Joe, Johnnie, C a r men, Frankie and Brother Julio Hernande z appea red in C leve l andS "Catholic U n i ve r se Bul letin11 last month-: Brother Julio, his wife Fina, and the k i ds are coordinati ng the boycott i n Ohio. Hernandez and his family arrived i n C l e v eland in September, and have been worki ng full time on the r.rape Boycott ever s i nee. Three Rochester Men Fast In Protest of Scab Grapes Birchers Fail to Cool Oregon UFWOC Supp.ort KLAMA Til FALLS , OREGOOThrow in a union aud i ence v i ewin g the film "Huelga," six cups of john Birchers, ad d a dash of George Wall ace suppo r ters, stir well, ba k e for about two hours in a heated, but non-violent oven , and lo and behold!, you have a food caravan makin g i ts w ay to De l ano . This prev iously unknown recipe was discovered b y Ed Chierra, UFWOC representative in Ore gon , when he recently showed •Huel ga" to an audience of members of the Inte r natio n al Woodworkers Association (IWA). "Birchers, armed to the teeth with copies of "Th e Grapes, Communist Wrath in De l a no," (a right-win g , American Opinion red-smear pamphl et) came in and set up information tables with House OnAmer ican Activities Committee literature,.. repo rts lrv F letcher, voca l suppo rter of the UFWOC and pres ident of the American Federation of Teachers (AF1) in KlamaTh Falls. A ccording to Fletcher,themajor iry of people a t the film-sh owing ROCHESTER, November 21--Two market has r emoved California were Birches. They made a feeble y oung men from Rochester, N.Y., grapes f r om its she lves.'" anempt to persuade those present today were beginning the 1 3th day In order that Stores be b r ought who were not members of their o f a fast designed t o bear "perin t o n egotiatio n s with the UFWOC: o r ganization that the UFWOC was sona l witness during the Thanks -imerfaith r elig i ous services h ave a "communist front" Union . (UFWOC giving season to the hunger and been conduc ted in front of a leading Assistant Director, Larry Itli ong , suffering face d by the nation's farmRochester chain stores, and indi I S s u ing the john Birch Society for worke rs," while a third man, Or. vid ua l custom e r s have initiated law -$1 m illi on for lib e l because they john Radebaugh , Director of Migrant suits charging one chain with fraud, stated i n "The Grapes, • That he He a lth Programs at the Universicy because the suit alleges, consumers was a card-carrying member of of Rochester , was about to begin were told . grapes on -sal e were not the Communist Party.) a fast " to further demonstrate the from California when in fac t they In addition to the Brichers, the concern of communitY leaders over two co-chairmen of the K l amalh the c o ntinued sale of grapes in AS a result o f the fast and the Falls s upport group forGeorgeWa l -several Rochester chain stores." pressure broug htonthestoreswhich lace were also in e vidence at the The two young men , whose fast sell scab grapes by The Rochester meeting. has been commended by Mayor Frank community, one major chain has canTh e result of the meeting was a T . Lamb of Rochester, and by many celled its order for grapes, and hearty endorsement of the farm r e li g ious andcivicgroL!ps, havegone several others have agreed to dis-workers Union by those AFT and with out food sinc e Novemb e r 7 , cuss the boycott issue with comrw A members present. They also while Dr. Radebaugh sai d he planned mun iry groups. decided to join the f ood caravan to fast "un t il every Rochester superl eaving Portla n d November 29.

