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Hispanic link weekly report, May 27, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 27, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Malang The News This Week
The American G.I Forum holds its annual Memorial Day ceremony May 27 honoring Felix Longoria at his gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery. Navy Capt Frank Gamboa, acting deputy assistant secretary of defense, leads the tribute to the World War II veteran whose denial of burial in his Texas hometown led to the Forum’s founding... Attorney General Edwin Meese III names Edward J. Garcia, U.S. District Court judge in Sacramento, Calif., to an 11-member commission that will study ways to control pornography... New York Gov. Mario Cuomo appoints two Latinos to the State Task Force on Aging: Carlos Ramirez, publisher of El diario/la prensa, and Elston Hernandez, of the Isla Housing and Development Corporation.. . The appointments follow the naming of Jane Lee Garcia to the New York State Counci I of the Arts. Garcia, president of
MAT 2 91985
the board of trustees of the Bronx Museum of the Arts, is married to Congressman Robert Garcia.. The University of California, Riverside, Library is renamed the Tomas Rivera Library May 23 in honor of the noted educator and novelist who died last year. Concepcibn Rivera donates her late husbands personal papers, including several unpublished works, to the university, where Rivera served as chancellor. . . Leonore Cevera of Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, joins the Republican National Committee as administrative assistant to Hispanic liaison Rudy Beserra... Jesse de la Rosa, 24, becomes the first Hispanic executed in the United States since the Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment in 1976. A murderer, de la Rosa was killed by lethal injection in Huntsville, Texas, May 15... Golfer Nancy L6pez takes a step closer to the Ladies Professional Golfers Association Hall of Fame by winning the Chrysler-Plymouth Classic May 19. It’s her 30th victory since turning pro in 1978.

Latino Winners in Congress Raised $3.7 Million
The most recent addition to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Rep. Tony Coelho(D-Calif.), raised $631,965 in his race for re-election last year to top the other 12 caucus members in campaign fund-raising, according to figures
Radio Marti Supported
Inauguration of Radio Marti broadcasts to Cuba May 20 brought a generally enthusiastic reaction from Cuban Americans in Miami.
The 14 1/2-hour daily Voice of America service, authorized by Congress Oct. 4,1983, combines news, soap operas, features and anti-Castro commentaries. It airs from 5:30 am. to 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 to 11:30 p.m. daily.
In Miami, Tomas Regalado, WRHC radio news director and columnist with El Miami Herald, reported “ecstatic^’ reception by Cuban Americana People there see it as signaling “a new era of confrontation between the United States and Cuba,” he said.
Manuel G6mez, who heads the liberal Cuban American Committee in Washington, D.C., expressed less enthusiasm. “It’s a reaction of somebody who’s mad,” he said. “The best way to gain influence with a clearly established government is to open trade.”
released May 20 by the Federal Election Commission.
Altogether, the 13 winning Hispanics raised $3.7 million and spent almost $3.3 million in their campaigns for the ‘83-84 election cycle.
NABE Urges Budget Rise
Sarah Mel&ndez, president of the National Association for Bilingual Education, called on a congressional subcommittee May 15 to support a proposed $37 million supplemental appropriation for bilingual education programs this fiscal year.
She also urged the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education to increase the 1986 bilingual education budget to account for inflation and population growth. The Reagan administration has proposed holding bilingual education spending at 1985 levels or $139 million.
The $37 million supplemental was introduced by Reps. Dale Kildee (D-Mich.), Augustus F. Hawkins (D-Calif.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) in February. It would bring 1985 funding up to $176 million, the figure authorized though not appropriated by Congress last fall.
The commission’s Interim Report No. 9 found that candidates for the House and Senate spent $374 million during last year’s races. While that figure represents a 9.3% increase over the 1982 elections, it is considerably less than the 43% increase from 1980 to 1982 or the 23% jump from 1978 to 1980.
The FEC report shows that the 13 Hispanic House members spent an average of $252,003 in their successful races, compared to $288,070 for average winning representatives The figures for all winning House candidates in the 1983-84 election cycle more than tripled — to $126.5 million from $38 million in 1975-76.
A total of 2,035 congressional candidates raised $398.6 million in the 1983-84 election cycle. Political action committees contributed $104.9 million or 26% of all money raised. Coelho placed 43rd on the commission’s
_________________ continued on page 2
Simpson Bill Introduced
An immigration bill which could deny amnesty to all undocumented workers in the U.S. was introduced by Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), coauthor of last year’s Simpson-Mazzoli immigration legislation, on May 23.
The bill would impose criminal penalties upto$10,000 on employers who knowingly hire undocumented workers, reduce paperwork for firms employing foreign nationals, provide more dollars for Border Patrol enforcement, and establish a presidential panel to measure the effectiveness of the employer sanctions.
I A year after the law takes effect, the panel would report on its usefulness in deterring illegal immigratioa Only if the panel certifies that the sanctions are effective would amnesty be considered for aliens who had resided in the U.S. since 1980.
Those qualified would be given temporary legal status for three years and permanent status after they demonstrate minimum English-language competency.
CONGRESSIONAL CAMPAIGN FINANCES - ’83 - ’84
State U.S Representative Raised Spent PAC $
California Tony Coelho (D) $631,965 $488,012 $286,098
Matthew Martinez (D) 195,688 183,696 127,180
Edward Roybal (D) 153,529 75,415 64,971
Esteban Torres (D) 224,568 182,693 120,995
New Mexico Manuel Lujan (R) 521,876 498,025 197,763
William Richardson (D) 439,746 425,934 257,985
New York Robert Garcia (D) 278,242 227,146 123,672
Texas Albert Bustamante (D) 572,871 569,322 118,196
Kika de la Garza (D) 175,538 126,001 92,710
Henry B. Gonzalez(D) 66,829 67,017 24,758
Solomdn Ortiz (D) 347,724 312,139 110,890
Puerto Rico Jaime Fuster(D) 81,124 80,300 0
Virgin Islands Ron de Lugo (D) 37,532 40,343 9,425
Source: FEC Reports on Financial Activity, 1983-84: U.S. Senate and House Campaigns, Interim Report No. 9. (PAC $ - Money contributed to candidates by Political Action Committees.)


Sin pelos en la lengua
WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO? Remember when the U.S. Postal Service unveiled its first-ever stamp commemorating the Hispanic American contribution to national defense last Nov. 1?
It seemed to gain little public attention, disappearing almost as quickly as it arrived.
