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Hispanic link weekly report, June 24, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 24, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Daniel Fern&ndez, the foreman of a now-defunct Elk Grove Village, III., silver recovery plant, and two plant executives are convicted of murder in a precedent-setting case involving worker safety. A Chicago court ruled June 14 that the men were responsible for the Sept. 10,1983, death of Stefan Golab because they did not correct hazardous conditions at the plant. Golab’s work exposed him to cyanide fumes. Sentencing is set for June 28... The New York State Hispanic Chamber of Commerce honors its Hispanic Businessman and Businesswoman of the Yean Frank F. Flores, president of Marsden Reproductions, and Betsy Gonzdlez, president of Betsy Gonzalez, Ltd., a fashion design company. . . Sidney Gutierrez completes his yearlong training period and graduates along with 16 other members of NASA’s 1984 class of astronauts. The nation’s
HR/CR
other and first Latino mission specialist, Franklin Chartg-Diaz, is now scheduled to take off Iri 20" * ^artos Morales,
president of Development Inc. in Alexandria, Va., is
named acting executive director of the National Business Incubation Association, a new group promoting the nurturing of small businesess ... Rodolfo O. de la Garza, executive assistant to the chancellor of the University of Texas System, joins the Texas Advisory Committee of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.. . California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Eliseo Samaniego of Visalia to the State Water Resources Control Board. . . Meanwhile in New York, Gov. Mario Cuomo appoints Nelida Perez, librarian at the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquehos, to the newly created New York Historical Records Advisory Board... The board of trustees of the Tom£s Rivera Center in Claremont, Calif., officially announce the appointment of Arturo Madrid as center president.

Farmworkers Deny Campbell Boycott Near End
The president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee told Weekly Report June 19 that wire service reports last week indicating the committee and Campbell Soup Co. have reached an agreement to end FLOC’s 6 1/2-year boycott against the company are “outright lies”
“The boycott will continue until we have signed a collective bargaining agreement
Nebraska Legislators Ax Commission on Latinos
Members of the Nebraska Mexican American Commission, rushing against a June 28 deadline, were attempting to meet with state officials late last week in hopes of preventing the commission from closing its doors.
On June 5 the state’s unicameral legislature voted 26-23 to eliminate the 13-year-old commission and two other groups, the Commission on Indian Affairs and Status of Women Commission, The vote was seen as a cost-cutting action by a legislature reluctant to raise taxes this year, said Rudy Peralez, commission executive director. Democratic Gov. Robert Kerrey signed the legislation June 6.
Peralez admitted that saving the commission seemed unlikely. The nine-member staff hoped at least to make arrangements that would transfer some commission activities to other agencies, he said. The commission, which operated on a $236,000 budget last year, was told to shut down by the end of the state’s fiscal year June 30.
Although now without funding and staff, the 10-member commission still exists* created by statute in 1972. The members have agreed to continue meeting and advocating on behalf of the state’s 28,000 Hispanics.
A Hispanic Link survey published this year (see Jan. 14 issue) found 20 state-level Hispanic commissions, councils and committees located mainly in the Midwest and Northeast.
calling for sweeping changes of the working and living conditions of the workers in the fields,” said Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Toledo, Ohio-based farmworkers union.
The FLOC boycott, begun in January 1979, seeks a collective bargaining agreement for farmworkers toiling on farms contracted to do work for Campbell in Ohio, Michigan and Indiana Velasquez estimated that 95% of the 3,000 farmworkers at Campbell-contracted farms are H ispanic. The boycott also seeks a ban on child labor and abolishment or control of the use of pesticides.
Scott Rombach, director of public relations at Campbell’s headquarters in Camden, N.J., said FLOC and Campbell initialed an understanding May 13 which calls for the formation of a commission that would set up guidelines for union elections on the farms. He added that the understanding goes into effect July 1 when the commission will make plans for the secret ballot elections.
The National Council of Churches in New York City has been acting as a mediator between Campbell and FLOC.
Velasquez said Campbell released information June 18 on what was supposed to be a private, on-going dialogue between the company and FLOC to “mitigate” the impact of the endorsement of the boycott by Roman Catholic bishops in Ohio June 17.
A statement issued by the bishops of six dioceses in Ohio said “the farmworkers are seeking the same legal rights to organize and bargain collectively” granted to other workers.
“Campbell is responding to the bishops’ support by trying to make it look like this thing
Latino Honored for Service
Arturo Montoya of Tucson, Ariz., was one of nine persons honored for public service by the American Institute for Public Service in Washington, D.C., June 19. Montoya received a medallion and $1,000 for his work among Yaqui Indians.
Other recipients of the institute’s Jefferson Awards included Betty Ford, Lee A. lacocca and James A. Baker III.
is about over, and trying to slow down the support of the boycott. I think they’ll realize this is a big mistake later because this thing is not going to be over tomorrow,” Velasquez said.
Despite Campbell’s assertion that it does not directly employ the farmworkers, Velasquez said it is beginning to show responsibility by giving $40,000 to Ohio State University last fall to establish a scholarship fund for the children of migrant farmworkers.
Campbell built three day-care centers for the children of migrant farmworkers five years ago in northwest Ohio and created six model labor camps in the same area, Rombach said. He added that the boycott has had no effect on Campbell’s sales or earnings.
Among the supporters of FLOC’s boycott are the Mexican American Political Association, United Farm Workers, the Democratic National Committee’s Hispanic Caucus, League of United Latin American Citizens and the Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs.
— Carlos Morales
Illinois School Reform
A package of legislation recently approved by the Illinois House, which proposes educational reforms that directly affect Hispanic students, probably will be approved by the State Senate and governor “before the month is out,” says Rep. Joseph Berrios (D-Chicago).
The legislation calls for statewide gathering of dropout statistics, the formation of local school advisory committees in Chicago and the creation of non-discriminatory assessment tests for Hispanic students. The legislation, sponsored by Berrios, was recommended by the Illinois Hispanic Task Force, an advisory body created by the legislature.