PAGE 5

EL MALCR I AQO, Sun.day, December ;1 , . 1 .968/$. UFWOC SHOWDOWN WllHHANk OF AMERICA SAN FRANCISCO, November The' United Farm Workers Organizing Committe today called on the mammoth Bank of America, one of the largest banks in the world, to recognize the UFW OC as bargaining agent for those workers who ?arvest grapes on more than 5,000 acres of land owned by the bank near Ducor, in Tulare County, California. Bank of America officiais have re-bank and its agricultural subsidiary. Bank officialS' atfirstclaimedthat they did not control AIC, and that the Union would have to deal with that company. It rurned out later, however, that attorneys for B of A were also the attorneys for, o.r 'officials of, AIC , Vice President Iverson of the Bank of America admitted that the bank owned and controlled the land, but fused to negotiate with the Union, that. they planned to sell it. Iver-and have refused to study proof son agreed to meet with Union rep-submitted by the Union that it did, I t appears that bank officials con-res en ta t i ve s, but later they tel-indeed, represent the workers. tinue to make major managerial ephoned to say they woul<;l not ne-The bank also refused to discuss decisions about the operation of the gotiate, recognize the Union, or allow a secret ballot election to determine property. elections for the workers. if the workers wanted the Union They claimed they were not 1eto represent them. UFWOC has aru10unced the Union and thousands of individual farm workers will withdraw their funds from the bank if its officials continue to refuse to negotiate. The dispute can be traced to September 21, 1965, when whole crews at " the ranch, then owned by P. J. Divizich, joined the strike, which was certified by the California De-partment of Labor. During the next two years, the Union called on Divizich to nego-tiate several times. Divizich, reportedly the owner of the largest contiguous vineyard in the nation, refused to discuss elections or any kind of negotia tions with the Union. On january IO of this year, in a forced sale at the Tulare County Courthouse in Visalia, the Bank of America bought the Divizich holdings. It was reported that the sale was made to cover debts which Di vizich had to the Bank of America. In February, Agribusiness Investment Co. suddenly appeared, with, as its president, an attorney for Bank of American. It is the "emp loyer" and runs the property, but the bank retained direct ownership of the land, according to According to UFWOC organizers Manuel Uranday andWilUamG_hand ler, who signed up the workers during a three-month organizing drive beginning in September, the Bank of America and AIC hired many of the workers directly. In other cases, labor contractors were einp loyed and they recruited and hired the workers. In still otl1er cases, grapes were sold "on the vine" to other local growers, who broUght their own workers in or used the AIC's employee s to harvest the crop. On October 24, a telegram was sent to the 8 of A by Cesar Chavez, who notified them that UFWOC represents a majorir:y of the workers and asked for negotiations with the gaily obligated to do so, since farm workers were excluded from the . National Labor Relations Act. Second , claimed one high B of A official, "We don't want to lead the parade ... this is a social revolution.". Bank o f f i cia 1 s also reportedly said , •we have more important business to attend to." At press time, the Union was waiting for a final answer from the bank before proct eding wi . th tw:;-

PAGE 6

FARM WORKERS BEGIN TO COLLECT MINIMUM WAGES SACRAMENTO, November 20Nobody knows h ow many women and children will be cheated out of their farm wages this year, according to officials of the .' State Di vision of Industri a l Welfare. Severa l months ago, State Industrial .welfare Commission an nounced new minimum wages of$1.65 an hour for women and $1.35 per hour for minors, to become effective February 1 . I n typical agri-business style , growers immediately went to court to block payment of the new mi nimum wagP.s. On September 10, Ju dge Leonard Friedman of the Third District Court of Appeal ruled that the minimum wage was ap plicabl e to farm work er's just like anybody else, and ordered growers to pay the wages retroactive to February 1. Now comes the problem of how to enforce the ruling. jay Underman of the Industrial Welfare Division estimates there are "tens of thousands of workers and millions of dollars involved.• Asked how many workers have back wages due them, Mrs. Vir gini8. Allee, chief of the division said "We don't have the vaguest idea.• What she does know i s that the Industrial Welfare Division has 48 people available to investigate cases of growers who refuse t o pa y the back wages. Unti l cases are reported however , Mrs. Allee says the Industrial Welfare Division will rely on •grower self-discipline• on a kind of honor system. _ In the meantime. thousandsofmi giatory, seasonal farm workers have left Califotnta to return to their homes or tO continue \}'Orking in other states. i more, whodo .notspeak English or read the newspapers probably hav e no idea whatever that they are owed bac k wages for every hour they worked sinCe February 1 at wages below lhe minimum . The California Grape and Tree Fruit League was the organization which temporarily blocked the pay ment of the minimum wage in the Courts. In 1963, when minimum wages of for and$1.05 for were announced, it was the same organization that blocked the new Egg Brsad and Paat1'isa A Z Z Kirnis of Donuts Cakes for aU Occasions Fre110h Bread a reminder from the CREDIT UNION ..• Now attorneys have filed suit ! to de termine what lhe minimum wage ' . should have been from 1963 until February 1, 1968. If it rums out the $1.30 was legal, who is going to see tO it that back wages be collected by thousands of migrants who may have worked for SO dif ferent employers during that period. The 48 investigators of the State Division of Industrial Welfare? And that is why farm workers need a Union, YOU A fJEMBER OF YOUR FARM WORKER SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY AS I DE DURING THE MONTHS, NOW HAVE E X TRA MONEY TO SPEND DURI E WINTER. ---1 N TODAY, AND FINO OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE THE WORKERS UNION P.O, BOX 894 "'.-o,, l).,_,o DELANO, CALIFOR .NIA 93215