Not quite true. The Postal Service’s stamp management division tells us that, like all commemoratives, it was kept on general sale for 60 days and remains on sale at philatelic (collectors') windows in the main p.o.’sof larger cities until next Nov. 1. Or,fora50-cent handling charge, you can order it direct (minimum order $5) from the Philatelic Sales Division, U.S. Postal Service, Washington, D.C. 20265-9997.
As for its popularity, it outpaced the three other commemoratives unveiled at about the same time, with 106 million stamps distributed. The others: Vietnam veterans, 105 million, nation of readers and Eleanor Roosevelt, 89 million each.
MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE PENTAGON: President Reagan wants Star Wars and he got a Hispanic version when Corpus Christi native Stella Guerra-thaf s right, Stella Guerra- was appointed as e.e.o. director in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air
Force. Guerra, who used to work with Chief of Protocol Abelardo Valdez in the Carter administratiorl, checks on 250,000 Air Force civilian personnel at 140 installations.
In July, for the second time in their history,the Disabled American Veterans will announce a Latino (also a Texan) as their disabled veteran of the year... And- maybe this has military significance, too-when the Republican National Hispanic Assembly board replaced RNHA executive director Jim Brulte(who had resigned) with Manuel G6mez, of Puerto Rico, they changed his title to “chief of staff.” WHERE WAS JERRY APODACA BETWEEN 1975 AND 1978? In Santa Fe, governing New Mexico, we thought. But the May 9 headline over a lengthy Los Angeles Times news-feature on Toney Anaya calls Anaya the “1 st Latino Governor of New Mexico.”
For the record, Anaya is No. 4 since New Mexico became a state in 1912. Its very first Hispanic governor took office in 1598.
AND THE WINNER IS: More than 200,000 elementary and intermediate school students had a chance to compete, and the winners of the New York City School’s spelling bee were 10-year-old Jaime P6rez and 13-year-old Pedro Figueroa. There were $1,000 in prizes and the usual TV cameras, cheering sections and celebrities. What was special was that the concurso de deletreo was in Spanish. “We have to learn to speak English, but not at the expense of Spanish,” Board of Education VP Miguel Martinez told reporters.
-Kay Barbaro
Gutierrez to Fight Firing
Jose Gutierrez, the highest Hispanic in the administration of Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry, has vowed to fight in court his May 20 firing by his former friend and boss.
Barry dismissed Gutierrez, a cabinet member who headed the D.C. Department of Administrative Services, after months of public wrangling over awarding of city contracts. Gutierrez, demoted March 25 after accusing a key aide of the mayor of pressuring him to award contracts for political reasons, was then charged by the mayor of showing favoritism in contracts and leases to a Hispanic firm headed by businessman Angel Roubin.
‘Kiko’ Martinez Case Ends
The long legal battles waged against federal authorities by Francisco “Kiko” Martinez came to an end this month when a federal judge threw out the remaining criminal charges against the Colorado Chicano activist and lawyer.
U.S. District Judge William D. Browning dismissed two false-statement charges and one of perjury against Martinez in Tucson May 8. While not ruling that federal officials in fact conducted a vendetta against the activist as Martinez has charged, Browning did say that the case “may be viewed as retaliatory or vindictive.”
Federal prosecutors charged that Martinez illegally posed as a Mexican citizen when he tried to re-enter the United States through Nogales, Ariz., in 1980. Martinez had been in Mexico for seven years to avoid prosecution on charges that he sent letter bombs- none of which exploded- to Denver law enforcement officials in the 1970s.
The bomb charges were dropped in Denver in November 1984. Martinez said the false-statement charges - filed in January - were brought against him because federal prosecutors were bitter about the resolution of the letter bomb case.
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Latinas Earn Less Pay
Hispanic women - who on average earn $224 a week - have the lowest median weekly income among all full-time workers, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported May 20.
H ispanic men average $289 a week, according to bureau statistics on weekly earnings for the first quarter of 1985. Other statistical highlights:
• There were 1.9 million Hispanic women 16 years and older in the work force and 3.2 million Hispanic men.
• Hispanics made up6.8% of the nation’s 74 million f ulFtime workers during the year’s first quarter.
• The median weekly income for black men is $305; for black women, $248.
• White men earn $408 on average and white women earn $273.
Ferre to Push Mayor Plan
Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre says he’ll continue to push a plan to create a strong-mayor form of government for the city - even if it means leading a petition drive to place the plan on the ballot.
The plan, which would eliminate the current city manager system, was stalled May 9 when City Commissioner Demetrio Perez Jr. introduced his own plan to reorganize Miami’s government.
Ferr§ has said he’ll continue to look for support on thefive-membercommission before launching a petition drive.
In related news, a group of political and civic leaders formed this month a committee to monitor Miami’s upcoming elections in hopes of preventing candidates from harping on potentially divisive ethnic or racial themes
The Fair Campaign Practices Committee hopes that all candidates will campaign in an amicable manner and avoid a repeat of the bitter mayoral race in 1983.
Latinos Raised Millions
continued from page 1
list of the top 50 money raisers in the House for 1983-84. He and Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairman Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) were among the top 50 PAC beneficiaries, with $286,098 (20th) and $257,985 (33 rd), respectively. Other figures from the report:
• Freshman Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) was second to Coelho in total funds raised at $572,871. He was also the top money spender among Hispanics at $569,322, followed by Manuel Lujan (R-N.M.) at$498,025 and Coelho at $488,012. Bustamante, who ran unopposed in the general election, defeated nine-term incumbent Abraham Kazen in the primary for Texas’ 23 rd District.
• The least money raised was by Reps. Ron de Lugo (D-Virgin Islands), Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas) and Jaime Fuster (D-Puerto Rico), at $37,532, $66,829 and $81,124, respectively. This ranking also holds for money spent and PAC contributions, with Fuster receiving no PAC money.
• Fuster won as Puerto Rico’s resident commissioner (a non-voting House delegate), although opponent Nelson Famadas spent ($122,742 vs. $80,300) and raised($124,432 vs. $81,124) more than he did.
• Four Hispanic Republican challengers to two each Hispanic and Anglo incumbent Democrat representatives waged formidable campaigns despite, in some cases, miniscule campaign financing.
In California, Miriam Ojeda won 37% of the vote to Howard Berman’s 63% with only $7,023 raised compared to Berman’s $220,590. In Florida, Ricardo Nuhez received 40% of the vote, to Claude Pepper's 60%, with $48,063 raised to Pepper's $247,490.