Accurate data on dropout rates would help determine the need for special education programs, Berrios told Hispanic Link In Chicago the Hispanic dropout rate is estimated at 64% and the overall dropout rate at 45%, but some local school districts“were reporting dropout rates of 7% to make themselves look good,” Berrios said.


Sin pelos en la lengua
LULAC’S NEW LOOK: When delegates to the 56th annual convention of the League of United Latin American Citizens wind up their business and pleasure in Anaheim, Calif., next Sunday, the nation’s oldest, biggest and boldest national Hispanic membership organization will have a new face, a new style, and maybe a new mandate.
For the past six years of its phenomenal growth, LULAC flourished behind the combative eloquence of a trio of Texas lawyers: Ruben Bonilla, followed by brother Tony, both of Corpus Christi, and Mario Obledo, a native of San Antonio. (Obledo entered college at UT-San Antonio at age 16 and later worked in the State Attorney General’s office there before switching to gentler associations on the Harvard law school faculty and on Jerry Brown’s cabinet in Sacramento, Calif.)
Julio Barreto, former top aide to former LULAC executive director Arnold Torres (Barreto resigned a couple of weeks after Torres left) describes the choices facing members this week:
• Anita Del Rio, an ex-Marine and mother of four who is an administrator of human resources programs for California’s Orange County.
• Oscar Mor&n works in San Antonio as a regulations analyst for
the military insurance company USAA, which ranks in the Fortune 500.
Both are loyal, long-time LULAC leaders and profess to be ready to do battle for traditional LULAC causes, Barreto says.
What is unique about Del Rio, is obvious: she’s a women. Never has LULAC been headed by a woman. She’s the third serious female candidate in history to seek the office.
She’s also a Democrat who, according to Barreto, is painting Moran as a Republican who might wobble on real Hispanic concerns. “If Oscar is elected,” Del Rio told Barreto,“I would see LULAC becoming part of the (Reagan) administration, and I would hate to see that happen.”
Moran would not tell Barreto whether he’s Republican-saying that it should have no bearing on the race. But he did express hisconcern over the national office’s “failure^’ to prioritize issues and to function in a businesslike manner. “We became an organization that took on all comers,” he said. “We tried to accomplish too much with the resources that we had.” LULAC’S national office debt is now in six figures.
Is anybody really worried about LULAC’S future?
“The bottom line,” says ex-president Tony Bonilla, “is that so long as there are Hispanics unemployed, Hispanics dropping out of school and Hispanics going to bed at night hungry, LULAC will always be around.”
- Kay B&rbaro
Hispanic Health Survey Due in Fall
Latino Among Hostages
The first bits of information from a long-awaited and often criticized national study on Hispanic health are scheduled to be released this fall, federal health officials now say. The release promises yet more controversy for the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, commonly known as the HANES.
Parts of the survey, focusing on Mexican Americans in the Southwest, will be unveiled
Florida Education Report
A Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs report has identified a chronic shortage of H ispanic college teachers and a low enrollment of Hispanic college students as two major flaws in the Florida higher education system.
Only 1Q5 teachers out of 5,782 are of Hispanic origin, the report said, recommending that affirmative action plans of the State University System include Hispanics.
The report, released May 20 and listing 1984 f igu res, also noted that 9,371 of 135,525 students are Hispanic. This represents 6.9% of the students in a state that is about 10% Latino. Northern and Central Florida universities were most in need of stepped-up recruitment programs, the report said.
The commission,! formed in 1977 by the state legislature as an advisory board on Hispanic issues, also recommended:
• Financial aid for Hispanic students who are unable to afford the high cost of remedial English programs.
• A scholarship program and other incentives to attract students from Caribbean and Latin American countries.
• The use of academic performance as a standard for admission into academic programs instead of English-language assessment tests.
• Certification of instructors in the areas of bilingual education and English as a Second Language to ensure qualified instructors for language minority students.
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in a series of papers at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in Washington, D.C., Nov. 17-21.
The release originally had been scheduled by the National Center for Health Statistics for last February, said division director Robert Murphy. A high rate of staff turnover caused the delay, he said.
The health association’s Latino Caucus has refused toco-sponsorthe presentations, saying the center dictated the release of survey data without Latino input Steven McKane, caucus president, said the center has ignored recommendations on the release made by a Department of Health and Human Services task force in which Hispanics participated.
Caucus member Marylin Aguirre Molina said she was disappointed with the kind of data the center has chosen to release first.
The papers to be presented in November— on subjects such as cholesterol levels, hypertension, and blood lead levels in children — are of a“clinical, technical nature which don’t show the big picture,” she said.
Refugee Worker Retrial
A federal appeals court overturned June 18 the conviction of Stacey Merkt, a religious worker found guilty in March of illegally transporting two Salvadoran aliens in Texas.
The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans sent the case back to Federal District Court in Brownsville, Texas, for retrial. A three-judge panel said the jury that convicted Merkt on March 27 did not receive adequate instructions during the trial.
Merkt, a volunteer worker at the Casa Oscar Romero refugee center in San Benito, said she was not smuggling aliens, but merely taking them to an immigration office to apply for political asylum. The judges did not address Mertk’s claim that she was following her religious beliefs in transporting the Salvadorans
Latino Among Hostages
As of presstime Vicente Garza, a 53-year-old businessman from Laredo, Texas, was still one of 40 passengers from the hijacked TWA airliner being held hostage in Beirut Also held captive by Shiite terrorists was Garza’s son-in-law, Robert Trautmann, 37, of Laredo.
Garza’s wife, Irma Garza, 48, was released by the hijackers J une 14 along with Trautmann’s wife, Irma Trautmann, and Trautmann’s three children.
At a press conference in Laredo June 18, Irma Garza said, “I want to ask anyone that can to call Washington to ask the president to help us.”
Two other Latinos, Jose Delgado, 64, and his wife, Sylvia Delgado, 58, of Escondido, Calif., were released by the terrorists June 14.
Science Workforce 2.2%
Hispanics, 5% of the total U.S. workforce in 1982, comprised only 2.2.% of the total science and engineering workforce that year, according to a 1985 National Research Council report.
Alan Fechter, director of the Washington, D.C.-based council, presented the report at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Los Angeles May 31.