PAGE 7

EL MALCRIAOO, Sunday,December 1968/7 "Ji Farm W .orkers • $1,247/year On Thursday, November 28, all the poor--wi 11 thank God for the abundance of good things this earth has prodUced. Little will thev know that the poor will be celebrating a different kind of Thanksgiving, a Thanksgiving of hope for the future when they, too, will enjoy similar blessings. l t is ironic that those who t i II the so i 1 , cu 1 t i vate and harvest the fruits, vege tab 1 es and other foods that fi II your tables with abundance have nothing left for themselves. This is very poignant at Thanksgiving. The farm workers today (California grape pickers) are trying to share in that abundance so they too can haVe a happy Thanksgiving in years to come. This is why they are asking you to join with them in passing up grapes this Holiday Season and until such time as their ri9hts as laborers are recog-nized. Indeed, this. is a small sacrifice to ask; We are certain God wi lis that all men share in the good things this earth p reduces. Remember the poor this Hoi iday Season. DON1T BUY GRAPESt Cesar Chavez. America's more than two million "full-time" farm laborers worked an average of 129 days in 1967, earning about $1,247 for that year ($9.65 daily), according to the September 1968 report of the U.S. Department of Agric ulrur e on the '"Hired Farm Workers Force of 1967." Migratory farm workers in the Western U.S. were the best paid, earning $12.85 a day, while farm laborers in the South were !he worst paid, earning about $8.15 daily, during a season which amounted to less than four months. The figures show that migratory farm workers living in the West (Arizona, California, Oregon, and Washington) earned yearly about $1,657, while those in the South earned only $1,051. GRAPE BOYCOTT HITS ENGLAND LONDON, November 22--UFWOC representatives in London, England, reported growing support for the international boycott of California table grapes. On November 16, the U.S. Board of Trade, using the facilities of the Department of Agriculrure branch of the U.S. Embassy in London, held a press conference to advertise for winter sale in Great Britain the "Best of the Southwest," fruit displays including California grapes. The Embassy conference was picketed for three hours by the "Lon don Grape Boycot t Committee," carrying signs reading "Don't Grape Great Britain," and "Reject the Grapes of Wrath. • Members of the Committee passed in addition, . the Covent Garden out leafletS to British and porters, who handle all produce at press officials raising questions London's largest market, have sent about the exploitive labor conditions letters to the American .Embassy, under which non-union grapes are local produce wholesalers, and the picked, and called attention to the British Importers Association exUFWOC strike against California pressing theU: solidarity with strik-grape growers. ing California farm workers and de-The previous week the British claring their refusal to handle Cal-Porter's Union, angered over the ifornia grapes. fact that they were not informed that The Covent Garden porters have they were handling . grapes, presented a resolution to the Trans-and not wanting to become involved port and General Workers Union, in a labor dispute, sent an angry a trade union federation of more letter to the U.S. Embassy pro-than 1,500,000 workers, calling for testing the Embassy's plan to use a complete blockade of California color photos showing British por-grapes by dockworkers, 1:ruck ters Wlloading red California Em-drivers, store clerks, and produce parer grapes as advance publicity terminal porters. for the press conference.

