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Hispanic link weekly report, June 10, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 10, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Making The News This
Diana Caballero Pfcrez is re-elected president of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights at its convention in Philadelphia June 2. Delegates among the 500 participants condemn by resolution the city police action against MOVE as inhumane... Ana Colomar O’Brien of the U.S. Department of Interior succeeds National Credit Union Administration board member Elizabeth Flores Burkhart as president of the 1-year-old National Council of Hispanic Women. At a Washington reception attended by Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Dole and U.S. Treasurer Katherine Ortega, the council honors three recent federal appointees: Linda Chavez, director of the White House Office of Public Liaison; Donna Alvarado, director of Action;
and Senate Sergeant at Arms Ernest Garcia... Annabelle Jaramillo, of Corvallis, Ore., is re-elected president of Image at its annual convention in Seattle June 1... The Rev. Alvaro Corrada del Rio is appointed June 6 by Pope John Paul II auxiliary bishop of the District of Columbia, making him the first native Puerto Rican bishop in the United States. The nation’s 17th Hispanic bishop, Corrada is the brother of Baltasar Corrada del Rio, former Puerto Rico resident commissioner and now mayor of San Juan... Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Jose Holguin, who promised fallen crewmates in World War II that he would return to the South Pacific to retrieve their bodies for proper burial, attends ceremonies for Sgt. Henry Garcia in Whittier, Calif. Holguin located Garcia’s and four crewmates’ remains after a four-year search that included two trips to New Guinea.

^Two-Year Drop in College Aid to Latinos: 29%
The number of Hispanic students at public colleges receiving financial aid fell by 29% between the academic years of 1981 -82 and 1983-84, according to figures released by a nationwide association of state colleges June 2.
In 1983-84 fully 94,167 Hispanic students, both dependent and independent, received some aid outside of their families, either through state and federal programs or from their own institutions. Two years earlier,133,504 had received aid.
The drop in Hispanic students using financial aid was more than twice the 12.4% decline
Philadelphia ‘War Zone’
Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode responded to complaints by Puerto Rican community leaders June 3 and ordered police to stop making random searches in the Spring Garden section of the city.
“It’s like a war here,” Spring Garden United Neighbors president Raul Serrano told Weekly Report. In an area that’s more than 50% white, the whites are being left alone while Latinos are constantly harassed following the May 28 slaying there of police officer Thomas Trench, Serrano said. Trench was shot as he sat in his parked patrol carat3 a.m.
Serrano and SGUN executive director Willie Martinez met with Goode June 3 and agreed to hold off filing suit in federal court to see if the meeting bears results.
Complaints included police breaking down doors with sledgehammers, sweeping Roberto Clemente playground to take 60 to 70 persons into custody before releasing them with no charges, and tightly handcuffing teenagers caught in the sweeps.
After touring the neighborhood,City Councilman Angel Ortiz said that he wanted the killer apprehended as much as anyone, but not at the expense of abusing people’s rights.
Labors Casillas Resigns
Frank C. Casillas, assistant secretary for employment and training at the Department of Labor, announced his resignation June 5. One of the highest-ranking Hispanics in the Reagan administration, Casillas cited family reasons for his departure.
reported for all minorities. The overall drop went to 533,596 from 609,303, says the report prepared by Jacob O. Stampen, professor at the University of Wisconsin, for the Washington, D.C. -based American Association of State Colleges and Universities.
The number of black students receiving aid fell 14%- from 371,438 in 1981-82 to318,986 in 1983-84. White students, at 32%, had the largest decline, from 1,041,348 to 705,537.
Stampen attributes the decline to several reasons: a general drop in minority college enrollment, a switch by many students to rely on repayable loans instead of grants, and real or potential cuts in aid programs that may discourage students from applying for aid.
Chicago Redistricting OK’d by Supreme Court
The U.S. Supreme Court’s June 3 decision to uphold a lower court ruling which said Chicago’s City Council wards must be redistricted to reflect increased minority voting strength augurs well for Hispanics, says a Hispanic advocate there.
Raymond Romero, a Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund lawyer who is pursuing the case, predicts that redistricting should cause Hispanics to pick up two or three more seats on the council.
The City CounciPs white majority had asked the court to overturn a May 1984 ruling by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals that said a 1982 redistricting plan left Hispanics without a “reasonable and fair opportunity to elect candidates of their choice.” The appeals court ordered a district court to draw up a new districting plan - a move now cleared by this month’s ruling.
Chicago, 14% Hispanic, has one Hispanic-a Puerto Rican - on the 50-member City Council. Romero told Weekly Report that MALDEF is pushing for special elections to be held this year. The next regular election is scheduled for spring of 1987.
Romero says a fair redrawing of ward boundaries would create two more seats in Chicago’s predominantly Puerto Rican neighborhoods and one in its predominantly Mexican American community.
The report also found:
• That in 1981-82 blacks, Hispanics and other minorities comprised 32% of all aid recipients. Two years later, fewer than 29% were.
• More than 85% of all aid recipients at public colleges have family or personal income below the national median income. About half live at or below the poverty line.
• The percentage of students receiving aid at public colleges fell 2.3% between 1981-82 and 1983-84 while enrollment held at about 9.7 million.
Health Report Due Soon
A Health and Human Services task force report projected to be released in July will be the first comprehensive national source on a number of health issues in the Hispanic community.
Only state-by-state statistics are now available on what HHS officials believe are dispro-portionally large national incidences among Hispanics of homicides, cardiovascular diseases, infant deaths, chemical dependancy, cancer and other health risks.
HHS Secretary Margaret Heckler, who commissioned the report in March of last year, will study the report before it is released to the public.
The report will recommend ways the federal government can help eliminate or reduce the gap in health status between whites and Hispanics, and suggest how to alleviate the shortage of health professionals in Hispanic communities.
Fund Gets $2.5 Million
An additional 3,000 H ispanic students from throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands will receive college scholarships and cash awards thanks to a $2.9 million grant renewal from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to the National Scholarship Awards Program.