The 2.2% figure may be somewhat inflated because it includes Puerto Rico while the total U.S. workforce figure does not
The report also pointed to an underutilization rate of 5.8%, which means the percentage of trained science and engineering professionals who are not being used to their full potential.
Blacks made up 2.6% of the science and engineering workforce while comprising 9% of the total workforce. The black underutilization rate was 7.6%.
According to the report, these figures mean “an unnecessary loss of talent from the scientific and engineering enterprise.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL: Film and video artists have until July 12 to submit entries for the 10th annual CineFestival in San Antonio. The non-competitive festival, scheduled for Aug. 16-23, features films and videos relevant to the H ispanic community. Contact San Antonio CineFestival, 1300 Guadalupe St., San Antonio, Texas 78201 (612) 271-9070.
FLORIDA EDUCATION: Free copies of the recently released Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs’ report entitled “The Hispanic Student in Florida’s University System” are available Contact Angel Gonzalez, Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs,, Governor’s Office, The Capitol, Tallahassee, Fla 32301-8047 (904) 488-5394.
CITIZENSHIP CONFERENCE: Limited free copies are available of proceedings from the First National Hispanic Citizenship Conference held last year by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officiate The publication includes presentations by immigration officiate civil rights groups and congressional staff. Contact NALEO, 420 Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
ENDOWMENT PROGRAM UPDATE: A pamphlet from the National Endowment for the Humanities provides information on endowment activitiee including guidelines on what projects and activities are eligible for endowment financial support Copies of “Overview of Endowment Programs 1985-86” are free Contact National Endowment for the Humanities, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 786-0438.
VIEWPOINTS ON IMMIGRATION: Two new publications released this month focus on immigration, both legal and illegal, and its impact on the United States. “Latin Migration North: The Problem for U.S. Foreign Policy,” by Michael S. Teitelbaum, is published by Publications Office, Council on Foreign Relations, 58 East 68th St, New York, N.Y. 10028 (212) 734-0400. Cost $4.95. “Clamor at the Gates: The New American Immigration,” edited by Nathan Glazer, is by Institute for Contemporary Studies Press, 785 Market St., Suite 750, San Francisco, Calif. 94103 (415) 543-6213. Cost: $10.95.
MINORITIES IN SCIENCE: Two free reports detailing the numbers of minorities in the sciences are available. Both include Hispanics. For “A Statistical Picture of Minorities in Science,” contact Alan Fechter, Office of Science and Engineering Personnel, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418. For “Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering,” contact Michael Crowly, National Science Foundation, 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550.
CARTOONISTS* WIN $50: Weekly Report is looking for the best editorial cartoon depicting the “immersion method” of language instruction. For details, drop a card to: Immersion method, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENTSPECIALIST GS-9/11/12 Office of Justice Programs. Call Sharon May (202) 724-7725.
DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE - UNDERWRITING: San Diego’s public broadcasting station, KPBS-TV/FM, is seeking someone to obtain underwriting for local, national and regional programming. The position entails identifying funding opportunities from a wide variety of sources, including foundations, corporate and individual entities.
Requirements include equivalent to acollege degree, three years of verifiable, successful fund-raising or sales experience in public television/radio or a related field. Experience with foundations is strongly preferred.
Salary range starting at $29,000 depending upon experience, with a possible cost-of-living increase anticipated on 7/1 /85. Excellent benefit package.
Applications must be received by 7/31/85 at San Diego State University Employment Office, Third Floor-Administration Building, San Diego, Calif. 92182.
KPBS-TV/FM is an EEO/AA Title IX Employer and we welcome all applications
WRITER/PRODUCER: KPBS-TV Public Affairs Department has an opening for a writer/producer. Primary assignment producing in-studio programs
Expected to write scripts, proposals for otherstation producers Minimum three years experience with script writing, proposal writing and producing. Strong writing skills required.
Salary range starting at$19,500, depending on experience, with a possible cost-of-living increase anticipated on 7/1/85. Excellent benefit package.
Applications must be received by 7/31/85 at San Diego State University Employment Office, Third Floor-Administration Building, San Diego Calif. 92182.
KPBS-TV/FM is an EEO/AA Title IX Employer and we welcome all applications
PRESIDENT AND GENERAL COUNSEL: Dynamic attorney with extensive management and fundraising experience to direct a nonprofit Hispanic civil rights organization. Headquartered in San Francisco, MALDEF has regional operations throughout the country. MALDEPs programs emphasize voting and political rights, access to employment and education, immigration and naturalization and Chicana rights. The president and general counsel is responsible for all fiscal and management functions of the organization. He/She reports to a 40-member national board of directors Qualifications include significant legal and administrative experience and Hispanic civil rights background. Bilingual candidates preferred. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume and references to Fernando de Necochea, Chairman of the Board, c/o MALDEF, 28 Geary St, Third Floor, San Francisco, Calif. 94108. Deadline: July 15.
EDITOR FOR WEEKLY REPORT
HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE, Washington, D.C., seeks editor/reporter for its national news weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly Report Candidate to start on/about July 15. Position involves reporting, writing and editing on a broad range of news related to U.S. Hispanic concerns. Excellent opportunity to report and learn about federal government and the status of Hispanics nationally. Spanish useful Send inquiries, plus references, to Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL sought by Hunter College High School in New York. Administrative experience with student activities, scheduling, and student attendance. NYS Certification as School Administrator also required. Salary: $38,574. Send resume to: Mr. Alan J. Guma, Principal Hunter College High School, 71 East 94th Street, New York, N.Y. 10128.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
IMAGE AWARDS LUNCHEON Beverly Hills June 25
The National Conference of Christians and Jews is the sponsor. Award recipients will be those individuals and organizations who have made a special contribution to improving the image of Hispanics in the entertainment media Cheryl Fields (213) 385-0491
LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS CONFERENCE Anaheim, Calif. June 26-30 The convention theme is “New Directions’85.” Scheduled events include election of a national president,
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
a leadership development workshop, a health fair, exhibits and symposiums on education, the budget and the media
Manuel M&rquez (714) 898-2312
AMERICAN Gl FORUM ANNUAL CALIFORNIA
CONVENTION
Newark, Calif: June 27-30
Delegates from 35 California chapters will conduct
business, attend workshops and present resolutions.
