Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, June 17, 1985

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, June 17, 1985
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
Three Latinos are among the 43 oustanding young professionals selected for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s National Fellowship Program: Joseph Trevlfto, 34, executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens; Ramona Ortega-Liston, 30, visiting scholar at Arizona State University in Tempe and Republican political organizer, and Henry Herrera, 43, director of psychiatric consultation and liaison services at the University of Rochester in New York. Trevino will continue his LULAC duties while conducting research under a fellowship grant. . . Fernando Torres-Gil, a professor in gerontology and public administration at the University of Southern California, begins work June 17 as staff director of the House Select Committee on Aging in Washington, D.C. . . Also beginning work June 17 is Jane Delgado, who replaces Rodolfo
Sanchez as executive director of COSSM HO, the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizations in Washington. Sanchez will now head Hispanic Americana, a consulting firm... San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros is elected to a three-year term on Notre Dame University’s 48-member board of trustees... The Mexican and American Foundation in San Diego announces June 7 the winners of its annual Man and Woman of the Year Awards: Brian G. Dyson, president of Coca-Cola, for the company’s National Hispanic Business Initiative, and Diana Gomez, editor of the foundation’s monthly newspaper, The Forum, for 13 years of service to the foundation... Several Hispanic officials in Colorado, among them Rich Castro, director of the Denver Commission on Community Relations, criticize Gov. Dick Lamm for not appointing any Hispanics to the newly restructured Colorado Commission on H igher Education last month.

National Advisory Council Attacks Bilingual Ed.
The national advisory council on bilingual education, making a departure from positions taken by previous councils, has recommended that the federal government reduce both financial and philosophical support of transitional bilingual education.
The 15-member National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education also strongly urges in its ninth annual report that schools rely more on traditional English-only instruction. It makes the recommendation citing possible monetary savings and general Reagan administration reservations about teaching children in languages other than English.
The council, reconstituted when Congress reauthorized the 1968 Bilingual Education
Calif. Groups to Challenge Bilingual Ed. Rule Change
The California Association for Bilingual Education and five other state education organizations will challenge in court this summer a controversial amendment to the state’s bilingual education regulations that would make it easier for local school officials to transfer students from bilingual programs to regular English-only programs.
The amendment would waive beginning next fall the required proficiency tests and allow transfer of students after three years of bilingual classes regardless of their academic progress. The groups will argue in Sacramento Superior Court that, as a result, money-conscious school districts could initiate a wholesale removal of students in order to dismantle their bilingual programs.
“Many schools are hostile to bilingual programs,” association President LorenzaCalvillo-Craig said. “They would rather spend (that) money on their college-bound kids, or to buy new computers or chemistry tubes.”
Calvillo-Craig said recent figures show that 525,000 California students are now enrolled in bilingual education programs, up from487,000 five years ago. An estimated 75% of these are Hispanic.
Act last fall, is composed of educators and parents and includes seven Hispanics. Anthony Torres, a Reagan administration appointee, is council chairman and a school superintendent in Sauk Village, III.
The report, submitted to Congress March 31, was released publicly this month.
“Educational research does not lend itself to hard conclusions as to whether one method of teaching children English is better than another,” says the report “Nevertheless, there is a growing body of opinion that counsels expansion of barely used alternatives to bilingual education.”
The report adds that it is less difficult—and less expensive — to find traditional teachers of English as a Second Language or ESL because they are not required to speak the students’ native tongue.
The U.S. Department of Education estimates that there are 2.4 million school-age children with limited English abilities. That means 500,000 teachers - one out of four - have a non-English speaker in class. Only 56,000
OSHA Decision Petitioned
Farmworkers’ attorneys petitioned the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia June 11 to compel the Labor Department to issue a standard requiring farmers to provide drinking water, handwashing facilities and toilets for field hands.
The Migrant Legal Action Program argued that an April decision by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration not to create such a standard was “irrational, arbitrary and capricious” and contradicted expert testimony on the need for such facilities.
Caucus 6-5 vs. Contras
Congressional Hispanic Caucus members voted 6-5 June 12 against a House bill to provide $27 million in non-lethal aid to contra forces in Nicaragua. Caucus chairman William Richardson was joined by fellow New Mexican Manuel Luj6n and Texans Albert Bustamante, Kika de la Garza and Solomon Ortiz in supporting President Reagan’s call for help to the contras.
teachers use foreign languages for instruction. About 103,000 teach traditional ESL.
Federally supported bilingual education programs served about 173,000 students in 1982-83. Of those 108,922 were Hispanic.
Among the report’s recommendations:
• ESL classes, while providing instruction strictly in English, should also encourage teaching Spanish and Hispanic history and culture to Hispanic students.
• The Education Department’s Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs currently provides about $99 million in grants to school districts out of its $139 million budget. The office should scale down financial support for bilingual education beginning in fiscal year 1985-1986. “This goal should be emphasized,” the report say&
continued on page 2 (•
Poverty Report Update
At the urging of a Hispanic advocacy group, ' members of the House Ways and Means Committee have directed the research arm of Congress to supplement a recent report on child poverty with expanded statistics on Hispanics.
Released May 22, “Children in Poverty” focused almost exclusively on blacks and whites, ignoring the fact that Hispanic children have the second-highest overall poverty rate at 37.8%, said Harry Pachon, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. ^
A NALEO analysis shows, for example, that Hispanics are mentioned in only five of 50 tables and charts dealing with race and ethnicity accompanying the report.
“It is appalling that Latino children... are virtually ignored in national studies of children in poverty,” Pachon said.
Joan Anzalone, NALEO research associate, added that many facts on Hispanic children in poverty are readily available from the Census Bureau and other sources but were not included in the report prepared by the Congressional Research Service and Congressional Budget Office.


