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Hispanic link weekly report, May 20, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 20, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The New 77? Week
John Negroponte waits for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to vote on his nomination to the State Department post of assistant secretary for the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs Negroponte, formerly ambassador to Honduras will be succeeded by John Arthur Ferch... Meanwhile, Hortencia Benavidez and Pepe M6ndez await full Senate approval of their nominations to the board of directors of the Legal Services Corporation. The Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee unanimously approved the nominations May 8... Joseph M. Aguayo is named secretary general of the International Federation of Multiple Sclerosis Societies. Most recently Aguayo served as vice president for development and special projects for Independent Sector. He’ll assume
his new duties in London, England, June 1. . . Dr. Luis Perez of Sanford becomes president of the Florida Medical Association, a 14,000-i ember doctors organization. He is ’he first Cuban American to hold the post... Perez’s promotion comes just two months after Dr. Jorge Prieto is appointed as president of the Chicago Board of Health. Prieto, a native of Mexico, is credited with bringing nationwide acclaim to the city’s Family Practice Department, which he heads... New York Mayor Ed Koch appoints a nine-member special advisory committee to review the city police department following allegations of misconduct and brutality. Among the members are Amalia Betanzos of the Wildcat Corporation, a job-training group, and George L Sanchez, deputy police commissioner for equal employment opportunity. .. California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Kathleen A. Calderon as assistant secretary of the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency.
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New Miami Survey Finds‘Reverse Assimilation’
Spanish is growing as a language of social, economic and political importance in South Florida, and its resurgence could reflect a national trend, a Strategy Research survey in the greater Miami area shows.
The study, the tenth conducted in Miami since 1967 by the market analysis corporation, was released May 11. It reveals a dramatic reversal of an assimilation trend suggested | by its surveys in the ’70s.
“There is an implication that assimilation is I not taking place. We’re almost having reverse assimilation occurring,” Strategy Research President Richard Tobin told Weekly Report.
More than 40% of Dade County’s Anglos felt that it is essential fortheir children to read and write Spanish perfectly, he said, while ! close to 60% said they enjoy socializing with Latino friends. Other studies by Strategy Research have concluded that their interest was stimulated by the desire to capitalize on economic, political and social opportunities, he said.
i The current survey also shows that 98% of [ the community’s Hispanics felt that it was essential for their children to read and write
Latino Social Attitudes in South Floridr
19bo 1985
Culture should be preserved 96.1% 99.7% It’s important to vote 93.4% 99.4%
Like to socialize with Latinos 95.5% 97.6% Like to socialize with Anglos 80.0% 85.4%
Source: The 1985 South Florida Latin Market, Strategy Research Corp.
English perfectly. (Only 94% of the Anglo respondents felt it was essential.)
Miami-area Latinos “are a bilingual people, proud of both sides,” Tobin commented. Nearly 100% said they felt their culture should be preserved.
Strategy Research, which conducted the major market survey used by the National Association of Spanish Broadcasters in the early ’80s in educating advertisers on the value of Spanish-language marketing, plans to release four more local market surveys, at about 45-day intervals, before the end of the year. These will be, chronologically, on New
York, Phoenix, San Francisco and Chicago.
Early next year, it expects to release a survey on Los Angeles.
Those and many other areas in the United States have experienced influxes of Spanishspeaking immigrants not dissimilar to that in South Florida.
Tobin noted a declining use of Spanish in the Miami area until the 1980s, when some 100,000 Mariel refugees began settling there and additional immigrants, mainly from El Salvador, Nicaragua and Mexico, began coming. Most of the non-Cuban arrivals were middle class.
In 1970, there were about 300,000 Hispanics in Dade County. By 1980, there were nearly 550,000. Today, the report counts 853,200 in Dade, with an additional 75,000 in adjoining Broward and Monroe Counties, which were also included in the survey.
Dade County itself grew from 1.25 million in 1970 to nearly 2 million today, with Latinos increasing from 23% to 43% of the population.
The 82-page survey includes shopping, product usage, travel and ownership patterns,
continued on page 3
Puerto Ricans Leave Coors Pact
I
The National Puerto Rican Coalition has pulled out of the much publicized $325 | million agreement signed by the Adolph Coors Company and a coalition of five other |i national Hispanic organizations.
Coalition President Louis Nunez told His-; panic Link that while a majority of coalition I members supported the agreement, a “significant and articulate” group opposed it.
. The board of directors, meeting in New York April 29, decided it would be divisive and counterproductive to remain in the pact, he said.
Nuhez informed the Golden, Colo.-based brewery of the coalition’s decision in a | letter to Division President Peter H. Coors May 3. The coalition is composed of 46 | member organizations nationwide.
!----------------------------------------------
Critics of the coalition’s participation in the pact, among them the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy in New York, pointed to an ongoing union boycott of Coors beer and at provisions in the agreement that had the Hispanic organizations “flak-catching” for the brewery.
In return for millions directed at the general Hispanic community through advertising, employment and philanthropic activities, the Hispanic organizations agreed to “take positive and visible action to help eliminate misconceptions of Coors within the Hispanic community.”
The pact was signed Oct. 29,1984, by the coalition, National Council of La Raza, National Image, United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, American Gl Forum and Cuban National Planning Council.
Bilingual Hiring Ordered
One of the largest school districts in California has, for the first time, been ordered to fulfill all of the requirements of the state’s bilingual education laws and regulations following an out of court settlement of a suit reached this month.
Parents of children in the Oakland Unified School District and the school district signed a three-year agreement May 3 that calls for an increase of certified bilingual education teachers, curriculum and materials.
Victor Ochoa, a lawyer with the Legal Aid Society of Alameda County who handled the parents suit, called the settlement, “a landmark case that will have an impact throughout the state and, possibly, the nation.”
Ochoa said the consent decree requires the school district to hire an additional 93 bilingual teachers (there are currently 76) to instruct the estimated 9,000 LEP elementary students-3,700 of whom are Hispanic.


Sin pelos en la lengua
LIFE’S LITTLE EMBARRASSMENTS: “Gracias," read the NBC ad in giant type (in the Hispanic media conference program) “for placing the accent on opportunity.” &Gra-SEE-us?