Rudy Venegas (415) 792-2799
COMING SOON
EL PASO FESTIVAL El Paso July 12-14
Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533-1700
TEXAS ASSOCI ATION OF MEXICAN AM ERICAN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Antonio July 17-20 Elena de la Garza (512) 447-9821
HISPANIC AMERICAN FESTIVAL Washington, D.C. July 21-28 Antonio Melus (202) 673-6764
SPOTLIGHT
The Hispanic Leadership Training Program, sponsored by several Florida groups, will hold a July 14 session entitled “Common Issues Faced by Board Members” in Miami. Fiye more sessions will follow in this six-month program aimed at increasing parties pation by Dade Country Hispanic boards and committees in the public and private Sectors. For more information contact Alina E. Becker(305) 642-3484.
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20005.
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Arts & Entertainment
NETWORKTELEVISION PROGRAMS AND independent film productions dominate the list of entries for the 1985 Imagen Awards to be handed out June 25 at a Beverly Hills luncheon.
Three Imagen Awards will be presented by the Hispanic Media Image Task Force of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, intended to honor“those in entertainment media whose work portrays Hispanics in a positive and more accurate manner in television and film.”
Entries for the awards, which are not limited to specific categories, were taken from producers, film distributors and/or television networks.
By press time, an award selection panel had narrowed its selection down to some 30 qualifying entries - most of which are television programs. Among them: three Miami Wee episodes, two Cagney and Lacey shows, the El Capitan episode of Hill Street Blues, an episode of Silver Spoons, and the series Santa Barbara Film entries include El Norte and The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez.
The Hispanic Media Image Task Force of the NCCJ was established in 1982 to “find ways to foster a more favorable image of Latinos in
media” Actress Carmen Zapata is the task force chairwoman. Hispanics on the eight-member award selection panel are: cinematographer John Alonzo, attorney Vilma Martinez, educator Julian Nava and publisher Dolores S&nchez.
THREE NATIONAL MAGAZINES AND an advertising agency are being sued by the organizers of this month’s Los Angeles Gay Pride Parade and Festival — over an ad that features Puerto Rican actress Rita Moreno.
The group, Christopher Street West, has filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court against Newsweek, Time and U.S. News and World Report, which allegedly“entered into an illegal conspiracy in restraint of trade for the purpose of rejecting advertising submitted by any gay-oriented organization.” The suit also mentions the advertising agency Media Network Inc.
- The ad in question, for Gay Pride events June 22-23, quotes Moreno as a supporter of gay rights: “I was typecast as a Latin spitfire in my early roles and had to work very hard to make people see me as a person and a versatile actress. I suppose that s why I feel so strongly that I should defend human rights and why I’ve always supported my gay friends.”
— Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MINORITY JOURNALISTS CONFERENCE: Pennsylvania State University will hold its sixth annual conference for minority journalists July 21-24.
Its purpose is to encourage minority journalists to stay in journalism through career planning.
Registration ($30) deadline is July 1. For more information contact Christine Templeton, School of Journalism, 215 Carnegie Building, University Park, Pa. 16802 (814) 865-6597.
NEW HISPANIC JOURNALISTS GROUP: Some 180 Hispanic journalists from New York and New Jersey got together in New York City May31 to hear plans for establishing the New York Association of Hispanic Journalists.
The session was initiatied by New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez and Afotfc/as del Mundo metropolitan editor Antonio Espinal. The group formed an 11-member
planning committee to review proposed bylaws and decide when elections will be held.
Noticias del Mundo and El Diaric/La Prensa are providing office space for association meetings until it secures its own.
SEMINAR DATES SET: The American Society of Newspapers Editors has Set the dates for 15 of 16 seminars on “Minorities in the Newsroom” it plans to conduct between October 1985 and February 1986.
Carl Morris, ASNE’s manager of minority affairs, said representatives of the national Hispanic, black and Asian American journalists’ associations have been asked to assist ASNE in advertising the seminars and getting minority journalists to them. He added that the free seminars will include workshops on resume preparation and interviewing tips.
The sites, dates and contact persons for the seminars are:
Atlanta, Oct. 3-5, Coleen Kelly, Atlanta Journal and Constitution, (404) 526-5340.
Greensboro, N.C., Oct. 3-5, Ben Bowers, Greensboro News and Record, (919) 373-7051.
Portland, Oct. 3-5, William Hilliard, Portland Ore-
gonian, (503) 221-8145.
Ann Arbor, Mich., Oct. 17-19, Ben Johnson, Detroit Free Press, (313) 222-5008.
Cleveland, Oct. 17-19, William Barnard, Cleveland Plain Dealer, (216) 344-4255.
Oakland, Oct24-26, William Wong, Oakland Tribune, (415) 645-2229.
Philadelphia Nov. 7-9, Acel Moore, Philadelphia Inquirer, (215) 854-4533
St. Louis, Nov. 7-9, David Lipman, St Louis Post Dispatch, (314) 622-7005.
Chicago, Nov. 14-16, Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune, (312) 222-3519.
Hartford, Nov. 14-16, Irving Kravsow, The Hartford Courant, (203) 241-6481.
Arlington, Texas, Nov. 22-23, Ralph Langer, The Dallas Morning News, (214) 977-8363.
Richmond, Va., Nov. 22-23, Alf Goodykoontz, Richmond Times- Dispatch and Richmond News Leader, (804) 649-6265.
Gainesville, Fla., Jan. 16-18, John Roosenwald, University of Florida, (904) 392-0550.
Memphis, Jan.30-Feb. 1 .Walter Veazey, Memphis Commercial Appeal, (901) 529-2307.
Austin, Texas, Feb. 13-15, Arnold Rosenfeld, Austin American-Statesman, (512) 445-3661.
Mesa, Ariz. (Dates to be determined.)