S/n pe/os en la lengua
THE PRESIDENTS OPERATION: Ronald Reagan spent June 10 celebrating “Operation Open Door," greeting 100 big and little political types- including half a dozen Hispanics- who converted in recent months to the Republican Party.
Among those who accepted his invitation to breakfast and White House photo sessions were his new deputy assistant for public liaison, Linda Chdvez, Kenner, La., City Council member Edmond Muniz, and the quartet from Florida: Tampa Mayor Robert Martinez, Broward County Sheriff Nicolds Navarro, and Hialeah City Council members Hugo Alvarez and Paulino NuAez.
Also worthy of mention is Florida State Rep. Dexter Lehtinen. He was a Democrat when he married fellow representative lleana Ros, a Republican, last year.
ALAN NELSON’S OPERATION: Across the country, in Southern California, Immigration and Naturalization Service director Alan Nelson was equally frivolously occupied the first week of June conducting “Operation Employer,” netting 936 undocumented workers there in five days. Most are probably back on the job by now.
A similar public relations effort in Arizona a couple weeks earlier scooped up 556 undocumented workers (earning an average of $3.95 an hour stooping in the sun). That includes five who were caught and shipped across the border on a Friday only to be caught
again two days later.
A Southern California survey following INS’S infamous 1982 “Operation Jobs” showed that 80% of those arrested were back on the job within three months.
This month’s sweep reminded Caminos magazine editor Roberto Rodriguez of the time a few years ago that he was interrogated and thrown into an INS van at the Hollywood-Burbank Airport He had refused to speak English to the officers, demanding to know why he was singled out of the crowd.
He was stopped, he says, because, “I am dark, I am short, and I wear a moustache.”
INS, he claims, has a preconceived notion that “illegal aliens” are all dark, short and “foreign-looking.” Of the 5,500 rounded up in “Operation Jobs,” 99.3% were from Latin America and the Caribbean. Hmmmm.
OPERATION SPORTS: The charter issue of the “Magazine of History” for social studies teachers features University of Indiana basketball coach Bobby Knight(wanted in Puerto Rico for assaulting a police officer) as its “role model” coach. . . New York Times’ columnist James Reston says that the “only things we have in common with Cuba are geography and baseball.” He adds, while poking fun at Radio Marti, “If we could get an expansion Latin American team into the big leagues, as we did with Canada, we might make more progress than telling Cuba what bums they are.”
- Kay Barbaro
CONGRESSIONAL DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS FOR 1984
OUTSIDE HONO-
STATE U.S REPRESENTATIVE INCOME RARIUMS ASSETS LIABILITIES
California Tony Coelho (D) $ 78,303 $42,200 $192,008 $165,003
Matthew Martinez (D) 10,002 0 500,002 15,001
Edward Roybal (D) 255,002 3,000 316,005 230,003
Esteban Torres (D) 404 2,725 101 115,002
New Mexico Manuel Lujan (R) 17,604 3,946 371,004 0
Bill Richardson (D) 3,602 12,750 2,000 180,004
New York Robert Garcia (D) 100 7,000 0 75,002
Texas Albert Bustamante (D) 45,574 250 116,002 115,002
Kika de la Garza (D) 0 38,250 15,001 0
Henry B. Gonzalez (D) 300 0 0 0
Solomon Ortiz (D) 2,271 0 26,003 15,001
Puerto Rico Jaime Fuster (D) 77,471 0 465,004 10,002
Virgin Islands Ron de Lugo (D) 20,003 0 510,008 15,001
Source: 1984 financial disclosure statements, House Office of Records and Registration
Hispanics in House Disclose Worth
Financial disclosure statements of the 13 Congressional Hispanic Caucus members show that Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) made the most in outside income ($255,002) and was the heaviest in debt ($230,003) in 1984.
The Ethics in Government Act of 1978 requires members, officersand employees of Congress to file disclosure statements with the House Clerk and Senate Secretary by May 15 for the preceding year. The statements were made public May 20 and coincided with congressional campaign financing figures released by the Federal Election Commission the same day. (See May 27 Weekly Report.)
Reporting the least in outside incomes were Kika de la Garza (D-Texas) with none, Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.), $100, and Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas), $300. Outside income does not include representatives’ $75,100 annual salary.
Reporting the most assets were Ron de
Lugo(D-Virgin Islands) with $510,008, Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), $500,002, and Jaime Fuster (D-Puerto Rico), $465,004.
Many of the categories on the financial statement form do not require congressmen to list amounts Instead they use ranges such as“not more than $5,000” or “over $225,000.” The preceding and accompanying chart figures use the lowest possible range figures. A zero means the amount was less than the minimum reporting requirement Only liabilities exceeding $10,000, for example, must be reported.
Jobless Rate 10.7%
Hispanic unemployment rose to 10.7% in May, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported June 7. In April Hispanic unemployment was 10.3%.
The overall jobless rate was a repeat of April’s 7.2%.
Bilingual Ed. Rejected
continued from page 1
(The Reagan administration proposes freezing the bilingual education office at $139 million the next fiscal year. Congressional observers say if s likely the House and Senate will agree to the Reagan proposal.)
Echoing recent comments by Gerda Bikales, executive director of U.S. English before a congressional subcommittee, the report takes a swipe at groups supporting bilingual education, suggesting these proponents are more interested in preserving jobs than in educatioa
“While the supporters of the bilingual education approach have been most successful in codifying this methodology, there are now many members of the council who reject one exclusive methodology, and would prefer to give school districts the flexibility of local choice in selecting teaching approaches,” writes council chairman Torres in a report cover letter.
Torres adds that a critical look at bilingual education funding is needed because there is “little evidence that it is accomplishing its
objective.” -steve Padilla
Latinos Eye N.Y.C. Post
Eva Guardarramas, an attorney who was chairman of Hispanics for Reagan-Bush in New York last year, became the first Hispanic woman nominated for a major New York City office when Republicans there tapped her to run for City Council president June 7.
