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El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 20

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 20
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
El Molcriado Sot)
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER V
IN ENGLISH
Volume II, Number 20 Delano, California
Sunday, December 15, 1968


2/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968
in this issue
El Malcriado says
BY THE EDITOR
Di Giorgio sends workers to "camp". 3 Poor Loader. .... 4
Canadians rally to aid boycott. ... 5
Pickets busted in
Oregon..............6
Subsidies, sT—
Weifare^ no. , . . 9
News from the legislative front . . 12
AURARIA LIBRARY
1)16702 D240442
I Our cover: Madonna and Child by Andrew Zermeno\
EL MALCRIADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker, is published twice monthly by the UNITEO FARMWORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in the United States and its possessions are $3-50 per year, and foreiqn, including Canada and Mexico, US $5.00. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC, AFL-CIO are included in monthly dues.
Editorial and business offices located at the northwest corner of Gar-ces Highway and Mettler Avenue, Delano, California.
Address all correspondence to: EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215.
For advertising rates, contact Federico ChSvez at (805) 725-1337 or the mailing ad-ress listed above.
The time has arrived for me to write an editorial on die subject of die holiday season. Somehow die holidays sneaked uponusherein Delano.
The rhythm of life in the Union changes with the seasons. There is jubilation and hope during die harvest. Workers under contract bring home fat paychecks and truck-loads of succulent grapes roll through town on their way to the wine crushers.
Picket lines surround the fields and the red and black banners beckon the tired, harried-looking scabs to leave the vineyards until the growers agree to negotiate with the Union.
In July, our boyeotters left in cars and pickups, on the bus, and hitch-hikingj to spread the message of the boycott across this country' * and Canada.
Their spirits were good, and though the offices were quiet after they left, there was great optimism.
I am sure the feeling in die air was the same when the corn crop was brought into Teotihuacan and Chichen Itza centuries ago. .
Then came the lay-offs in the fall. Despite victories on the boycott from Boston to Berkeley, the winter ahead looked bleak—another season would pass without victory.
Franzia and Paul Masson signed
contracts, adding two new ranches to the list of vineyards where some element of justice prevailed, but for the majority of California's farm workers, another winter of privation and bitterness...
When Thanksgiving came, we tried hard to be thankful—we had come a long way since the beginning—but there was so much more to be done.
The workers are pruning now. It’s bitter cold in the mornings, and fog blankets the valley at this time of year. It was so thick last week a Greyhound bus got lost on a side road and needed a policeman to guide it back to Highway 99.
Our many friends will be here on Saturday for die Christmas party. They have not forgotten us. But our brothers and sisters on the boycott will not be home. Their job goes on~Christmas or no Christmas.
We have no doubt that one day this will all be over. A new year is coming up, and 1969 will be die year we have been waiting for... the year when die growers will realize that to continue fighting is wasteful and foolish.
To our subscribers and friends we wish a year of fulfillment and happiness. Perhaps next Christmas’s message will be a little more exultant.
EL MALCRIADO More and more people are finding out that a-P.0. BOX 130 subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way DELANO, CA to keep up with the farm worker struggle.
93215 Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English__ Espanol__
ADDRESS-domicilio_ CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday. December 15, 1968/3
Di Giorgio Sends Workers to Camp
LAMONT, December 12—Three large grape-growing corporations who have purchased die 6,000 acres Di Giorgio ranch in Lamont may refuse to honor die former owner’s contract with the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, according to spokesmen for die Union in an interview with EL MALCRIADO today.
M. Caratan of Delano is purchasing $475,000 worth of die property. M. M. Sabovich has bought a similar ammount. The largest purchase, though not yet publically announced, is reported to have been made by S. A. Camp Inc. of Shafter. Camp is reported to be buying nearly 5,000 acres of Di Giorgio land, valued at over $5,000,000. As of this writing, Camp has failed to answer die UFWOC telegram to him asking for negotiations and for an orderly transfer of the contract between Di Giorgio and die new owner.
UFWOC leaders pledged their support for the Di Giorgio workers, who are demanding that the new
owners recognize and honor die provisions of the old contract. The Di Giorgio workers are planning a parade and demonstration of solidarity in Lamont on Saturday, December 14.
In the meantime, a UFWOC grievance against Di Giorgio for violation of die agreement which was in force until the sale was legally completed, has gone to arbitrator Sam Kagel in San Francisco.
Union officials and ranch committeemen have denounced the use of scab Caratan employees on the Di ' Giorgio property while Di Giorgio was still bound to its UFWOC contract, and before the Union was notified of the alleged sales.
Lamont representative Mack Lyons headed a Union delegation which testified at arbitration hearings in San Francisco last week.
Lyons said that while the Union was not notified of the sale or the resulting cancellation of the contract, non-union workers were in the ranch doing die pruning.
Jim Drake, assistant administra- .
tive director of the Union, compared the reaction of Union workers to that of a man who comes home to find his wife in bed with another man.
"We may be getting a divorce,” Drake told 200 workers assembled for a special meeting in Lamont, "but we’re sure as hell going to enforce our rights until it is legal, and until we consummate a marriage with the new growers.1*
Most of the Di Giorgio workers were laid off at die end of die harvest season on November 13. Later, when the pruning season began, workers were supposed to have been recalled according to their seniority.
The Union grievance alleges workers without seniority were called to work before the agreement was terminated. The Union has demanded back pay for the workers whose seniority was ignored. The Union also plans a new phase of nonviolent experimentarion to assure the peaceful transfer of the contract to the new owners.
JUSTICE AT DI GIORGIO,., This -photo was taken at the Di Giorgio ranch in Delano in 19653 when hopes were high that the strike would bring, justice to those who harvested the crops there. The struggle goes on. See page 11 for more details. Photo by Ballis


VEL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968
MAYORS REJECT ANTI BOYCOTT MOVE
NEW ORLEANS, December 11— Two UFWOC supporters distributing leaflets at the annual conference of the National League of Cities became the personal guests of Philadelphia’s Mayor James Tate after a run-in with Delano's Mayor Clifford Loader and Mayor Russ Karlen of Bakersfield, it was reported today.
The Rev. Jerry Fuller and Mrs. Roberta McLaughlin, members of the New Orleans Friends of the Farm Workers, were distributing leaflets near the conference hall in a New grleanMiotel^whei^^aderJCarlen,
Mayor loader of 'Delano
and others reportedly began harassing them with insults.
The hotel manager showed up, and Rev. Fuller and Mrs. McLaughlin were being forcibly ejected from the hotel when Mayor Tate arrived and assured die manager that the leafletters were not only welcome, but that they were his personal guests.
Loader and Karlen had introduced a resolution earlier calling on other mayors to keep their political noses out of the grape strike and other labor disputes.
Mayor Tate, a past president of the League, strongly opposed the resolution, noting that the grape boycott represented a moral as well
as an economic problem, and that it was right and proper for mayors and cities to take stands on such questions.
The resolution was defeated overwhelmingly in a voice vote, and the boycott of California table grapes received a rousing cheer from the assembled mayors of most of the cities in the United States.
Later, during the discussion with Mrs. McLaughlin, Loader accused the UFWOC supporter of knowing "nothing about die strike.”
“I am the mayor of Delano,” he told her.
"Who elected you, the growers?” asked Mrs. McLaughlin.
“No, the farm workers elected me,” replied Loader.
“Well then why are you opposed to letting the farm workers vote on whether they want a Union or not?” asked Mrs. McLaughlin.
Loader had no answer, Mrs. McLaughlin told EL MALCRIADO.
DETROIT, November 26—A group of 25 Mexican-Americans walked out of a Michigan Welfare League conference today in protest against the League’s refusal to pass or even discuss a proposed resolution supporting die California grape pickers strike and die nation-wide boycott of California table grapes.
The conference, which had called together representatives from poor peoples' groups throughout Michigan, had scheduled resolutions and debates on problems of poor people for the morning session, and panel discussions, on such topics as “The Forgotten Poor,” “The Future of Michigan’s Migrants,” and “Hunger in Michigan—Telling It like It Is” for die afternoon.
When Rub6n Alfaro, a representative from the Bishop’s Committee for the Spanish Speaking in Lansing, proposed that the group support the strike and boycott, he was ruled "out of order”. .
In protest, he and die large group of brown and black delegates walked
Farm Bureau Blasts Boycott
KANSAS CITY, December 12— The American Farm Bureau Feder-aion’s annual convention has come out strongly against the boycott of California table grapes, against inclusion of farm workers under the National Labor Relations Act, and in favor of their own boycott of Jewell Tea Stores (a large supermarket chain in the Midwest) because of its reported discontinuance of handling California grapes.
The Farm Bureau, which is controlled by large banks, insurance companies, food processors, packers, canners shippers, and some of die largest of American Agri-Business, called on its members to eat all the grapes they could stomach, and encourage their friends to do so.
The convention was picketed by a group led by Robert Bustos, Kansas City UFWOC representative, who passed out leaflets describing the farm workers' plight and calling upon delegates to boycott grapes.
out of the conference.
Tom Chavez, a member of the League Board of Directors, announced his resignation. Miss Lupe Anguiano, UFWOC grape boycott representative in Michigan, who was scheduled to participate in the panel on Michigan’s migrants, expressed "surprise and disgust with the League’s refusal to discuss an issue so basic to the future of all of America’s farm wokers.”
The Detroit News reported on a speech to the conference by an H. M. Meredith: “H. M. Meredith, director of the Midland County Department of Social Services, said that the rural poor are more numerous than die poverty-stricken in city slums, but are ignored becauseo of their silence. He called them the 'forgotten poor' who only attract attention as they migrate to the cities, at a national rate of 600,000 a year."
Is it we who are silent? Or they who refuse to listen?
MICH iHEARS FROM FORGOTTEN POOR


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/5
More than a 1,000 Canadians were present for a march and rally in support of the boycott recently. More pictures by Morden Lazarus on page 9.
CANADA RALLIES TO UFWOC
TORONTO, CANADA, December 10—Hie boycott of California table grapes in Canada reached a new level of intensity in late November and early December, according to Jessica Govea and Marshall Ganz, UFWOC representatives in Toronto. Some of die highlights;
*A special fact finding investigation by three Canadians, William Archer, Ronald Haggart, and Rev. Ed File, visited Delano and returned to Canada convinced of the justice of the farm workers' struggle. In a report carried in the press and over radio and T.V. through much of Canada, die three charged, "The overriding issue in the California grape dispute is the right of collective bargaining which is being denied to the farm workers. From our examination, it is clear that the table grape growers are unwilling to allow their workers to choose their own representatives
and let them bargain freely for them.* Hie report charged Giu-marra had refused to allow elections rhongh die UFWOC “would undoubtedly - have received majority support."
Hie report concluded “Rather than surrender or turn to violence, UFWOC has taken the only alternative, which is to reach out to die consumer to apply economic pressure on the growers through a boycott of table grapes. The boycott offers the only viable method for bringing the grape growers to the bargaining table."
♦Hie Mayor and City Council of Toronto proclaimed “Grape Day* on November 23, in honor of the grape pickers and in support of the grape boycott.
•Over 1000 Canadians attended a march and rally in support of the boycott. Included among the mar-
chers were labor leaders and workers, nuns, priests, students and concerned individuals. Hie march received nationwide publicity.
♦Grape growers, desperate at the rising tide of boycott support, tried to stop the boycott with a special injunction. After a court hearing, die Canadian judge dismissed the growers’ charges and demanded that the growers pay all die costs of the trial, over $4,500, including fees for the lawyers defending the boycott!
♦John Giumarra Jr. made a frantic trip to Canada to appear on Canadian T.V. to defend the “poor growers." But UFWOC Attorney Jerome Cohen met Giumarra before die T.V. cameras and debated him. By all reports, die UFWOC lawyer overwhelmed Giumarra with facts and statistics supporting the justice of the boycott and strike.