And there was the persuasive op/ed piece opposing the English-only constitutional amendment bylined by ex-LULAC lider Arnold Torres in such papers as the Denver Post (March 26) and Houston Chronicle (April 8) - only to surface under new LULAC lider Joe Trevifio’s byline in USA Today April 10.
TELL IT TO THE I. N.S.: “And how did you happen to come to the United States?”
“ I was just sai ling by when a German U-boat sank me off the coast of New Jersey... so I swam to Atlantic City.”
If any other Cuban told that story, he’d be shipped straight back to Mariel. But Joseph Rodriguez - confirmed by the Senate as New Jersey’s first Hispanic federal judge this month (Weekly Report, May 13) - says thaf s exactly what happened to his father.
In May of 1918, Mario Rodriguez was aboard the Cuban passenger ship Carolina when it was torpedoed by a German sub off the Jersey coast After two days adrift in a lifeboat, he swam ashore at the coastal resort and later settled in Camden, where he and his Puerto Rican bride, Carmen, raised four sons- one of them Joseph- and a daughter.
TOMBSTONE DIPLOMACY: California “Culture Clash” comedian Rick Salinas says that when President Reagan was in Europe this month, he visited a French cemetary on Cinco de Maya (If you didn’t laugh, ask a Mexican friend to explain it to you.)
- Kay B&rbaro
Chicago Hiring Praised Six Latinos Win Business Awards
The Mayor’s Advisory Commission on Latino Affairs in Chicago has praised the city - and Mayor Harold Washington in particular - for increased hiring of Latinos in the past 23 months.
From May 1983 to March 1985, 233 or 10.1% of the new hires by the city’s 46 departments and agencies were Latino, the commission said in a study released April 27.
However, the commission criticized the City Council, which had 13 Latinos among 246 new hires - a rate of 5.2%. Latinos, who comprise 17% of Chicago’s population, make up 4% of the city’s workforce.
N.Y. Race Relations Poll
New York City Hispanics responding to a recent poll on race relations were more likely than black and white respondents to socialize with a friend of another race.
The New York Times/WCBS-TV poll, released May 14, showed 67% of the Hispanics saying they had spent a social evening with a friend of another race in recent months. For whites the figure was 54%, for blacks 63%.
The poll, which showed that racial tensions persist in the city, indicated Hispanics were less isolated at home and at work than whites or blacks. The poll was based on phone interviews in English and Spanish of 1,557 New Yorkers, 14% of whom were Hispanic.
Sixteen percent of the Hispanics said they would be “very concerned” if a family member wanted to marry a black The percentage of whites who would be concerned about an interracial marriage was 42%.
Twenty-nine percent of the white respondents also said they would be concerned if a family member wanted to marry a Hispanic. Seven percent of the blacks said they would be concerned about possible Hispanic in-laws.
Six percent of the Hispanics said they would be concerned if afamily member wished to marry a white person.
Radio Marti Ready to Go
Radio Marti, the congressionally authorized Voice of America broadcast to Cuba, is about to begin its daily programming beamed at the islands population, sources told Weekly Report At press time, there were indications that It could start broadcasting as early as May 20,
Six Hispanic entrepreneurs picked up awards recognizing their contributions to small business development during festivities marking National Small Business Week in Washington, D.C., May 7. The awards are presented annually by the Small Business Administration.
The Hispanic winners, their companies and awards are:
• Janie Anzaldua, owner of St. Mary’s Sewing Industries in Edcouch, Texas Small Businessperson of the Year. Her four-year-old company, started with a $10,000 investment, now employs 116 and topped $290,000 in profits last year.
• R. Alan Fuentes, president of Computer Dynamics Inc. of Virginia Beach, Virginia Small
Research Center Planned
Plans for a national research center to analyze educational policy issues affecting Hispanics, particularly Puerto Ricans, were announced May 8 by ASPIRA of America, a Puerto Rican service organization.
Juan Rosario, ASPIRA executive director, announced the plan upon receiving a $40,000 grant from Anheuser-Busch Companies for the center to be based in Washington, D.C. The planners expect that a fully staffed center will operate on a $400,000 budget annually.
The ASPIRA Institute for Educational Policy Research should begin operations in a few months, said Sarah Melendez, minority affairs director at the American Council on Education, who has developed that idea with ASPIRA
Melendez added that the project should complement the work of two other research centers created since January, the Tomds Rivera Center in Claremont, Calif., and the Hispanic Research Center in Tempe, Ariz.
Latina Named Miss USA
Laura Elena (Herring, a Mexican-born 21-year-old now living in El Paso, became the first Hispanic- and first foreign-bom contestant - to be crowned Miss USA May 13.
Herring, who spent her first 11 years in northern Mpxico, says that in honor of her mother she?II compete under the name Laura Martinez Herring when she represents the United States at the Miss Universe Pageant in Miami July 15.
Businessperson of the Year. His company has doubled its sales each of its five years. In 1984 it showed $7.7 million in sales.
• Eric Torres, president of Kiddies Manufacturing Inc. of Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico Small Businessperson of the Year. A producer of “kiddie rides,” the Torres plant created 60 new jobs in an economically depressed area.
• Joe Pacheco, of Murray, Utah, Accountant Advocate of the Year. Pacheco has promoted minority business in several ways and even offered services free of charge to beginning companies.
• Esperanza M. Guerrero, senior consultant at Price Waterhouse inTucson, Ariz, Minority Advocate of the Year. Guerrero has worked actively with Chicanos Por La Causa as a consultant and advisor to minority businesses
• Hector Holguin, chairman of the board of Holguin Corporation in El Paso, Small Business Innovator of the Year. Holguin is a world leader in installing and designing computer systems to aid engineers and architects in designing and drafting projects His company ranks second in the United States and fifth worldwide in this new computer field.
Shooting Prompts Lawsuit
The decision by San Diego District Attorney Ed Miller not to prosecute a U.S. Border Patrol agent for shooting and wounding a Mexican boy last month has prompted a suit against the federal government and angered the youth’s family and local U.S. Hispanic leaders
Humberto Carrillo Estrada, 12,was shot in the chest by agent Edward Cole April 18. Carrillo and several other people allegedly began pelting two agents near the San Ysidro, Calif, port of entry with rocks as they tried to stop his 15-year-old brother from scaling a fence back into Mexico.