— Carlos Morales
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher. Hector Ericksen- Mendoza Editor Steve Padilla
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza, Ancel Martinez, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
Carlos Morales, Julio Ojeda
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast, in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact HSctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week HA/CR other and first Latino mission specialist, Franklin ChangDiaz, i s now scheduled to take off Ill 20 ... Carlos Morales, president of in Alexandria, Va., is named acting executive director of the National Bus i ness Incubation Assoc i ation , a new group promoting the nurturing of small businesess . . . Rodolfo 0. de Ia Garza , executive assistant to the chancellor of the University of Texas System, joins the Texas Advisory Committee of the U.S . Commission on Civil Rights ... California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints Eliseo Samaniego of Visalia to the State Water Resources Control Board ... Meanwhile in New York, Gov . Mario Cuomo appoints Nelida Perez, librarian at the Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueiios, to the newly created New York Historical Records Advisory Board . . . The board of trustees of the Tomas Rivera Center in Claremont , Calif., officially announce the appointment of Arturo Madrid as center president. Daniel Fernandez, the foreman of a now-defunct Elk Grove Village , Ill., silver recovery plant, and two plant executives are convicted of murder in a precedent-setting case involving worker safety. A Chicago court ruled June 14 that the men were responsible for the Sept. 10, 1983, death of Stefan Golab because they did not correct hazardous conditions at the plant. Golab ' s work exposed him to cyanide fumes. Sentencing is set for June 28 ... The New York State Hispanic Chamber of Commerce honors its Hispanic Businessman and Businesswoman of the Year. Frank F. Flores, president of Marsden Reproductions, and Betsy Gonzalez, president of Betsy Gonzalez , Ltd. , a fashion design company ... Sidney Gutierrez completes his yearlong training period and graduates along with 16 other members of NASA's 1984 class of astronauts. The nation's HISPANI WEEKLY REP June 24, 1985 Farmworkers Deny Campbell Boycott Near End The president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee told Weekly Report June 19 that wire service reports last week indicating the committee and Campbell Soup Co . have reached an agreement to end FLOC's 6 1 /2year boycott against the company are "outright lies." " The boycott will continue until we have signed a collective bargaining agreement Nebraska Legislators Ax Commission on Latinos Members of the Nebraska Mexican American Commission, rushing against a June 28 deadline, were attempting to meet with state officials late last week in hopes of preventing the commission from closing its doors. On June 5 the state's unicameral legislature voted 26 to eliminate the 13-yearold commission and two other groups, the Com mission on Indian Affairs and Status of Women Commission . The vote was seen as a cost-cutting action by a legislature reluctant to raise taxes this year, said Rudy Peralez, commission executive director. Democratic Gov . Robert Kerrey signed the legislation June 6 . Peralez admitted that saving the commission seemed unlikely. The nine-member staff hoped at least to make arrangements that would transfer some commission activities to other agencies, he said . The commission , which operated on a $236,000 budget last year, was told to shut down by the end of the state's fiscal year June 30. Although now without funding and staff, the 1 o-member commission still exists, created by statute in 1972. The members have agreed to continue meeting and advocating on behalf of the state's 28,000 Hispanics . A Hispanic Link survey published this year (see Jan. 14 issue) found 20 state level Hispanic commissions, councils and committees located mainly in the Midwest and Northeast. calling for sweeping changes of the working and living conditions of the workers in the fields," said Baldemar Velasquez , president of the Toledo, Ohio-based farmworkers union . The FLOC boycott, begun in January 1979, seeks a collective bargaining agreement for farmworkers toiling on farms contracted to do work for Campbell in Ohio, Michigan and Indiana . Velasquez estimated that 95% of the 3,000 farmworkers at Campbell-contracted farms are Hispanic. The boycott also seeks a ban on child labor and abolishment or control of the use of pesticides . Scott Rombach, director of public relations at Campbell's headquarters in Camden, N . J., said FLOC and Campbell initialed an understand ing May 13 which calls for the formation of a commission that would set up guidelines for union elections on the farms. He added that the understanding goes into effect July 1 when the commission will make plans for the secret ballot elections. The National Council of Churches in New York City has been acting as a mediator between Campbell and FLOC. Velasquez said Campbell released information June 18 on what was supposed to be a private, on-going dialogue between the company and FLOC to "mitigate" the impact of the endorsement of the boycott by Roman Catholic bishops in Ohio June 17. A statement issued by the bishops of six dioceses in Ohio said "the farmworkers are seeking the same lega l rights to organize and bargain collectively" granted to other workers . " Campbell is responding to the bishops' support by trying to make it look like this thing Latino Honored for Service Arturo Montoya of Tucson, Ariz . , was one of nine persons honored for public service by the American Institute for Public Service in Washington , D.C., June 19. Montoya received a medallion and $1,000 for his work among Yaqui Indians. Other rec ipients of the institute's Jefferson Awards included Betty Ford, Lee A. lacocca and James A. Baker Ill. is about over, and trying to slow down the support of the boycott. I th i nk they'll realize this is a big mistake later because this thing is not going to be over tomorrow, " Velasquez said . Despite Campbell's assertion that it does not directly employ the farmworke rs, Velasquez said it is beginn i ng to show responsibility by giving $40,000 to Ohio State University last fall to establish a scholarship fund for the children of migrant farmworkers. Campbell built three day-care centers for the children of migrant farmworkers five years ago in northwest Oh i o and created six model labor camps in the same area, Rombach said . He added that the boycott has had no effect on Campbell's sales or earnings. Among the supporters of FLOC's boycott are the Mexican American Political Association , United Farm Workers , the Democratic National Committee's Hispanic Caucus, League of United Latin American Citizens and the Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs . Carlos Morales Illinois School Reform A package of legislation recently approved by the Illinois House, which proposes educational reforms that directly affect Hispanic students, probably will be approved by the State Senate and governor"before the month is out," says Rep . Joseph Berrios (DChicago). The legislation calls for statewide gathering of dropout statist i cs , the formation of local school advisory committees in Chicago and the creation of non-discriminatory assessment tests for Hispanic students. The legislation , sponsored by Berrios , was recommended by the Illinois Hispanic Task Force, an advisory body created by the legislature. Accurate data on dropout rates would help determine the need for special education programs, Berrios told Hispanic Link. In Chicago the Hispanic dropout rate is estimated at 64% and the overall dropout rate at 45%, but some local school districts"were reporting dropout rates of 7 % to make themselves look good," Berrios said .