6/EL MALCRIADO, SundaYJ_Decembe£_1jJ__1j68
OREGON ARRESTS:
COPS ARREST PICKET LINE
CPA from La Raza
CATHOLIC BISHOPS BACK RIGHTS OF FARM WORKERS
NORTH SALEM, OREGON—Local newspapers, radio and television objected strongly in North Salem, Oregon, recently, when 28picketers protesting die sale of scab California table grapes in a local market were arrested by police.
The 28 who were arrested, including ten adults and 18 children were released on their own recognizance on November 29, two days after they had been arrested and charged with disordely conduct, according to UFWOC organizer Nick Jones.
Jones said the group was picketing a market during the evening. At about 8;30 PM, five squad cars and a paddy wagon arrived, carrying a dozen cops clad in crash helmets and carrying billy clubs.
Pickets were old they had three minutes to cease leafletting and disperse, Jones said. Ignoring police demands, die picketers continued their picketing. The 28 were promt-ly arrested. Eighteen children were taken to the Juvenile Center, while the ten adults were held incomu-nicado. Bail was set at $100 apiece.
The adults were listed as Mr. and Mrs. Juan Narvaez, Mr. and Mrs. Rafael Ruiz, Mr. and Mrs. Dale Vinton, Martha Fullenwider, Peter Tunno, Berna Wingert and Jones.
Jones said bail was dropped at a preliminary hearing on November 29 and the adults and children were released. He attributes the cancellation of bail to the strong support of the local press for the right to demonstrate peacebly.
Jones said the adults refused to eat during the time they were held.
WORKERS VS.WITCHES
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO—The regional director of the National Relations Board on the island of Puerto Rico has dismissed charges of sorcery and witchcraft originated in Hato Rey during a workers representation election which die 1AM
DELANO, December 11—The Catholic bishops of the United States during their recent annual fall meeting in Washington issued a statement on farm labor in praise of the organizing efforts of the UFWOC.
“For 30 years the disadvantaged field workers of this nation have stood by helplessly and listened to other Americans debating the farm labor problems," the statement said. "Burdened by low wage scales, mounting health problems, inadequate educational opportunities, substandard housing, and a lack of year-round employment, they have often been forced to live a life
devoid of security, dignity and reasonable comfort. For the past three years, however, many of them have been attempting to take their destiny into their own hands. This is a very healthy development."
The bishops also urged Congress to enact legislation to
1. Include farm workers under the National Labor Relations Act.
2. Include farm workers more effectively under a national minimum wage which will ensure diem a decent standard of living.
3. To include farm workers under the national employment insurance program.
won.


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/7
PAPER SHANTIES FOR MIGRANTS! PLANNED
BERKELEY, November 15-Architects Sanford Hirshen and Sim Van der Ryn of Berkeley have designed a new type of house for migrant farm workers which is made of "paper and plastic foam," according n a report in Time magazine's November 15 issue.
The shanties, euphemisticallyde-scribed as " shelters" by Time, can be built for $1200. ‘ "So far, 20 communities of these and similar quarters have been built with a combination of funds provided by localities, the Rosenberg Foundation and the Economic Opportunity Act," Time reports.
Time also was pleased that the houses "fold up like accordions.” “The paper and plastic foam shelters will replace the reeking hovels inhabited by California migrant workers,” Time rhapsodized.
EL MALCRIADO SAYS: We have some advice for the bureaucrats and tax-exempt foundations and all the other agencies that are trying to "solve" the migrant housing problem with such unique new ideas. If migrants were paid a decent wage, they could buy or rent decent houses like any other workers. We don’t ask that the tax-payer provide us with housing, or subsidize the rich growers in yet another form. As for those "paper and plastic foam shelters,” we doubt very much that the people that designed them and are building them would live in them. Why should we have to?
*********¥¥¥¥¥*¥¥*¥¥**¥¥ * Season's Greetings * *from
MOTO’S
MARKET
WHERE THE
SHOP
2504 Shaft3 Selma,
HUELGUI STAS*
*
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Ca.i
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iiigKjHH Ppil 1

1111111 BEffiSaf-v f-v ,v -. (|*



v-;;
TULARE CAMPS REBUILT
VISALIA, December 14—Construction began today on 200 units of migrant housing for Tulare County farm workers, with the groundbreaking ceremonies for a $1.9 million project at Linnell Labor Camp and Woodville Labor Camp.
Each camp will have 100 dwellings, grouped in 25 four-unit buildings.
Construction will be of cement blocks with fiberboard interior. Rent for the 825-square foot homes will be $50 per month plus gas and electricity. The homes include heaters and coolers.
The housing projest is aimed at replacing the tin shacks in which Tulare County workers have been living since the 1930’s.
In 1965 the Tulare County Housing
Authority attempted to raise die rent on the one-room, unheated, uncooled, leaky shacks to $25 per month, setting off a massive rent strike among the tenants.
County officials investigated the camps and condemned the shacks, finding 52 violations of health and building codes.
A District Judge later upheld the rent strike and condemned die rent increases as illegal. Under all this pressure, the TCHA finally moved to improve the deplorable conditions in the camps. The present ground - breaking ceremonies, after three years of delays, will begin construction of improved housing which is long overdue.
Robert J. Sanchez Omer
The only completely Mexican Mortuary in northern California
SANCHEZ-HALL MORTUARY
FRESNO
1022 “B" STREET TELEPHONE 237-3533
Services available everywhere. . ,No matter where you live, our price is the same . .death notices In newspapers and on the radio are included, , ; we can make arrangements for every economic situation Telephone 237-3532


8/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968
Students strike in Texas
ELSA, TEXAS—Militant students at Edcouch-Elsa High School in Texas walked out of their classrooms on November 14 and refused to return to class until a list of their demands were considered by the School Board.
The walk-out came after a meeting of die Board, which the students expected to present their list of 15 grievances, was cancelled without explanation.
The students’ demands included "die immediate halt of discrimination against Mexican-American students," "the right to speak Spanish on campus without being submitted to humiliating and unjust punishments," and die improvement of educational facilities and the quality of instruction.
The students had attempted to present their grievances in normal channels, but when they announced they would attend die November II meeting of die School Board, die meeting was cancelled. They had also spoken with the superintendent of schools, but he advised them that the School Board would have to consider their grievances.
Little ever happens in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, which has an overwhelmingly Mexican population. The school is located between the towns of Edcouch and Elsa, which are about 1 mile apart in the northern part of Hidalgo County. Most of die students are the children of farm workers.
Thirty-one students were expelled as a result of the boycott. Others were forced to apoligize for their actions. Federal Judge Reynaldo Garza of Brownsville later ordered the expelled students back to school, since the law requires a hearing before schools can take such action against the students.
The students had the support of their parents in most cases. Attorney. Robert Sanchez, who represented die students, said most of the improvements they demanded
Mexican - American students in Elsa - Edcouch High School demanded an end to discrimination and an upgrading of the quality of education in this South Texas community.
tion by saying, “We’re tired of getting pushed around.”
In the meantime, legal maneuver-ings continued in Brownsville, in hopes that the courts would forbid the expulsion of students by extra-legal procedures.
State Senator Joe Bernal told a rally in Edcouch, "These students are saying what we didn't say when we were young or students. They are asking for dignity and respect."
“were long overdue.”
About 85 percent of die students are of Mexican descent, and they rebelled against what diey said were favoritism. shown in the school towards Anglo students and discrimination against Chicanos. At the heart of the problem is the students’ desire to have the rich Mexican cultural tradition recognized in their classrooms.
One student summed up the situa-
a reminder from CREDIT UNION...
ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM WORKER CREDIT
SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY ASIDE DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY TO SPEND DURING THE WINTER.
COME IN TODAY, AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE MONEY AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE.
FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION
P.O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215
OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER 105 Asti St.3 Delano3 Ca.


nrncoTj
wifattHi,
Graph
GeAPiS
mm
'boycott
CAUFORNIA
EvJYCOTT
X-llfORNlA
/japes
The march in Toronto, Canada. See story on page 5 of this issue. Fotos by Morden Lazarus> Ontario Federation of Labour.
MADERA COUNTY, CA.--8I peril cent of Madera County growers
It who receive farm subsidies between [$5,000 and $133,000 per year op-pose a guaranteed annual income â– of $4,500 for a family of seven, I a recent survey shows.
Ninety-four percent oppose pro-viding a minimum of $4,000 to a I family of five.
Stanford graduate student Robin â–  Yeamans recently conducted telephone interviews with growers in [ Madera County, which ranks as the 137th wealthiest agricultural county [in die nation.
. It has die highest concentration lof poor families (29.8 percent) in â– California, and its infant mortality Irate is among the highest (10.1 Iper 1,000) in the state.
Growers there received $3,008,901 gin farm subsidies in 1966.
&
Here are some comments from growers interviewed in the servey.
"Giving causes loss of pride," said the wife of a Madera County grower who opposed federal welfare assistance to the poor. Her husband received $29,000 in cash from the Feds in 1966.
“The Bible says a man should work,” said a grower who opposed federal aid to die poor, but grabbed $18,000 for himself in 1966 farm subsidies.
"I can’t understand having things handed to you,” said die wife of a grower, but evidently her husband could understand die $16,000 crop subsidy he received in 1966.
"Idleness causes many evils,” said a grower who got $8,000 in 1966 from crop subsidy programs but opposes all federal aid to die poor.
The following comments came from growers who received from $7,000 to $27,000 each in farm subsidies in 1966:
"Everybody should have it as hard as I did."
“Anyone healthy shouldn’t get more than what sthey can earn."
*We don’t want to create generations of idle people.”
Miss Yeamans showed only eight percent of die growers or their wives interviewed recognized a parallel between the federal money they get and the federal aid to the poor they oppose.
A total of $3,281,621,070 was paid to U. S. growers in 1966 by the Federal government. Of the total, $103,881,250 went to California growers. The bulk of this was for not growing cotton.________________
W EL^MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/9
SUBSIDIZED GROWERS SCORN WELFARE
ft