A 36-year-old native of Puerto Rico, Guardarramas has been general counsel of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly and assistant district attorney in Queens.
Three other Latinos will be among seven candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for City Council president in a primary Sept. 10 They are Assemblyman Angelo Del Toro, State Senator Israel Ruiz Jr. and Jos6 Erazo, an attorney.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
SIMPSON IMMIGRATION BILL: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has completed its analysis of the new immigration proposal by Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.). For a free copy of the 11-page critique, contact Richard Fajardo, Acting Associate Counsel, MALDEF, 1701 - 18th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 393-5111.
CHILDREN IN POVERTY: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has prepared a brief analysis, complete with charts, on Hispanic children living in poverty. Free copies are available. Contact: Joan Anzalone, Research Associate, NALEO, 420 Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN: Copies of “Make Something Happen,” a comprehensive report on the status of Hispanics in secondary schools, are still available from the Hispanic Policy Development Project. Cost $12.50 for the two-volume set Contact HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-8414.
VETERANS’ MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS: A new scholarship program provides for dependents of veterans, particularly those of veterans killed, disabled or wounded in action. Applicants must be under 22, have completed their freshman year in college and maintain a 2.75 GPA One hundred students will receive $5,000 awards. For an application contact your local American Gl Forum chapter or Adolph Coors Company, Veterans’ Memorial Scholarship Fund, Mail Number 329, Golden, Colo. 80401. Deadline: July 15.
ESSAY CONTEST: Students between grades 7 and 12 are encouraged to enter an essay contest commemorating the 175th anniversary of the independence of Mexico on Sept. 16. Entries may be English or Spanish. For contest rules contact Samuel Mark, Director of Hispanic Programs, College of Letters Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California, University Park, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-4012 (213) 743-0977. Deadline: Sept. 1.
PUERTO RICAN HISTORY: The Pennsylvania Department of Education has prepared a booklet designed to give school administrators and teachers a basic understanding and awareness of Puerto Rican history and culture. Contact Susan Mitchell, Affirmative j Action Officer, Education Building, 333 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 17126-0333 (717) 787-1953. It’s free.
BILINGUAL EDUCATION REPORT: Limited copies of the ninth annual report of the National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education are available from the U.S. Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs. They're free. Contact Paul Balach or Deborah Young, OBEMLA, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Reporters’ Building, Room 421, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 245-2609.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
EDITOR FOR WEEKLY REPORT DIRECTOR OF NEGOTIATIONS, Research
HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE, Washington, and I PD sought by the Montana Education D.C., seeks editor/reporter for its national Association. SALARY RANGE S19,777 — news weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly Report. $41,532. QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor’s degree. Candidate to start on/about July 15. Position Teaching or similar background preferred, involves reporting, writing and editing on a Experience and/or formal training in field (s) broad range of news related to U.S. Hipanic related to job requirements. Valid driver's concerns. Excellent opportunity to report and license. Knowledge of school finance, public learn about federal government and the status sector bargaining, teacher certification re-of Hispanics nationally. Spanish useful Send quirements, research procedures, and corn-inquiries, plus references, to Charlie Ericksen, puter operation is desirable. SEND APPLI-Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St NW, CATION, RESUME AND REFERENCES TO: Washington, D.C. 20005 (202)234-0737. David Hartman, Montana Education Association
4 _ _ 1232 E Sixth Ave., Helena, Mont. 5960*1.
MAGIC 102 FM, Washington, D.C.
MAGIC 102, — Transtar Format 41 soft AC ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL sought by Hunter
seeks 2 announcers. Warm, conversational C°He9© High School in New York. Adminis-delivery, not “disc jockey.” Compose and deliver trative experience with student activities, light interesting 3 1/2 minute newscasts, scheduling, and student attendance. NYS announce commercial & promo copy. Expert- • Certification as School Administrator also ence with Harris 9000 series helpfuL Tape required. Salary: $38,574. Send resume to: and resume (no calls) to Dave Hodgdon, Mr- Alan J. Guma, Principal, Hunter College MAGIC 102 FM,464640thSt. NW. Washington, Hi9h School, 71 East 94th Street, New York, D.C. 20016. WTKS is an Equal Opportunity N.Y. 10128.
Employer. DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE - UNDER-
PRESIDENT AND GENERAL COUNSEL: WRITING: San Diego’s public broadcasting Dynamic attorney with extensive management station, KPBS-TV/FM, is seeking someone to and fundraising experience to direct a non- obtain underwriting for local, national and profit Hispanic civil rights organization. Head* regional programming. The position entails quartered in San Francisco, MALDEF has identifying funding opportunities from a wide regional operations throughout the country, variety of sources, including foundations, MALDEPs programs emphasize voting and corporate and individual entities, political rights, access to employment and Requirements include equivalent to a college education, immigration and naturalization and degree, three years of verifiable, successful Chicana rights. The president and general fund-raising or sales experience in public counsel is responsible for all fiscal and television/radio or a related field. Experience management functions of the organization, with foundations is strongly preferred. He/She reports to a 40-member national Salary range starting at $29,000, depending
board of directors. Qualifications include upon experience, with a possible cost-of-signiflcant legal and administrative experience living increase anticipated on 7/1/85. Excellent and Hispanic civil rights background. Bilingual benefit package.
candidates preferred. Salary commensurate Applications must be received by 7/31/85 with experience Send resume and references at San Diego State University Employment to Fernando de Necochea, Chairman of the Office, Third Floor-Administration Building, Board, c/o MALDEF, 28 Geary St., Third Floor. San Diego, Calif. 92182.