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Sin peJos en Ia lengua the military insurance company USAA, which ranks in the Fortune 500. LULAC'S NEW LOOK: When delegates to the 56th annual convention of the League of United Latin American Citizens wind up their business and pleasure in Anaheim, Calif., next Sunday, the nation's oldest, biggest and boldest national Hispanic membership organization will have a new face, a new style, and maybe a new mandate. Both are loyal, long-time LULAC leaders and profess to be ready to do battle for traditional LULAC causes, Barreto says. What is unique about Del Rio, is obvious : she's a women. Never has LULAC been headed by a woman. She's the third serious female candidate in history to seek the office. For the past six years of its phenomenal growth, LULAC flourished behind the combative eloquence of a trio of Texas lawyers: Ruben Bonilla, followed by brother Tony, both of Corpus Christi, and Mario Obledo, a native of San Antonio. (Obledo entered college at UT-San Antonio at age 16 and later worked in the State Attorney General's office there before switching to gentler associations on the. Harvard law school faculty and on Jerry Bro . wn's cabinet in Sacramento, Calif.) She's also a Democrat who, according to Barreto, is painting Moran as a Republican who might wobble on real Hispanic concerns. "If Oscar is elected," Del Rio told Barreto," I would see LU LAC becoming part of the (Reagan) administration , and I would hate to see that happen." Moran would not tell Barreto whether he's Republican-saying that it should have no bearing on the race. But he did express his concern over the national office's "failure" to prioritize issues and to function in a businesslike manner . "We became an organization that took on all comers," he said. "We tried to accomplish too much with the resources that we had ." LULAC's national office debt is now in six figures. Julio Barreto, former top aide to former LULAC executive director Arnold Torres (Barreto resigned a couple of weeks after Torres left) describes the choices facing members this week: Is anybody really worried about LULAC's future? • Anita . Del Rio, an ex-Marine and mother of four who is an administrator of human resources programs for California's Orange County. "The bottom line," says ex-president Tony Bonilla, "is that so long as there are Hispanics unemployed, Hispanics dropping out of school and Hispanics going to bed at night hungry, LULACwill always be around." • Oscar Moran works in San Antonio as a regulations analyst for Hispanic Health Survey Due in Fall The first bits of information from a long awaited and often criticized national study on Hispanic health are scheduled to be released this fall, federal health officials now say . The release promises yet more controversy for the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Survey, commonly known as the HANES. Parts of the survey, focusing on Mexican Americans in the Southwest, will be unveiled Florida Education Report A Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs report has identified a chronic shortage of Hispanic college teachers and a low enroll ment of Hispanic college students as two major flaws in the Florida higher education system . Only 1 05 teachers . out of 5,782 are of Hispanic origin, the report said, recommending that affirmative action plans of the State University System include Hispanics. The report, released May 20 and listing 1984 figures, also notedthat9,371 of135,525 students are Hispanic. This of the students in a state that is about 10% Latino. Northern and Central Florida universi ties were most in need of stepped-up recruitment programs, the report said. The commission,1 formed i _ n 1977 by the state legislature as an adv1sory board on Hispanic issues, also recommended: e Financial aid for Hispanic students who are unable to afford the high cost of remedial English programs. e A scholarship program and other incentives to attract students from Caribbean and Latin American countries. e The use of academic performance as a standard for admission into academic programs instead of English-language assessment tests. e Certification of instructors in the areas of bilingual education and English as a Second Language to ensure qualified instructors for language minority students. 2 in a series of papers at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in Washington, D.C., Nov. 17-21. The release originally had been scheduled by the National Center for Health Statistics for last February, said division director Robert Murphy. A high rate of staff turnover caused the delay, he said. The health association's Latino Caucus has refused to co-sponsor the presentations, saying the center dictated the release of survey data without Latino input. Steven McKane, caucus president, said the center has ignored recommendations on the release made by a Department of Health and Human Services task force in which Hispanics par ticipated. Caucus member Marylin Aguirre Molina said she was disappointed with the kind of data the center has chosen to release first. The papers to be presented in Novemberon subjects such as cholesterol levels, hyper tension, and blood lead levels in childrenare of a "clinical, technical nature which don't show the big picture," she said. Refugee Worker Retrial A federal appeals court overturned June 18 the conviction of Stacey Merkt, a religious worker found guilty in March of illegally trans porting two Salvadoran aliens in Texas. The 5th U . S . Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans sent the case back to Federal District Court in Brownsville, Texas, for retrial. A three-judge panel said the jury that convicted Merkt on March 27 did not receive adequate instructions during the trial. Merkt, a volunteer worker at the Casa Oscar Romero refugee center in San Benito, said she was not smuggling aliens, but merely taking them to an immigration office to apply for political asylum. The judges did not address Mertk's claim that she was following her religious beliefs in transporting the Salvadorans. -Kay Barbaro Latino Among Hostages As of presstime Vicente Garza , a 53-year old businessman from Laredo , Texas, was still one of40 passengers from the hijacked TWA airliner being held hostage in Beirut. Also held captive by Shiite terrorists was Garza's son-in-law, Robert Trautmann, 37, of Laredo. Garza's wife , Irma Garza, 48, was released by the hijackers June 14 along with Trautmann's wife, Irma Trautmann, and Trautmann's three children. At a press conference in Laredo June 18, Irma Garza said, "I want to ask anyone that can to call Washington to ask the pres ident to help us . " Two other Latinos, Jose Delgado, 64, and his wife, Sylvia Delgado, 58, of Escondido, Calif. , were released by the terrorists June 14. Science Workforce 2.20/o Hispanics , 5% of the total U.S. workforce in 1982, comprised only 2.2.