PAGE 8

. 8/El MALCR I ADO, Sunday, Violate Child labor law-s Of nearly 14,000 youngsters found by investigators to be employed in violation of child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, employed in agriculture, according to the Wage & Hour and Public Contracts Division of the U.S. Department of Labor. The 1 555 children were found to be under 16 years of age, and wo1t-klng during school hours. Of th11se, according to the report, 240 were nine years old or younger; 738 were between 10 and 13 years old; and 573 were between 14'-15. Child labor prov i sions affecting agriculture make itillegalforchild-age. ren under 1 6 to work during the hours The Labor Depar t ment did not schoo l is in session. speculate on the number of chil d This explains why a majority of labor violations which went undis -those minors caug}n were enrolled covered. THREE MEXICANS KlllEC: SMUGGliNG ' ''ACCIDENT" IN TEXAS , Servia no Cervantes, Alfredo Each of them had $100 or so with Quentin and jose Ochaoa, together them , and we can imagine what it with 43 other Mexican citizens, de took to raise the money for the trip cJded one day to try their luck in the rural areas of Mexico. finding work on the northern side When they got to Piedras of the Rio Grande. They left their at the border, the 49 men families behind, hoping to rerurn picked up by a •contractor. • That before long with a little extra cash, was on_September 29.

PAGE 9

once said, "An A1'my moves on its " La Huelga is no exception. are some of the Union's cooks: Carmen Reyes , Leona Guzman and Es Pulmano. B e l ow: the kitchen ga1'FHipino Han is harvested for Car>rnen Reyes and Leona Guzman Geo!'ge Ebale , Tom Dahilig and Mal'tin Galapo1't

PAGE 10

10/EL •MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, 1968 MENDOZA'S GRAND TOUR jose Mendoza, former officer of the now defunct Agricultural Wor kers Freedom to Work Association, was 'met by a rumulruous crowd of 15 or 20 students at a recent lecture at Fordham Universiry,aCath olic New York City University. Mendoza, ecstatic at the mass turnout for his talk, has set Yale University, in New Haven, Corm ecticut, as the next stop for preaching his tirade on the illegality and , futility of a union for farm workers. RUERTO RICANS OBJECT Since both Universities are mammoth , and have enrollments of more th.an 10,000 each, 15-20doesn'tseem like such an awesome audience. TO "BLOOD TAX" If Mendoza's l uck continues, someday he may hit an overflowing, standing-roomonly crowd of 25. SAN JUAN, P .R.--The trials of Rio Piedras made ROTC voluntary more than 100 Puerto Rican men in 1960, registration has dropped who have refused induction into the from 100 percent of able bodied males ' United States Army were scheduled to 6.3 percent of the male students, t o begin on TUesday , November 12, one report indicates. with jose del Carmen Garcia Miranda being the first defendant. bwrrpe1'stickersbwrrperstickers h is expected the ttials will last BOYCOTT GRAPESBOYCOTT GRAPES lnto February. five for $1. OOfive for $1.00 While citizens of PuertoRicocannot vote for President, nor do they have representation in the Congress of the United States, they are subject to Ple U.S. draft. While the doc 1rine of taxation without representation protects them frOm having to pay taxes to the United States, they
PAGE 11