8/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968
-j
Students strike in Texas
ELSA, TEXAS—Militant students at Edcouch-Elsa High School in Texas walked out of their classrooms on November 14 and refused to return to class until a list of their demands were considered by the School Board.
The walk-out came after a meeting of the Board, which the students expected to present their list of 15 grievances, was cancelled without explanation.
The students’ demands included “the immediate halt of discrimination against Mexican-American students," “the right to speak Spanish on campus without being submitted to humiliating and unjust punishments,” and the improvement of educational facilities and the quality of instruction.
The students had attempted to present their grievances in normal channels, but when they announced they would attend the November 11 meeting of the School Board, the meeting was cancelled. They had also spoken with the superintendent of schools, but he advised them that the School Board would have to consider their grievances.
Little ever happens in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, which has an overwhelmingly Mexican population. The school is located between the towns of Edcouch and Elsa, which are about 1 mile apart in the northern part of Hidalgo County. Most of the students are the children of' farm workers.
Thirty-one students were expelled as a result of the boycott. Others were forced to apoligize for their actions. Federal Judge Reynaldo Garza of Brownsville later ordered the expelled students back to school, since die law requires a hearing before schools can take such action against the students.
The students had die support of their parents in most cases. Attorney. Robert Sanchez, who represented die students, said most of the improvements they demanded
Mexican - American students in Elsa - Edcouch High School demanded an end to discrimination and an upgrading of the quality of education in this South Texas community.
“were long overdue."
About 85 percent of the students are of Mexican descent, and they rebelled against what they said were favoritism, shown in die school towards Anglo students and discrimination against Chicanos. At the heart of the problem is the students’ desire to have the rich Mexican cultural tradition recognized in their classrooms.
One student summed up the situa-
tion by saying, “We’re tired of getting pushed around.”
In the meantime, legal maneuver-ings continued in Brownsville, in hopes that the courts would forbid the expulsion of students by extralegal procedures.
State Senator Joe Bernal told a rally in Edcouch, “These students are saying what we didn’t say when we were young or students. They are asking for dignity and respect.”
a reminder from CREDIT UNION...
ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM WORKER CREDIT

SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY ASIDE DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY TO SPEND DURING THE WINTER.
COME IN TODAY, AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE MONEY AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE.
FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION
P.O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215
OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER 105 Asti St.y Delano3 Ca.


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/9
r
[ subsidized growers scorn welfare
r MADERA COUNTY, CA.--81 per-Icent of Madera County growers Iwho receive farm subsidies between |$5,000 and $133,000 per year oppose a guaranteed annual income ref $4,500 for a family of seven, fa recent survey shows.
|k Ninety-four percent oppose pro-lyiding a minimum of $4,000 to a lifamily of five.
»' Stanford graduate student Robin jafeamans recently conducted tele-jpione interviews with growers in KMadera County, which ranks as the {37th wealthiest agricultural county In die nation.
|, It has die highest concentration (of poor families (29.8 percent) in California, and its infant mortality ||ate is among the highest (10,1 per 1,000) in the state, p' Growers there received $3,008,901 |lh farm subsidies in 1966.
Here are some comments from growers interviewed in the servey.
"Giving causes loss of pride," said the wife of a Madera County grower who opposed federal welfare assistance to the poor. Her husband received $29,000 in cash from the Feds in 1966.
“The Bible says a man should work,” said a grower who opposed federal aid to die poor, but grabbed $18,000 for himself in 1966 farm subsidies.
"I can’t understand having things handed to you,” said the wife of a grower, but evidently her husband could understand the $16,000 crop subsidy he received in 1966.
“Idleness causes many evils,” said a grower who got $8,000 in 1966 from crop subsidy programs but opposes all federal aid to the poor.
The following comments came from growers who received from $7,000 to $27,000 each in farm subsidies in 1966:
“Everybody should have it as hard as I did."
"Anyone healthy shouldn’t get more than what sthey can earn.”
“We don’t want to create generations of idle people.”
Miss Yeamans showed only eight percent of the growers or their wives interviewed recognized a parallel between the federal money they get and the federal aid to the poor they oppose.
A total of $3,281,621,070 was paid to U. S. growers in 1966 by the Federal government. Of the total, $103,881,250 went to California growers. The bulk of this was for not growing cotton. ___________
WfCOTT
1CAUFOW6
mm
I^.tycott
v^jfORNlA
The march in Toronto, Canada. See story on page 5 of this fiorden Lazarus, Ontario Federation of Labour.
PH
m 1* k*** i


10/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968
Editor: -
Imagine my surprise when I received December I issue today, only a day after December 1! I think that your paper is reallyhip. Thanks especially for the tuf pix of Jaime "Scoop” Reyes. Keep up die good work and good luck.
Please feel free to print my .letter in next copy of your fantastic sheet.
Tommy Dee
Bryn Mawr, Pa Dec. 3, 1968
We suspect Mr. Dee gotELMAL-criado confused with “Movie Passion" or some similar magazine, but we print his letter because the praise is so heart-warming.
The Editor
Editor:
Please take me off your mailing list. The contribution I made was in the name of the Pastor, Rev. C, J. Wood and with parish funds for the " poor" people. This in no way means to show on what side of the dispute I am on.
God Bless,
(Rev.) Louis Gutierrez St. Ann's Church Santa Monica, California
Viva la Causa Y
El Progreso
of
a,
s4tZ Fresno California
YOU ARE THE GROWERS!
Editor:
I hope you’ll excuse my anonymity—I’m a foreigner and in danger of being deported for political activity. Having grown up in a country where unions are strong, I am disgusted by die robber barons who exploit workers here, especially farm workers.
One little point—you, of all people, should not call the robbers GROW-
ERS. They don’t grow the grapes— you do! They should be called owners, which is all they are, and one day they won’t be even that. But it’s you who are, and always will be, the true and honorable growers.
Viva la Causa!
A Student
San Francisco, Ca.
December 6, 1968
CATHOLIC WORKER
Dear Friends,
We are always delighted to get EL MALCRIADO, and hope to have . a story about die farm workers in die Catholic Worker next issue and also an appeal for subscriptions to your paper.
We are so glad to have die Spanish issue, for the beautiful illustrations. You should have them in the English edition too. Could we reproduce them in the CW? You are welcome to any of ours.
Love to all of you,
Dorothy Day
Tivoli, New York December 4, 1968
GIFT SUBS FOR XMAS~$3.50^
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We have a large Selection of Spanish Magazines, Books, and Records.
LADUANO ESPAMA, Pnp.
"I AM WITH YOU”
Editor:
Though I am a long way from your area of struggle, I want you to know I am with your movement and leader the marvelous and wonderful man, Sr. Cesar Chavez. I do hope he will regain his health and strength and continue to lead such a great revolution to free the farm worker across this country.
1 was given very much in for matipn through your local leader Sr. Julio Hernandez.
Sincerely,
J. Edward Jorie
East Cleveland, Ohio November 24, 1968
STT


'EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/11
Di Giorgio Sales Involve Huge Water, Cotton Subsidies
Sel1ing the family Farm
Mr. and Mrs.
Robert
DiGi-org-Lo
The three companies which are purchasing the Di Giorgio ranch have not all been involved in die grape strike, but the M. Caratan Vineyards was one of the original ranches when workers went out oa strike in September, 1965, and Sabovich Ranch was also truck. All are large agribusines corporations owning thousands of acres apiece. Ironically, Di Giorgio was forced to sell the land under provisions of a law aimed at encouraging small farmers.
The sales of Di Giorgios's land resulted from an agreement between the Di Giorgio corporation and the Federal Government, under which Di Giorgio received subsidized water for irrigation of thousands of acres of land in Tulare and Kern Counties. Di Giorgio holdings far exceeded the "160 acre limitation," which was designed to help small farmers irrigate their lands while limiting the amount of free or government-subsidized water provided to large growers. Di Giorgio made an agreement with the federal government by which he would receive unlimited water subsidies for a 10-year period, after which he would sell off his "excess lands.”
In 1967, all but 400 of Di Giorgio's 4,400 acres outside Delano were sold. The present sale includes the remaining 400 acres plus the 8,600-acre “Home Ranch” in the Ar-vin-Lamont area south of Bakersfield.
According to the Fresno Bee of December 8, E. J. and M. M. Sabovich purchased 1,280 acres of die Lamont ranch.
“They purchased the blocks in varying sizes and combinations of purchasers to qualify under the 160-acre limit regulations,” the Bee quoted Bureau of Reclamation officials as saying.
The Bureau estimated the land of the vineyards at a value of $1, 200-$l,800 per acre. Another large purchaser, M. Caratan of Delano, is buying $475,000 of Di Giorgio's
land. Thus both of these "family farmers” are buying about a halfmillion dollars’ worth of land.
Both are members of the California Grape and Tree Fruit League, which recently attempted to block enforcement of the $1,65 minimum wage for women, claiming grape growers are unable to afford such "high” wages.
The biggest purchases of Di Giorgio’s land were made by the S. A. Camp ranch, which is estimated to have acquired about $5 million worth. Camp is no newcomer to agriculture, having built his empire in Kern County during the 1920’s and 1930’s. The Camp family has been prominent in Democratic politics, and W. B. Camp, brother of S. A’. Camp, was an assistant director of die Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) during the days of die New Deal under President Franklin Roosevelt.
As head of the cotton division, Camp helped push through die cot-
ton. subsidy program, which has since become an annual $3 billion giveaway.
W. B. Camp himself collected $238,816 in federal subsidies during 1967, according to the Congressional Record. The payments were primarily for cotton Not grown. S. A. Camp collected $517,285 for the cotton he did not gnow last year.
While UFWOC’s contracts with other ranches are protected by successor clauses guaranteeing that purchasers or leasees will be required to abide by the provisions of' collective bargaining agreements, the Di Giorgio workers do not have .such a clause protecting diem.
But all Union members have a stake in seeing to it that die Di-Giorgio workers do not lose the benefits of their contract. As one worker put it, “The victories we have won so far will mean nothing if we cannot continue to organize new ranches and maintain the contracts which expire on the old ones.”