San Francisco, Calif. 94108. Deadline: July KPBS-TV/FM is an EEO/AA Title IX Employer 15. and we welcome all applications.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
NEW YORK STATE HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS BANQUET j New York June 19
Bob Estrada (212) 737-9708
! NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MINORITY CONTRACTORS CONVENTION Ft Worth, Texas June 19-22 Dewey Thomas Jr. (202) 347-8259
COMING SOON
HISPANIC LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM Miami June 23
The program, sponsored by several Dade County Hispanic Link Weekly Report
groups, will focus on developing communication skills. More sessions will follow in coming months. Alina E Becker (305) 642-3484
IMAGEN AWARDS LUNCHEON Beverly Hills June 25
The National Conference of Christians and Jews is the sponsor.
Cheryl Fields (213) 385-0491
LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS CONFERENCE Anaheim, Calif. June 26-30 Manuel M&rquez (714) 898-2312
AMERICAN Gl FORUM ANNUAL STATE
CONVENTION
Newark, Calif. June 27-30
Rudy Venegas (415) 792-2799
EL PASO FESTIVAL El Paso July 12-14
Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533-1700
TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Antonio July 17-20 Elena de la Garza (512) 447-9821
SPOTLIGHT
The 15th Hispanic American Festival has been scheduled for the week of July 21 in Washington, D.C. The week-long celebration of Hispanic culture will feature an outdoor festival and parade, cultural performances, educational workshops and sporting events. For more information contact Antonio Melus (202) 673-6764.
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20005.
3


Arts & Entertainment
A RETROSPECTIVE OF THE FILMS of Carlos Gardel will air this week on the SIN Television Network as part of a month-long film series that echoes many efforts throughout Latin America to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the tango superstar's death.
The retrospective airs June 19 with Argentine journalist Ovidio Lago as narrator. Following will be the films El dia que me quiera on June 26 and Cuesta abajo on June 29. (Check local listings.)
Born in 1890 to an Argentine woman in Tolouse, France, Gardel is credited with singing the world’s first tango - a tune titled Mi noche triste. He was known throughout the world for his hundreds of recordings and a host of films, most of which were produced in the United States.
The Gardel series on SIN included earlier this month a documentary, Carlos Gardel, una historia, and two films, Tango Bar and the classic Tango en Broadway.
The singer, affectionately know as Morocho del Abasto, died in a plane crash June 25,1935, while en route to a performance in Cali, Colombia.
HOLLYWOOD FILM PRODUCERS HAVE DROPPED PLANS to premiere the film version of A Chorus Line via satellite throughout Latin America later this year.
The distributor, Embassy Communications, would have beamed the film next December in a deal whereby Latin American networks would have sold local advertising time.
The project reportedly was created by Carlos Barba, general manager of WN JU, a Spanish-language TV station owned by Embassy in New York. Embassy executives say the plan might be revived for other features or for WN JU-produced programs.
In related news, Barba will receive the 1985 Recognition Award from the Latino Playwrights at a gala benefit June 19. The New York-based writers’ group also will honor actress and singer Irene Cara and Goya Foods President Joseph Unanue.
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
â–º HISPANIC PUBLIC TV NETWORK STYMIED: The first Hispanic organization seeking to establish a national non-commercial public television network faces an uncertain future due to recent Federal Communications Commission rule changes.
The non-profit national group, Hispanic Information and Telecommunications Network, has since November 1983 applied for 57 Instructional Television Fixed Service licenses in cities which include most major Hispanic markets.
On May 31, the FCC adopted rule changes that would allow only local entities to apply for fixed service channels during the first year after the new rules are published in the Federal Register. National applicants, including HITN and some black groups, must wait a year at least for reconsideration of their applications.
In the meantime, says HITN president Jose Luis Rodriguez, local school districts and educational institutions with whom HITN had taken steps to align, may choose to move
forward without HITN. The number of available channels will also be greatly reduced.
HITN was established in New York to create a Public Broadcasting Service-type network in 1980 by a group of Hispanic educators, professionals, business persons and community representatives It was aided in its developmental project through 1981 and 1982 grants totaling $150,100 from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.
The rule changes, says Rodriguez, could crush his organization’s hope of providing an empathetic national outlet for independent Hispanic producers and for needed educational programs to Latino communities nationwide.
The fixed service television channels, made available by the FCCtrf 1963, were intended for use by schools and non-profit organizations engaged in the formal education of students and non-profit educational bodies.
There are now 20 channels available for non-commercial use on the microwave portion of the radio spectrum in each market area. The FCC normally grants fixed service channels in groups of four.
The FCC rule change was proposed in August 1984 after the Public Broadcasting Service had already obtained 82 instructional
channel licenses for its National Narrowcast Service.
Since then, it was granted four additional licenses. HITN was finally given its first one, in New Orleans, in March of this year.
PBS has received preferential treatment from the FCC, Rodriguez feels.
“The FCC opened the door long enough for PBS to pass through, dragged its feet on our applications, and is now closing the door in front of us,” he says.
HITN attorney Mary Albert cites that while HITN and other national applicants were required in March 1984 to provide extra information on their programming plans, no such demands were placed on PBS.
Now HITN plans to ask the commission for a stay of the rule changes and reconsideration of its applications.
Bruce Romano, a lawyer with FCC, says that the commission received few applications for the channels prior to 1983. That was the year the FCC adopted rules assigning eight of the 28 channels in each market to commercial operators. A flood of applications resulted, prompting the FCC to propose rules on who would be eligible to apply, Romano explains.