Matthew Martinez beat Richard Gomez in California, 52% to 42%, raising $195,688 to Gomez’s $154,208. Bill Richardson won in New Mexico with 63% and $439,746 to Lou Gallegos’ 37% and $207,831.
. — Carlos Morales
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
STATISTICS ON VETERANS: A Veterans Administration report provides detailed information about veterans, including Hispanics, Single copies of “Veterans in the United States: A Statistical Portrait from the 1980 Census” are available free from the Statistical Policy and Research Service, Research Division (711), Veterans Administration, Washington, D.C. 20420.
HISPANIC VETERANS THROUGH HISTORY: The Defense Department is updating ‘Hispanics in America’s Defense,” a book detailing Hispanic contributions to the U.S. Armed Forces from the nation’s beginnings to the present. The free book won’t be available till the fall but orders may be placed now. Send orders to: ODASD (EO/SP), The Pentagon, Room 3E323, Washington, D.C. 20301.
HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES: A new census report provides numerous statistics on the make-up of U.S. families. The statistics, which include Hispanics, range from family size to employment and occupation. To order “Household and Family Characteristics: March I984,” contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Request Stock No. 033-001-90797-6. Cost $8.50.
PUBLIC POLICY RESEARCH GRANTS: The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council are accepting applications for grants to support public policy research on contemporary Hispanic issues. Both individuals and institutions may apply. For further information contact Inter-University Program for Latino Research, Ram6n Saldivar or Harriett Romo, University of Texas at Austin, Center for Mexican American Studies, Student Services Building 4.120, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471-4557. Deadline: July 15.
WOMEN OF THE WORLD: A new census publication reports on the social and economic situation of women in developing countries. The report includes many statistics on 21 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Copies of “Women of the World — A Chartbook for Developing Regions” are $2.75. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington. D.C. 20402. Request Stock No. 003-024-06202-0.
CARTOONISTS, WIN $50: Weekly Report is looking for the best editorial cartoon depicting the “immersion method” of language instruction. For details, drop a card to: Immersion method, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
SENATE AND HOUSE CAMPAIGNS: Information on money raised, spent and contributed to Congressional candidates by political action committees can be found in the “FEC Reports on Financial Activity, 1983-84: U.S. Senate and House Campaigns, Interim Report No. 9.” Cost $15 in advance. Contact FEC Office of Public Records, 1325 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20463 (202) 523-4065 or toll free 800-424-9539.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737.. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
FINANCIAL PLANNER We need people to help market our exciting line of financial products. If you have the qualifications we’ re looking for, we’ll train you to help people build solid financial futures. And we’ll provide first-rate insurance and investment products from Connecticut Mutual, a recognized leader in the industry. Successful Connecticut Mutual Representatives earn $50,000 a year and more. So if you’re interested in a meaningful and rewarding career in financial planning, send your resume to: Delvin E Benjamin, J.D., Connecticut Mutual, 140 Garden St, G-19, Hartford Cona 06154. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
NIGHTSIDE ASSISTANT PRODUCTION MANAGER sought by Tucson Newspapers, Inc. Pre-press essential. Should know cold-type, composing, plate and color, APS micro 5,8300 display ad, CSI editorial and classified systems, and management skills. Post-press experience a plus Salary $30,000s; excellent benefits. Send resume: Wayne Bean, P.O. Box 26887, Tucson, Ariz. 85726.
THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION, Washington, D.C, has the following openings:
• LEGAL SERVICES SPECIALIST Salary range $32,625-$45,305. Qualifications: College degree Experience in reviewing and analyzing financial data Willingness to travel extensively. Skill in applying sound business management principles and practices in evaluating the effectiveness of state legal programs and in < recommending changes to correct or improve weak or lagging operations and programs Skill in writing sophisticated policy papers including conducting independent research and analysis of policy issues and administrative problems. Skill in computing basic and intermediate descriptive and inferential statistics Knowledge of the data entry procedures and reporting capabilities of automated data processing systems for the Attorney Referral and the Unified Legal Services Programs Skill in mediating and resolving problems among diverse groups including lawyers, insurance companies affiliate leadership and i staff. Skill in implementing new policies or ; changing existing ones Ability to plan, organize;
and coordinate work in situations with competing demands Knowledge of the organization of state bar associations and their relationship to union-sponsored legal services programs
• COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST (A) Salary range $36,554-$52,980. Qualifications BA degree in Journalism, Communications Arts or equivalent. Five years experience in mass media and association work which required him/her to independently create, write, and edit news stories articles scripts ads testimonies and other documents for the purpose of swaying public opinion or gaining support of special interest groups Ability to use sound judgment with skills in human relations and experience in teacher advocacy role. Knowledge, skills and ability to analyze and evaluate various circumstances events and activities, and develop strategies and materials to further N EA aims Knowledge of basic research techniques including literature searches and interviewing for ascertaining data regarding educational, organizational and political issues which are confronting the Associatioa Thorough knowledge of NEA programs missions and organizational structure.
• MANAGER, PUBLIC RELATIONS Salary range $47,485-$59,142. Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in Communications and/or radio and television broadcasting or equivalent Extensive media and public relations experience in a position which would have developed substantial contacts in the communications field produced competence in electronic media operations e.g, program development and design, conference coverage and production of media spots Exceptional skills in human relations and commitment to the advancement of teachers and education. Knowledge of and skills in applying sound management principles theories and techniques in the overall management direction, and supervision of staff, programs and resources in a media relations environment Thorough knowledge of the Association’s organizational structure, programs policies and philosophies at all levels i.e, national, state, and local.
Send application/resume to the Personnel Manager, NEA, 1201 16th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
NATIONAL IMAGE TRAINING CONFERENCE AND CONVENTION Seattle May 28 - June 1
Image’s yearly convention will include its seventh annual Women’s Action Committee Seminar. Albert Olvera (206) 764-3501 NATIONAL CONGRESS FOR PUERTO RICAN RIGHTS
Philadelphia May 31 - June 2 The Congress’ third national convention has the theme of “The Puerto Rican Fight for Equality- A Determined Movement.”