% of the total science and engineering workforce that year, according to a 1985 National Research Council report. Alan Fechter, director of the Washington, D.C. -based council, presented the report at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Los Angeles May31. The 2.2% figure may be somewhat inflated because it includes Puerto Rico while the total U.S. workforce figure does not. The report also pointed to an underutilization rate of 5.8%, which means the percentage of trained science and engineering professionals who are not being used to their full potential. Blacks made up 2.6% of the science and engineering workforce while comprising 9% of the total workforce. The black under utilization rate was 7 .6%. According to the report, these figures mean "an unnecessary loss of talent from the scien tific and engineering enterprise." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL: ' Film and video artists have until July 12 to submit entries for the 1Oth annual CineFestival in San Antonio. The non-competitive festival, scheduled for Aug. 16-23; features films and videos relevant to the His panic community. Contact San Antonio CineFestival, 1300 Guadalupe St., San Antonio, Texas 78201 (512) 271-9070. FLORIDA E .DUCATION: Free copies of the recently released Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs' report entitled "The Hispanic Student in Florida's University System" are available. Contact Angel Gonzalez, Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs, Office, The Capitol, Tallahassee, Fla , 32301-8047 (904) 488-5394. CITIZENSHIP CONFERENCE: Limited free copies are.available of proceedings from the First National Hispanic Citizenship Conference held last year by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. The publication includes presentations by im migration officials, civil rights groups and congressional staff. Contact NALEO, 420 Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. ENDOWMENT PROGRAM UPDATE: A pamphlet from the National Endowment for the Humanities provides information on endowment activities, including guidelines on what projects and activities are eligible for endowment financial support. Copies of "Overview of Endowment Programs 1985-86" are free. Contact National Endowment for the Humanities, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 786-0438. VIEWPOINTS ON IMMIGRATION: Two new publications released this month focus on immigration, both legal and illegal, and its impact on the United States. "Latin Migration North: The Problem for U.S. Foreign Policy , " by MichaelS. Teitelbaum, is published by Publications Office, Council on Foreign Relations, 58 East 68th St., New York, N.Y. 1 0028 (21 2) 734-0400. Cost $4.95. "Clamor at the Gates: The New American Immigration," edited by Nathan Glazer, is by Institute for Contemporary Studies Press, 785 Market St., Suite 750, San Francisco, Calif . 94103 (415) 543-6213. Cost: $1 0.95. MINORITIES IN SCIENCE: Two free reports detailino the numbers of minorities in the sciences are available. Both include Hispanics. For "A Statistical Picture of Minorities in Science," contact Alan Fechter, Office of Science and Engineering Personnel, National Research Council, 21 01 Constitution Ave . NW, Washington, D.C. 20418. For "Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering," contact MichaeL Crowly, National Science Foundation, 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550. CARTOONISTS, WIN $50: Weekly Report is looking for the best editorial cartoon depicting the "immersion method" of language instruction. For details, drop a card to: Immersion method, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. Nw:washington, D .C. 20005. CORPORATE CLASSIFfEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or pho ' ne your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p .m. (En Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates : $35 per column inch. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST G&9/11/12 Office of Justice Programs. Call Sharon May (202) 724. DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE UNDER WRITING: San Diego's public broadcasting station. KPB& TV/FM, is seeking someone to obtain underwriting for local, national and regional programming. The position entails identifying funding opportunities from a wide variety of sources. including foundationS, corporate and individual entities. Requirements include equivalent to a college degree, three years of verifiable, successful fund-raising or sales experience in public television/radio or a related field. Experience with foundations is strongly preferred. Salary range starting at $29,000 depending upon experience, with a possible living increase anticipated on 7 / 1 / 85. Excellent benefit package. Applications must be received by 7/31/85 at San Diego State University Employment Office, Third Floor-Administration Building , San Diego, Calif . 92182. KPB& TV/FM is an EEO/ AA Title IX Employer and we welcome all applications. WRITER/PRODUCER : KPB& TV Public Affairs Department has an opening for a Primary assignment producing in-studio programs. Expected to write scripts, proposals for other station producers. Minimum three: years experience with script writing, proposal writing and producing. Strong writing skills required. Salary range starting at$19, 500, depending PRESIDENT AND GENERAL COUNSEL: Dynamic attorney with extensive management and fund raising experience to direct a non profit Hispanic civil rights organization. Head quartered in San Francisco, MALDEF has regional opeiations throughout the country. MALDEF's programs emphasize voting and political rights, access to employment and education, immigration and naturalization and Chicana rights. The president and general counsel is responsible for all fiscal and management functions of the organization. He/She reports to a 40member national board of directors. Qualifications include significant legal and administ r ative experience and Hispanic civil rights background. Bilingual candidates preferred. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume and references to Fernando de Necochea, Chairman of the Board , c / o MALDEF, 28 Geary.St. , Third Floor, San Francisco, Calif. 9 ' 41 08.' Deadline: July 15. EDITOR FOR-WEEKLY REPORT HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE, Washington. D.C., seeks editor/reporter for its national news weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly Report. Candidate to start on/about July 15. Position involves reporting, writing and editing on a broad range of news related to U.S. Hispanic concerns. Excellent opportunity to report and learn about federal government and the status of Hispanics nationally. Spanish useful. Send inquiries, plus references, to Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234 0737. on experience, with a possible costofliving ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL sought by Hunter increase anticipated on 7/1/85. Excellent College High School in New York. Adminis benefit package. , trative experience with student activities, Applications must be received by7/31/85 scheduling, and student attendance. NYS at San Diego State University Employment Certification as School Administrator also Office, Third Floor-Administration Building, required. Salary: $38,574. Send resume to: San Diego Calif. 92182. Mr. Alan J. Guma, Principal, Hunte( College KPB&TV/FM is an EEO/AA Title IX Employer High School, 71 East 94th Street, New York, and we welcome all applications. N . Y . 10128. Calendar a leadership development workshop, a health fair, exhibits and symposiums on education, the budget and the media HISPANIC AMERICAN FESTIVAL Washington, D.C. July . 