Los Angeles attorney Marco L6pez filed a $3 million claim April 25 against the federal government on behalf of Carrillo (who denies throwing any rocks), charging attempted murder, assault with a deadly weapon, battery and assault.
Herman Baca, chairman of the Committee on Chicano Rights in San Diego, called the May 1 district attorney’s decision a“coverup, a whitewash.”
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
MIAMI LATINOS: Strategy Research has released a new 82* page survey of the Hispanic market in South Florida Cost $34.95. Contact Elizabeth Grudzinski, Strategy Research Corp., 100 NW 37th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33125 (305) 649-5400.
MINORITY DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS: The Ford Foundation will begin accepting in September applications for a new $9 million doctoral fellowship program. The foundation will award 40 three-year fellowships with annual stipends ranging from $6,000 to $10,000. It also will award 10 grants valued at$18,000 a year. For information, contact Fellowship Office, National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334-2000.
CHICAGO HIRING REPORT: The Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs has released a report detailing the hiring of Latinos in the city s 46 agencies and departments. While the mayor's office has made notable progress, the City Council has an unimpressive record, the report says. The report is free but enclose $1 in stamps to cover postage. Contact Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs, City Hall, Room 703, 121 North LaSalle St, Chicago, III. 60602 (312) 744-4404.
SUCCESSFUL YOUTH PROGRAMS: A new report analyzes successful Hispanic youth employment programs across the country and gives tips on how to make such programs work at a community level. The Management Information Services report costs $8. Discounts for bulk orders available. Contact International City Management Association, MIS Report Ordering Department 1120 G St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 626-4600.
VETERANS’ MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: The Adolph Coors Company has created a scholarship program for the dependents of veterans, particularly those of veterans killed, disabled or wounded in the line of duty. Applicants must be under 22, have completed their freshman year in college and maintain at least a 2,75 GPA Coors will select 100 students for the $5,000 scholarships. For an application contact your local American Gl Forum chapter or Adolph Coors Company, Veterans’ Memorial Scholarship Fund, Mail Number 329, Golden, Colo. 80401. Deadline: July 15.
SAFE SCHOOLS: The Institute for Urban and Minority Education has published a monograph discussing ways to make schools safer. The monograph also analyzes specific features of schools themselves that promote violence and disruption. The cost of “Safe Schools, Sound Schools: Learning in a Non-Disruptive Environment’ is $6. Make checks payable to Teachers College. To order contact ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027 (212) 678-3437.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives,and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ED Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
ASSISTANT EDITOR sought by Caminos FINANCIAL PLANNER: We need people Magazine, Los Angeles, California Applicant to help market our exciting line of financial must have two years of college and previous products If you have the qualifications we’re experience on a school or other publicatioa looking for, we’ll train you to help people build Duties include: Writing columns conducting solid financial futures. And we’ II provide first-interviews editing and research. Write to rate insurance and investment products from Kirk Whisler, Publisher, Caminos P-O. Box Connecticut Mutual, a recognized leader in 54307, Los Angeles Calif. 90054. the industry. Successful Connecticut Mutual
REGISTRAR STUDENT SERVICES* Middlesex Representatives earn $50,000 a year and County College. Edison, New Jersey. The mora So if you’re interested in a meaningful registrar directs student registration, the and warding career in financial planning, scheduling of instructional facilities, and the send your resume ,0: Delv,n E Beniamin, maintenance and reporting of confidential J D - Connecticut Mutual. 140 Garden St, G-academic records. Three years experience 19. Hartford, Conn 06154. An Equal Opportunity in registration and records, preferably in an Employer.
administrative or supervisory position, required ENTRY-LEVEL POSITIONS with the govern-
Master's degree in related field preferred, but ment in Montgomery County. Maryland, are will consider candidates with a Bachelor's available on a continuing basis Call (301* degree plus five years of appropriate experience: 251-2252.
Salary $31,114-$40,578. Contact the Personnel Office, Middlesex County College (201) GENERAL MANAGER, KUBO- FM, Salinas. 548-6000 or write Diana Michelle Goffe, Dean California KUBO is soon to be a CPB -of Student Services Middlesex County College, qualified station that serves over 27000 residents Edison, New Jersey 08817. jn the Salinas Valley and Monterey Bay area
gXgCyjiy^ DIRECTOR RESPONSIBILITIES: To provide overall
Milwaukee Boys and Girl's Club administration and coordination of KUBO.
â–  MBGC seeks Executive Director, responsible QUALIFICATIONS: Fundraising and financial to the board of trustees to direct and administer management skills are necessary. Bilingual the agency. Position requires college degree (EnglisIVSpanish) is preferred Must have strong and 12 years relevant experience including writing skills SALARY: $1,000-$1,300 per at least 10 years defined supervisory and mon*h Plus fringe benefits. Flexible hours administrative responsibilities Ideal candidate TO APPLY: Send resume to KUBO, P.O. Box will havedemonstrated experience and success ^ 243, Salinas Calif. 93902 or call (408) 422-in financial, personnel and resource manage- 5826. Application deadline is June 1,1985. ment of multi-unit, building-centered, nonprofit agency with annual operating budget of EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR sought by Washoe
$2 million in United Way, government and County Teachers Association, Nevada Qualified private support. Person would have energy, candidates should have3-5 years of managerial imagination, ability to relate well with wide experience in medium - sized associations range of people, excellent planning and background experience in public relations communication skills Hiring range $45,771 bargaining, labor relations program development -$53,676. Excellent benefits Send resume and communications Send resume and letter by June 15 ta Search committee Milwaukee of application toe Don Purcell, Executive Director, Boysand Girf s Club P-O. Box92159, Milwaukee Washoe County Teachers Association, 2105 Wis 53202. Capurro Way, Suite G, Sparks Nevada 89431.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MIGRATORY FARMWORKERS: PROBLEMS AND
SOLUTIONS
Raleigh, N.C. May 21-22
The conference will include an in-depth look at the latest research concerning migrant education, health, employment and demographics. The National Governors' Association is the sponsor.