James Collazo (215) 634-4443
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
COMING SOON
NATIONAL ACTION COUNCIL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING ANNUAL FORUM Atlanta June 5-7
Matthew O'Brien (212) 279-2626
BILINGUALISM: PROBLEMS, PROSPECTS,
EVALUATION
New York June 7
A daylong conference sponsored by Yeshiva University. Joshua A. Fishman (212) 430-2370
CONFERENCE ON EDUCATIONAL EQUITY AND EXCELLENCE
Breckenridge, Colo. June 19-21
“Extending Educational Practices for a Changing
Society” is the conference theme.
Percy Morehouse (801) 626-6650
TEXAS ASSN. OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Antonio July 17-20 Rigo Goana (512) 447-9821
MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOUNDATION DINNER
San Diego July 27
Tony Valencia (619) 295-4522
SPOTLIGHT
“Minority Crime and the Juvenile Justice System” will explore the causes contributing to minority youth crime and discuss possible ways to solve this problem. The conference, set for May 30-31 in Washington, D.C., is sponsored by the U.S. Justice Department and five law enforcement and legal organizations. For further information contact Wende Keefe (301) 251-5353.
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Arts & Entertainment
PROPOSALS FOR FUNDING the operation of a Latino programming consortium are currently being sought by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in accordance with its Minority Consortia Policy. Proposals from organizations capable of producing, acquiring and/or distributing radio and TV programs of special interest to U.S. Hispanics will be accepted through July 16.
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting funds five “minority” consortia: Latino, Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and black.
In other broadcasting news: KTLA, a Los Angeles independent station that in 1984 became the first in the nation to broadcast some of its programs simultaneously in Spanish and English, has been sold to the Tribune Co. for $510 million. . . and actor Martin Sheen appears May 29 in the last episode of Spaceflight, a four-parter airing this month on PBS stations...
A COLLECTION OF SOME 60,000 volumes of Latin American materials worth approximately $1.7 million has been donated recently to the University of Southern California.
The H.F. Boeckmann II Collection, which USC will house at its Doheny Library, places the Los Angeles institution’s research resources in Latin American studies among the country’s top 10.
Meanwhile, a group of 20 Latin American and six Canadian Writers joined 60 others from the United States in the first-ever Dialogo de todas las Americas. The gathering, held May 8 in New York, was conceived as an ongoing process on interchange between writers and artists from throughout the American hemisphere.
Another writer, Gregory Rabassa, is one of 12 recipients this year of the New York Governor's Arts Awards. Rabassa, a translator of Latin American and Spanish literature, is a professor of Romance languages at Queens College, City University of New York. He won the National Book Award this year for his translation of Julio Cortazar's Hopscotch.
ONE LINERS: The May 31 release by Universal Pictures of Fletch, starring Chevy Chase, features two Hispanic actors: Irene Olga Lopez plays a maid and Rick Garcia plays a waiter... Continuing art exhibitions around the country include The Art of Pre-Columbian Gold: The Jan Mitchell Collection at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art through Jan. 1 and a retrospective view of Mexican painter David Alfaro Siqueiros’ work at the San Diego Museum of Art through June 9... and, the release of Cantar6, cantaras, the famine relief song recorded by Latino singers, has been postponed another week to June 8; meanwhile, the producing group Hermanos del tercer mundo has shortened its name to Hermanos to indicate political neutrality... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas j
Media Report
ASSESSING NEW YORK MEDIA: A New York Times/WCBS-TV poll published in the Times May 14 found that most Hispanics and whites there believe the city’s newspapers and television stations are fair in their reporting on minorites.
A majority of blacks felt that coverage by New York’s television stations was fair but that of its newspapers was not.
The poll was based on 1,557 telephone interviews conducted April 27- May 3.
A majority of all three groups also said that their friends used racial slurs about people of other races, that they had spent an evening recently with a friend of another race, and that they felt big companies hire minority employees only as “tokens.”
FALCON WANTS MEETINGS: As The
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Steve Padilla
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza, ^ Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Carlos Morales,
Ancel Martinez
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report m participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737
GROUPS’ PERCEPTIONS OF MEDIA IN NEW YORK CITY
NEWSPAPERS TELEVISION
HisF
Fair to minorities Too favorable to minorities Too unfavorable to minorities Source: 1985 New York Times/WCBS-TV poll.
Hispanic Black White Hispanic Black White
49% 33% 58% 58% 42% 61%
8% 7% 13% 10% 7% 17%
23% 43% 11% 19% 38% 10%
New York Times and the I nstitute for Puerto Rican Policy there continue to spar over the Times’ failure to hire Puerto Ricans, the man who set off the controversy is heading south.
William Stockton, the paper’s assistant to the executive editor, has been named to head its Mexico City bureau.
Remarks by Stockton at the National Hispanic Media Conference in Tucson last month were interpreted by journalists there as challenging the competence of Puerto Ricans to work for the Times.
Letters by Institute executive director Angelo Falc6n to Times’ executive editor Abraham Rosenthal have yet to produce a requested meeting with Rosenthal or an apology by the paper.