- Carlos Morales
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Steve Padilla
Reporting Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza, Ancel Martinez, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
Carlos Morales, Julio Ojeda
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at, your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Sanchez as executive director of COSSMHO, the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizati o ns in Washington . Sanchez will now hdad Hispanic Americana , a con s ulting firm . .. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros is elected to a threeyear term on Notre Dame University's48-member board of trustees . . . The Mexican and American Foundation in San Diego announces June 7 the winners of its annual Man and Woman of the Year Awards: Brian G. Dyson, president of Coca-Co l a , for the company's National Hispanic Business Initiative, and Diana Gomez, editor of the foundation's monthly newspaper, The Forum , for 13 years of service to the foundation . . . Several Hispanic officials in Colorado , among them Rich Castro, director of the Denver Commission on Community Relations, criticize Gov . Dick lamm for not appointing any Hispanics to the newly restructured Colorado Commission on Higher Edu c ation last month. Three Latinos are among the 43 oustanding young professionals selected for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's National Fellowship Program : Joseph Trevino, 34, executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens; Ramona Ortega-Liston, 30, visiting scholar at Arizona State University in Tempe and Republican political organizer, and Henry Herrera, 43, director of psychiatri c consultation and liaison services at the University of Rochester in New York. Trevino will continue his LULAC duties whi.le conducting research under a fellowship grant. . . Fernando Torres-Gil, a professor in gerontology and public administration at the University of Southern California, begins work June 17 as staff director of the House Select Committee on Aging in Washington, D.C. . . Also beginning work June 17 is Jane Delgado, who replaces Rodolfo Vol. 3 No. 24 HISPANI LINK WEEKL June 17, 1985 NationaiAdvisoryCouncii Attacks Bilingual Ed. The national advisory council on bilingual education , making a departure from positions taken by previous councils, has recommended that the federal government reduce both financial and philosophical support of tran sitional bilingual education. The 15-member National Advisory and Coor dinating Council on Bilingual Education also strongly urges in its ninth annual report that schools rely more on traditional English-only instruction. It makes the recommendation citing possible monetary savings and general Reagan administration reservations about teaching ch i ldren in languages other than English. The council, reconstituted when Congress reauthorized the 1968 Bilingual Education Calif. Groups to Challenge Bilingual Ed. Rule Change The California Association for Bilingual Education and five other state education organizations will challenge in court this summer a controversial amendment to the state's bilingual education regulations that would make it easier for local school officials to transfer students from bilingual programs to regular English-only programs. The amendment would waive beginning next fall the required proficiency tests and allow transfer of students after three years of bilingual classes regardless of their academic progress. The groups will argue in Sacramento Superior Court that as a result money-conscious school districts could initiate a wholesale removal of students in order to dismantle their bilingual programs. "Many schools are hostile to bilingual programs," association President Lorenza Calvillo-Craig said . "They would rather spend (that) money on their college-bound kids, or to buy new computers or chemistry tubes. " CalvilloCraig said recent figures show that 525,000 California students are now enrolled in bilingual education programs, upfrom487,000 five years ago. An estimated 75% of these are Hispanic. Act last fall, is composed of educators and parents and includes seven Hispanics. Anthony Torres , a Reagan administration appointee, is council chairman and a school superintendent in Sauk Village , Ill. The report, submitted to Congress March 31, was released publicly this month. " Educational research does not lend itself to hard conclusions as to whether one method of teaching children English is better than another, " says the report . " Nevertheless, there is a growing body of opinion that counsels expansion of barely used alternatives to bilingual education. " The report adds that it is less difficult-and less expensive-to find traditional teachers of English as a Second Language or ESL because they are not required to speak the students' native tongue . The U.S. Department of Education estimates that there are 2.4 million school-age children with limit':ld English abilities. That means 500,000 teachers-one out of four-have a non-English speaker in class . Only 56,000 OSHA Decision Petitioned Farmworkers' attorneys petitioned the U . S . Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia June 11 to compel the Labor Department to issue a standard requiring farmers to provide drinking water , handwashing facilities and toilets for field hands. The Migrant Legal Action Program argued that an April decision by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration not to create such a standard was " irrational , arbitrary and capricious " and contradicted expert testimony on the need for such facilities. Caucus 6-5 vs. Contras Congressional Hispani c Caucus members voted 6-5 June 12 against a House bill to provide $27 million in non-lethal aid to contra forces in Nicaragua . Caucus chairman William Richardson was joined by fellow New Mexican Manuel Lujan and Texans Albert Bustamante, Kika de Ia Garza and Solomon Ortiz in supporting President Reagan's call for help to the contras. teachers use foreign languages for instruct ion. About 1 03,000 teach traditional ESL. Federally supported bilingual education programs served about 173,000 students in 1982-83. Of those 1 08,922 were Hispanic. Among the report' s recommendations: e ESL classes, while providing instruction strictly in English , should also encourage teaching Spanish and H ispanic history and culture to Hispanic students. • The Education Department's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs currently provides about $99 million in grants to school districts out of its $139 million budget. The office should scale down financial support for bilingual education beginning in fiscal year 1985-1986. " This goal should be emphasized," the report says. continue d o n page 2 ' " Poverty Report Update At the urging of a Hispanic advocacy group, members of the House Ways and Means Committee have directed the research arm of Congress to supplement a recent report on child poverty with expanded statistics on Hispanics. Released May 22, "Children in Poverty' ' focused almost exclusively on blacks and whites, ignoring the fact that Hispanic children have the second-highest overall poverty rate at 37 . 8%, said Harry Pach6n , e x ecutive director of the National Associatiof of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. A NALEO analysis shows, for example, that Hispanics are mentioned in only five of 50 tables and charts dealing with race and ethnicity accompanying the report. "It is appalling that Latino children ... are virtually ignored in national studies of children in poverty, " Pach6n said . Joan Anzalone, NALEO research associate , added that many facts on Hispanic children in poverty are readily available from the Census Bureau and other sources but were not included in the report prepared by the Congressional Research Service and Congressional Budget Office.