El MALCR I ADO, Sunday, December 2, 1968/11 INCREASE SOCIAL SECURIT'f! DELANO, November 16--Wilbur ]. Cohen, the outgoing Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare told a University of Michigan cOn ference on Social Security last week, he recommends a 50 percent increase in benefits, including a $100a-month minimum in Social Security payments. Cohen, a government officail Wl der the Kennedy and johnson administrations, said, "We may not be able to do this all at once, but the first step should be a IS percent across-the-board benefit increase, with an increase in the imum monthly benefit to $70 for a single retired worker or widow and to $105 for a couple." Cohen said the new President "'will have a unique oppornmity to continue the prpgress that has been made" in the past eight years, but he anticipated disputes over Social improvements. He said tba"t new administration should tal!e immediate action in three areas 1. Creation of a new mechanism "keep the system up to date with rising wages and to make the benefits inflation proof." 2. Increase in the amount of earnings counted Wlder Social Security, . in stages up to $15,000, "to make the program more effective for those who earn somewhat above the average as well as for average and below-average 3. Expanded . medicare protection against the heavy cost of prescrip. tion drugs." To strengthern his remards, the outgoing HEW secretary pointed out that social security• is already keeping 10 million AmericanS above the poverty line and that a $100 monthly payment would lift 4.4 million more above it. PROGRESS IN OHIO OTTOWA, OH. IO, November 20The Farm Labor Organizing Committee of Ohio has announced the end of the harvest season in o hio and the successful negotiation of 23 contracts with Individual farmers during the . 1968 seasOn. A brief strike in the tomato harvest gained for the workers a small increase in wages and various improvements in working conditions and workers' rights. Baldemar Valesquez, leader of FLOC, that the Union is hoping to enter into negotiati<•ns with major processors in the at.:.. during the winter months to establish collective bargaining procedures and hopefully involve the processors directly in the establishment of a "'special benefits fund" for union members. Processors would contribute a certain amOWlt per ton of tomatos processed, to be used in health insurance or workman's compensationS, which are not provided by the state of Cbio to farm workers. Meanwhile, most of the migrants who harVest the crops in Ohio have returned to Texas, and FLOC and other groups are hoping to continue Union organizing in the Rio Grande Valley this winter to build the organization before next year's season begins. RECORD PROFITS FOR . U.S. CORPORATIONS NEW YORK, October 30--Soaring profits were again reported this quar:ter by 438 U.S. companies which give advance information to the Wall Streetjournai. The companies' profits were $4.3 billion for the third quarter of 1968, a full13.6 percent than earn ings during the same period last year. Predictions earlier this year said the third quarter of 1968 would be the beginning of a "profit squeeze," but evidently the reverse was true, the journal reported.

PAGE 12

12/EL MALCRIADO, Sunda y , December 2, 1968 Cold Storage Holdings Increase 48 Percent BY GUILL.E.Rt'O SAST R E partment of Agr ic ulrure's office in t on during the 1968 season than in UFWOC RESEARCH OJ R ECTOR Fresno. a c omparab le period in I96c Be-DELANo , November 20--col d Total grape sales for the season tween june 1 and November 14 of storage holdingsofunsoldCalifornia are so far 25.853 ,750 bOxes, for a last year, 464 carlots were retable grapes were 7, 0 88,210 boxes dec lin e of seven percent from 1966, ceived and unloaded. Thi s yea r the as o f October 31, for an increase the la s t year for which complete figur e was down to only 341 car-of 48 percent over the same time figures are available . last year, according to figures re-Some 27 pe rcent fewer shipment s leased by the United States De-were received and unloaded in 8os-Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars, with il lustrations draum by contemporary Mexican and Mexican -Amer-ican make handsome C1iPistmas presents. (See Advertisement Page L4. J LET US ALL BE NAMECALLERS It ts imperative that we i n .me radica l movement know a.ctly wt. o our opprftsora ..... That m .. na. among other thi nlis. glfling names--.pecial l y the names of those key mo n ey-powel'5 end t hei r lttrVInts who attempt to remain invisib l e behind the sueen of their po applrtltus. One aueh f;ture, -brought recently to the ettention of the , Gu•dian, is the man above: D r. JohnS. o f Det.nse R._.rdl and E ngiMering for the Defens. D epartme n t. Hk jo b 1 To hand out mo re than $60 million pe r year for scie n tific researc h on behalf of U : S . imperialism. One of his interests, Indeed, is the "motivations" of the Columbia rebels . I n a future i ssu e o f the Guenlen therflOfl, you will l earn mon about h im , incl u ding h is eddrea. Among other o f ou r recent and regul ar f eatu res : O a two-paye diagram of the power s tru c ture that dominates Columbia" Univ ersi ty D a detailed breakdown o f U.S. military a rm s manuf actu rers D reoular disp atches from Southeast Asia and Pari s by Wilfred Burchett D fo rmer SNCCmembef Juliu s Lester's popu l ar colu mn Onew lef i1nalysis by Carl Dav idson 0 book, film and record r eviews 0 nuch m"or e i n 20 t o 24 pages tabloid SUbecribe today. Oluly. Enclos e d is $ ___ for a: __ regulu subscription (52 wteks) a t '$7. __ student or GJ subscription at $3.50 (include n ame of school) . __ lef1week trial subscription at $ 1 . On all but the ten week trial , add $2 for Can11da and Latin America, $3 efuwhere N o m Addre1 City Gumdim1 .....SIIIe---Zil) _ _ _ 197 J:. 41h St. Nr!w Vorl. , N.Y. 1(J(J('J lots. Shipments to other East Coast cities are also off this year. Baltimore is down 16 percent; Buf falo, 18 percent, while N ew York City, the •dumping groW1d " for grapes this year, i s down 1 percenL The only slight reduction in s hipments toNewYorkwasgained at the cost o f severe price depres sion s: growers evidently had to dump bOycotted grapes in New York for whateve r they could get. When growers . cannot sell their grapes for table use they turn them into wine. This season nearly 13 percent more grapes have gone to wineries located in the major table grape areas of the san J oaquin Valley than during the same period in 1%7. Th e t ota l quanti ty of grapes used for winery purposes has already sur ... passed the total season mark for 1967 by 8 percent, and i s nearly 3 percent above the total season mark for 1966 . Estimates o f the cost of the boycott to the California table grape industry vary w idely. In public, growers claim the boycott has been a flop--that it has not cost them There does seem to be one grower who has some mo ne y , however. According to an interview published in the Lo s Angeles Times, john Kovacevich said he received 50 cents less per box of grapes this year. 1f other growers are in the same boat, then the grape business is reeling . So me 18, 878 car lots haye been shipped this year. A t 1,250 boxes per carlot, than 23,597,500 boxes • It all means that Kovacavich and other growers may h ave lost a s much as $U,798,750 this season.