Six hundred Hispanic students already have received scholarships of $1,500 and another 600 have won awards of $100 since the program began in 1984. Last month, the College Board announced it will award 500 stipends of each type in 1986.


Sin pelos en la lengua
THE SIMPSON-NOBODY BILL: Because of the press their perennial immigration bill has received, “Simpson-Mazzoli” has become such a household term that some casual listeners and readers have even mistaken it for a new European sportscar.
Before introducing the ’85 version. Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.) had expressed confidence that Rep. Romano Mazzoli (D-Ky.) would go along for the ride again. Buthedidn’t. Nordidanyotherdesirable House co-sponsors emerge in support of Simpson’s more nativist proposal this year.
Thus, the increasingly popular press label for the senator’s new immigration vehicle: “The Simpson-Nobody bill."
Would you buy one?
NEXT QUESTION: Do you suppose that they never caught an episode of AKA Pablo? The National Conference of Christians and Jews will be honoring producer Norman Lear for his “special contribution to the positive image of Hispanics” at its first annual Imager) awards luncheon in Beverly Hills June 25.
I wonder if he’ll crack any jokes about the waiters who serve their meal.
INCORPOREAL HEREDITAMENTS AND THINGS LIKE THAT: Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas), was described by The Washington Post last year as an “oddity” who “clings to the almost archaic belief that a congressman should not accept big donations from the groups that seek to influence his committees.”
The observation came after the 13-term legislator from San Antonio, who chairs the House’s Housing and Community Development Subcommittee, returned a belated “campaign contribution” of $4,000 from BUILDPAC, the National Association of Homebuilders’ political action committee, Gonzalez added a note saying that he could “only conclude that the contribution was intended to assure‘access’ in the future.”
Henry B. is also a maverick when it comes to filling out government forms. On his 1984 financial disclosure statement required by the Congressional Ethics in Government Act, he addended:
“Neither I nor my wife nor relatives to the tenth degree of consanguinity have any corporeal on incorporeal hereditaments through gift, devise or descent — nor do I own bonds, stock or real or personal property accruing directly or indirectly any benefits or interest income (other than enumerated herein above).”
— Kay Barbaro
Democrats Revoke Hispanic Caucus
Bacardi Replaces Goya On Top 500 Listing
Bacardi Imports Inc of Miami has displaced Goya Foods Inc. as the nation’s top Hispanic-owned company in Hispanic Business magazine’s annual listing of the major Latino firms published this month.
The 41-year-old importer and distributor of rum and wine, with 224 employees, grossed $450 million in total sales last year. Goya, of Secaucus, N.J, fell to sixth place with $245 million in sales and 510 employees.
The Santa Barbara, Calif.-based magazine upped its annual listing from 400 to 500 this year and added Puerto Rico-based businesses for the first time. Two of these additions, Banco Popular de Puerto Rico and Bacardi Corp., placed second and third with sales of $348 million and $270.96 million.
Banco Popular also had the largest workforce - 4,580 employees. A total of 34 island companies made the 500 list.
“The reasons are obvious,” writes Hispanic Business editor Jesus Chavarria to explain why Puerto Rico companies were added. “ Puerto Rico’s business economy is wholly integrated with the U.S. . . (and) island companies are actively seeking business ties with all leading markets in the U.S.”
Heading the list of the 50 fastest-growing firms were two San Antonio companies, Satelco Inc., a long-distance telephone company, and Sosa& Associates, an advertising agency.
The Hispanic Business 500 transacted $7.46 billion in business and employed 63,538 workers. California had the most companies on the list with 107, followed by Texas (92), Florida (84) and New York (41).
Service companies were the most common businesses making the list, followed by manufacturing concerns, food establishments, wholesale businesses, and a combination of retail, construction and financial firms.
The decision by the Democratic National Committee to revoke official recognition of seven caucuses, including the Hispanic one, does not alter the status of those groups, say Hispanic leaders in the DNC.
The DNC’s Executive Committee passed a resolution in Washington, D.C., May 17 rescinding official recognition of the Hispanic, Black, Asian-Pacific, Liberal/Progressive, Lesbian
Denver Desegregation
The Denver school system will remain under the jurisdiction of a federal court and continue to report to that court on the progress of its desegregation plan, a federal judge ruled in Denver June 3.
The ruling by U.S. District Judge Richard Matsh was the latest step in Keyes vs. Denver School District, the first court case to establish that Hispanics could be considered a group in desegregation litigation. Until the 1973 case, “it was blacks and whites only and no one considered anyone else,” said Diana Campoamor, a spokeswoman for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in San Francisco.
J udge Matsh will confer with involved attorneys soon before setting a specific limit on the jurisdiction extension.
and Gay, and Business and Professional Caucuses. The decision came one day after DNC Chairman Paul G. Kirk Jr. urged the committee to end factionalism within the party organization.
Carmen Perez, national vice chairperson of the 26-member Hispanic Caucus, told Hispanic Link that the effect of the resolution “was to close the door for any other caucus to become a part of the Executive Committee.” Perez added that the Hispanic, Black and Women’s Caucuses each retain one Executive Committee, seat under the party’s bylaws, which can be changed only by the full 377-member DNC, The Hispanic Caucus was formed in 1972.
Polly Baca, DNC vice chairperson, explained that the resolution makes it easier for other groups, such as the elderly and farmers, to hold informal caucuses at party meetings. A 1982 Executive Committee resolution enabled DNC members to form an official caucus by securing the signatures of at least 38 members The new resolution allows any 10 DNC members to caucus informally at party events.
While the resolution states that the informal caucuses will not be included on official DNC agendas, they still will be able to obtain some logistical and administrative support.