Responding for Rosenthal, Times’ assistant managing editor James Greenf ield told Falcdn that Stockton’s remarks were “misconstrued” and invited him to “bring to our attention any Puerto Rican journalists who would like to be considered for a reporting position at The Times.” -Carlos Morales
John Ortega 1864 Philip Bazaar 1865 France Silva 1901 Joe P. Martinez 1943 Lucian Adams 1945 Marcario Garcia 1945 Harold Gonsalves 1945 David Gonzales 1945 Silvestre Herrera 1945 Jos6 L6pez 1945 Manuel P6rez Jr. 1945 Cleto Rodriguez 1945 Ysmael Villegas 1945
Alejandro Ruiz 1946 Jos6 Valdez 1946 Eugene Obregdn 1950 Baldomero L6pez 1950 Reginald Desiderio 1951 Edward G6mez 1951 Fernando Luis Garcia 1952 Joseph Rodriguez 1952 Benito Martinez 1953 Ambrosio Guillen 1953 Rodolfo Hernandez 1962
Euripides Rubio 1966 M6ximo Yabes 1967 Carlos James Lozada 1967 Daniel Fernandez 1967 Alfredo Gonzalez 1968 Jay Vargas Jr. 1968 H6ctor Santiago-Col6n 1968 Ralph E. Dias 1969 Jos6 Francisco Jimenez 1969 Emilio de la Garza Jr. 1970 Miguel Keith 1970 Louis Rocco Jr. 1970 Roy Benavidez 1981
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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MAY 2 91985 Making The News This Week The American G.l Forum holds its annual Memorial Day ceremony May 27 honoring Felix Longoria at his gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery. Navy Capt Frank Gamboa, acting deputy assistant secretary of defense, leads the tribute to the World War II veteran whose denial of burial in his Texas hometown led to the Forum's founding ... Attorney General Edwin Meese Ill names Edward J. Garcia, U.S. District Court judge in Sacramento, Calif., to an 11 member commission that will study ways to control pornography ... New York Gov. Mario Cuomo appoints two Latinos to the State Task Force on Aging: Carlos Ramirez, publisher of El diario/la prensa, and Elston Hernandez, of the Isla Housing and Development Corporation ... The appointments follow the naming of Jane Lee Garcia to the New York State Council of the Arts. Garcia, president of the board of trustees of the Bronx Museum of the Arts, is married to Congressman Robert GarCia .. The University of California, Riverside, Library is renamed the Tomas Rivera Library May 23 in honor of the noted educator and novelist who died last year. Concepci6n Rivera donates her late husbancfs personal papers, including several unpublished works, to the university, where Rivera served as chancellor ... Leonore Cevera of Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, joins the Republican National Committee as administrative assistant to Hispanic liaison Rudy Beserra ... Jesse de Ia Rosa, 24, becomes the first Hispanic executed in the United States since the Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment in 1976. A murderer, de Ia Rosa was killed by lethal injection in Huntsvi)le, Texas, May 15 . . . Golfer Nancy L6pez takes a step closer to thB Ladies Professional Golfers Association Hall of Fame by winning the Chrysler-Plymouth Classic May 19. It's her 30th victory since turning pro in 1978. Vol. 3 No. 21 LINK \:VEEKL Y RE Latino Winners in Congress Raised $3.7 Million The most recent addition to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Rep. TonyCoelho(DCalif.), raised $631 ,965 in his race for re-election last year to top the other 12 caucus members in campaign fund-raising, according to figures ' released May 20 by the Federal Election Commission. Altogether, the 13 winning Hispanics raised $3. 7 million and spent almost $3.3 million in their campaigns for the '83 election cycle. :CONGRESSIONAL CAMPAIGN FINANCES'83-'84 i State California 'New Mexico U.S. Representative Tony Coelho (D) Matthew Martrnez (D) Edward Roybal (D) Esteban Torres (D) Manuel Lujan (R) Raised $631,965 195,688 153,529 224,568 521,876 Spent PAC$ $488,012 $286,098 183,696 127,180 75,415 64,971 182,693 120,995 498,025 197,763 William Richardson (D) 439,746 425,934 257,985 Robert Garcia (D) 278,242 227,146 123,672 New York Texas .Albert Bustamante (D) 572,871 569,322 118,196 Kika de Ia Garza (D) 175,538 126,001 92,710 Henry B. Gonzalez(D) 66,829 67,017 24,758 Solom6n Ortiz (D) 347,724 312,139 110,890 Puerto Rico Jaime Fuster (D) 81,124 80,300 0 1 Virgin Islands Ron de Lugo (D) 37,532 40,343 9,425 Source: FEC Reports on Financial Activity, 1983-84 : U .S. Senate and House Campaigns, Interim Report No. 9. (PAC.$-, Money contributed to candidates by Political Action Committees.) Radio Marti Supported Inauguration of Radio Marti broadcasts to Cuba May 20 brought a generally enthusiastic reaction from Cuban Americans in Miami. The 14 1 /2hour daily Voice of America service, authorized by Congress Oct. 4, 1 983, combines news, soap operas, features and anti-Castro commentaries. It airs from 5:30 am. to 1 :30 p . m . and 4:30 to 11 :30 p.m. daily. In Miami, Tomas Regalado, WRHC radio news director and columnist with El Miami Herald, reported "ecstatic'' reception by Cuban Americans. People there see it as signaling "a new era of confrontation between the United States and Cuba," he said. Manuel Gomez, who heads the liberal Cuban American Committee in Washington, D.C . , expressed Jess enthusiasm. "It's a reaction of somebody who's mad," he said. "The best way to gain influence with a clearly established government is to open trade." NABE Urges Budget Rise Sarah Melendez, president of the National Association for Bilingual Education, called on a congressional subcommittee May 15 to support a proposed $37 million supplemental appropriation for bilingual education programs this fiscal year. She also urged the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education to increase the 1986 bilingual education budget to account for inflation and population growth. The Reagan administration has pro posed holding bilingual education spending at 1985 levels or $139 million. The $37 million supplemental was introduced by Reps. Dale Kildee (D-Mich.), Augustus F . Hawkins (DCalif.) and John McCain (RAriz.) in February. It would bring 1985 funding up to $176 million, the figure authorized though not appropriated by Congress last fall . The commission's Interim Report No. 9 found that candidates for the House and Senate spent $374 million during last year's races. While that figure represents a 9.3% increase over the 1982 elections, it is con siderably less than the 43% increase from 1980 to 1982 or the 23% jump from 1978 to 1980. The FEC report shows that the 13 Hispanic House members spent an average of $252,003 in their successful races, compared to$288,070 for average winning representatives. The figures for all winning House candidates in the 1983-84 election cycle more than tripled -to $126.5 million from $38 million in 1975 76. A total of 2,035 congressional candidates raised $398. 6 million in the 1983 election cycle . Political action committees contributed $104.9 million or 26% of all money raised. Coelho placed 43rd on the commission's continued on page 2 Simpson Bill Introduced An immigration bill which could deny amnesty to all undocumented worke.rs in the U.S. was introduced by Sen . Alan Simpson (RWyo.) , coauthor of last year's Simpson Mazzoli immigration legislation, on May23. The bill would impose criminal penalties upto$1 0,000 on employers who knowingly hire undocumented workers, reduce paper work for firms employing foreign nationals, provide more dollars for Border Patrol en forcement, and establish a presidential panel to measure the effectiveness of the employer sanctions. A year after the law takes effect, the panel would report on its usefulness in deterring illegal immigration. Only if the panel certifies that the sanctions are effective would amnesty be considered for aliens who had resided in the U . S . since 1980. Those qualified would be given temporary legal status for three years and permanent status after they demonstrate minimum English-language competency.