PAGE 13

EL MI\LCRIADO, Sunday, December 2, Editor: I have been a supporter of the grape workers strike and a subscriber to EL MALCRIADO, and have learned many shocking facts of life of the California farm workers which my life in Michigan, where I come from, did not teach In last month's issue I read the story of the cruel treatment by the u.s. Consul in Tijuana of a Mexican man who, after fifty years in this coWltry, is being held there because he sought to legalize his status. If he is still held, I wonder if there is something I can do to help bring his story to the public and to find some legal help for him. I would appreciate having a few extra copies of the story. Thank you, Mrs. Marvel Burns San Diego, California Editor's repZ.y: The story you refer to was brought to our attention by an organization which has lawyers available to assist such persons, and the man you read about is receiving help from them. Thank you for your interest in the welfare of the farm worker. The Editor Send your Z.etters to EL MALCRlADO_, United Farm Workers_, P.O. Box 130_, DeZ.ano_, CaZ.ifornia 93215. Editor: I have read in the pages of your magazine of the struggle of the farm workers, also I have heard about it first hand from people connected with it. Last month I was privileged to meet your leader Cesar Chavez. COWlter in defiance of the grape boytcott. Well, the grapes had belonged to a friend of her son who has a vineyard near Lodi. She had been given a great quantity of them. He told her th!lt this year he is feeding his grape harvest to his hogs! If ranchers are forced to do this because they cannot sell their The fo Uowing was written to the Portland Oregonian in reply to an anti-boycott letter-tothe-editor whioh they had printed. Editor, The Oregonian: Grapes are delicious and nutricious , yes. But so are apples, oranges, pears, grapefruit, bananas and lemons, which are in abtmdant supply at the grocery stores where Gail Brown buys her so-called •b?y cott brand" grapes. I read her letter in your paper with wondering if by chance she could be one of the bodies from a science thriller frozen many years ago and in need, not only of nutrution but of education in !he current century as well. It is true that the const::ner boycott against California table grapes (which I support) has had help in its program of educational leaflei:ing from long haired and bearded yowtg men. In the days of Christ tere were many such concerned about human suffering. Would Mrs. Brown have called them "wild haired and scroWlgy?" The consumer boycott against Cal ifornia table grapes means •Don't buy these grapes." Why? Because there is a forgotten segment of workers on the great grape ranches of California who are denied wages sufficient to feed, house and educate their children. The housewife purchasing grapes produced under these conditions and the grocer offering such grapes for sale are parteners in the exploita tion of human beings. I am shocked at the insensitivity of Gail Brown and the owner of the store where she bys her grapes. Lois Stranahan Portland, Oregon November 12. 1968 Now I must tell you of the success of your boycott. A woman who . works with me here in San Francisco gave me some as we sat eating our lunch. "Where did these come from?• I asked, not wanting to eat them if is r------_,_,._......., Sincerely, Dear Readers: Happy Thanksgiving. judith Stevenson Los Maloriados they had been purchased over the San Francisco, Calif. November 15, 1968