Top Five Hispanic Businesses
Rank Company CEO Type of Business 1984 Sales*
1 Bacardi Imports Inc, Miami Luis J. Echarte Liquor distr. $450.00
2 Banco Popular de Puerto Rico, San Juan Hector Ledesma Banking 348.00
3 Bacardi Corporation, San Juan Manuel Luis del Valle Rum Mfg. 270.96
4 Recarey Enterprises Inc., Miami Miguel Recarey Medical Svcs. 266.48
5 V. Suarez & Co., San Juan Diego Suarez Liquor distr. 250.00
* In millions Source: Hispanic Business, June 1985
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
NEW YORK STATE LATINOS: AN IGNORED MINORITY: The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy has released a 33-page critique of New York Gov. Mario Cuomo’s Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs’ study “New York State Hispanics: A Challenging Minority.” Copies are free. Contact: Institute for Puerto Rican Policy Inc., 114 East 28th St., Suite 300, New York, N.Y. 10016.
HANDLING FARM CHEMICALS: The National Agricultural Chemicals Association has published a brochure “Work Smart. . . Work Safely... With Farm Chemicals.” Illustrations and instructions-including a Spanish translation - tell farm workers how to avoid unnecessary exposure to farm chemicals. For a free copy contact: Communications Department, National Agricultural Chemicals Association, 1155 15th St. NW, 9th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 296-1585.
GAO REPORTS: The U.S. General Accounting Office publishes a monthly listing of government reports on subjects ranging from national defense to social services. Single copies are free. To obtain the monthly list contact: U.S. General Accounting Office, Document Handling and Information Services Facility, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
HOLD ON TO YOUR DREAMS: A joint project by the National Council of La Raza and McDonald’s aims to encourage Hispanic children to stay in school. It consists of a series of bookcovers highlighting educational facts and contemporary Hispanic achievers. The bookcovers will be distributed this month in participating McDonalcfs restaurants throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.
CIVIL RIGHTS AND JTPA: A 25-page report by a University of Chicago research team has found that civil rights enforcement under the Job Training Partnership Act has virtually disappeared. The study examined developments at the federal, state and local levels in Illinois. For a free copy, contact: Dr. Gary Orfield, Department of Political Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, III. 60637 (312) 962-8462.
MAN A SCHOLARSHIPS: The Mexican American Women’s National Association offers annual awards upto$1,000 to Hispanas who show a commitment to improving the quality of life for Mexican American women and other Hispanics. Deadline: Sept 23. For more information contact: MANA, 1201 16th St. NW#420, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-3440, Attn: Scholarship Committee.
MINORITY GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS: $11,100 stipends will be offered to minority individuals who have a demonstrated ability and special aptitude for advanced training in science or engineering. The deadline is Nov. 15. Contact Fellowship Office, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334-2872.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 "N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
EDITOR, Assistant to Higher Education TELEVISION PRODUCER/DIRECTOR
Officer, The City University of New York REQUIRED: Bachelor’s Degree; minimum of two years experience with scholarly journals, indexing, MLA style; ability to write copy for promotional brochures; excellent proofreading and copy editing skills. DUTIES: Edit and follow through to production of academic and administrative materials. SALARY: Commensurate with experience. Excellent fringe benefits. Please send resume by Aug. 30 to: Dyanne Maue, Publications Office, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, N.Y. 11367-0904.
PRESIDENT
CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC
BROADCASTING REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS:
• Experience in the allocation of resources, budget management and the administration of a complex enterprise.
• Knowledge of the legislative and executive branches of the U.S. Government.
• Understanding of the specific needs and concerns of women and minorities.
To apply, please mail resume or short biography to:
Ms. Sandra Meyer Russell Reynolds Associates, Inc.
245 Park Avenue New York, N.Y. 10167
PUBLICATIONS SALES/ FULFILLMENT PART-TIME
Twenty hours per week, six dollars an hour. Involves receiving orders, fulfillment (mailing), processing (file maintenance), and promotional tracking. Additional responsibilities include processing direct mail requests. Available immediately. Respond (resume only!) to: ASPA Communications Department, Box H, 1120 G St. NW, Suite 500, Washington. D.C. 20005. APPLY IMMEDIATELY! EOE/AA.
Individual will assume the content responsibility as well as the planning, assembling and producing and/or directing of television public affairs segments with emphasis on multicultural issues.
Candidate must have a B.A. Degree, plus one year work experience in production, reporting, on-camera talent, directing, or a combination of the above.
Salary range $18,111 - $19,922. Employee is eligible for the University benefit package.
Submit a University of Arizona Staff Employment Application to: Employment Office, University of Arizona, 1717 East Speedway, Tucson, Ariz. 85721.
CIRCULATION MANAGER for international magazine. Salary $35,000 - $38,000. Requirements: 2-3 years circulation or related experience. Fluent English/Spanish. Contact David Foster (914) 699-9414.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISOR
Responsible for supervision of International/ Intercultural programs in the Center for International Studies. Bachelor’s Degree and Spanish-English fluency required Good salary/ excellent benefits. If interested, please send resume to: Mr. G.R. Hannah, Director of Per-Ssonnel, Bergen Community College, 400 sonnel, Bergen Community College, 400 Para-mus Road, Paramus, N.J. 07652 by Sept. 27, 1985.
An Equal Opportunity Employer.
SECRETARY/RECEPTION 1ST sought by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Washington, D.C. Salary $18,000. Clerical experience and Spanish/English fluency required. 50 wpm typing preferred.
Send resume to: Frank Newton, Ph.D., Executive Director, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL HISPANIC ASSEMBLY DINNER
Washington, D.C. Sept. 16
Mary Anne Fitzgerald (202) 863-8610
CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS INSTITUTE DINNER
Washington, D.C. Sept 17 .
Beverly Vigil Ellerman (202) 543-1771
CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING
SYMPOSIUM
Washington, D.C. Sept. 17^
The symposium will show Hispanics how they can play a more active role in public broadcasting and avail themselves of its services. It is an opportunity to meet Hispanic producers, directors, writers, actors Hispanic Link Weekly Report
and other professionals involved in public broadcasting.
Linda Liebold (301) 261-1085
FIRST HISPANIC DESIGNERS FASHION SHOW Washington, D.C. Sept. 17 Well-known Hispanic designers, such as Oscar de la Renta, Carolina Herrera, and Adolfo, will be showcased. The show will highlight Hispanic contributions to the fashion industry.