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Force. Guerra, who used to work with Chief of Protocol Abelardo Valdez in the Carter administratiort, checks on 250,000 Air Force civilian personnel at 140 installations. WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO? Remember when the U.S. Posta' Service unveiled its first-ever stamp commemorating the Hispank American contribution to national defense last Nov. 1? It seemed to gain little public attention, disappearing almost as quickly as it arrived. Not quite true. The Postal Service's stamp management division tells us that, like all commemoratives, it was kept on general sale for 60 days and remains on sale at philatelic (collectors') windows in the . main p.o.'s of larger cities until next Nov . 1. Or, for a 50-cent handling charge, you can order it direct (minimum order $5) from the Philatelic Sales Division, U .S. Postal Service, Washington, D.C. 20265-9997. In July, for the second time in their history, the Disabled American Veterans will announce a Latino (also a Texan) as their disabled veteran of the year ... And-maybe this has military significance, toowhen the Republican National Hispanic Assembly board replaced RNHA executive director Jim Brulte(who had resigned) with Manuel G6mez, of Puerto Rico, they changed his title to "chief of staff." WHERE WAS JERRY APODACA BETWEEN 1975 AND 1978? In Santa Fe, governing New Mexico, we thought. But the May 9 headline over a lengthy Los Angeles Times news-feature on Toney Anaya calls Anaya the "1st !-atino Governor of New Mexico." For the record, Anaya is No. 4 since New Mexico became a state in 1912. Its very first Hispanic governor took office in 1598. As for its popularity, it outpaced the three other commemoratives unveiled at about the same time, with 106 million stamps distributed. The others: Vietnam veterans, 1 05 million, nation of readers and Eleanor Roosevelt, 89 million each. AND THE WINNER IS: More than 200,000 elementary and intermediate school students had a chance to compete, and the winners of the New York City School's spelling bee were 1 0-year-old Jaime Perez and 13-year-old Pedro Figueroa. There were $1 ,000 in prizes and the usual TV cameras, cheering sections and celebrities . What was special was that the concurso de deletreo was in Spanish. "We have to learn to speak English, but not at the expense of Spanish," Board of Education VP Miguel Martinez told MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE PENTAGON: President Reagan wants Star Wars and he got a Hispanic version when Corpus Christi native Stella Guerr&-thafs right, Stella Guerr&was appointed as e.e .o. director in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Gutierrez to Fight Firing Jose Gutierrez, the highest Hispanic in the administration of Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry, has vowed to fight in court his May 20 firing by his former friend and boss. Barry dismissed Gutierrez, a cabinet member who headed the D.C. Department of Adminis trative Serv i ces, after months of public wrangling over awarding of city contracts. Gutierrez , demoted March 25 after accusing a key aide of the mayor of pressuring him to award contracts for political reasons, was then charged by the mayor of showing favoritism in contracts and leases to a Hispanic firm headed by businessman Angel Roubin . 'Kiko' Martinez Case Ends The long legal battles waged against federal authorities by Francisco"Kiko" Martinez came to an end this month when a federal judge threw out the remaining criminal charges against the Colorado Chicano activist and lawyer . U.S. District Judge William D . Browning dismissed two false-statement charges and one of perjury against Martinez in Tucson May 8. While not ruling that federal officials in fact conducted a vendetta against the activist as Martinez has charged, Browning did say that the case "may be viewed as retaliatory or vindictive." Federal prosecutors charged that Martinez illegally posed as a Mexican citizen when he tried to re-enter the United States through Nogales , Ariz., in 1980. Martinez had been in Mexico for seven years to avoid prosecution on charges that he sent letter bombs-none of which exploded-to Denver law enforcement officials in the 1970s. The bomb charges were dropped in Denver in November 1984. Martinez said the false statement chargesfiled in January-were brought against him because federal prose cutors were bitter about the resolution of the letter bomb case . 2 Latinas Earn Less Pay Hispanic women-who on average earn $224 a week have the lowest median weekly income among all full-time workers, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported May 20. Hispanic men average $289 a week, accord ing to bureau statistics on weekly earnings for the first quarter of 1985. Other statistical highlights: • There were 1.9 million Hispanic women 16 years and older in the work force and 3.2 million Hispanic men. e Hispanics made up6.8% of the nation's 74 million full-time workers during the year's first quarter. e The median weekly income for black men is $305; for black women, $248. e White men earn $408 on average and white women earn $273. Ferre to Push Mayor Plan Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre says he'll continue to push a plan to create a strong-mayor form of government for the city-even if it means leading a petition drive to place the plan on the ballot. The plan, which would eliminate the current city manager system, was stalled May9 when City Commissioner Demetrio Perez Jr. intro duced his own plan to reorganize Miami's government. Ferre has said he'll continue to look for support on thefive-membercommission before launching a petition drive. In related news, a group of political and civic leaders formed this month a committee to monitor Miami's upcoming elections in hopes of preventing candidates from harping on potentially divisive ethnic or racial themes. The Fair Campaign Practices Committee hopes that all candidates will campaign in an amicable manner and avoid a repeat of the bitter mayoral race in 1983. -Kay Barbaro Latinos Raised Millions continued from page 1 list of the top 50 money raisers in the House for 1983-84. He and Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairman Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) were among the top 50 PAC beneficiaries, with $286,098 (20th) and $257,985 (33rd), respectively. Other figures from the report: e Freshman Rep. Albe r t Bustamante (D Texas) was second to Coelho in total funds raised at $572,871. He was also the top money spender among Hispanics at $569,322, followed by Manuel Lujan (R-N.M.) at$498,025 and Coelho at $488,012. Bustamante, who ran unopposed in the general election, defeated nine-term incumbent Abraham Kazen in the primary for Texas' 23rd District. e The least money raised was by Reps . Ron de Lugo (D-Virgin Islands), Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas) and Jaime Fuster (D Puerto Rico), at$37,532,$66,829 and$81 ,124, respectively . This ranking also holds for money spent and PAC contributions, with Fuster receiving no PAC money. e Fuster won as Puerto Rico's resident commissioner (a non-voting House delegate), although opponent Nelson Famadas spent ($122,742 vs . $80,300) and raised($124,432 vs. $81,1 24) more than he did. . e Four Hispanic Republican challengers to two each Hispanic and Anglo incumbent Democrat representatives waged formidable campaigns despite, in some cases, miniscule campaign financing. In California, Miriam Ojeda won 37% of the vote to Howard Berman's63% with