12/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15‘, -1968
SACRAMENTO EYES FARM LABOR LEGISLATION
SACRAMENTO, December 11; California legislators are talking more and more about passing some kind of legislation to deal with farm labor disputes, according to a series of interviews appearing recently in the press. Talk has centered on bills to outlaw boycotts, outlaw strikes at harvest, and, though this has low priority in most discussions, providing a framework for col-' lective bargaining negotiations between growers and farm workers.
More “ liberal” growers and even Governor Reagan are talking about raising minimum wages for farm workers (at present, $1.15 an hour, for men, $1.35 for minors, and $1.
65 for women, though the latter are not enforced) and providing some kind of unemployment insurance for farm workers. Both proposals are aimed as much at cutting the ground out from under the United Farm Workers organizing drive as improving conditions for. farm workers.
Senator Walter Stiern, D-Bakers-field, has proposed a law calling for compulsory arbitration of labor disputes in agriculture. His proposal would outlaw strikes atharvest time. Governor Reagan’s "Farm Labor Program" calls for passage of a
State Sen. Walter Stiern
very minimum state unemployment insurance program for farm workers, but Reagan and most large Agribusiness organizations call for
action at die federal level to deal with farm labor disputes.
State Senator Howard Way, Rep-Exeter, a former grape grower, commented, “I sense a growing awareness on the part of farmers that they can no longer turn their backs on this problem, that something must be done.”
W ay suggested studying the situation in Hawaii, where farm workers are covered by a "Little Wagner
SAN FRANCISCO, December 4— O. W. Fillerup, head of the Council of California Growers, today suggested prompt action on state and Federal legislation to settle farm labor disputes.
Fillerup, long a bitter opponent of die unionization of farmworkers, and a spokesman for growers who have most strenuosly resisted the Union's demands for elections and collective bargaining agreements, recommended a program "which would, of course, include (union representation) elections which could result in collective bargaining.”
“The time has come for legislation, at the federal level if possible, to settle labor disputes,” he said. The state should act, if the national Congress does not,” he added.
Fillerup's proposals indicate a growing concern on the part of corporate agriculture in California over the effectiveness of UFWOC’s boycott of California table grapes. According to Harry Bernstein, labor editor for die Los Angeles Times, Fillerup’s proposal "was the first strong call from California agriculture for farm labor legislation, although some grower groups have previously indicated the need for such laws in a general way.*1
Act” and can petition for union representation elecdons.Farm workers in Hawaii have the highest wages in the nation, are covered by collective bargaining agreements in the main industries (sugar and pineapples), have unemployment insurance, health insurance and pension plans, and most of the benefits that industrial workers in this country enjoy.
Fillerup called for a "special system...with a board or commission, which would take into account the unique factors of agriculture, such as the perishable nature of die product.”
Such suggestions are usually designed to set the stage for outlawing strikes at harvest time.
Farm workers, however, feel die strike is the workers’ last resort, his inalienable right, and that nothing should limit this right to strike except a contract in which, the workers agrees to a "no-strike” clause in return for job security, decent wages and the other benefits.
Fillerup’s proposals, while offering no "solution* to die farm labor problem, indicate that some growers are at least aware that a "problem” does exist. Evidently growers are at last beginning to suffer a little themselves from the chaos in agricultural labor relations, just as farm workers have suffered for decades. Perhaps Filerup’s proposals will start a dialogue, discussions, or even that frightening word, "negotiations” word, "negotiations” between tiieU-nion and growers. The time for such a dialogue seems long overdue.
Grower Proposes Anti Strike Bill


EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/13
NEWS BRIEFS NEWS BRIEFS NEWS
BOSTON
BOSTON, November 28—Richard Cardinal Cushing of Boston announced his support of the boycott of California table grapes and vowed he would refrain from eating grapes until the dispute between grapes growers and the workers was settled. The Cardinal also endorsed the stand by the Bishops and Archbishops of California who unanimously called for the extension of the National Labor Relations Act to cover farm workers.
Hie Cardinal’s statement came shortly after the annual fall meeting of the Bishops, Archbishops and Cardinals of the Unites States met in Washington and issued a strong statement in behalf of the rights of farm workers to organize.
SAN FRANCISCO
SAN FRANCISCO, December 10— Lupe Murgufa announced today that the San Francisco and Bay Areas Delano Support Committee will sponsor a caravan to Delano on December 21. Murguia, representative for the UFWOC in the Bay Area, said that the caravan will leave the Mission District (24th and Alabama) between 7:30 and 8 AM on die 21st. Delegations from the Labor Movement, the Brown Berets, student groups, church groups, and concerned individuals will be participating. YOU are invited—JOIN US, Murguia said. For information call 655-3256 in Oakland .
WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, November 28—The Federal Government has issuednew regulations for visitors crossing die border from Mexico into the United States. The new entry permit will be dated and will be good for 15 days for Mexican citizens coming to the U.S. to visit, shop, or do business. It is valid only within 25 miles of the border.
The new regulations replace the "72-hour pass" Which could be used within 150 miles of the border. The “72-hour pass” regulations were widely abused by people who used the pass to gain entrance to the U.S. and then got a job and remained in the country illegally. The new regulations are designed to curb this practice.
Union spokesmen were doubtful, however, that the new regulations would be any more adequately enforced than the old ones. And the new regulations avoid the much more serious problem of regulating the “Green Card” program. Since growers, Congressmen, Senators, Department of Justice officials, and Immigration Department officials all seem determined that die existing regulations will not be enforced, the passing of new regulatons does not represent any improvement of the situation.
KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE
car.,, life... fire
PHONES:
Office, ^85-0650 Residence, 266—13^9
3222 East Mayfair Blvd. Mayfair Shopping Center Fresno, Calif. 93703
Mr. Le^ will be in the UFWOC Service Center, 105 Asti, Delanoy every Wednesday to serve U-nion members.
CHICAGO
CHICAGO, December 10—Hie United Farm Workers Organizing Committee scored major victories in the Midwest in its boycott of California table grapes this week. Eliseo Medina, UFWOC leader in Chicago, reports that Jewel Tea, with over 230 stores in Illinois, removed all grapes from its shelves. Two other major chains followed suit. And in Michigan, Lupe An-guiano, UFWOC chairman, reports that Eastern Michigan is almost clean of grapes, with statements by 6 major chains to stop handling the scab product.
The boycott is also growing stronger in downstate Illinois and in Indiana, Medina reports. The "Calumet Area Pro Farm Workers Committee” led by Lalo Gonzales and Robert Murillo has scored successes in Hammond, East Chicago, Whiting, Gary, and Munster, Indiana. Mayor John Nicosia of East Chicago and Garey’sMayor Richard Hatcher have endorsed the boycott and more and more groups and citizens are becoming aware of die farm workers’ problems. "It’s groups like the ‘Calumet Area Pro Farm Workers Committee’ that are taking La Causa to every corner of the nation,” Medina said.
DELANO
Perelli-Minetti workers with seniority are requested to register immediately for work during the pruning season, which begins next month, according to hiring hall director Manuel Sanchez.
Sanchez said members can avoid needless delays by bringing their dues books with them when they go to register


A Christmas Gift from
EL MALCRIADO AND THE PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED FARM |
WORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO
invite you to look into the publications of the United Farm Workers, for unique and meaningful gifts, and for new insight into one of the most significant labor struggles taking place in America today. The art,, music, and literature offered here are an outgrowth of the strike by grape pickers in the vineyards around Delano, California. The money collected from the sale of these works goes directly to the United Farm Workers, to further the efforts to organize America's most exploited workers, the farm workers. We encourage you to put your money to work in this cause, and introduce your family and friends and neighbors to this courageous struggle by the farm workers for dignity and justice.
MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR
This beautiful calendar employs twelve great works by Mexican and Mexican-Ame-rlcan artists, which have appeared as covers on "EL MALCRIADO" over the last three years. All are in the graphic art tradition of Mexico, woodcuts, engravings, pen-and-ink drawings. This type of art was an outgrowth of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and represents one; of the outstanding expressions of Revolutionary Art from Mexico. It remains very much a part of Mexican-Ameri-can culture.
The' calendar is 9 x 18, red ink on ochre stock.
($2.00 each plus SO$ handling 6 for $10.00 plus $1.00 handling)
•»*/ —asv“aSsx,r^eu)
3 1 + s ' *> 1
A> 1 // A /9
a : re â–  19 i 20 &
och/tre-'
October-

* , y*
Please send me ______of your Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars 6 $2.00
each plus 50$ for postage and handling: .
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY __________________ ________ STATE ZIP
(Make check or money order payable to United Farm Workers, Box lsd~ Delano, Calif. 95215) *
l


HUELGA!
THE FIRST 100 DAYS OF THE GREAT DELANO GRAPE STRIKE, by Eugene Nelson
"HUELGA! * bv Eugene Nelson'remains the finest account yet published on the early daysoof the Delano Grape Strike. Nelson was! a picket line Captain (and later led the Union drive to organize the melon fields of Texas) and writes with intimate knowledge of the origins and beginnings of the strike. Nelson also includes a briefbiogra-phy and interviews with Cesar Chavez and other Union leaders, and a history of the National Farm Workers 'Association, the predecessor of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee.
(160 pages, with illustrations by George Ballis,..$1.50)
"HuelgcT’Buttons
LARGE BUTTONS (2" diameter), | black and red, with the UFWOC [I eagle and “Viva la Causa" or
1 "huelga—DELANO”........
| ($1,00 each or 5 for $3.75)
Regular Buttons (1 1/2“ diameter or smaller), black and red, with the UFWOC eagle and "Boycott
Grapes" or similar captions.........
(5Q£ each or 5 for $2.00)
BASTA!
("ENOUGH"), THE TALE OF OUR STRUGGLE. Photos by George4BaIlis.
"BASTA! ” is a unique book, a photographic essay on the battle for dignity in the fields of California. The text is from the historic Plan of Delano, the proclamation of the farmwworkers which was sread at the rallies as the farm workers marched from Delano to Sacramento in 1966. There is an introduction by Cesar Chavez. The photographer, George Ballis, has spent his life in the San Joaquin Valley. He is a sensitive artist, in the tradition of Dorothea Lange, who truly captures the spirit of the Movement. ($2.00 plus. 50^ for postage, handling)
BUMPER STICKERS, "Boycott Grapes” with the UFWOC eagle... 15” long (5 for $1.00)
BLACK AND RED WALL POSTER, 17” x 23”, of Emiliano Zapata, with the banner headline, “VIVA LA RE-1 VOLUCION”. Zapata was the hero of the Mexican Revolution, who led the peasants of Central Mexico in their struggles for land and liberty. ($1.50, plus 25# handling. 5 copies for $5.00)
VIVA LA REVOLUCION
Delano
HUELGA! by Nelson BASTA! photos by Ballis Zapata Posters "Huelga en General”
Large Huelga Buttons Small Buttons Bumper stickers
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
(Make checks payable to the United ' Farmworkers, Box 130, Delano, Ca.)