PAGE 2

• again two days later. Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE PRESIDENT'S OPERATION: Ronald Reagan spent June 10 celebrating "Operation Open Door," greeting 100 big and little political types-including half a dozen Hispanics-who converted in recent months to the Republican Party. A Southern California survey following INS's infamous 1982 "Operation Jobs" showed that80% of those arrested were back on the job within three months. Among those who accepted his invitation to breakfast and White House photo sessions were his new deputy assistant for public liaison , Linda Chavez, Kenner, La., City Council member Edmond Muiiiz, and the quartet from Florida: Tampa Mayor Robert Martinez, Broward County Sheriff Nicolas Navarro, and Hialeah City Council members Hugo Alvarez and Paulino Nuiiez. This month's sweep reminded Caminos magazine editor Roberto Rodriguez of the time a few years ago that he was interrogated and thrown into an INS van at the Hollywood-Burbank Airport . He had refused to speak English to the officers, demanding to know why he was singled out of the crowd. He was stopped, he says, because, "I am dark, I am short, and I wear a moustache." Also worthy of mention is Florida State Rep . Dexter Lehtinen. He was a Democrat when he married fellow representative Ileana Ros, a INS, he claims, has a preconceived notion that "illegal aliens" are all dark, short and "foreign-looking." Of the 5,500 rounded up in "Operation Jobs," 99.3% were from Latin America and the Caribbean. Hmmmm . Republican, last year. ALAN NELSON'S OPERATION: Across the country, in Southern California, Immigration and Naturalization Service director Alan Nelson was equally frivolously occupied the first week of June conducting "Operation Employer," netting 936 undocumented workers there in five days. Most are probably back on the job by now. A similar public relations effort in Arizona a couple weeks earlier scooped up 556 undocumented workers (earning an average of $3.95 an hour stooping in the sun). That includes five who were caught and shipped across the border on a Friday only to be caught OPERATION SPORTS: The charter issue of the "Magazine of History" for social studies teachers features University of Indiana basketball coach Bobby Knight(wanted in Puerto Rico for assaulting a police officer) as its "role model" coach ... New York Times' columnist James Reston says that the "only things we have in common with Cuba are geography and baseball." He adds, while poking fun at Radio Marti, "If we could get an expansion Latin American team into the big leagues, as we did with Canada, we might make more progress than telling Cuba what bums they are." CONGRESSIONAL DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS FOR 1984 OUTSIDE HOND-U .S. REPRESENTATIVE INCOME RARIUMS ASSETS LIABILITIES STATE California Tony Coelho (D) $78,303 $42,200 $192,008 $165,003 Matthew Martinez (D) 0 500,002 15,001 Edward Roybal (D) 255,002 3 ,000 316,005 230,003 New Mexico New York Texas Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Esteban Torres (D) Manuel Lujan (R) Bill Richardson (D) Robert Garcia (D) Albert Bustamante (D) Kika de Ia Garza (D) Henry B . Gonzalez (D) Solomon Ortiz (D) Jaime Fuster (D) Ron de Lugo (D) 404 17,604 3,602 100 45,574 0 300 2,271 77,471 20,003 2,725 101 115,002 3,946 371,004 0 12,750 2,000 180,004 7,000 0 75,002 250 116,002 115,002 38,250 15,001 0 0 0 0 0 26,003 15,001 0 465,004 10,002 0 510,008 15, 001 Source: 1984 financial disclosure statements, House Office of Records and Registration Hispanics in House Disclose Worth Financial disclosure statements of the 13 Congressional Hispanic Caucus members show that Edward Roybal (DCalif.) made the most in outside income ($255,002) and was the heaviest in debt ($230,003) in 1984. The Ethics in Government Act of 1978 requires members, officers and employees of Congress to file disclosure statements with the House Clerk and Senate Secretary by May 1 5 for the preceding year. The statements were made public May20 and coincided with congressional campaign financing figures released by the Federal Election Commission the same day. (See May 27 Weekly Report.) Reporting the least in outside incomes were Kika de Ia Garza (DTexas) with none, Robert Garcia (DN.Y.). $100, and Henry B. Gonzalez (DTexas), $300. Outside income does not include representatives' $75,100 annual salary. Reporting the most assets were Ron de 2 Lugo (D-Virgin Islands) with $510,008, Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), $500,002, and Jaime Fuster (D-Puerto Rico), $465,004. Many of tht;l categories on the financial statement form do not require congressmen to list amounts. Instead they use ranges, such as "not more than $5,000" or" over $225,000." The preceding and accompanying chart figures use the lowest possible range figures. A zero means the amount was less than the minimum reporting requirement Only liabilities exceeding $1 0,000, for example, must be reported. Jobless Rate 1 0. 7/o Hispanic unemployment rose to 10.7% in May, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported June 7. In April Hispanic unemployment was 10. 3%. The overall jobless rate was a repeat of April's 7 . 2%. Kay Barbaro Bilingual Ed. Rejected continued from page 1 (The Reagan administration proposes freezing the bilingual education office at $139 million the next fiscal year. Congressional observers . say it's likely the House and Senate will agree to the Reagan proposal.) Echoing recent comments by Gerda Bikales, executive director of U .S. English before a congressional subcommittee, the report takes a swipe at groups supporting bilingual edu cation, suggesting these proponents are more interested in preserving jobs than in education. "While the supporters of the bilingual edu cation approach have been most successful in codifying th i s methodology, there are now many members of the council who reject one exclusive methodology, and would prefer to give school districts the flexibility of local choice in selecting teaching approaches , " writes council chairman Torres in a report cover letter. Torres adds that a critical look at bilingual education funding is needed because there is "little evidence that it is accomplishing its objective." Steve Padilla Latinos Eye N. V.C. Post Eva Guardarramas, an attorney who was chairman of Hispanics for Reagan-Bush in New York last year, became the first Hispanic woman nominated for a major New York City office when Republicans there tapped her to run for City Council president June 7 . A 36-year-old native of Puerto Rico, Guar darramas has been general counsel of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly and assistant district attorney in Queens. Three other Latinos will be among seven candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for City Council president in a primary Sept. 10 They are Assemblyman Angelo DelToro, State Senator Israel Ruiz Jr. and Jose Erazo, an attorney. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