only$7,023 raised compared to Berman's $220,590. In Florida, Ricardo Nunez received 40% of the vote, to Claude Pepper's 60%, with $48,063 raised to Pepper's $247,490. Matthew Martinez beat Richard Gomez in California, 52% to 42%, raising $195,688 to Gomez ' s $154,208. Bill Richardson won in New Mexico with 63% and $439,746 to Lou Gallegos' 37% and $207,831. . Carlos Morales Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS STATISTICS ON VETERANS: A Veterans Administration report provides detailed information about veterans, including Hispanics. Single copies of"Veterans in the United States: A Statistical Portrait from the 1980 Census" are available free from the Statistical Policy and Research Service, Research Division (711 ), Veterans Administration, Washington, D.C. 20420. HISPANIC VETERANS THROUGH HISTORY: The Defense Department is updating 'Hispanics in America's Defense," a book detailing Hispanic contributions to the U.S. Armed Forces from the nation's beginnings to the present. The free book won't be available till the fall but orders may be placed now. Send orders to: ODASD (EO/SP), The Pentagon, Room 3E323, Washington, D.C. 20301 . HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES: A new census report provides numerous statistics on the make-up of U .S. families . The statistics, which include Hispanics, range from family size to employment and occupation. To order "Household and Family Characteristics: March 1984," contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Request Stock No. 033-001-907976. Cost: $8.50. PUBLIC POLICY RESEARCH GRANTS: The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council are accepting applications for grants to support public policy research on contemporary Hispanic issues. Both individuals and institutions may apply. For further information contact Inter-University Program for Latino Research, Ramon Saldivar or Harriett Romo, University of Texas at Austin, Center for Mexican American Studies, Student Services Building 4.120, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471-4557. Deadline: July 15. WOMEN OF THE WORLD: A new census publication reports on the social and economic situation of women in developing countries. The report includes many statistics on 21 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Copies of "Women of the WorldA Chartbook for Developing Regions" are $2.75. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington . D .C. 20402. Request Stock No. 003-024-06202-0. CARTOONISTS, WIN $50: Weekly Report is looking for the best editorial cartoon depicting the "immersion method" of language instruction. For details, drop a card to: Immersion method, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. SENATE AND HOUSE CAMPAIGNS: Information on money raised, spent and contributed to Congressional candidates by political action committees can be found in the "FEC Reports on Financial Activity, 1983-84: U.S. Senate and House Campaigns, Interim Report No. 9." Cost: $15 in advance. Contact: FEC Office of Public Records, 1325 K St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20463 (202) 523-4065 or toll free 800-424-9539. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you i"n your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link. 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737 .. Ad copy received by 5 p .m. !En Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates : 75 cents per word. Display rates : $35 per column inch. FINANCIAL PLANNER: We need people to help market our exciting line of financial products. If you have the qualifications we ' re looking for, we'll train you to help people build solid financial futures. And we'll provide first rate insurance and investment products from Connecticut Mutual, a recognized leader in the industry. Successful Connecticut Mutual Representatives earn $50,000 a year and more. So if you're interested in a meaningful and rewarding career in financial planning , send your resume to: Delvin E. Benjamin , J.D., Connecticut Mutual, 140 Garden St., G19, Hartford, Conn 06154. An Equal Opportunity Employer . NIGHTSIDE ASSISTANT PRODUCTION MANAGER sought by Tucson Newspapers, Inc. Pre-press essentiaL Should know cold type, composing, plate and color, APS micro 5, 8300 display ad, CSI editorial and classified systems, and management skills. press experience a plus. Salary $30,000s; excellent benefits. Send resume : Wayne Bean, P.O. Box 26887, Tucson, Ariz . 85726. THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION , Washington, D.C. , has the following openings: e LEGAL SERVICES SPECIALIST Salary range$32 , 625-$45 ,305. Qualifications: College degree. Experience in reviewing and analyzing financial data Willingness to travel extensively. Skill in applying sound business management principles and practices in evaluating the effectiveness of state legal programs and in . recommending changes to correct or improve weak or lagging operations and programs. Skill in writing sophisticated policy papers, including conducting independent research and analysis of policy issues and administrative problems. Skill in computing basic and inter mediate descriptive and inferential statistics. Knowledge of the data entry procedures and reporting capabilities of automated data processing systems for the Attorney Referral and the Unified Legal Services Programs. Skill in mediating and resolving problems among diverse groups, including lawyers, insurance com . panies, affiliate leadership and , staff. Skill in implementing new policies or ' changing existing ones. Ability . to plan, organize, and coordinate work in situations competing demands. Knowledge of the organization of state bat associations and their relationship to legal services programs. e COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST (A) Salary range $36, 554$52 ,980. Qualifications: BA degree in Journalism , Communicat i ons Arts or equivalent. Five years experience in mass media and association work which re quired him/her to independently create, write , and edit news stories, articles, scripts, ads, testimonies, and other documents for the purpose of swaying public opinion or gaining support of special interest groups. Ability to use sound judgment with skills in human relations, and experience in teacher advocacy role. Knowledge, skills and ability to analyze and evaluate various circumstances. events, and activities, and develop strategies and materials to further NEA aims. Knowledge of basic research techniques, including literature searches and interviewing for ascertaining data regarding educational , organizational and political issues which are confronting the Association Thorough knowledge of NEA pro grams, missions. and organizational structure. e MANAGER, PUBLIC RELATIONS Salary range $4 7 ,485$59, 142. Qualifications: Bachelofs degree in Communications and/or radio and televiSion broadcasting or equivalent Extensive media and public relations experience in a position which would have developed substantial contacts in the communications field, produced competence in electronic media operations, e . g., program development and design , conference coverage and production of media spots. Exceptional skills in human relations, and commitment to the advancement of teachers and educaiion . . Knowiedge of and skills in applying sound management principles, theories, and techniques in the overall manage direction, and supervision of staff , programs, and resources in a media relations ment Thorough knowledge of the Association's organizational structure , programs, policies, and philosophies at all levels, i . e . , national, state, and local. Send application/resume to the Personnel Manager , NEA 1201 