BEE'S
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918 Main st. DELANO across from the Post Office
Everything at low Discount Prices
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Full Text

PAGE 1

Volume II, Number 20 Delano, California Sunday, Decembe r 15, 1 968

PAGE 2

2(_EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15,1968 , ... _E_I_M_a_l c--ri_a_d_o_s_a_y_s_ in this issue Di Giorgio sends workers to "camp11• Poor Loader .... Canadians rally to aid . , Pickets busted in Oregon . • , . . . 6 Subsidies, s IWe 1 fare_ , no .•. News from the leg-islative front , 12 I U18702 0240442 Our cover: Madonna and Chi 1 d by Andrew Zermeno ELHAtCRIAOO,TheVoiceoftheFar01 'Worker, is publi5hed twice monthly by the UNITED FARHWORKERS ORr.AHIZINr. C.OHHITTH,AFL-CIO. Subsc"riptionsin thellnitedStatesandit$possenions are$3.SOper year,andforeiqn, inchodinq Canada and l\e1dco, US $5.00. nc v Editorial and busir.eu offices locatedatthenorthwestcornero'fr.arces lliqhway and Avenue, Delano,California. Address all<:orrespondence to: EL MALCRIAOO,Post0ffi<:e&ox130,0oelano,Callfornia93215. Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215. For advertising rates, contact Federico Chavez at (805) 725 .. 1337 or the rnai 1 ing adress 1 is ted above. BY THE EDI,TOR The time has arrived for me to write an editorial on the subject of the holiday season. Somehow the holidays sneaked Delano. The rhythm of life in the Union changes with the seasons. There is jubilation and hope during the harvest. Workers under contract bring hon'te fat paychecks and truckloads of succulent grapes roll t hrough town on their way to the wine crushers. Picket lines surround the fields and the red and black banners beckon the tired, harried-looking scabs to leave the vineyards until the growers agree to negotiate with the Union. In july, our boycotters left in cars and pickups, on the bus , and hitch-hiking , to spread the message , of the boycott across this councry ' and Canada. Their spirits were good, and though the offices were quiet after they left, there was great optimism. I am sure the feeling in the air was the same when the corn crop was brought into Teotihuacan and Chichen Itza cenruries ago. Then came the lay-o ffs in the fall. Despite victories on the boycott from Boston to Berkeley, the winter ahead looked bleak--another season would pass wit\1out victory. Franzia and Paul Masson signed contracts, adding t_WO new ranches to the list of vineyards where some element of justice prevailed, butfor the majority of California's farm workers, another of privation and bitterness ... When Thanksgiving we tried hard to be thankful--we had come a long way since the begilming--but there was so much more to be done. The workers are pruning now. It's bitter cold in the mornings, and fog blankets the valley at this time of year. It was so thick last week a Greyhound bus got lost on a side road and needed a policeman to guide it back to Highway 99. Our many friends will be here on saturday for the Christmas party. They have not forgo tten us. But our brothers and sisters on the boycott will not be home. Their job goes on--Christmas or no Christmas. We have no doubt that one day this will all be over. A new year is coming up, and 1969 will be the year we have been waiting for ... the year when the growers will realize that to continue fighting is wasteful and foolish. To our subscribers and friends we wish a year of fulfillment and happiness. Perhaps next Christmas's message will be a little more exultant . EL MALCRIADO p .o. BOX 130 DELANO, CA 93215 More a':ld '!lore people are finding out that a to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don't be left out--send in this coupon today! FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3. SO TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS; EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME Espanol_ ADDRESS-domicilio _______ _::_ _______ _ CITY-ciudad STATE-estado ZIP __

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El MALCR I ADO, Sunday, aecembe r 15, 1968/3 DiGiorgio Sends Workers to Camp LAMONT , December 12--Three large grape-growing corporation s who have purchased rl1e 6,000 acres Di G iorgio ranch in Lamont may refuse to honor the former ow ner's contract with the United Farm Workers Organ izing Commi ttee, according to spokesmen for the Union i n an interview with E L MALCRIADO today. M . Caratan of Delano i s purchas ing $475 , 000 worth of the property. M. M . SabOvich has bought a similar ammount . The largest purchase, though not yet publically anno unced, is reported to have been made by S . A. Cam p I nc. of Shafter. Camp i s reported to be buying nearly 5,000 acres of Di Giorgio land, valued at over $5,000,000. As of this writing, Camp has failed co answer the UFWOC telegram to h im asking for negotiations and for an orderly transfer of the contract between Di Gio r gio and the owners recogn ize tive director of the Union, compared visions ot the old contract. The Di the reaction of Union workers to Giorgio workers are planning a pa _ that of a man who comes home to rade a nd demonstration of solidarifind his w ife in bed with a nothe r ty in Lamont on Saturday , December ma n. 14. 11We may be getting a divorce," In the meantime, a UFWOC grieDrake told 200 workers assemb led vance against Di Giorgio for viola for a special meet in g in La mont , cion of the agreement whi ch was in we're sure as hell goi ng to force unti l the sale was l egally enforce our rights until it is l e -completed, has gone to arbitrator gal, and until we consummate a Sam Kagel in San Francisco. marriage with the new growers.'' Union officials and ranch commit-Most of the Di Giorgio workers teemen have denounced the use of were laid off at the end of the . scab Caratan employees on the Di 1 harvest season on November 13. Giorgio property while Di Giorg i o Later, when the pruning season was Still bOund to its UFWOC conbega n, wor kers were supposed to traer, and before theUnionwasnoti-have beenreca lledaccordingtotheir fied of the alleged sales. seniority. Lamont representative Mack LyThe Union grievance alleges workens headed a Union delegation whic h ers w ithout seniority were called testified at arbi tration hearings in to work before the agreement was San Francisco last week . terminated. 1l1eUnionhasdemanded Lyons said that whil e the Union back pay for the workers whose was not notified of the sale or seniority was ignored. TI1e Union the resulting cancellation of the c on also p lans a new phase of non-UFWOC lead er-s p l edged their sup-trace, non-union workers were in vio lent experimentarion to assure port for the Di Giorgio workers, the ranch doing the pruning. the peaceful transfer of the conwho are demanding th:lt the new jim Drake, assistant administra. tract to the new owners. JUSTICE AT DI GIORGIO,, . photo was taken at the Di Giorgio in Delano in l965J when hopes wer e high that the strike would justice tO those who harvested the crop s there. The struggle goes on . See page, 11 for mor>e detai Zs. Photo Bd lis

PAGE 4

4/EL M A LCRI ADD, Sunday, Decembe r 15, 1968 MAYORS REJECT ANTI BOYCOTT MOVE Farm Bureau Blasts Boycott KANSAS C I1Y, December 12-NEW ORLEANS, December 11--as an economic problem, and th,at The American Farm Bureau Feder1\vo UFWOC suppo rters distribut-it was right and proper for mayors aion' s ann ual convention has come ing leaflets at the annual conferen-and cities to take stands ,on such out strong l y against the boycott of ce of the National League of Citquestions. California table grapes, against in-ies became the personal guests of The resolution was defeated over elusion of farm workers under the . Philadelphia ' s Mayor james Tate whelmingly in a voice vote , and the National Labor Relations Act , and after a run-in with Delano's Mayor boycott of Ca lifornia table grapes in favor of their own boycott of Clifford Loader and Mayor Russ recei ved a r ous in g cheer from the jewe ll Tea Stores (a large super-Karlen of Bakersfield, il was re-assembled mayors of most of the market chain i n the Midwest) be-ported today . cities in the United States. cause of its reported discontinuThe Rev. jerry Fuller and Mrs . Later, during the discussion with ance of handling California: grapes. Roberta McLaugh lin, members of the Mrs. McLaughlin, Loader accused The Farm Bureau, which i s con-New Or leans Friends of the Farm the UFWCX:: supporter of knowi ng trolled by large banks, insurance Workers, were d istri b utin g leaflets "nothing a b out the companies, food processors, pack-near the conference hall in a New "I am the mayor of ers, canners shippers, and some he told her. of the largest of American Agri"Who elected you, the growe rs?" B usiness, called o n its membe r s asked Mrs. McLaughlin. w eat all d1e grapes they could "No, the farm workers elected stomach, and encourage their friends replied Loader. to do so. "Well then why are you opposed TI1e convention was picketed by to l etting the farm workers vote a group led by Rober t Bustos , Kan-an whed1er they want a Union or sas C ity UFWOC: representativ e , who asked Mrs. McL3ughlin. passed out leaflets describing the Loader had no answer, Mrs. Me-farm workers' plight and calling Laughlin told E L MALCRIADO. upon de legates to boycott grapes. MICH. ,HEARS FROM FORGOTTEN POOR OETROIT , November26--Agroup out of the conference. of 25 Mexican-Americans walked Tom Clnl'vez, a member of ou t of a M i chigan Welfare League the League Boa rd of Directors , conference tod ay i n prote s t against announced his resi gnation. M iss the League's refus al to pass or even Lupe Anguiano, UfWOC grape boy -discuss a proposed resol ution sup-cott represen n ;n ive in Mich igan, who Mayor /Alader of Delano porti ng the Califo r nia grape pickers was schedu led to participat e i n the strike and t!le nation-wide boyc ot t panel on Michigan ' s migrants, ex-of Califor nia t able grapes . pressed "surprise and disgust with and others reportedly began l11e con ference, which had called the L eague ' s refusal to discuss an in g them with insults. together representa ti ves from poor issue so basic to the future of The hotel manager showed up, peop les' groups throughout M i chiall of Amer ica's farm wokers." and Rev. Fuller and i\•lrs. g an, had scheduled resol utions and lin were being forcibly ejected from debates on prob lems of poor people TI1e Detroit News reported on a the hotel when M ayor Tate arrived for the morning session, and pane l speech to the conference by an H . and assured the manager tha t the discussions, on suc h topics as "TI1e M . Meredith: "H . M . Meredith , di leafletters were nor only we lcome, Forgouen Poor." "''111e Future of rector o f the M i dland County Deb u t that they were h i s persona l Michigan's Migrants/ and "Hunger panmenc of Socia l Se r v ices, said guests. in Michi gan--Telling I t like I t Is" th31 the rural poor a r e more nomeLoader and Karlen had introduced for the afternoon. rous than the poverty -stricken in a resolution earlier calling on other W hen Ruben Alfaro, a represencity s lum s , butareignoredbecauseo mayors to keep thei r political noses tative from the Bishop ' s Comm i ttee of their s ilence . He called them out of the grape strike and other for the Spanish Speaking in Lanthe ' forgotten poor ' who only attract labor disputes. s ing, proposed that the . group sup attention as they migrate to the Mayor Tate, a past presi dent o r port the srrike an d boycott , he was cities, at a na tiona l rate o f 600,000 the League , strOngl y opposed the ruled "our of order". a year."' resolution, notin g that the grape I n protest, he and the large group I s it we who are s il ent? Or boycott represented a moral as we ll of and b l ack delegates walked they who refuse to listen?