THE GOOD NEWS SIMPSON IMMIGRATION BILL: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has completed its analysis of the new immigration proposal by Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.). For a free copy of the 11-page critique, contact Richard Fajardo, Acting Associate Counsel, MALDEF, 1701 -18th St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20009 (202) 393-5111 . CHILDREN IN POVERTY: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has prepared a brief analysis, complete with charts, on Hispanic children living in poverty. Free copies are available. Contact: Joan Anzalone, Research Associate, NALEO, 420 Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN: Copies of "Make Something Happen," a comprehensive report on the status of Hispanics in secondary schools, are still available from the Hispanic Policy Development Project. Cost $12.50 for the two-volume set. Contact HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite 310, Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 822-8414. VETERANS' MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS: A new scholarship program provides for dependents of veterans, particularly those of veterans killed, disabled or wounded in action. Applicants must be under 22, have completed their freshman year in college and maintain a 2.75 GPA One hundred students will receive $5,000 awards. For an application contact your local American Gl Forum chapter or Adolph Coors Company, Veterans' Memorial Scholarship Fund, Mail Number 329, Golden, Colo. 80401. Deadline: July 15. ESSAY CONTEST: Students between grades 7 and 12 are en couraged to enter an essay contest commemorating the 175th anniversary of the independence of Mexico on Sept. 16. Entries may be English or Spanish. For contest rules contact: Samuel Mark, Director of Hispanic Programs, College of Letters Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California, University Park, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-4012 (213) 743-0977. Deadline: Sept. 1. PUERTO RICAN HISTORY: The Pennsylvania Department of Education has prepared a booklet designed to give school ad ministrators and teachers a basic understanding and awareness of Puerto Rican history and culture. Contact Susan Mitchell, Affirmative Action Officer, Education Building, 333 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa . 17126-0333 (717) 787-1953. It's free. BILINGUAL EDUCATION REPORT: Limited copies of the ninth annual report of the National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education are available from the U.S . Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs. They're free . Contact Paul Balach or Deborah Young, OBEMLA, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Reporters' Building, Room 421, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 245-2609. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p .m. (E1) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. EDITOR FOR WEEKLY REPORT DIRECTOR OF NEGOTIATIONS . Research HISPANICLINKNEWSSERV\CE,Washingtol\ and \PO sought by the Montana Edu cation D.C., seeks editor/reporter for its national Association. SALARY RANGE 519.777 news weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly Report. $41 ,532. QUALIFICATIONS: Bache\ o ( s degree. Candidatetostarton/aboutJuly15. Position Teaching or similar background preferred. involves reporting, writing and editing on a Experience and/or formal training in field {s) broad range of news related to U.S . Hi panic rel ated to job requirements. Valid driver's concerns. Excellent opportunity to report and li cense. Knowledge of s chool finan ce, publi c learn about federal government and the status sector bargaining, teacher c e rtifi cation reef Hispanics nationally . Spanish useful . Send quirements, rese a rch procedures, and com inquiries, plus references, to Charlie Ericksen, puter operation is desirable. SEND APPLI Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. NW, CATION, RESUME AND REFERENCES TO: Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234. David Hartmal\ Montana EducationAssociatio MAGIC 102 FM, Washington, D.C . 1 232 E. Sixth Ave . , Helena, Mont. 5960'1 . MAGIC 102,Transtar Format 41 soft AC ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL sought b y Hunter seeks 2 announcers. warm, conversational College High School in New York. Ad minis delivery , not"disc jockey." Compose and deliver trative experience with student activities, light, interesting 3 1/2 minute newscasts, scheduling, and student attendance. NYS announce commercial& promo copy. Experi-Certification as School Administrator also ence with Harris 9000 series helpful. Tape required. Salary: $38,574. Send resume to: and resume (no calls) to Dave Hodgdon, Mr. Alan J. Guma, Principal, Hunter College MAGIC102 FM,464640thSt. NW.WashingtOI\ High School, 71 East 94th Street, New York, D.C. 2001 6. WTKS is an Equal Opportunity N . Y . 10128. Employer. DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE UNDER PRESIDENT AND GENERAL COUNSEL: WRITING: San D ie go' s public broadcasting Dynamic attorney with e x tensive management station, KPBSTV/ FM, is seeking someone to and fundraising experience to direct a non-obtain underwriting for local, national and profit Hispanic civil rights organization . Headregional programming. The position entails in San Francisco, MALDEF has 1 identifying funding opportunities from a wide regional operations throughout the country. vari e ty of sources, in cluding foundations, MALDEPs programs emphasize voting and corporate and individual entities . political rights, access to employment and Requirementsincludeequivalenttoacollege education. immigration and naturalization and degree, three years of verifiable, successful Chicana rights. The president and general fund-raising or sales experience in public counsel is responsible for all fis c al and television/radio or a related field . E xperience management functions of the organization. with foundations is strongly preferred. He/She reports to a 40member national Salaryrangestartingat$29,000.depending board of directors. Qualifications include upon experience, with a possible cost-of significant legal and administrative experience living increase anticipated on 7/1/85. Excellent and Hispanic civil rights background . Bilingual benefit package. candidates preferred. Salarycommensurate Applications must be receiv ed b y 7 / 31 /85 with experience. Send resume and references at San Diego State University Employment "to Fernando de Necochea, Chairman of the Office, Third Floor-Administration Building, Board, c/o MALDEF, 28 Geary St., Third Floor. San Diego, Calif. 92182. San Francisco, Calif. 