Penny Harrison (703) 620-3374
U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CONVENTION
San Juan, Puerto Rico Sept. 18-22 Hispanic business leaders from the United States, Mexico, the Caribbean and other Latin American countries will meet to study and emphasize the role Hispanics play in international trade.
Sherri Hill (816) 842-2255 or 842-2228
FIRST HISPANIC GOLF CLASSIC Rockville, Md. Sept. 18
Chi Chi Rodriguez, PGA tour star, will give an exhibition
and play 18 holes.
Patricia Bario (301) 565-5184
LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS ISSUES CONFERENCE
Washington, D.C. Sept. 19-21 Major topics of discussion include countertrade, technology and financial issues affecting Latin American countries.
Catherine Seller (202) 676-6300
PUERTO RICAN FOLK ARTS FESTIVAL New York Sept. 19-29
In celebration of cultural folkloric influences of Puerto Rico, this festival will feature music, poetry, and films.
Latino Playwrights (212) 598-0400
UTAH HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Salt Lake City, Utah Sept. 20-21 Aimed at “Hispanas in transition,” the conference will provide resource information, support systems and assistance in employment through networking. DeLoris Silva (801) 533-4060
3


Arts & Entertainment
A FASHION SHOW, A RADIO series and a minority symposium are among events planned by U.S. broadcast organizations to commemorate National Hispanic Heritage Week.
The first two of those events are funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting; a third will air on the SIN television network.
Most national public radio stations around the country will air this week a five-part series of 30-minute profiles of Latinos who “play important roles in strengthening and enriching their communities.” Hosted by Rene Enriquez, Portraits of Hispanic America will include a closing shov&that examines the role of the church and the lives of U.S. His panics. &
A second%IPR series is scheduled to air this week: five Spanish-language music programs in stereo that will highlight various aspects of Hispanic music - from salsa/jazz to a Mexican rondalla.
Both NPR series are funded by member stations and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Jose McMurray is coordinating producer; Frank Tavares is executive producer.
On Sept. 17, the CPB will sponsor A Valuable Partnership- Public Broadcasting and You. The symposium, to be held at the Shoreham
Hotel in Washington, D.C., is part of a series of CPB-sponsored events to inform minority groups about public broadcasting.
Also on Sept. 17, the SIN Television network will air the first Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit. Oscar de la Renta and Adolfo are among Latinos who will show their men’s and women’s fall collection at the event, co-sponsored by SIN and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc.
Many other cultural events around the country will coincide with the current National Hispanic Heritage Week celebration. In Los Angeles, an exhibition of works by Mexican painter David Alfaro Siqueiros continues at Plaza de la Raza after a Sept. 14 opening. In Chicago, the Facets Performance Ensemble will perform Macondo, a play based on Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, Sept. 20 at Northeastern Illinois University’s auditorium.
ONE LINERS: Portraits of Maria Callas and Joan Baez are part of the Women on Time exhibit on view through next year at the Smithsonian Institute’s Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C— Lucy Arnaz takes on the female lead role in My One And Only Sept. 17 at the music center Ahmanson theater in Los Angeles... And ABC will air the 37th annual Emmy Awards show Sept. 22; Edward James Olmos is up for a “Best Supporting Actor nod for his role on NBC’s Miami Vice...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
VOLUNTEER TALENT: More than 20 of the nation’s top Hispanic advertising and public relations firms have united in an effort to tell the story of mounting Hispanic business successes to the world.
The agencies, spread in such key areas as New York, California, Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico, form the new volunteer marketing committee of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
The body, chaired by Ben Gutierrez, president of Ben-G Industries of Troy, Mich., is shouldering the task of promoting the goals of the chamber, including creating broader awareness of the benefits of doing business with Hispanic firms.
Since forming in New York June 5, the committee has nearly doubled in size. A second New York meeting was held Aug. 2 and a third is set to coincide with the USHCC conference
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast m any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription ft 3 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 18-22.
Among the major national p.r. and advertising firms and advertisers presently participating, according to USHCC operations director Marcos Rincon, are:
From New York: JDC Communications, The Bravo Group, Hispania- J. Walter Thompson, Garcia Patto Inti., Font & Vaamonde, Conill Advertising, Coe & Company, AC&R Rossi, Foote Cone& Belding, Adelante Advertising, Robles Communications, Castor Spanish International, UniWorld Hispanic, Caballero Spanish Media, Bristol-Myers.
From Los Angeles: Bermudez & Associates, Rendon Enterprises.
From Miami: Zubi Advertising.
From San Antonio: Sosa & Associates, Henry Molina.
From San Juan, P.R.: Badillo/Compton.
From Secaucus, N.J.: Goya Foods.
From Troy, Mich.: Ben-G Industries.
The committee is co-chaired by Ed Caballero of Caballero Spanish Media and Peter Spengler, Bristol-Myers vice-president for advertising.
Three subcommittees are preparing strategies on membership development and sales (chair,
Jose Unanue, prea, Goya Foods); public relations and publicity (chair, Jackie da Costa, pres., JDC Communications), and advertising and publications (chair, Alicia Conill, pres., Conill Advertising.)
TAX BRIEFING: President Reagan joined in a special White House briefing Sept. 11 for 100 journalists, about a tnird of them Hispanic, on his tax reform proposal. Other invited groups represented labor and Catholic organizations.