PAGE 5

More than a 1,000 Canadians were present for a march and rally in support of the boycott recently. More pictures by Morden lazarus on page 9. CANADA RALLIES TO UFWQ, C TOROt'ITO, CANADA, December 10--The boycott of California table grapes in Canada reached a new level of intensity in late November and early December, according to Govea and Marshall Ganz, UFWCC representatives in Toronto. Some of the highlights: *A special fact finding investigation by lhree Canadians, William Archer, Rc;mald Haggart, _ and Rev. Ed File, visited Delano and "re turned to canada convinced of the justice of the farm workers' struggle. In a report carried in the press and over radio and T. V, through much of Canada, the three charged, "The overriding issue in the California grape dispute is . the right of collective bargaining which is being denied to the farm workers. From our examination, it is clear that the table grape growers are unwilling to allow their workers to choose own representatives and let them bargain freely for them." The report charged Giumarra had refused to allow elections though UFWCC "would un doubtedly have received majority support," The report concluded "Rather than surrender or rurn to violence, UFWOC has taken the only alternative, Which is to reach out to the consumer to apply economic pressure on the growers through a boycott of table grapes. The boycott offers the only viable method for bringing the grape growers to the bargaining table." *The Mi:!yor and City Council of Toronto proclaimed "Grape on November 23, in honor of the grape pickers and in support of the grape boycott. "'Over 1000 Canadians attended a march and rally in support of the boycott. Included among the mar-chers were labor leaders and workers, mms, priests, srudents and concerned individuals. The march received nationwide publicity. *Grape growers, desperate at the rising tide of boycott support, tried to stop the boycott with a special injWlction. After a court hearing, the Canadian judge dismissed the growers' charges and demanded that the growers pay all the costs of the trial, over $4,500, including fees for the lawyers defending the boycott! *john Giumarra Jr. made a frantic trip to Canada to . appear on Canadian T.V. to defend the •poor growers." But U _FW CC Attorney jerome Cohen met Giumarra before the T.V. cameras and debated him. By all reports, the UFWOC lawyer overwhelmed Giumarra with facts and statistics supporting the justice of the boycott and strike.

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NORTH SALEM, OREGCX'I--LO cal newspapers , radio a nd television obj ected strongly i n North Sa lem, Oregon, recently, when 28 picketers protesting the sale of scab Cali fornia table grapes i n a local market were arrested by police. Th e 28 w h o were arrested, in cluding ten adults and 18 chil dren were released on their own recognizance on November 29, two days afte r they had been arrested a nd charged with disordely conduct, ac cor d in g to UFWOC organizer Nick jones. jOnes said thegroupwas picketing a market during the e ve ning. At ' about 8:30 P M , five squad cars and a paddy wagon arrived, carry ing a dozen cops clad in crash helmets and carrying b illy c lubs. Pickets were t old they had three minutes to cease leafletting and disperse, jones s aid, I gnoring police demands , the picketers continued thei r pic ketin g. The 28 we r e promtl y arrested. Eighteen children were taken to the juvenile Center, while the ten adu lts were he l d incomu nicado. Bail was set at $100 apiece. The adults were listed as Mr. and Mrs. juan Narvaez, Mr . and Mrs . Rafael Ruiz, Mr. and Mrs . Dale ---------------------Vinton, Martha Fullenwi der, Peter Tunno , Berna W ingert and jones. jones said bail was dropped at a preliminary hearing on November 29 and the adults and children were CATHOLIC BISHOPS BACK RIGHTS OF FARM WORKER , S DELANO, December 11--The cade void of security, dignity and rea-r e leased. He attributes the cance ll a tholic bishops of the United States sonable comfort. Fo r the past three tion of bail to the strong support during thei r recent annual fall meet-years, however, many of them have of the local press for the right to ing in washington issued a state-been attempti n g to take their des-demonstrate peacebly. ment on farm l abor in praise of tiny into their own hands. Thi s i s j ones sai d the adults refused to the organizingeffortsoftheUFWOC. a very hea l thy develo pment." eat during the time they were he l d. •For 30 yea r s the disadvant aged The bishops also urged Congress field worke r s of this nation h ave w enac t legisl a tion ro WORKERS VS . WITCHES stood by helplessl y and listened ro I . Include far m workers under the other Americ ans debati n g the farm National Labo r Relations Act . SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICQ--The labo r prob le ms , .. the statement said. 2. In c lude farm workers more regional director of the National "Burdened by low wage scales, effectively under a national minimum Relation s Board on the island of mounting hea lth problems, inade-wage which will ensure them a d e -Puerto Rico has 'dismissed charges quate educa tiona l opportunities , sub-cent standard of li v ing. of sorcery and witchcraft ori ginated standard housing , and a lac k of 3. T o include farm workers under in H ato Rey during a workers re-year-round employment, they have the n ational e mployment insurance presentaJion election which the lAM often been forced to li ve a life pr.ogram.

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EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/7 PAPER SHANTIES FOR MJGRANTSi PLANNED BERKE L EY, November IS--A r chitects Sanford Hirshen and Sim Van der Ryn of Berkeley have designed a new type of house for mi grant farm workers whi ch is made of •paper and plastic according • l a report in Time maga zine' s November IS issue. The shanties, euphemisticallydescribed as shelters" by Time, can be built for $1200 . o far, 20 communities of these and similar quarters have been built with a combination of funds provided by localities, the Rosenberg Foundation and the Economic Opportunity Act , " Time reports. Time also was pleased that the houses •told up like accordions." "The paper and plastic shelters will replace th e reeking hovels inhabited by California migrant TULARE CAMPS REBUILT Time rhapsodized. VISALIA, December 14--ConAuthority attempted toraisetherent E L MALCRIADO SAYS: We have struction began today on 200 units on the one-room, unheated, un-some advice for the bureaucrats of migrant housing forn.tlareCouncooled, leaky shacks to $25 per and tax:exempt and all cy farm workers, with the ground month, setting off a massive rent the other agencies lhat are trying breaking for a $1.9 milstrike among the tenants. t o "solve" themigranthousingprob lion project at Linnell Labor Camp County officials investigated the Iem with such unique new ideas. and Woodville Labor Camp. camps and condemned the Shacks. If migrants were paidadecentwage. Each campwillhavelOOdwellings, finding 52 violations of health and they could buy or rent decent houses grouped in 2:5 four-unit buildings. buildin g codes. like any other workers. We don't Construction will be of cement A District judge later upheld ask that the tax-payer provide us blocks with fiberboard interior. Rent the rent strike and condemned the with hous in g, or subsidize the rich for the 825-square foot homes will rent inc reases as illegal. Under growers in yet another form . As be $50 pe r month plus gas and all this pressure, the TCHA fina lly for those "paper and plastic foam electricicy. The homes include moved to improve r he dep lorable shelters," we doubt very much that hearers and Coolers. conditions in the The pre-the people d1at designed them and The housing pro jest is aimed at sent ground-breaking ceremonies, are building them wou ld live in them. replacing the tin shacks in which Thafter three ye3rs of delays, will Why should we have to? !are County workers have been living begin construction of improved hous ..................................... ! ! Season's Greet-z-ngs : :from i " MOTO'S :: i * MARKET :: WHERE THE HUELGU I STAsi ! SHOP :t * 250 4 Shaft, Selma, Ca.: : ••••• ****************** since the 1930's. in g which is long overdue. In 1965 the Tulare C o unty Housing RobBrt J. Sanchez """"" The only compl e t ely Mexican Mortuary in northern California SANCHEZ.HALL MORTUARY FRESNO 1022 "B" STREET Services aval iable everywhere, • ,No ter where you I ive, our price ls the same 1 arrangements for every economic situati on Tetephone 23?-3532

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8/El MALCR I ADD, Sunday, December 15, 1 968 ' ELSA, TEXAS--Mi'litant students at EdcOuch Elsa High School in Texas walked out o f their classrooms on November 14 and refused to return to class until a list of their demands were considered by SChool Board. The walk-out came after a meet ing of the Board, which the srudents expected to present their list of 15 grievanCes, was cancelled without explanation. The srudents ' demands inc luded "the immediate halt of discrimination against Mexican Amer i can stu dents," "the right to speak Span i sh on campus without being submitted to humiliating and unjust punishments, and the improvement o f educational facilities and the quality of instruction. The students had attempted. to present the i r grievances in normal channe l s , but when they announced they would attend the November !1 meeting of the School Board, the meeting was cancelled . TI1ey had also spoken with the superintendent of schools,. but he advised them that the School Board would have to consider their grievances. Little ever happens in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, which has an overwhelmingly Mexican popula tion. Tl)e school is located ber-.veen the towns of Edcouch and Elsa, which are about I mile apart in the northern part of Hidalgo CoWl ty. Mos t of the stu " dents are the children of farm workers. TIIircy-one srudents were expelled as a result of the boycott. Others were forced to apoligize for their actions. Federal Judge Reynaldo Garza of Brownsville later ordered t he expelled students back to school, since the law requires a he _aring before schoo l s can take such action against the students. The students had the support of their parents in most cases. At torney. Robert sanchez, who repre sented the s tu dents, said most of the improvements they demanded American students in El.sa Edaouah High Sahool. demanded an end to disarimination and an upgrading of the quaZity of education in this South Texas aorrununi ty. "were long o verdue." . About 85 JX!rcent of the students are o f Mexican descent, and they rebelled against what they said were favoritism . shown in the schOol to wards Anglo students and discrimination against Chicanos . At the hean of the problem is the srudents' desire to have the rich Mexican cultural tradition recognized in their classrooms. One student summed up the sirua-a reminder f rom the CREDIT UNION . . • tion by saying, "We're tired of getting pushed around," In the meantime, legal maneuver ings continued in Brownsville, in hopes that the would forbid the expulsion of students by extra legal procedures. State Senator joe Bernal told a rally in Edcouch, •These students are saying what we didn't say when we were young or students. TIJey are asking fOr dignity and respect." ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM \I'ORKER CREDIT SMART SAVERS, \o/HO PUT MONEY AS I DE OUR I NG THE SUMME R MONTHS, NO\o/ HAVE EXTRA MONEY T O S PEND DURING THE \o/INTER. COME .IN TODAY, MONEY AND PLAN . . . AND FIN O OUT HO\o/ YOU CAN SAVE FOR THE FUTURE. FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P . O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 9321S OFFICES AT THii SERVICE CE!'ITER 105 Asti St • ., Det.ano, Ca.