21-28 Antonio Melus (202) 673 THIS WEEK IMAGE AWARDS LUNCHEON Beverly Hills June 25 The National Conference of Christians and Jews is the sponsor. Award recipients will be those individu als and organizations who have made a special contribution to improving the image of Hispanics in Manuel Marquez (714) 898-2312 AMERICAN Gl FORUM ANNUAL CALIFORNIA CONVENTION Newark, Calif. June 27 Delegates from 35 Californ i a chapters will conduct business, attend workshops and present resolutions. Rudy Venegas (415) 792 COMING SOON the entertainment media. EL PASO FESTIVAL Cheryl Fields (213) 385 El Paso July 12-14 LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533 CITIZENS CONFERENCE TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN Anaheim, Calif . June 26-30 CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION The convention theme is "New Directions '85." Scheel-San Antonio July 17 uled events include election of a national president, . Elena de Ia Garza (512) 447-9821 Hispanic Link Weekly Report SPOTLIGHT The Hispanic Leadership Training Program, spon sored by several Florida groups, will hold a July 14 session entitled "Common Issues Faced by Board Members" in Miami. Five more sessions will follow in this six month program aimed at increasing pation by Dade Country Hispanic boards and com mittees in the public and private sectors. For more information contact Alina E. Becker(305) 642. Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community . Items should be re ceived two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N . St. NW, Washington, D .C., 20005. 3

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Arts & Entertainment media" Actress Carmen Zapata is the task force chairwoman. Hispanics on the eight-member award selection panel are: cinematographer John Alonzo, attorney Vilma Martinez, educator Julian Nava and publisher Dolores Sanchez. NETWORK TELEVISION PROGRAMS AND independentfilm productions dominate the list of entries fort he 1985 Imagen Awards to be handed out June 25 at a Beverly Hills luncheon. Three Imagen Awards will be presented by the Hispanic Media Image Task Force of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, intended to honor"those in entertainment media whose work portrays Hispanics in a positive and more accurate manner in television and film." THREE NATIONAL MAGAZINES AND an advertising agency are being sued by the organizers of this month's Los Angeles Gay Pride Parade and Festival over an ad that features Puerto Rican actress Rita Moreno. Entries for the awards, which are not limited to specific categories, were taken from producers, film distributors and/or television networks. The group, Christopher Street West, has filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court against Newsweek, Time and U.S. News and World Report, which allegedly"entered into an illegal conspiracy in restraint of trade for the purpose of rejecting advertising submitted by any gay-oriented organization." The suit also mentions the advertising agency Media Network Inc. By press time, an award selection panel had narrowed its selection down to some 30 qualifying entries-most of which are television programs. Among them: three Miami Vice episodes, two Cagney and Lacey shows, the El Capitan episode of Hill Street Blues, an episode of Silver Spoons, and the series Santa Barbara Film entries include El Norte and The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez. The Hispanic Media Image Task Force of the NCCJ was established in 1982 to "find ways to foster a more favorable image of Latinos in The ad in question, for Gay Pride events June 22-23, quotes Moreno as a supporter of gay rights: "I was typecast as a Latin spitfire in my early roles and had to work very hard to make people see me as a person and a versatile actress. I suppose thafs why I feel so strongly that I should defend human rights and why I've always supported my gay friends." Media Report MINORITY JOURNALISTS CONFERENCE: Pennsylvania State University will hold its sixth annual conference for minority journalists July 21. Its purpose is to encourage minority journal ists to stay in journalism through career planning. Registration ($30) deadline is July 1. For more information contact Christine Templeton, School of Journalism , 215 Carnegie Building, University Park, Pa. 16802 (814) 865-6597. NEW HISPANIC JOURNALISTS GROUP: Some 180 Hispanic journalists from New York and New Jersey got together in New York City May 31 to hear plans for establishing the New York Association of Hispanic Journalists. The session was initiatied by New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez and Noticias del Mundo metropolitan editor Antonio Espinal. . The group formed an 11-member HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc; 1420 'N' Street, N. W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Steve Padilla Reporting : Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza, Ancel Martinez, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Carlos Morales, Julio Ojeda No portion of Hi s panic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CON FERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your nex t conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234. 4 planning committee to review proposed bylaws and decide when elections will be held. Noticias del Mundo and El Diarie/La Prensa are providing office space for association meetings until it secures its own. SEMINAR DATES SET: The American Society of Newspapers Editors has set the dates f . or 15 of 16 seminars on "Minorities in the Newsroom" it plans to conduct between October 1985 and February 1986. Carl Morris, ASNE's manager of minority affairs, said representatives of the national Hispanic, black and Asian American journalists' associations have been asked to assist ASNE in advertising the seminars and getting minority journalists to them. He added that the free seminars will include workshops on resume preparation and interviewing tips. The sites, dates and contact persons for the seminars are: Atlanta , Oct. 3-5, Coleen Kelly, Atlanta Journal and Constitution, (404) 526. Greensboro, N.C., Oct. 3, Ben Bowers , Greens boro News and Record, (919) 373-7051. Portland, Oct. 3-5, William Hilliard, Portland Ore-Antonio Mejias-Rentas gonian, (503) 221. Ann Arbor, Mich. , Oct. 17, Ben Johnson, Detroit Free Press, (313) 222-5008. Cleveland , Oct. 17-19, William Barnard, Cleveland Plain Dealer, (216) 344-4255. Oakland, Oct 24 , William Wong, Oakland Tribune, (415) 645. Philadelphia Nov. 7-9, Acel Moore, Philadelphia Inquirer, (215) 854-4533/ St. Louis, Nov. 7-9 , David Lipman , St. louis Post Dispatch, (314) 622. Chicago, Nov. 14-16, Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune, (312) 222. Hartford , Nov . 14 16, 1rving Kravsow, The Hartford Courant, (203) 241. Arlington, Texas, Nov. 22-23, Ralph Langer, The Dallas Morning News, (214) 977-8363. Richmond, Va., Nov. 22, Alf Goodykoontz, Rich mond TimesDispatch and Richmond News leader, (804) 649-6265. Gainesville, Fla., Jan. 16, John Roosenwald, University of Florida, (904) 392. Memphis,Jan .30-Feb. 1, Walter Veazey, Memphis Commercial Appeal, (901) 529. Austin, Texas, Feb . 13, Arnold Rosenfeld, Austin American-Statesman, (512) 445. Mesa, Ariz . (Dates to be determined.) Carlos Morales Hispanic Link Weekly Report