The sessions, coordinated with the White House public liaison office, included presentations by communications chief Patrick Buchanan and Treasury Department experts
N EW VOICES: University of Texas/Austin graduate Melinda Machado joins the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project in San Antonio for a year starting this week as its Field Foundation communications intern... The National Association of Latino Appointed and Elected Officials, Washington, D.C., hired local writer Kathy Stafford as its media coordinator. - Charlie Ericksen
Secretary Brock Rejects Toilets for Farmworkers
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week and Senate Sergeant at Arms Ernest Garcia .. . Annabelle Jaramillo, of Corvallis, Ore., is re-elected president of Image at its annual convention in Seattle June 1 ... The Rev . Alvaro Corrada del Rio is appointed June 6 by Pope John Paul II auxiliary bishop of the District of Columbia, making him the first native Puerto Rican bishop in the United States. The nation's 17th Hispanic bishop, Corrada is the brother of Baltasar Corrada del Rio, former Puerto Rico resident commissioner and now mayor of San Juan .. . Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Jose Holguin, who promised fallen crewmates in World War II that he would return to the South Pacific to retrieve their bodies for proper burial, attends ceremonies for Sgt. Henry Garcia in Whittier, Calif. Holguin located Garcia's and four crewmates' remains after a four year search that included two trips to New Guinea. Diana Caballero Perez is re-elected president of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights at its convention in Philadelphia June 2. Delegates among the 500 participants condemn by resolution the city police action against MOVE as inhumane ... Ana Colomar 0' Brien of the U.S. Department of Interior succeeds National Credit Union Administration board member Elizabeth Flores Burkhart as president of the 1-yearold National Council of Hispanic Women. At a Washington reception attended by Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Dole and U.S. Treasurer Katherine Ortega, the council honors three recent federal appointees: Linda Chavez, director of the White House Office of Public Liaison; Donna Alvarado, director of Action; Vol. 3 No. 23 June 10,1985 Drop in College Aid to Latinos: 29/o The number of Hispanic students at public colleges receiving financial a id fell by 29% between the academic years of 1981 and 1983, according to figures released by a nationwide association of state colleges June 2. In 1983 fully94,167 Hispanic students, both dependent and independent, received some aid outside of their families, either through state and federal programs or from their own institutions. Two years earlier, 133,504 had received aid. The drop in Hispanic students using financial aid was more than twice the 12.4% decline Philadelphia 'War Zone' Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode responded to complaints by Puerto Rican community leaders June 3 and ordered police to stop making random searches in the Spring Garden section of the city. "lfs like a war here," Spring Garden United Neighbors president Raul Serrano told Weekly Report. In an area thafs more than 50% white, the whites are being left alone while Latinos are constantly harassed following the May 28 slaying there of police officer Thomas Trench, Serrano said . Trench was shot as he sat in his parked patrol car at3 a.m . Serrano and SGU N executive director Willie Martinez met with Goode June 3 and agreed to hold off filing suit in federal court to see if the meeting bears results. Complaints included police breaking down doors with sledgehammers, sweeping Roberto Clemente playground to take 60 to 70 persons into custody before releasing them with no charges, and tightly handcuffing teenagers caught in the sweeps. After touring the neighborhood , City Council man Angel Ortiz said that he wanted the killer apprehended as much as anyone, but not at the expense of abusing people's rights. Labor's Casillas Resigns Frank C . Casillas, assistant secretary for employment and training at the Department of Labor, announced his resignation June 5. One of the highest-ranking Hispanics in the Reagan administration , Casillas cited family reasons for his departure. reported for all minorities. The overall drop went to 533,596 from 609,303, says the report prepared by Jacob 0. Stampen, professor at the University of Wisconsin, for the Washington, D . C . based American Association of State Colleges and Universities. The number of black students receiving aid fell14%-from371 ,438 in 1981 to318,986 in 1983. White students, at 32%, had the largest decline, from 1 ,041 ,348 to 705,537. Stampen attributes the decline to several reasons: a general drop in minority college enrollment, a switch by many students to rely on repf!.yable loans instead of grants, and real or potential cuts in aid programs that may discourage students from applying for aid. Chicago Redistricting OK'd by Supreme Court The U.S. Supreme Courfs June 3 decision to uphold a lower court ruling which said Chicagd s City Council wards must be redistricted to reflect increased minority voting strength augurs well for Hispanics, says a Hispanic advocate there. Raymond Romero, a Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund lawyer who is pursuing the case, predicts that redistricting should cause Hispanics to pick up two or three more seats on the council. The City Council ' s white majority had asked the court to overturn a May 1984 ruling by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals that said a 1982 redistricting plan left Hispanics without a "reasonable and fair opportunity to elect candidates of their choice." The appeals court ordered a district court to draw up a new districting plana move now cleared by this month's ruling . Chicago, 14% Hispanic, has one Hispanica Puerto Rican on the 50-member City Council. Romero told Weekly Report that MALDEF is pushing for special elections to be held this year. The next regular election is scheduled for spring of 1987. Romero says a fair redrawing of ward boundaries would create two more seats in Chicago's predominantly Puerto Rican neighborhoods and one in its predominantly Mexican American community. The report also found: e That in 1981 blacks, Hispanics and other minorities comprised 32% of all aid recipients. Two years later, fewer than 29% were . e More than 85% of all aid recipients at public colleges have family or personal income below the national median income. About half live at or below the poverty line. • The percentage of students receiving aid at public colleges fell2. 3% between 1981 82. and 1983 while enrollment held at about 9 . 7 million. Health Report Due Soon A Health and Human Services task force report projected to be released in July will be the first comprehensive national source on a number of health issues in the Hispanic com munity. Only state-by-state statistics are now available on what HHS officials believe are disproportionally large national incidences among Hispanics of homicides, cardiovascular diseases, infant deaths, chemical dependancy, cancer and other health r i sks . H HS Secretary Margaret Heckler, who com missioned the report in March of last year, will study the report before it is released to the public. The report will recommend ways the federal government can help eliminate or reduce the gap in health status between whites and Hispanics, and suggest how to alleviate the shortage of health professionals in Hispanic communities. Fund Gets $2.5 Million An additional3,000 His panic students from throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands will receive college scholarships and cash awards thanks to a $2. 