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EL MALCRIADO-, Sunday , December 15, 1968/9 SUBSIDIZED GROWERS SCORN WELFARE MADERA COUNTY, CA.--81 percent of Madera County growers who receive farm subsidies between $5,000 and $133,000 per year oppose a guaranteed annual income of $4,500 for a family of seven, a recent survey shows . Ninety-four percent oppose providing a of $4,000 to a family of five, Stanford graduate student Robin Yeamans recently conducted te l e • phone interviews with growers in Madera County, which ranks as the 37th wealthiest agriculrural county in the nation. It has the highest concemrarion ' of poor fam ilies (29.8 percent) in 1 California, and its infant mortality 1 r:ate is among the highest (10.1 per 1 ,000) in the state. 'Growers there received $3,008,901 Here are some comments from growers interviewed in the servey. causes loss of pride," said the wife of a Madera County grower who opposed federal welfare assistance to the poor . Her husband received $29 ,000 in cash from the Feds in 1966. Bible says a man should work ," said a grower who opposed federal aid to the poor, but grabbed $18, 000 for himself in 1966 farm subsidies. "I can't understand having things handed to you ," said the wife of a grower, but evidently her husband could understand the $16,000 crop subsidy he received in 1966. "idleness causes many evils," said a grower who got $8,000 in 1966 from crop subs idy programs but opposes all federal aid w t11e The march in Toronto, Canada. See story on page Morden Ontario Federation of Labour. "Jlle f ollowing comments from growers who receive d from $7,000 to $27,000 each in farm sub sidies in 1966: "Everybody shou ld have it as hard as 1 d id." "Anyone health y shouldn't get more tha n what sthey can earn." "We don't want to create gene rations of idle people." Miss Yea mans showed only eight percent of the growers or their wives interviewed recognized a parallel between the federal money they get and the federal aid to the poor they oppose. A total of $3,281,621 ,070 was paid to U. S. growers in 1966 by the Federal government. Of the total, $103,881,250 went t o California The bulk of this was for

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8/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 196 8 ELSA , TEXAS--Militant srudents at EdcOuch Elsa High S:::hool in Texas walked out of their classrooms on November 14 and refused to rerurn to class until a list of their demands were considered by the SChool Board, The walk-out came after a meeting of the Board, which the students expected to present their list of 15 grievanCes, was cancelled with out explanation. The students' demands included "the immediate halt of discrimination against Mexican-Americansrudents, "the right to speak Spanish on campus without being sUbmitted to humiliating and unjust punish ments," and the improvement of educational facilities and the quality of instruction. Tite srudents had attempted to present their gri evances in normal Mexican students in Elsa Edcouch High School demanded an end to discrimination and an up gmding of the quality of education in this South Texas commwti ty. channels, but when they announced •were long overdue." tion by sayin g, "We're tired of they would attend the November ll About 85 percent of the students getting pushed aroW1d." meeting of the School Board, the are of Mexican descent, and they In the meantime, legal maneuver-meeting was cancelled. TI1ey had rebelled against what they said were ings continued in Brownsvi lle , in also spoken with the superintendent favoritism shown in the schoo l tohopes that the courts would forbi d of schools, but he advised t11em wards Anglo students and discrimi-the expulsion of students by extra-that the School Board would have nation against Chicanos. At t11e legal procedures. to consider their grievances . heart of the problem is the students' State Senator Joe Bernal told a Little ever happens in t11e Rio desire to have the rich Mexican rally in Edcouch, •These students Grande Valley of Texas, which has cultural tradition recognized in their are saying what we didn't say when an overwhelmingly Mexican popula-classrooms. we were young or students . They tion. The school is located between One srudent summed up the sirua -are asking for dignity and respect." the towns of Edcouch and Elsa, which are about 1 mile apart in the northern part of Hidalgo County. Most of the srudents are the children of farm workers. Thirty-one srudenrs were expelled as a result of the bOycott. Others were forced to apoligize for their actions. Federal Judge Reynaldo Garza of Brownsville later ordered the expelled students back to school, since the law requires a he _aring before schools can take such action against the students. The students had the support of their parents in most cases. At torney. Robert sanchez. who represented the students, said most of the improvements they demanded a reminder from the CREDIT UNION ... ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM \•IORKER CREDIT SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY AS I DE OUR I NG THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY TO SPENO DURING THE WINTER. COME IN TODAY, MONEY AND PLAN Q . . AND FINO OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE FOR THE FUTURE. FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P.O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215 OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER 105 Asti St.; DeZanoJ Ca.

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EL MALCRI ADO-, Sunday, December 15, 1968/9 -SUBSIDIZED GROWERS SCORN WElFARE MADERA COUNTY, CA. --81 percent of Madera County growers who receive farm subsidies between $5 , 000 and $133,000 per year op pose a guaranteed annual income of $4,500 for a family of seven, a recent survey shows . 1 Ninety-four percent oppose pro1 viding a minim:!m of $4,000 to a : family of five. ' Stanford graduate srudent Robin Here are some comments from growers in terviewed in the servey. "Giving causes loss of pride, " said !:he wife of a Madera County grower who opposed federal welfare assistance to the poor . Her husband received $29,000 in cash from the Feds in 1966. "The Bible says a man should work," said a grower who opposed federal aid to d1e poor, but grabbed $18,0 00 for himself in 1966 farm The following comments came from growers who received from $7 ,000 to $27,000 each in farm subin 1966: •Everybody should have it as hard as I did.H "Anyone healthy shouldn't get more than what sthey can earn." •we don't want to create generations of idle people." Miss Yeamans showed only eight subsidies. percent of the growers or their "I can't understand having things wives interviewed recognized a pa-handed to you," said the wife of rallel between the federal money a grower, but evidently her husband they get and the federal aid to the could understand the $16, 000 crop poor they oppose. subsidy he received in 1966. A weal of $3,28 1 ,621,070 was paid "Idleness causes many evils, " to U. S. growers in 1966 by the said a grower who got $8,000 in Federal government. Of the total , 1966 from crop subsidy programs $ !03,881, 250 went to California grow-

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10/EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968 !Letters 11!11 Editor: I magine my surprise when I received December I issue today, only a day after December '1! I think that you r paper is really hip. Thanks especially for the tuf pix of Jaime "Scoop" Reyes. Keep up the good work and good l uck. Please feel free t o print my .lener in next copy of your fantastic sheet. To,;,y Dee Bryn Mawr, Pa Dec. 3, 1968 We suspect Mr. Dee gotELMAL criado confused with "Movie pas or some similar magazine, but we print his letter because the praise is so heart-warming. The Editor: Please take me off your mailing liSt . The contribution I made was in the name of the Pastor, Rev . C. j. wood and with parish funds for the " peop le. 1l1is in no way mean s to s how on what side of the dispute 1 am on . God Bless, (Rev.) Louis Gutierrez St. Ann's Church Sa nta rvtonica, California lr&Y...&Y...&Y...&W Viva Ia Causa y Ei Progreso a. Fresno California ... ....& .. ...&Y....&Y_. Y OU ARE THE GROWERS! . Editor: I hope you'll excuse my anony miry--l' m a foreigner and in danger of being deported for political accivir:y. H aving grow n up in a country where unions are strong, I am d i sgusted by the robber barons who exploit workers here, especially farm workers, One little point--you , of all people, should not call d1e robbers GROW-CATHOLIC WORKER Dea r Friends, We are always deligh t ed to get EL MALCRIADO, and hope to have ERS. They don't grow the grapes-you dol They should be called owne r s , which i s a ll they are, and one day they won't be even that. But it's you who are, and a l ways w ill be, the O"Ue and honorable growViva la Causa! A Student San Francisco, Ca. Dec ember 6, 1968 "I AM WITH YOU" Edi tor: Though I am a l ong way ft:"om your area of struggle, I want you a Story about the farm workers i n . to know 1 am w ith your movement the Catholic Worker next issue and also an appeal for s ubscription s to your paper. We are so g l ad ro have the Span ish issue, for b eauti(ul illustra tions. You sho uld ha ve them in the English edition too. Cou l d wereproduce the m in the CW? You are welcome to any of ours. Love to all of you, Day Tiv oli , New York December 4, 1968 Egg BY'ead and PastY'ies AU Kinds of Donuts Cakes foY' aH Occasions FY'ench Bnad and leader the marvelous and won derful man, Sr. Cesar Chavez. I do hope he will regain his health and strength and continue to lead such a great revolution to free the ' rarm worker across this country . I w.is given ve r y much informa'r:i 9n through your loCal leader Sr. jUlio Hernandez . Sincere ly, J. Edward East Cleveland , Ohio November 24, 1968 We have a Se lec of Spanish f.faga .ranes , Books , and RecOY'ds .