94108. Deadline: July KPB& TV/ FM is an EEO/AA Title IX Employer J 5. and we welcome all applications. Calendar groups, will focus on developing communication : TEXASASSOCIATIONOFMEXICANAMERICAN THIS WEEK NEW YORK STATE HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS BANQUET New York June 19 Bob Estrada (212) 737-9708 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MINORITY CONTRACTORS CONVENTION Ft. Worth, Texas June 19-22 Dewey Thomas Jr. (202) 347-8259 COMING SOON HISPANIC LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM Miami June 23 The program, sponsored by several Dade County Hispanic Link Weekly Report skills . More sessions will follow in coming months . CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION Alina E . Becker (305) 642-3484 IMAGEN AWARDS LUNCHEON Beverly Hills June 25 The National Conference of Christians and Jews is the sponsor. Cheryl Fields (213) 385-0491 LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS CONFERENCE Anaheim, Calif. June 26-30 Manuel Marquez (714) 898 2312 AMERICAN Gl FORUM ANNUAL STATE CONVENTION Newark, Calif. June 27-30 Rudy Venegas (41 5) 792-2799 EL PASO FESTIVAL El Paso July 12-14 Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533-1700 San Antonio July 17-20 Elena de Ia Garza (512) 447-9821 SPOTLIGHT The 15th Hispanic American Festival has been scheduled for the week of July 21 in Washington, D.C. The week-long celebration of Hispanic culture will feature an outdoor festival and parade, cultural performances, educational workshops and sporting events. For more information contact Antonio Mel us (202) 673-6764. -------Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be re ceived two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location , contact name and phone number . Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report , 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . , 20005. 3

PAGE 4

Arts & Entertainment The singer, affectionately know as Morocho del Abasto, died in a plane crash June 25, 1935, while en route to a performance in Cali, Colombia . A RETROSPECTIVE OF THE FILMS of Carlos Gardel will air this week on the SIN Television Network as part of a month-long film series that echoes many efforts throughout Latin America to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the tango superstar's death. HOLLYWOOD FILM PRODUCERS HAVE DROPPED PLANS to premiere the film version of A Chorus Line via satellite throughout Latin America later this year . The retrospective airs June 19 with Argentine journalist Ovidio Lago as narrator. Following will be the films El dia que me quiera on June 26 and Cuesta abajo on June 29. (Check local listings.) The distributor, Embassy Communications, would have beamed the film next December in a deal whereby Latin American networks would have sold local advertising time. The project reportedly was created by Carlos Barba, general manager of WNJU, a Spanish-language TV station owned by Embassy in New York. Embassy executives say the plan m ight be revived for other features or for WNJU-produced programs . Born in 1890 to an Argentine woman in Tolouse, France, Gardel is credited with singing the world's first tango-a tune titled Mi noche triste. He was known throughout the world for his hundreds of recordings and a host of films, most of which were produced in the United States. The Gardel series on SIN included earlier this month a documentary, Carlos Garde/, una historia, and two films, Tango Bar and the classic Tango en Broadway. In related news , Barba will receive the 1985 Recognition Award from the Latino Playwrights at a gala benefit June 19. The New York based writers' group also will honor actress and singer Irene Cara and Goya Foods President Joseph Unanue. Media Report llUBLIC TV NETWORK STYMIED: The first Hispanic organ1zatlon see mg o establish a national non-commercial public television network faces an uncertain future due to recent Federal Communications Commission rule changes. The non-profit national group, Hispanic Information and Telecommunications Network, has since November 1983 applied for 57 Instructional Television Fixed Service licenses in cities which include most major Hispanic markets. On May 31, the FCC adopted rule changes that would allow only local entities to apply for fixed service channels during the first year after the new rules are published in the Federal Register . National applicants, including HITN and some black groups, must wait a year at least for reconsideration of their applications. In the meantime, says HITN president Jose Luis Rodriguez, local school districts and educational institutions with whom HITN had taken steps to align, may choose to move HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street, N. W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Steve Padilla Reporting : Charlie Ericksen , Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza, Ancel Martinez, .t..ntonio Mejias-Rentas, Carlos Morales, Julio Ojeda No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permissio n . Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the late s t edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in parti ci pants ' packets at your next conference or conventi o n . For details, contact Hector Ericksen Mendoza (202) 234. 4 forward without HI TN. The number of available channels will also be greatly reduced . HITN was established in New York to create a Public Broadcasting Service-type network in 1980 by a group of Hispanic educators, professionals, business persons and community representatives. It was aided in its developmental project through 1981 and 1982 grants totaling $150,100 from the National Telecommuni cations and Information Administration. The rule changes, says Rodriguez, could crush his organization' s hope of providing an empathetic national outlet for independent Hispanic producers and for needed educational programs to Latino communities nationwide. The fixed service television channels, made available by the FCC m 1963, were intended for use by schools and non profit organizations engaged in the formal education of students and non-profit educational bodies. There are now 20 channels available for non-commercial use on the microwave portion of the radio spectrum in each market area. The FCC normally grants fixed service channels in groups of four. The FCC rule change was proposed in August 1984 after the Public Broadcasting Service had already obtained 82 instructional -Antonio Mejias-Rentas channel licenses for its National Narrowcast Service. Since then, it was granted four additional licenses. HITN was finally given its first one, in New Orleans, in March of this year. PBS has received preferential treatment from the FCC, Rodriguez feels. " The FCC opened the door long enough for PBS to pass through, dragged its feet on our applications, and is now closing the door in front of us," he says . HITN attorney Mary Albert cites that while HITN and other national applicants were required in March 1984 to provide extra information on their programming plans, no such demands were placed on PBS. Now H ITN plans to ask the commission for a stay of the rule changes and reconsideration of its applications. Bruce Romano, a lawyer with FCC , says that the commission received few applications for the channels prior to 1983. That was the year the FCC adopted rules assigning eight of the 28 channels in each market to commercial operators. A flood of applications resulted , prompting the FCC to propose rules on who would be eligible to apply, Romano explains. Carlos Morales Hispanic Link Weekly Report