9 million grant renewal from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to the National Scholarship Awards Program . Six hundred Hispanic students already have received scholarships of $1 ,500 and another 600 have won awards of $100 since the program began in 1984. Last month, the College Board announced it will award 500 stipends of each type in 1986.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua INCORPOREAL HEREDITAMENTS AND THINGS LIKE THAT: Rep . Henry B. Gonzalez(DTexas), was described by The Washington Post last year as an "oddity" who "clings to the almost archaic belief that a congressman should not accept big donations from the groups that seek to influence his committees. " THE SIMPSON-NOBODY BILL: Because of the press their perennial immigration bill has received, "SimpsonMazzoli" has become such a household term that some casual listeners and readers have even mistaken it for a new European sportscar. The observation came after the 13-term legislator from San Antonio , who chairs the House's Housing and Community Development Subcommittee, returned a belated "campaign contribution" of $4,000 from BUILDPAC, the National Association of Homebuilders' political action committee, Gonzalez added a note saying that he could "only conclude that the contribution was intended to assure 'access' in the future. " Before introducing the '85 version. Sen. Alan Simpson (RWyo.) had expressed confidence that Rep. Romano Mazzoli (DKy.) would go along for the ride again. But he didn't. Nor did any other desirable House co-sponsors emerge in support of Simpson's more nativist proposal this year. Thus, the increasingly popular press label for the senator's new immigration vehicle: "The Simpson-Nobody bill." Henry B. is also a maverick when it comes to filling out government forms. On his 1984 financial disclosure statement required by the Congressional Ethics in Government Act , he addended: Would you buy one? NEXT QUESTION: Do you suppose that they never caught an episode of AKA Pablo? The National Conference of Christians and Jews will be honoring producer Norman Lear for his "special contribution to the positive image of Hispanics" at its first annual Imagen awards luncheon in Beverly Hills June 25. "Neither I nor my wife nor relatives to the tenth degree of consanguinity have any corporeal on incorporeal hereditaments through gift, devise or descent-nor do I own bonds, stock or real or personal property accruing directly or indirectly any benefits or interest income (other than enumerated herein above) ." I wonder if he'll crack any jokes about the waiters who serve their meal. -Kay Barbaro Bacardi Replaces Goya On Top 500 Listing Bacardi Imports Inc . of Miami has displaced Goya Foods Inc. as the nation's top Hispanic owned company in Hispanic Business magazine's annual listing of the major Latino firms published this month. The 41-year-old importer and distributor of rum and wine, with 224 employees, grossed $450 million in total sales last year. Goya, of Secaucus, N.J., fell to sixth place with $245 million in sales and 510 employees. The Santa Barbara, Calif . -based magazine upped its annual listing from 400 to 500 this year and added Puerto Rico-based businesses for the first time. Two of these additions, Banco Popular de Puerto Rico and Bacardi Corp., placed second and third with sales of $348 million and $270.96 million . Banco Popular also had the largest work force -4 ,580 employees. A total of 34 island companies made the 500 list. "The reasons are obvious," writes Hispanic Business editor Jesus Chavarria to explain why Puerto Rico companies were added. "Puerto Rico's business economy is wholly integrated with the U . S ... (and) island companies are actively seeking business ties with all leading markets in the U . S." Heading the list of the 50 fastest-growing firms were two San Antonio companies, Satelco Inc., a long-distance telephone company, and Sosa& Associates, an advertising agency. The Hispanic Business 500 transacted $7.46 billion . in business and employed 63,538 workers. California had the most companies on the list with 107, followed by Texas (92) , Florida (84) and New York (41 ). Service companies were the most common businesses making the list, fqllowed by manufacturing concerns, food establishments, wholesale businesses, and a combination of retail, construction and financial firms . 2 Democrats Revoke Hispanic Caucus The decision by the Democratic National Committee to revoke official recognition of seven caucuses, including the Hispanic one, does not alter the status of those groups, say Hispanic leaders in the DNC . The DNC's Executive Committee passed a resolution in Washington, D.C., May 17 rescinding official recognition of the Hispanic, Black, Asian-Pacific, Liberal/Progressive, Lesbi an Denver Desegregation The Denver school system will remain under the jurisdiction of a federal court and continue to report to that court on the progress of its desegregation plan, a federal judge ruled in Denver June 3. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Richard Matsh was the latest step in Keyes vs. Denver School District; the first court case to establish that Hispanics could be considered a group in desegregation litigation. Until the 1973 case, "it was blacks and whites only and no one considered anyone else," said Diana Campoamor , a spokeswoman for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in San Francisco . Judge Matsh will confer with involved attorneys soon before setting a specific limit on the jurisdiction extension. and Gay, and Business and Professional Caucuses. The decision came one day after DNC Chairman Paul G . Kirk Jr. urged the committee to end factionalism within the party organization. Carmen Perez , national vice chairperson of the 26-member Hispanic Caucus, told His panic Link that the effect of the resolution "was to close the door for any other caucus to become a part of the Executive Committee." Perez added that the Hispanic, Black and Women ' s Caucuses each retain one Executive Committee. seat under the party's bylaws, which can be changed only by the full 377-member DNC. The Hispanic Caucus was formed in 1972. Polly Baca , DNC vice chairperson, explained that the resolution makes it easier for other groups, such as the elderly and farmers, to hold informal caucuses at party meetings. A 1982 Executive Committee resolution enabled DNC members to form an official caucus by securing the signatures of at least 38 members. The new resolution allows any 10 DNC members to caucus informally at party events. While the resolution states that the informal caucuses will not be included on official DNC agendas, they still will be able to obtain some logistical and administrative support. Top Five Hispanic Businesses Rank Company CEO Type of 1984 Business Sales * Bacardi Imports Inc, Luis J. Echarte Liquor $450.00 Miami distr. 2 Banco Popular de Hector Ledesma Banking 348.00 Puerto Rico, San Juan 3 Bacardi Corporation , Manuel Luis del Rum Mfg. 270.96 San Juan Valle 4 Recarey Enterprises Inc., Miguel Recarey Medical 266.48 Miami Svcs. 5 V. Suarez & Co., San Juan Diego Suarez Liquor distr. 