PAGE 14

14/EL MALCRI A DO, Sunday, December 2. A Christmas Gift from EL MALCRIADO AND THE PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED FARM WORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFL-CI O invite you to Zook into the pubZications of the United Fa'!'m Workers, for unique and meaningful gifts, and for new insight into one of the most significant Zabor struggZes taking pZace in Ame rica today. The art, and Z.iteroture offered here ar>e an outgrowth of the strike by grape pickers in the vineyards around Delano , Cal.iforn.ia. The money collected from the sale of these wprks goes directZy to the United Fam Workers, to further the efforts to organize America ' s most exploited workers, the faPm workers . W e encourage you to put your money to !.Jork in this cause , and introduce your fami Zy and friends and neighbors to this cou rageous struggZe by the farm workers for> dignity and justice. MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR This beautiful calendar employs twe l ve great works by Mexican and Mex ican-American a r t ists, which have appeared as covers o n 11El M A LCRIAD011 over the last three years. All a r e in the graphi c a r t tradition o f Mexico, woodcuts, en9rav i ngs, p en-and-i nk drawings. This type o f a r t was an outgrowth of the Mexican Revolution ( 1 9101 920) and represents one o f t h e outs t a n ding expressions of Revol utionar y Art f rom Mexico. I t remains very much a part of Mexican-American c ulture. The ca 1 e n d a r i s 9 x 18, red ink on ochre s tock. ($2. oo each pZus so handZing 6 for $10.00 pZus $1.00 handZing) f7 : 7 8 9 i 1'0 I 11 1;:. /.'0 ,/1 /Y. 1: , 1 J8 : PZease sand me __ of y our Me:x:i.can G raph i.a Arts C a '/.endar s e $2.00 each pZus 5 0 for p o s tage and handti.ng: NAHE -----------------------CITY STAT-E ZIP {Make ciUi" k or money order paydb'/.e to Fann wo, ke rs, Del.ano , Cati.f. 93215}

PAGE 15

"Huelga "Buttons LARGE BUTTONS (2" diameter), black and red, with the UFWOC eagle and " Viva la Causa" or "huelga--DELANO" ................. . ($1.00 each o r 5 for $3. 75) Regular Buuo n s ( I 1/2" d iameter or smaller), b l ack and red, with the UFWOC eagle and "Boycott Grapes" or similar captions ...... (SO each or 5 for $2.00) BUMPER S TICKER S , "Boycott Grapes" with the urwoc eagle ... 15" long (5 for $1.00) HUELGAJ by Nelson BASTA! photos by Sallis Zapata Posters "Huelga en General" Large Huelga Buttons Small Buttons Bumper Stickers BLACK AND RED WALL POSTER, X 23", of EmiJiano Zapata, with the banner headline, vi VA LA RE VOLUCI
PAGE 16

1/o /t:l t.IJ\ 1 ,... "1 "" r , BEE'S Discount Dept. Store 918 Main st. DELANO across from the Post Office herything at low Discount Prices 10YS COSMETICS Novelties Housewares Jewelry Radios General Merchandise * .,. 'l ('i'..,_'"> ., .. , (1/'i:) ALSO IN: COACHELLA STOCKTON INDIO TRACY