Fernando Alegria (202) 624-5427
U.& HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Los Angeles May 24
A national conference to discuss current issues facing Hispanic business.
Jay Garcfa (816) 842-2228
COMING SOON
NATIONAL CONGRESS FOR PUERTO RICAN RIGHTS CONVENTION Philadelphia May 31 - June 2 James Collazo (215) 643-4443
NATIONAL ACTION COUNCIL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING ANNUAL FORUM Atlanta June 5-7 Matthew O’Brien (212) 279-2626
BILINGUALISM: PROBLEMS, PROSPECTS,
EVALUATIONS
New York June 7
A one-day conference sponsored by Yeshiva University. Joshua A Fishman (212) 430-2370
NEW YORK STATE HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS BANQUET New York June 19 Bob Estrada (212) 737-9708
Miami Market Survey
continued from page 1
economic impact and lifestyle patterns. Four hundred interviews were conducted with heads of Latino households and 400 with heads of non-Latino households.
On “language spoken most frequently at home,” 92.3% said Spanish. This contrasts to 82.8% in 1975 and 75.6% in 1980.
The South Florida Anglo community is readily accepting the Latino culture, the report says, citing its strong acceptance of music and dance and its socializing with Latino friends as evidence.
“Due to the availability of a high level of Latin culture in the Miami area and the near proximity of Latin cultures, South Florida is a bicultural and bilingual community,” it concludes.
- Charlie Ericksen
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


Arts & Entertainment
THE NUMBER OF PRIMETIME PROGRAMS FEATURING Hispanic actors and actresses in lead roles will be cut in half as CBS, NBC and ABC announce their lineups for the 1985-1986 fall season.
Only four programs featuring Latinos in lead roles will return- three on NBC, one on CBS. ABC had no programs with Latinos in lead foies during the 1984-1985 season.
Returning on NBC are Family Ties, which features child actress Tina Yothers; Hill Street Blues, starring Rene Enriquez; and Miami Vice which features Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago. The peacock’s network, which placed second in last season’s ratings race, dropped the serial Berrengers, a limited-run show that featured Eddie V6lez in a lead role.
First-placed CBS dropped three shows with Hispanic stars, including the long-running The Dukes of Hazzard with Latina Catherine Bach. The network also cancelled two shows that premiered in the 1984-85
season with Hispanics in prominent roles: ER, in wnich Luis Aval was a semi-regular cast member, and The Lucy Arnaz Show, a m season replacement.
The three networks added a total of 22 prime time shows for ne season’s rosters; no Hispanic cast member has been announced c any of them. Absent from the new season is an expected spin-off < The Bill Cosby Show- a Latino version of the popular sitcom that woul have starred Tony Orlando as a New York social worker.
In contrast to the four shows with Hispanics in lead roles, the 1985 1986 season includes 11 shows that feature black characters.
ONE LINERS: El Norte which recently was nominated for ar Academy Award, has its non-pay television premiere on PBS’s American Playhouse May 20 at 9 p.m. (ET). . . Embassy Home Entertainment releases on videocassette May 22 Torchlight; the film about cocaine abuse, starring Pamela Sue Martin, was produced by her husband Manuel Rojas... and Rosa Montoya’s Bailes Flamencos company performs at San Francisco’s Music Hall Theater May 25...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MANAGEMENT HURDLE: Results of yet another survey on black and Hispanic partic pation in print media are in, and they’re evci gloomier than those found by the American Society of Newspaper Editors in its recently released annual newsroom headcount.
ASNE reported that only 5.7% of the nation’s newspersons working on dailies in 1984 were minority (1.5% Hispanic), a first-ever slight decrease since it started surveying mer papers in 1978. But it showed minomies moving up a bit into the “news executive” range. (The latter might also have been the result of their defining “news executive,” for the first time, as someone who supervises three or more persons.)
Now the Institute for Journalism Education has released key findings of its 1984-1985 study on upward mobility in the newsroom.
IJE President Ellis Cose offers these preliminary conclusions:
• Minorities are leaving the newsroom at three times the rate of their white peers, and
40% of those remaining expect to leave, compared to 22% of whites. They’re leaving, they say, because of “lack of opportunity.”
• Of the minority journalists interviewed, 50% want a career in newspaper management, compared to only 28% of whites. Yet 45% 're whites have managerial responsibilities, ough whites and minorities in the survey were hired at the same level within the same time period.
The Berkeley, Calif.-based IJE interviewed 300 journalists (125 white, 115 black, 44 Hispanic and 16 Asian) at 18 newspapers in these 10 cities Miami, Chicago Los Angeles San Francisco, Atlants Detroit; Charlotte N.C., Philadelphia, Tucson and El Paso. .
The study, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, looked at journalists who entered the newspaper market between 1969 and 1979. Its full finding's will be released later this year.
Concludes Cose for the present “Unless the news industry recognizes and acts on this ‘quiet crisis’ it faces a mass exodus of minorities seeking opportunity outside the profession.”
BREAKING INTO BROADCASTING: The National Association of Broadcasters will conduct
an employment and career strategy workshop at its Washington, D.C., headquarters May29 from 11 am.to1 p.m. Ifs for those interested in sales, news and engineering careers and ‘ ifs free. Advance registration required. Call Claryce Handy (202) 429-5497.
NAMES: Los Angeles Times metro editor Frank Sotomayor is one of 19 journalists picked as Harvard University Nieman Fellows for 1985-1986... Juan V£squez, the paper's Mexico City bureau chief and recent Overseas Press Club award winner for best economics reporting from abroad, will join the Times’ Washington bureau July 1...
Helga Silva, long-time political writer with The Miami Herald, has joined Radio Marti in Washington, D.C., as deputy news director.
.. Ernie Torres has started at The Washington Post as a copy editor after lengthy stints with the Long Beach Independent Press-Telegram and The Philadelphia Inquirer...
Weathercaster Maclovio P6rez of Los Angeled KCBS-TV has signed a five-year contract with the station reported to be in seven figures.
— Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street, N. W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Steve Padilla
Reporting Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza. Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Carlos Morales,
Ancel Martinez
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any. form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants* packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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( i l Making The News This Week his new duties in London , England , June 1 . . . Dr . Luis Perez of Sanford becomes president of the Florida Medical Asso c iation , a 14, 000-1 ember doctors organization . He is ' he first Cuban American to hold the post. .. Perez ' s promotion comes j ust two months after Dr . Jorge Prieto is appointed as president of the Chicago Board of Health . Prieto , a native of Mexico, is credited with bri ng i ng nationwide acclaim to the city's Family Practice Department , which he heads ... New York Mayor Ed Koch appoints a nine-member special advisory committee to review the city police department following allegations of misconduct and brutality . Among the members are Amalia Betanzos of the Wildcat Corporation, a job-training group, and George L Sanchez, deputy police commissioner for equal employment oppor tunity ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Kathleen A . Calder6n as assistant secretary of the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency . John Negroponte waits for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to vote on his nomination to the State Department post of assistant secretary for the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs. Negroponte , formerly ambassador to Honduras, will be succeeded by John Arthur Ferch ... Meanwhile, Hortencia Benavidez and Pepe Mendez await full Senate approval of their nominations to the board of directors of the Legal Services Corporation . The Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee unanimously approved the nominations May 8 ... Joseph M. Aguayo is named secretary general of the International Federation of Multiple Sclerosis Societies. Most recently Aguayo served as vice president for de velopment and special projects for Independent Sector. He'll assume Vol. 3 No. 20 HISPANIC LINK New Miami Survey Finds' Reverse Assimilation' Spanish is growing as a language of social, economic and political importance in South Florida, and its resurgence could reflect a national trend, a Strategy Research survey in the greater Miami area shows. The study, the tenth conducted in Miami since 1967 by the market analysis corporation, was released May _11. It reveals a dramatic reversal of an assimilation trend suggested by its surveys in the '70s. "There is an implication that assimilation is not taking place. We're almost having rever-se assimilation occurring, " Strategy Research President Richard Tobin told Weekly Report. More than 40% of Dade County's Anglos felt that it is essential fortheirchildren to read and write Spanish perfectly, he said , while close to 60% said they enjoy socializing with Latino friends . Other stud . ies by Strategy Research have concluded that their interest was stimulated by the desire to capitalize on economic, political and social opportunities, he said . The current survey also shows that 98% of the community's Hispanics felt that it was essential for their children to read and write Latino Social Attitudes in South Floridr 1985 Culture should be preserved 96.1% 99 .7% It's important to vote 93 . 4% 99.4% Like to social i ze with Latinos 95.5% 97 .6% Like to socialize with Anglos 80.0% 85.4% Source : The 1985 South Florida Latin Market, Strategy Research Corp. English perfectly. (Only 94% of the Anglo respondents felt it was essential.) Miami-area Latinos " are a bilingual people , proud of both sides, " Tobin commented Nearly 100% said they felt their culture should be preserved. Strategy Research, which conducted the major market survey used by the National Assoc i ation of Spanish Broadcasters in the early '80s in educating advertisers on the value of Span i sh-language marketing, plans to release four more local market surveys, at about 45-day intervals , before the end of the year. These will be, chronologically, on New Puerto Ricans Leave Coors Pact The National Puerto Rican Coalition has pulled out of the much publicized $325 million agreement signed by the Adolph Coors Company and a coalition of five other nat ional Hispanic organizations. Coalition President Louis Nunez told His panic Link that while a majority of coalition members supported the agreement, a "sig nificant and articulate" group opposed it. The board of directors, meeting in New York April 29, decided it would be divisive and counterproductive to remain in the pact , he said. Nunez informed the Golden, Colo.based brewery of the coalition' s decision in a letter to D i vision President Peter H. Coors May 3. The coalition is composed of 46 member organizations nationwide. Critics of the coalition's participation in the pact, among them the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy in New York, pointed .to an ongoing union boycott of Coors beer and at prov isions in the agreement that had the f.! .spanic organizations " flak-catching" for the brewery. In return for millions directed at the general Hispanic community through advertising, employment and philanthropic activities, the Hispanic organizations agreed to "take positive and visible action to help eliminate misconceptions of Coors within the Hispanic community." The pact was signed Oct. 29, 1984, by the coalition, National Council of La Raza , National Image , United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, American Gl Forum and Cuban National Planning Council. York, Phoenix, San Francisco and Chicago. Early next year, it e x pects to release a survey on Los Angeles. Those and many other areas in the United States have experienced influxes of Spanish speaking immigrants not dissimilar to that in South Florida . Tobin noted a declining use of Spanish in the Miami area until the 1980s, when some 1 00,000 Marie! refugees began settling there and additional immigrants , mainly from El Salvador , N i caragua and Mex i co , began coming . Most of the non-Cuban arrivals were middle class . In 1970, there were about 300, 000 Hispanics in Dade County. By 1980, there were nearly 550,000. Today , the report counts 853,200 in Dade, with an additional75,000 in adjoining Broward and Monroe Counties, which were also included in the survey . Dade County itselfgrewfrom 1.25 million in 1970 to nearly 2 million today, with Latinos increasing from 23% to43% of the population . The 82page survey includes shopping, product usage , travel and ownership patterns , continu e d o n page 3 Bilingual Hiring Ordered One of the largest School districts in California has , for the first time, been ordered to fulfill all of the requirements of the state's bilingual education laws and regulations following an out of court settlement of a suit reached this month . Parents of children in the Oakland Unified School District and the school district signed a three-year agreement May 3 that calls for an increase of certified bilingual education teachers, curriculum and materials. Victor Ochoa, a lawyer with the Legal Aid Society of Alameda County who handled the. parents' su it, called the settlement, "a landmark case that Will have an impact throughout the state and, possibly , the nation. " ! L------------l Ochoa said the consent decree requires the school district to hire an additional 93 bilingual teachers (there are currently 76) to instru . \ estimated 9,000 LEP elementary students -3,700 of whom a r e Hispanic.