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'EL MALCRIAOO, Sunday, December 15, .1968/11 DiGiorgio Sales Involve Huge Water, Cotton Subsidies The three companies which are purchasing the DiGiorgio ranch haVe not all been involved in the grape strike, but the M. Caratan Vineyards was one of the original ranches when workers wentouton• strike in September, 1965, and 5abovich Ranch was also truck. All are large agribusines corporations owning thousands of acres apiece. Ironically, Di Giorgio was forced to sell the land Wlder provisions of a law aimed at encouraging small farmers. The sales of Di Giorgios's land resulted from an agreement between the Di Giorgio corporation and the Federal Government, under which DiGiorgio received subsidized water for irrigation of thousands of acres of land in Tulare and Kern Counties. Di Giorgio holdings far exceeded the •t60 acre limitation," which was desigried to help small farmers irrigate" their lands while limiting the amount of free or governmentsubsidized water provided to large growers. D1 Giorgio made an agree ment. with the federal government by which he would receive unlimited water subsidies for a 10-year period, after which he wOuld sell off his •excess lands." In 1967, all but 400 of Di Giorgio's acres outside Delano were sold. The present sale includes the remaining' 400 acres plus the 8,600-acre •Home Ranch"intheAr vin-Lamont area south of Bakers. field. According to the Fresno Bee of December 8, E. J. and M. M. Sabovich purchased 1,280 acres of the Lamont ranch. •They purchased the blocks in varying sizes and combinations of purchasers to qualify Wlder the 16D-acre limit regulations,• the Bee quoted Bureau of Reclamation officials as saying. The Bureau estimated the land of the vineyards at a value of $1, 200-$1,800 per acre. large purchaser, M. Car a tan of Delano, is buying $475,000 of Di Giorgio's farmers" are buying about a halfmillion dollars' worth of land. Both are members of the .Cali fornia Grape and Tree Fruit League, which recently attempted to block enforcement of the $1,6.5 minimum wage for women, claiming grape growers are unable to affor'd such "high" wages. The biggest purchases ofDiGiorgio' s land were made by the s. A Camp ranch, which is estimated to have acquired about $5 million worth. Camp is no newcomer to agriculture, having built his em, pire in Kern County during the 1920's and 1930's. The Camp family has been prominent in Democratic politics, and W. B. Camp, brOther of S. Camp, was an assiStant director of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) during the days of the New Deal under President Franklin Roosevelt. As head of the cotton division, Camp helped push through the cot-Selling the family Farm Mr . and Mrs. Robert DiGiorgio become an annual $3 billion giveaway. W. B. Camp himself collected $238,816 in federal subsidies during 1967, according to the Congressional Record. The payments were primarily for cotton Not grown. S. A. damp coliected $517,285 forthecocton he did not gilOW last year. While UFWOC's contracts with other ranches are protected by successor clauses guaranteeing that purchasers or leasees will be required to abide by the provisions of collective ?argaining agreements, the Di Giorgio workers do not have . a clause protecting them. But all Union members have a stake in seeing to it that the Di _Giorgio workers do no t lose the benefits of their conttact. As one worker put it, •The victories we have won so far will mean nothing if we continue to organize new ranches and maintain the conttacts which expire on the old ones."

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12/EL MALCR1ADO, Sunday, December 1 5', .1968 SACRAMENTO EYES FARM LABOR LEGISLATION SACRAMENTO, December 11: Cal-action at federal level to deal Act" and can petition for union ifornia legislators are talking more wit h farm labOr disputes, representation elections.Far m work-and more about passing some kind Sta te Senator Howard Way, Rep-ers in Hawaii have the highest of legislation to deal with farm IaExeter, a former grape grower, wages in the nation , are covered bor disputes, according to a series commented , " I sense a growing by collecti ve bargaining agreements of interviews appearing r ecently awareness on the part of farmers in the main industries (su ga r and in the press, Talk has centered that they can no l onger turn their pineapples), have unemployment in -on bills to outlaw boycotts, outlaw backs on this problem, that some-surance, health insurance and pen-strikes at harvest, and, though this thing must be done." sion plans , and most of the benefits has low priority in most discusWay suggested srudying thesirua-that industrial workers inthiscoun-sions, providing a framework for col tion in Hawaii, where farm workers try enjoy . lective bargaining negotiations be -are. covered by a "Little Wagner tween growers and farm workers. More growers and even Governor Reagan are talkin g about raising minimum wages for farm WQrkers (at present, $ 1 .15 an h our, for men, $1.35 for minors, and $1. 65 for women, though the latter are nor enforced) and providing some kind of unemployment insurance for farm workers. Both pro posals are aimed as much at cut ting the g roun d Out from u nder t he United Farm Workers organiz in g drive as improving conditions Grower Proposes Anti Strike Bill for. farm workers. Senator Waller Stiern, 0-Bakers field, has proposed a law calling for arbitra tion of labor dis putes in agriculture. His proposal would out law strikes at harvest time . Governo r Reagan's "Farm Labor Program" calls for passage of a State Sen. Walter Sti ern very minimuln state unemployment insurance prograrri 'for farm work ers, but Reagan and most large SAN FRANC I SCO, December 4-0. W . Fillerup, head of the Council of California Growers, today suggested prompt action on s tate and Federal legislation to settle farm labOr disputes. Fillerup, long a bitter opponent of the unionization of farm workers, and a spokesman for growers who have most strenuosly resisted tlle Union's demands for elections and collec ' tive barga in ing agreements, recommended a program "which would, of course, include (union re presentation) elections which could result in collective bargain ing." "TI1e time has come for legisla tion, at tllc federal level if possible, to settl e labor dis p utes, N he said. n1e stare should act, if the nationa l Congress does nor, • he added. Fillerup' s proposals indicate a growing concern on the part of corporate agriculture in California over the effectiveness of UFWC:C's bOycott of California table grapes. According to Harry Bernstein, l abor editor for the Los Angeles Times, Fillerup's proposal "was the first strong call from California agriculture for farm l abor legislation, altho ugh some grower groups have previously indicated the need for Agribusiness organizations call for such laws in a general way." Fillcrup called fora •specialsys tem . . . with a board o r commissi on, which would take into account the Wlique factors of agriculture, such as the perishable narure of the product." Such suggestion s are usually designed to set the stage for outlaw ing strikes at harvest time . Farm workers, however, feel the strike is the workers' last resort, his inalienable right, and that noth ing should limit this right to strike except a contract in which . the workers agrees to a "no-strike" clause in return for job security, decent wages and the other benefits. Fillerup' s proposals, while offerin g no "solution" to the farm la bor problem, indicate that some growers are at least aware that a "problem" does exist. Evidently growers are at last beginning to suffer a little themselves from the chaos in agricultural labor relations, just as farm workers ha ve suffered for decades. Perhaps Filerup' s proposals will start a dialogue , discussions. or even that frightening word, •negotiations" word, "negotiations" between the union and growers. The time. for such a dia l ogue seems long over due.

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EL MALCRIADO, Sunday, December 15, 1968/13 NEWS BRIEFS NEWS BRIEFS NEWS CHICAGO BOSTON, November 28--Richard Y CHICAGO, December 10--The BOSTON Cardinal CushingofBostonannolU1c United Farm Workers Organizing ed his support of the boycott of g:::: W A 5 H J N G T Q N California table grapes. this week, until the dispute between grapes Eliseo Medina, UFViOC leader in growers and the workers was set-WASHINGTON, November 28--The Chicago, reports that Jewel Tea, tied . The Cardinal also endorsed Federal Government has issued new with over 230 stores in Illinois , re-the stand by the Bishops and Archregulations for visitors crossing the moved all grapes from its shelves. bishops of California who unani-border from Mexico into the UniTwo other major chains followed mously called for the extension ted States. The new entry per-suit. And in Michigan , Lupe Anof the National Labor Relations Act mit will be dated and will be good guiana , UFWOC chairman, repons for 15 days for 1\.texican citizens that Eastern Michigan is almost to cover farm workers. The Cardinal's statement came coming to the U.S, to visit, shop , clean of grapes, With statements shortly after the annual fall meet-or do business. It is valid only by 6 major chains to swp handing of the Bishops, Archbishops and within 25 miles of the border. ling the scab product. Cardinals of the Unites States met The new regulations replace the The boycott is also g rowin g in Washington and issued a strong "72-hour \iy Wednesday to serve U nion member's. DELANO Perelli-Minetti workers w ith seniority are requested to register immediatel y for work during d1e pruning season, which begins next month, according to hiring ha ll di-rector Manuel Sanchez . Sanchez said members can avoid needless delays by bringing their dues books with them when they go to register

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A Christmas Gift from EL MALCRIADO AND THE PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED FARM WORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO invite you to look into the publications of the United Far>m Workers, for unique and meaningful gifts, and for new insight into one of the most significant labor struggles taking place in Ame rica today. The art, music, and literoaturoe offered hero are an outgrowth of the strike by grape pickers in the vineyal'ds around Delano , Californ.ia. The money ooZ.leated ft>om the sale of these works goes directly to the United Fam Workers, to further the efforots to or>ganize America's most exploited workers, the farm workers. We enoou:r>age you to put youl' money to work in this cause, and intr>oduce your [ami ly and friends and neighbors to this cou rageous strruggZ.e by the farm worker>s for dignity and justice. MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR This bea u tiful calendar employs twelve great works by Mexican and Mexican-American a rtists, which have appeared as cover s on 11E l M A LCRI A0011 over the last three years. All are i n t h e graphi c a r t tradit i o n of Mexico, woodcuts, enqrav i ngs, pen-and -ink drawings. This tyoe of art was an outgrowth of the Mexican Revo lution (1910-1920) and represents one o f the outstanding expressions of Revolutionary Art .from Mexico. It remains very much a pa r t of Mexican-American cu 1 tu re. The calendar is 9 x 18, red ink on ochr e stack. "li ($2. 00 each plus 50 handling 6 for $10.0 0 plus $1.00 handling! : .... 7 . s I 9 I"' /Jl . ,;:. • fl /$ , ""'" I , "'l' ----... l Please send me of your Me:rican Graphic Arts Calendazo s @ $2.00 each plus 50 for postage and handling: . NAME -----------------------------------------------ADDRESS------------------------------------------------CITY STAT-E ZIP _{Make c heck or money ol"de r payable to Un1.tea Farm Wol'"ke i-s . Delano, Calif. 93215) i

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Delano "Huelga"Buttons LARGE BurroNS (2" diame ter), black and red, with the UFWOC eagle and " Viva I a Causa" o r ••••••..•. . .•••••• ($1.00 each or 5 for $3.75) Regular Buttons (I 1/2" diameter or smaller), b lack and red, with the UFWOC eagl e and "Boycott 13U.\1PE R STIC:K E H S , "Boycon Grapes" with the UFWOC: eagle ••• IS" l ong (S for $ 1.00) B LACK AND RED WALL POST ER , x 23", of Emiliano Zapata, with , ., , / the banner headline, "VIVA LA REVOLUCION". Zapata was dle he•o of the Mexican Revolu tion , who led the peasams of Central Mexico in their struggles for l and and liberty. ($1.50, plus 25 handiin"g. 5 copies for $5.00) VIVA LA REVOLUCION. HUELGA! by Ne l son BASfA! photos by Sallis Zapata Poster s "Hue lga en General" Large Hue l ga Buttons Sma ll Buttons Bumper stickers ADDRESS -----------C ITY ____ STATE _______ _ (Make checks payable to rhe United , Box 130, Delano , Ca.)

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"'"'"' ;; . D (.' ; J <.-u BEE'S Discount Dept. Store 918 Main st. DELANO across from the Post Office herything at low Discount Prices 10YS v * . . . ' . ... ... ;, ,(. ... , ..... . . .. , , \ . l>ECOR.AT\ONS CLOTHING SOCKS COSME11CS Novelties Housewares Jewelry Radios General Merchandise ALSO IN: COACHELLA STOCKTON INDIO TRACY