16th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20036. Calendar COMING SOON TEXAS ASSN. OFMEXICANAMERICANCHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION NATIONAL ACTION COUNCIL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING ANNUAL FORUM San Antonio July 17-20 Rigo Goana (512) 447-9821 THIS WEEK NATIONAL IMAGE TRAINING CONFERENCE AND CONVENTION Seattle May 28-June 1 Image' s yearly convention will include its seventh annual Women's Action Committee Seminar . Albert Olvera (206) 764-3501 NATIONAL CONGRESS FOR PUERTO RICAN RIGHTS Philadelphia May 31 -June 2 The Congress' third national convention has the theme of "The Puerto Rican Fight for EqualityA Determined Movement." James Collazo (215) 634-4443 Hispanic Link Weekly Report Atlanta June 5 -7 . Matthew OBrien (212) 279-2626 BILINGUALISM: PROBLEMS, PROSPECTS, EVALUATION New York June 7 A daylong conference sponsored by Yeshiva University. Joshua A Fishman (212) 430-2370 CONFERENCE ON EDUCATIONAL EQUITY AND EXCELLENCE Breckenridge, Colo. June 19-21 "Extending Educational Practices for a Changing Society" is the conference theme . Percy Morehouse (801) 626-6650 MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOUNDATION DINNER San Diego July 27 Tony Valencia (619) 295-4522 SPOTLIGHT "Minority Crime and the Juvenile Justice System" will explore the causes contributing to minority youth crime and discuss possible ways to solve this problem . The conference, set for May 30-31 in Washington, D.C. , is sponsored by the U.S. Justice Department and five law enforcement and legal organizations. For further information contact Wende Keefe (301) 2515353. 3

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Arts & Entertainment Meanwhile, a group of 20 Latin American and six Canadian ilriters joined 60 others from the United States in the first-ever Dialogo de todas /as Americas. The gathering, held May 8 in New York, was conceived as an ongoing process on interchange between writers and artists from throughout the American hemisphere. PROPOSALS FOR FUNDING the operation of a Latino programming consortium are currently being sought by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in accordance with its Minority Consortia Policy . Proposals from organizations capable of producing, acquir i ng and/or distributing radio and TV programs of special interest to U.S. Hispanics will be accepted through July 16. Another writer, Gregory Rabassa, is one of 12 this year of the New York Governor's Arts Awards. Rabassa, a translator of Latin American and Spanish literature, is a professor of Romance languages at Queens College, City University of New York. He won the National Book Award this year for his translation of Julio Cortazar's Hopscotch. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting funds five "minority" consortia: Latino, Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and black. In other broadcasting news: KTLA, a Los Angeles independent stati on that in 1984 became the first in the nation to broadcast some of its programs simultaneously in Spanish and English , has been sold to the Tribune Co. for $510 million ... and actor Martin Sheen appears May 29 in the last episode of Spaceflight, a four-parter airing this month on PBS stations ... ONE LINERS: The May31 release by Universal Pictures of Fletch, starring Chevy Chase , features two Hispanic actors: Irene Olga Lopez plays a maid and Rick Garcia plays a waiter ... Continuing art exhibitions around the country include The Art of Pre-Columbian Gold: The Jan Mitchell Collection at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art through Jan. 1 and a retrospective view of Mexican painter David Alfaro Siqueiros' work at the San Diego Museum of Art through June 9 ... and, the release of Cantara , cantaras, the famine relief song recorded by Latino singers , has been postponed another week to June 8; meanwhile, the producing group Hermanos del tercer mundo has shortened its name to Hermanos to indicate A COLLECTION OF SOME 60,000 volumes of Latin American materials worth approximately $1 . 7 million has been donated recently to the University of Southern California. The H.F . Boeckmann II Collection, which USC will house at its Doheny Library, places the Los Angeles institution's research resources in Latin American studies among the country's top 10. political neutrality ... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas I Media Report GRouPs' PERCEPTioNs oF MEDIA IN NEwvoRKCITY NEWSPAPERS TELEVISION ASSESSING NEW YORK MEDIA: A New York Times/WCBS-TV poll published in the Times May 14 found that most Hispanics and whites there believe the city's newspapers and television stations are fair in their report ing on minorites. A majority of blacks felt that coverage by New York ' s television stations was fair but that of its newspapers was not. The poll was based on 1 ,557 telephone interviews conducted April 27-May 3. A majority of all three groups also said that their friends used racial slurs about people of other races, that they had spent an evening recently with a friend of another race , and that they felt big companies hire minority employees only as "tokens." FALCON WANTS MEETINGS: As The NIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A n a t ronal publication of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Steve Padilla Reporting : Charlie Ericksen , Elsa Ericksert-Mendoza. Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Carlos Morales, Ancel Martinez N o port ion o f His paRi c Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcas t in any. form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription 113 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest editiPn of Hospantc Link Weekly Report on participants packets at your next conference or convention. For details. contact Hector Ericksen Mendoza (2021 234 4 Hispanic Fair to minorities 49% Too favorable to minorities 8% Too unfavorable to minorities 23% Source: 1985 New York TimeS/WCBS-TV poll New York Times and the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy there continue to spar over the Times' failure to hire Puerto Ricans, the man who set off the controversy is heading south. William Stockton, the paper's assistant to the executive editor, has been named to head its Mexico City bureau . Remarks by Stockton at the National Hispanic Media Conference in Tucson last month were interpreted by journalists there as challenging the competence of Puerto Ricans to work for Philip Bazaar 1865 France Silva 1901 Black White Hispanic Black White 33% 58% 58% 42% 61% 7% 13% 10% 7% 17% 43% 11 o/o 19% 38% 10% Letters by Institute executive director Angelo Falcon to Times' executive editor Abraham Rosenthal have yet to produce a requested meeting with Rosenthal or an apology by the paper . Responding for Rosenthal, Times' assistant managing editor James Greenfield told Falcon that Stockton's remarks were "misconstrued'' and invited him to "bring to our attention any Puerto Rican journalists who would like to be considered for a reporting position at The -Carlos Joe P . Martinez 1943 Lucian Adams 1945 Marcario Garcia 1945 Harold Gonsalves 1945 David Gonzales 1945 Silvestre Herrera 1945 Jose L6pez 1945 Manuel Perez Jr. 1945 Cleto Rodriguez 1945 Ysmael Villegas 1945 Eugene Obreg6n 1950 Baldomero L6pez 1950 Reginald Desiderio 1951 Edward G6mez 1951 Fernando Luis Garcia 1952 Joseph Rodriguez 1952 Benito Martinez 1953 Ambrosio Guillen 1953 Rodolfo Hernandez 1962 Carlos James Lozada 1967 Daniel Fernandez 1967 Alfredo Gonzalez 1968 Jay Vargas Jr. 1968 Hector Santiago-Col6n 1968 Ralph E. Dias 1969 Jose Francisco Jimenez 1969 Emilio de Ia Garza Jr. 1970 Miguel Keith 1970 Louis Rocco Jr. 1970 Roy Benavidez 1981 Hispanic Link Weekly Report