250.00 *In millions Source: Hispanic Busine!>S, June 1985 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS. NEW YORK STATE LATINOS: AN IGNORED MINORITY: The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy has released a 33-page critique of New York Gov. Mario Cuomo's Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs ' study "New York State Hispanics: A Challenging Minority." Copies are free. Contact: Institute for Puerto Rican Policy Inc., 114 East 28th St., Suite 300, New York, N .Y. 10016. HANDLING FARM CHEMICALS: The National Agricultural Chemicals Association has published a brochure "Work Smart. .. Work Safely ... With Farm Chemicals." Illustrations and instructionsincluding a Spanish translation -tell farm workers how to avoid unnecessary exposure to farm chemicals. For a fre e copy contact: Communications Department, National Agricultural Chemicals Association, 1155 15th St. NW, 9th Floor, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 296-1585. GAO REPORTS: The U . S . General Accounting Office publishes a monthly listing of government reports on subjects ranging from national defense to social services. Single copies are free. To obtain the monthly list contact: U .S. General Accounting Office, Document Handling and Information Services Facility, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithers burg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241. HOLD ON TO YOUR DREAMS: A joint project by the National Council of La Raza and McDonald' s aims to encourage Hispanic children to stay in school. It consists of a series of bookcovers highlighting educational facts and contemporary Hispanic achievers. The bookcovers will be distributed this month in participating McDonalds restaurants throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. CIVIL RIGHTS AND JTPA: A 25-page report by a Un iversity of Chicago research team has found that civil rights enforcement under the Job Training Partnership Act has virtually disappeared. The study examined developments at the federal, state and local levels in Illinois. For a free copy, contact: Dr. Gary Orfield, Department of Political Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill. 60637 (312) 962-8462. MANA SCHOLARSHIPS: The Mexica n American Women ' s National Association offers annual awards up to$1 ,000 to H ispanas who show a commitment to improving the quality of life for Mexican American women and other Hispanics. Deadline : Sept. 23. For more information contact: MANA, 1201 16th St. NW #420, Washington, D. C . 20036 (202) 223-3440, Attn: Scholarship Committee. MINORITY GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS: $11 ,100 stipends will be offered to minority individuals who have a demonstrated ability and special aptitude for advanced training in science or engineering. The deadline is Nov. 15. Contact Fellowship Office , National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D . C . 20418 (202) 334-2872. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you i n you r search for executives and profess io nals. Mail o r p h one you r corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 'N St. NW. Washington, D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. EDITOR, Assistant to Higher Education TELEVISION PRODUCER/ DIRECTOR Officer, The City University of New York. RE Individual will assume the content res QUIRED: BacheiMs D egree; minimum o f two ponsibility as we ll as the planning, assembling years experience with scholarly journals, and producing and/or directing of television indexing, MLA s t yle; ability to write copy for public affairs segments with emphasis on promotional brochures; exce llent proofreading multicultur a l i ssues. and copy editing skills. DUTIES : Edit and follow Candidate mu s t ha ve a B.A. Degree. plus through to production of academic and ad ministrative materials. SALARY: Commen surate with experience. Excellent fringe benefits. Please send resume by Aug. 30 to: Dyanne Maue, Publications Office, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flu shing, N . Y . 11367-0904. PRESIDENT CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING REQU I RED QUALIFICATIONS: e Experience in the a llocation of resources. budget management and the administration of a complex enterprise. • Knowledge o f the legislative and executive branches o f the U . S . Government. • Understanding of the specif ic needs and concerns of women and minorities. To app ly, please mail r esume or short biography to: Ms. Sandra Meyer Russell Reynolds Associates, Inc. 245 Park Avenue New York , N . Y . 10167 PUBLICATIONS SALES/ FULFILLMENT PART-TIME one yea r work experience in production, reporting. on-camera talent. directing, O( a combination of the above. Salary range $ 18,111-$19,922. Employee is eligible for the University benefit package. Submit a University of Arizona Staff Employ ment Application to: Employment Office. University of Arizona, 17 1 7 East Speedway, Tucson. A riz. 85721 . CIRCULATION MANAGER for international magazine. Salary $35,000 $38,000. Requirements: 2-3 years circulation or re lated experience. Fluent English/Spanish. Contact David Foster (914) 699-9414. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISOR Responsible for supervision of lnternationaV Intercultura l programs in the Center for International Studies. Bachelor's Degree and Span ish-English fluency required Good salary/ excellent benefits. If interested, please sen d resume to: Mr. G.R. Hannah, Director of P er8sonnel, Bergen Communi t y College. 400 so nnel. Bergen Commu nit y College , 400 Para mus Road , Paramus, N . J . 07652 by Sept. 27, 1985. An Equal Opportunity Employer. Twenty hours per week, six dollars an hour. SECRETARY/RECEPTION 1ST sought by Inv olves receiving orders. fulfillment (mailing), the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, processing (file maintenance) , and promotional Washington, D . C . Salary $18.000. C lerical tracking. Additional responsibilities include experience and Spanish/English fluency reprocessing direct ma i l requests. Available quired. 50 wpm typing preferred. imm ed iately . Re spo nd (resu me only) to : ASPA Send resume to: Frank Newton, Ph . D .. Communications Department, Bo x H, 1120 G Executive Director, National Association of St. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building, APPLY IMMEDIATELY! EOE/AA. Suite 634, Wa shington, D .C. 20045. Calendar and other professionals involved i n public broad c asting . and play 18 holes . Patricia Bario (30 1) 565 THIS WEEK REPUBLICAN NATIONAL HISPANIC ASSEMBLY DINNER Washington, D.C. Sept. 16 Mary Anne Fitzgerald (202) 863-8610 CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS INSTITUTE Washington, b.C. Sept. 17 . Beverly Vigil Ellerman (202) -543-1771 CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING SYMPOSIUM Washington , D.C. Sept. 17 The symposium will show His panics how they can play a more active role in public broadcasting and avail themselves of its services. It is an opportunity to meet Hispanic producers, directors , writers, actors Hispanic Link Weekl y Report Linda Liebold (301) 261-1085 FIRST HISPANIC DESIGNERS FASHION SHOW Washington , D.C. Sept. 17 Well-known Hispan i c designers, such asOscarde Ia Renta, Carolina Herrera , and Adolfo , will be show cased. The show will highlight Hispanic contributions to the fashion industry . Penny Harrison (703) 620-3374 U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Juan , Puerto Rico Sept. 18-22 Hispanic business leaders from the United States, Mexico, the Caribbean and other Latin American countries will meet to study and emphasize the role Hispanics play in international trade. Sherri Hill (816) 842-2255 or 842-2228 FIRST HISPANIC GOLF CLASSIC Rockv i lle , Md. Sept. 18 Chi Chi Rodriguez, PGA tour star, will give an exhibition LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS ISSUES CON FERENCE Washington , D.C. Sept. 1 9-21 Major topics of discussion include countertrade, technology and financial issues affecting Latin American countries . Catherine Sell er (202) 676-6300 PUERTO RICAN FOLK ARTS FESTIVAL New York Sept. 19-29 In celebration of cultural folkloric influences of Puerto Rico , this festival will feature music , poetry , and films. Latino Playwrights (212) 598-0400 UTAH HISPANIC WOMEN'S CONFERENCE Salt Lake City, Utah Sept. 20-21 Aimed at " Hispanas in transition , " the conference will provide resource information, support systems and assistance in employment through networking. DeLoris Silva (801) 533-4060 3

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Arts & Entertainment Hotel in Washington, D . C . , is part of a series of CPB-sponsored events to i nform minority groups about public broadcasting. Also on Sept. 17 , the SIN Television network will air the first Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit. Oscar de Ia Renta and Adolfo are among Latinos who will show their men' s and women's fall collection at the event, co-sponsored by SIN and t he Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc . A FASHION SHOW, A RADIO series and a minority symposium are among events planned by U.S. broadcast organ izations to commemorate National Hispanic Heritage Week. The first two of those events are funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting; a third w ill air on the SIN tBievision network. Most national public radio stations around the country will air this week a five-part series of 30-minute profiles of Latinos wh o "play important roles in strengthening and enriching their communities." Hosted by Rene Enriquez, Portraits of Hi s p anic America will include a closing show.that examines the role of the church and the lives of U .S. Many other cultural events around the country will coincide with the current National Hispanic Heritage Week celebration. In Los Angeles, an exhibition of works by Mexican pa inter David Alfaro Siqueiros continues at Plaza de Ia Raza after a Sept. 14 opening. In Chicago, the Facets Performance Ensemble will perform Macondo, a play based on Gabriel Garcia Marquez' s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, Sept. 20 at Northeastern Illinois University's auditorium. Hispanics. ; . A second""NPR series i s scheduled to air this week: five Spanish language music programs i n stereo that will highlight various aspects of His panic music-f r om salsa / jazz to a Mex ican randalia . ONE LINERS : Portraits of Maria Callas and Joan Baez are part of the Women on Time exhibit on view through next year at the Smithsonian Institute's Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C ... . Lucy Arnaz takes on the female lead role in My One And Only Sept. 17 at the music center Ahmanson theater in Los Angeles ... And ABC will air the 37th annual Emmy Awards show Sept. 22; Edward James Olmos is up for a " Best Supporting Actor' ' nod for his role on NBC's Miami Vice . . . Both NPR series are funded by member stations and the Corporation for Publi c Broadcasting. Jose McMur ray is coordinating producer; Frank Tavares i s executive producer. On Sept. 17, the CPB will sponsor A Valuable Partnership-Public Broadcasting and You. Th e symposium, to be held at the Shoreham Media Report VOLUNTEER TALENT: More than 20 of the nation' s top Hispanic advertising and public relations firms have united in an effort to tell the story of mounting Hispanic business successes to the world. The agencies, spread in such key areas as New York, California, Te xas, Florida and Puerto Rico, form the new volunteer marketing committee of the U . S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The body , chaired by Ben Gutierrez, president of Ben-G Industries of Troy , Mich . , is shouldering the task of promoting the goals of the chamber , i n cluding creating broader awareness of the benefits of doing business with Hispanic firms. Since forming in New York June 5 , the committee has nearly doubled in size . A second New York meeting was held Aug. 2 and a third is set to coincide with the USHCC c onference HI.SPANJC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A natwnal publlcat10n of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street, N . W . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publ i s her. H ec t o r Ericksen Mendoza Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Del gado, Feli x Perez, Charlie E r icksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa EricksenMendoza. No port10n of H1spamc Lmk Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast 1n any form Without advance permiSSIOn. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription issues) $26. in San J uan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 18-22. Among the major national p. r . and advertising f i rms and adve r tisers presently part i cipating, according to USHCC operations director Marcos Rincon , are: From New York: JDC Communications, The Bravo Group, Hi spania-J. Walter Thompson, Garcia Patto Inti. , Font & Vaamonde, Conill Advertising, Coe & Compan y , AC&R Rossi , Foote Cone& Belding , Adelante Adv erti s ing , Robles Communications, Castor Spanish Internation a l , UniWorld Hispanic , Caballero Spanish Media , Bristol-My ers. From Los Angeles: Bermud e z& Associates, Rendon Enierprises. From Miami: Zubi Advertising. From San Antonio: Sosa & Associates, Henry Molina. From San Juan, P.R. : Badillo/Compton. From Secaucus, N .J.: Goya Foods. From Troy, Mich.: Ben-G Industries. The committee is co-chaired by Ed Caballero of Caballero Spanish Media and Peter Spengler, BristolMyers vice-president for advertising. Three subcommittees are preparing strategies on membership development and sales (chair, ....-.L\. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Jose Unanue , pres., Goya Foods); public relations and publicity (chair, Jackie da Costa, pres. , JDC Communications), and advertising and publications (chair, Al icia Conill, pres. , Con ill Advertising.) TAX BRIEFING: President Reagan joined in a special White House briefing Sept. 11 for 100 journalists, about c. tnird of them Hispanic , on his tax reform proposal. Other invited groups represented labor and Catholic organizations. The sessions, coordinated with the White House public liaison office, included presentations by communications chief Patrick Buchanan and Treasury Department experts. NEW VOICES: University of Texas/ Austin graduate Melinda Machado joins the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project in San Antonio for a year starting this week as its Field Foundation communications intern ... The National Association of Latino Appointed and Elected Officials, Washington, D . C., hired local writer Kathy Stafford as its media co ordinator. Charlie Ericksen . . CONFERENC E C O Of