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua If any other Cuban told that story, he'd be shipped straight back to Marie!. But Joseph Rodriguez-confirmed by the Senate as New Jersey's first Hispanic federal judge this month (Weekly Report, May 13)-says that's exactly what happened to his father. LIFE'S LITTLE EMBARRASSMENTS: "G,acfas," read the NBC ad in giant type (in the Hispanic media conference program) "for placing the accent on opportunity." lGraSEEus? And there was the persuasive op/ed piece opposing the English only constitutional amendment bylined by exLULAC lider Arnold Torres in such papers as the Denver Post (March 26) and Houston Chronicle (April 8) only to surface under new LULAC lider Joe Trevino's byline in USA Today April10. In May of 1918, Mario Rodriguez was aboard the Cuban passenger ship Carolina when it was torpedoed by a German sub off the Jersey coast. After two days adrift in a lifeboat, he swam ashore at the coastal resort and later settled in Camden, where he and his Puerto Rican bride, Carmen, raised four sons-one of them Joseph-and a daughter. TELL IT TO THE I. N. S.: "And how did you happen to come to the United States?'' TOMBSTONE DIPLOMACY: California "CultJre Clash" comedian Rick Salinas says that when President Reagan was in Europe this month, he visited a French cemetary on Cinco de Mayo. (If you didn't "I was just sailing by when a German Uboat sank me off the coast of New Jersey ... so I swam to Atlantic City." laugh, ask a Mexican friend to explain it to you.) Kay Barbaro Chicago Hiring Praised Six Latinos Win Business Awards The Mayor's Advisory Commission on Latino Affairs in Chicago has praised the city-and Mayor Harold Washington in particular-for increased hiring of Latinos in the past 23 months. From May 1983 to March 1985, 233 or 1 0 . 1% of the new hires by the city's 46 departments and agencies were Latino, the commission said in a study released April27. However, the commission criticized the City Council, which had 13 Latinos among 246 new hires-a rate of 5.2%. Latinos, who comprise 17% of Chicago's population, make up 4% of the city's workforce. N.Y. Race Relations Poll New York City Hispanics responding to a recent poll on race relations were more likely than black and white respondents to socialize with a friend of another race. The New York Times/WCB& TV poll, released May 14, showed 67% of the Hispanics saying they had spent a social evening with a friend of another race in recent months. For whites the figure was 54%, for blacks 63%. The poll, which showed that racial tensions persist in the city, indicated Hispanics were less isolated at home and at work than whites o.r blacks. The poll was based on phone inter views in English and Spanish of 1,557 New Yorkers, 14% of whom were Hispanic. Sixteen percent of the Hispanics said they would be "very concerned' if a family member wanted to marry a black. The percentage of whites who would be concerned about an interracial marriage was 42%. Twenty-nine percent of the white respondents also said they would be concerned if a family member wanted to marry a Hispanic. Seven percent of the blacks said they would be concerned about possible Hispanic in-laws . Six percent of the Hispanics said they would be concerned if a family member wished to marry a white person. Radio Marti Ready toGo Radio Marti, the congressionally authorized Voice of America broadcast to Cuba, is about to begin its daily programming beamed at the islands population, sources told Weekly Report At press time, there were indications that it could start broadcasting as early as May 20. 2 Six Hispanic entrepreneurs picked up awards recognizing their contributions to small business development during festivities marking National Small Business Week in Washington, D.C., May 7. The awards are presented annually by the Small Business Administration. The Hispanic winners, their companies and awards are: • Janie Anzaldua, owner of St. Mary's Sewing Industries in Edcouch, Texas Small Businessperson of the Year. Her fouryear old company, started with a $10,000 investment, now employs 116 and topped $290,000 in profits last year. • R. Alan Fuentes, president of Computer Dynamics Inc. of Virginia Beach, Virginia Small Research Center Planned Plans for a national research center to analyze educational policy issues affecting Hispanics, particularly Puerto Ricans, were announced May 8 by ASPIRA of America, a Puerto Rican service organization. Juan Rosario, ASPIRA executive director, announced the plan upon receiving a $40,000 grant from Anheuser-Busch Companies for the center to be based in Washington, D.C. The planners expect that a fully staffed center will operate on a $400,000 budget annually. The ASPIRA Institute for Educational Policy Research should begin operations in a few months, said Sarah Melendez, minority affairs director at the American Council on Education, who has developed that idea with ASPIRA. Melendez added that the project should complement the work of two other research centers created since January, the Tomas Rivera Center in Claremont, Calif., and the Hispanic Research Center in Tempe, Ariz. Latina Named Miss USA Laura Elena !::!erring, a Mexican-born 21 year-old now living in El Paso, became the first Hispanicand first foreign-born contestant -to be crowned Miss USA May 13. Herring, who spent her first 11 years in northern says that in honor of her mother she'll compete under the name Laura 1\:artinez Herring when she represents the United States at the Miss Universe Pageant in Miami July 15. Businessperson of the Year. His company has doubled its sales each of its five years. In 1984 it showed $7.7 million in sales. • Eric Torres, president of Kiddies Manu fac_turing Inc. of Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico Small Businessperson of the Year. A producer of"kiddie rides," the Torres plant created 60 new jobs in an economically depressed area • Joe Pacheco, of Murray, Utah, Accountant Advocate of the Year. Pacheco has promoted minority business in several ways and even offered services free of charge to beginning companies. • Esperanza M. Guerrero, senior consultant at Price Waterhouse in Tucson, Ariz., Minority Advocate of the Year. Guerrero has worked actively with Chicanos Por La Causa as a consultant and advisor to minority businesses. • Hector Holguin, chairman of the board of Holguin Corporation in El Paso, Small Business Innovator of the Year . Holguin is a world leader in installing and designing computer systems to aid engineers and architects in designing and drafting projects. His company ranks second in the United States and fifth worldwide in this new computer field. Shooting Prompts Lawsuit The decision by San Diego District Attorney Ed Miller not to prosecute a U.S. Border Patrol agent for shooting and wounding a Mexican boy last month has prompted a suit against the federal government and angered the youth's family and local U.S. Hispanic leaders. Humberto Carrillo Estrada, 12,was shot in the chest by agent Edward Cole April 18. Carrillo and several other people allegedly began pelting two agents near the San Ysidro, Calif., port of entry with rocks as they tried to stop his 15-yearold brother from scaling a fence back into Mexico. Los Angeles attorney Marco L6pez filed a $3 million claim April 25 against the federal government on behalf of Carrillo (who denies throwing any rocks), charging attempted murder, assault with a deadly weapon, battery and assault. Herman Baca, chairman of the Committee on Chicano Rights in San Diego, called the May 1 district attorney's decision a "coverup, a whitewash." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS MIAMI LATINOS: Strategy Research has released a new 82 page survey of the Hispanic market in South Florida. Cost: $34.95. Contact: Elizabeth Grudzinski, Strategy Research Corp., 100 NW 37th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33125 (305) 649. MINORITY DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS: The Ford Foundation will begin accepting in September applications for a new $9 million doctoral fellowship program. The foundation will award 40 three year fellowships with annual stipends ranging from $6,000 to $10,000. It also will award 1 0 grants valued at $18,000 a year. For information, contact Fellowship Office, National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334. CHICAGO HIRING REPORT: The Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs has released a report the hiring of Latinos in the city's 46 agencies and departments. While the mayor's office has made notable progress, the City Council has an unimpressive record, the report says. The report is free but enclose $1 in stamps to cover postage. Contact: Mayor's Commission on Latino Affairs, City Hall, Room 703, 121 North LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill. 60602 (312) 744 4404. SUCCESSFUL YOUTH PROGRAMS: A new report analyzes successful Hispanic youth employment programs across the country and gives tips on how to make such programs work at a community level. The Management Information Services report costs $8. Discounts for bulk orders available. Contact: International City Management Association, MIS Report, Ordering Department, 1120 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 626. VETERANS' MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND: The Adolph Coors Company has created a scholarship program for the dependents of veterans, particularly those of veterans killed, disabled or wounded in the line of duty. Applicants must be under22, have completed their freshman year in college and maintain at least a 2.75 GPA Coors will select 100 students for the $5,000 scholarships. For an application contact your local American Gl Forum chapter or Adolph Coors Company, Veterans' Memorial Scholarship Fund, Mail Number 329, Golden, Colo. 80401 . Deadline: July 15 . SAFE SCHOOLS: The Institute for Urban and Minority Education has published a monograph discussing ways to make schools safer. The monograph also analyzes specific features of schools themselves that promote violence and disruption. The cost of"Safe Schools, Sound Schools : Learning in a Non-Disruptive Environmenf' is $6. Make checks payable to Teachers College. To order contact ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N .Y. 10027 (212) 678. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executive and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hi anic Link . 1420 N St. NW. Washington . D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737 . Ad copy received by 5 p m . ( ETJ Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word . Display rates: $35 per column inch . ASSISTANT EDITOR sought by Caminos Magazine , Los Angeles, Cal i fornia . Applicant must have two years of college and previous experience on a school or other publication . Duties include : Writing columns, conducting interviews, editing and research . Write to Kirk Whisler , Publisher , Gamines, P .O. Box 54307, Los Angeles, Calif. 90054. REGISTRAR, STUDENT SERVICES, Middlesex County College, Edison, New Jersey. The registrar directs student registration, the . scheduling of instructional facilities, and the maintenance and reporting of confidential academic records. Three years experience in registration and records, preferably in an administrative or supervisory position. required Maste(sdegree in related field preferred, but will consider candidates with a Bachelo(s degree plus five years of appropriate experience. Salary$31,114-$40,578 . Contact the Perso,. FINANCIAL PLANNER : We need people to help market our exciting line of financial products. If you have the qualifications we' re looking for, we'll train you to help peopl e build solid financial futures . And we 'll provide first rate insurance and investment products from Connecticut Mutual. a recognized leader in the industry. Successful Connecticut Mutual Representatives earn $50,000 a year and more . So if you 're i nterested in a meani ngful and rewarding career in financial planning , send your resume to: Calvin E. Benjamin , J. D .• Connecticut Mutual, 140 Garden St., G19, Hartford, Conn. 06154 . An Equal Opportunity Employer . ENTRY: LEVEL POSITIONS with the gove,. men! i n Montgomery County. Maryland . are available on a continuing basis. Call 13011 , 251 2252. nel Office , Middlesex County College (201) GENERAL MANAGER , KUBOFM, Salinas, 548-6000orwriteDianaMichelleGolle,Dean California KUBO is soon to be a CPBof Student Sarvices, Middlesex County College, qualified station that serves over271XXJ residents Edison, New Jersey 08817 in the Salinas Valley and Monterey Bay area EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR RESPONSIBILITIES: To provide overall Milwaukee Boy's and Girrs Club administration and coordination of KUBO . . MBGC seeks Executive Director, responsible QUALIFICATIONS: Fundraising and financia l to the board of trustees, to direct and administer management skills are necessary . Bilingual the agency. Position requires college degree (Englistv'Spenish) is preferred Must have strong and 12 years relevant experience including writing skills. SALARY : $1,000-$1,300 per at least 10 years defined supervisory and month plus fringe benefits . Flexible hours. administrative responsibilities. Ideal candidate TO APPLY : Send resume to KUBO . P . O . Box will experience and success 1243, Salinas, Calif. 93902 or call (408) 422 in personnel and resource manage!$826 . Application deadline is June 1 , 1985. men! of mult i unit, building-centered, non profit agency with annual operating budget of $2 million in United Way , government and private support. Person would have energy, imagination , ability to relate well with wide range of people , excellent planning and communication skills. Hiring range $45, 771 $53,676 . Excellent benefits. Send resume by June 15 to: Search committee. Milwaukee Boy's and GirfsCiub, P .O. Box92159, Milwaukee, Wis. 53202. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR sought by Washoe CountyTeachersAssociatiOI\ Nevada Qualified candidates should have3 5 years of managerial experience i n medium associations, background experience in public relations, bargaining. labor relations, program development and communications. Send resume and letter of application Ia Don Executive Director . Washoe County Teachers Association , 2105 Capurro Way, Su ite G, Sparks, Nevada 89431. Calendar COMING SOON Miami Market Survey THIS WEEK MIGRATORY FARMWORKERS: PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS Raleigh, N.C. May 21 The conference will include an in-depth look at the latest research concerning migrant education, health, employment and demographics. The National Governors' Association is the sponsor . Fernando Alegria (202) 624 p. U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Los Angeles May 24 A national conference to discuss current issues facing Hispanic business. Jay Garcia (816) 842 Hispanic Link Weekly Report NATIONAL CONGRESS FOR PUERTO RICAN RIGHTS CONVENTION Philadelphia May 31 -June 2 James Collazo (215) 643 NATIONAL ACTION COUNCIL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING ANNUAL FORUM Atlanta June 5 7 Matthew O'Brien (212) 279 BILINGUALISM: PROBLEMS, EVALUATIONS New York June 7 PROSPECTS, A one-day conference sponsored by Yeshiva University. Joshua A. Fishman (212) 430 NEW YORK STATE HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS BANQUET New York June 19 Bob Estrada (212) 737 conti nued from page 1 economic impact and lifestyle patterns . Four hundred interviews were conducted with heads of Latino households and 400 with heads of non-Latino households. On " language spoken most frequently at home," 92.3% said Spanish . This contrasts to 82.8% in 1975 and 75.6% in 1980. The South Florida Anglo community is readily accepting the Latino culture, the report says, citing its strong acceptance of music and dance and its socializing with Latino friends as evidence. "Due to the availability of a high level of Latin culture in the Miami area and the near proximity of Latin cultures, South Florida is a bicultural and bilingual community," it concludes. Charlie Ericksen 3

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Arts & Entertainment season with Hispanics in prominent roles: ER, in wnich Luis Avalos was a semi-regular cast member, and The Lucy Arnaz Show, a mid season replacement. THE NUMBER OF PRIME TIME PROGRAMS FEATURING Hispanic actors and actresses in lead roles will be cut in half as CBS, NBC and ABC announce their lineups for the 1985-1986 fall season. Only four programs featuring Latinos in lead roles will return-three on NBC, one on CBS. ABC had no programs with Latinos in lead roles during the 1984-1985 season. The three networks added a total of 22 prime time shows for next season's rosters; no Hispanic cast member has been announced on any of them. Absent from the new season is an expected spin-off of The Bill Cosby Show-a Latino version of the popular sitcom that would have starred Tony Orlando as a New York social worker. Returning on NBC are Family Ties, which features child actress Tina Yothers; Hill Street Blues, starring Rene Enriquez; and Miami Vice, which features Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago. The peacock's network, which placed second in last season's ratings race , dropped the serial Berrengers, a limited-run show that featured Eddie Velez in a lead role . In contrast to the four shows with Hispanics in lead roles, the 1985-1986 season includes 11 shows that feature . black characters. ONE LINERS: El Norte, which recently was nominated for an Academy Award, has its non-pay television premiere on PBS's American Playhouse May 20 at 9 p .m. (El) ... Embassy Home Entertainment releases on videocassette May 22 Torchlight; the film cocaine abuse, starring Pamela Sue Martin, was produced by her husband Manuel Rojas. .. and Rosa Montoya's Bailes Flamencos company performs at San Francisco's Music Hall Theater May 25 ... First-placed CBS dropped three shows with Hispanic stars, including the long-running The Dukes of Hazzard with Latina Catherine Bach. The network also cancelled two shows that premiered in the 1984-85 Media Report MANAGEMENT HURDLE: Results of yet another survey on black and Hispanic partie pation in print media are in, and they're eve; gloomier than those found by the American Society of Newspaper Editors in its recently released annual newsroom headcount. ASNE reported that only5.7% of the nation's newspersons working on dailies in 1984 were minority (1.5% Hispanic), a first-ever slioht decrease since it started surveying mere papers in 1978. But it showed minor111es moving up a bit into the " news executive" range . (The latter might also have been the result of their defining "news executive," for the first time, as someone who supervises three or more persons . ) Now the Institute for Joumalism Education has released key findings of its 1984-1985 study on upward mobility in the newsroom. IJE President Ellis Cose offers these prelimi nary conc'lusions : • Minorities are leaving the newsroom at three times the rate of their white peers, and HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat1onat publication of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-028'0 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Steve Pad i lla Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Carlos Morales, Ancel Martinez 1/o portion of Hispanic Weekly Report maybe reprOduced or broadcast in any. lorffl' without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription 113 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS Include the latest edition of H1spamc L1nk Weekly Report'" participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details. contact Hector Er icksen Mendoza (2021 234 4 40% of those remaining expect to leave, compared to 22% of whites. They're leaving, they say, because of "lack of opportunity." • Of the minority journalists interviewed, 50% want a career in newspaper management :::ompared to only 28% of whites. Yet 45% whites have managerial responsibilities, . ough whites and minorities in the survey were hired at the same level within the same time period . The Berkeley, Calif.-based IJE interviewed 300 journalists (125 white, 115 black, 44 Hispanic and 16 Asian) at 18 newspapers in these 10 cities: Miami, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Atlanta, Detroit Charlotte, N.C., Philadelphia, Tucson and El Paso . . The study, funded by the Rockefeller Foun dation, looked at journalists who entered the newspaper market between 1969 and 1979. Its full findings will be released later this year. Concludes Cose for the present "Unless the news industry recognizes and acts on this 'quiet crisis,' it faces a mass exodus of minorities seeking opportunity outside the profession . " BREAKING INTO BROADCASTING: The National Association of Broadcasters will conduct -Antonio Mejias-Rentas an employment and career strategy workshop at its Washington, D.C., headquarters May 29 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. lfsforthose interested in sales, news and engineering careers and ifs free. Advance registration required. Call Claryce Handy (202) 429. NAMES: Los Angeles Times metro editor Frank Sotomayor is one of 19 journalists picked as Harvard University Nieman Fellows for 1985 ... Juan Vasquez, the paper's Mexico City bureau chief and recent Overseas Press Club award winnerfor best economics reporting from abroad, will join the Times' Washington bureau July 1 ... Helga Silva, long-time political writer with The Miami Herald, has joined Radio Marti in Washington, D .C., as deputy news director. .. Ernie Torres has started at The Washington Post as a copy editor after lengthy stints with the Long Beach Independent Pres9-Telegram and The Philadelphia Inquirer •.. Weathercaster Maclovio Perez of Los Angeles' KCB&-TV has signed a five-year contract with the station reported to be in seven figures. Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Link Weekly Report