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Hispanic link weekly report, July 1, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 1, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This
President Reagan says he’ll nominate Henry M. Ventura, executive director of the National Advisory Council on Adult Education, to be deputy director of ACTION, the agency overseeing volunteer service programs. The California native would be second in line to Donna Alvarado, the agency’s director... Robert Alvidrez, an employee of Wang Laboratories in Lowell, Mass., is among six U.S.citizens slain in a terrorist attack in El Salvador June 19. Also killed are four U.S. Marines... Arnold Torres, former executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens, is hired by the Ford Foundation as a consultant on Hispanic issues.. .United Farm Workers President Cesar Chdvez leads 150 pickets outside a San Francisco supermarket
to launch a nationwide boycott of California table-grapes. The boycott, which will employ computerizeJcyijreitmaRjIiSiito 400,000 consumers a month, hopes to focus on what Chavez calls anti-union efforts by the administration of Gov. George Deukmejian... Meanwhile, Deukmejian names Los Angeles police Capt. Joe Sandoval as new chief of the California State Police... Armando Albarran, a San Antonio native who lost both legs in combat in Vietnam, is named 1985 Disabled Veteran of the Year by the Disabled American Veterans... In Austin, Gov. Mark White meets with members of the Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce to discuss Hispanic business concerns. Association President Rudy Flores says other meetings are planned... Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) chairs an oversight hearing in Montebello, Calif., on the Job Training Partnership Act June 28.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Latino Youth Suicide Trend Tied to Culture Loss
A new study shows that while Hispanic suicide rates generally are well below the national average, the percentage of Hispanic suicide victims who are young and male is unusually high.
Some suicide experts say the trend could be connected to a diminishing influence of cultural values that probably act as a buffer against factors that can lead to suicide.
The experts, a team of three researchers at the national Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, warn that research on Hispanics and suicide is sparse. Their study, published in the spring issue of the journals Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, focused on Hispanics in California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. National figures on Hispanics are not yet available.
Still, the figures merit attention, especially in light of another report released bytheCDC June 23. That report shows a 50% increase between 1970 and 1980 in the suicide rates for all men nationwide between 15 and 24 years old. The rate for women in the same age group increased 5%.
The largest increase was among young white malea The rate for those males between 15 and 19 moved from 9.4 suicides per 100,000
The Miami electorate will decide Aug. 13 whether to scrap the existing city manager form of government in favor of a “strong mayor"’ system. Adoption of such a system would likely increase Cuban-American political clout in the city.
A 3-2 vote of the city commission June 13 cleared the way for the general election. Mayor Maurice Ferre and Commissioner Miller Dawkins, who is black, voted against the plan introduced by Commissioner Demetrio Perez May 29 and supported by Commissioners Joe Carollo and J. L. Plummer.
Predicting the outcome of the election is “nearly impossible,” Mayor's Assistant Nestor Toledo told Weekly Report, citing Cuban American support for and black-white opposition to the strong mayor plan.
According to the plan, which would become
in 1970 to 15 per 100,000 in 1980. Forages 20-24, the increase was from 19.3 to 27.8 and for ages 25-29 from 19.8 to 27.5.
The study on Hispanics compared their suicide rates with those of whites from 1976 to 1980. The five-year average white rate of 18.5 was almost twice the Hispanic 10.5 figure.
Hispanic women had the lowest rate of all groups, 4 suicides per 100,000. White women had a rate of 10.6.
The Hispanic male rate of 17.8 was well below the white male rate of 27.6. In raw figures, this translates to 2,868 suicides among Hispanic men and 23,083 suicides among white men during the study period.
What interests researchers is that 32.9% of all Hispanics who committed suicide were under age 25, compared with 17.3% for whites.
Among males, the white suicide victim tended to be older and the Hispanic victim younger (half of the Hispanic male suicides were under age 30). Hispanics had higher rates than whites in three young age groups: between ages 15-19 a rate of 10.7 to 6.0; between 20-24,22.6 to 12.9; between 25-29,15.8 to 12.3.
The parallel rates among young men could
effective in time for the November elections, the mayor would become the chief administrator of the city. Presently, it is the city manager. The mayor and five commissioners would be elected at large. This plan modifies Ferre’s original proposal which called for seven commission members, three elected from city districts with predominantly black, white or Hispanic populations.
Ferre has maintained that district elections are essential to insure continued representation of blacks and non-Hispanic whites on the commission. Hispanics account for 60% of the Miami population.
Although Ferre originally indicated that he would not run for re-election in November if the strong mayor plan were adopted, his supporters now believe he may change his mind.
reflect a loss of protective cultural values, said Jack Smith, one of the researchers, in a telephone interview. He noted that the study suggested two Hispanic values may protect against suicide: close family ties and the concept of family honor.
The report noted: “A cultural incentive not to dishonor one’s family with a suicide and the ability of close family ties to decrease the risk of social isolation may work together to diminish an individual’s risk of suicide.”
The report added that the incidence of suicide among Hispanics may be tied to the extent that cultural traditions continue to be held within Hispanic communities. Focusing on Mexican Americans in the Southwest, the report said, “The assimilation into the American culture has undoubtedly diminished the power of cultural traditions to influence behavior, particularly among Hispanic youth.”
- Steve Padilla
Official Illegal Alien Count Too High, Says New Study
A study released by the National Academy of Sciences last week said the number of illegal aliens in the United States is lower than official estimates.
The academy report released June 24, “Immigration Statistics: A Story of Neglect,” was produced by a 14-member panel following a request from the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
The panel estimated that there are 2 to 4 million illegal aliens in the United States and found no sharp increase in their numbers in recent years. It said INS records suggest that the illegal population has “increased little, if at all, since 1977, although entry attempts may have increased.”
The Census Bureau estimate in 1980 that there were 3 to 6 million illegals in the United States in 1978 has been the most often used figure, the study said. While a spokesman for INS contends the number has grown since then, he said the service has not updated the Census Bureau’s estimate.
Miami to Vote on Strong Mayor Plan


Sin pelos en la lengua
CUBAN POWER: In which U.S. city is an ethnic population now bitterly protesting a proposed at-large election system that, they fear, would deny equal representation in government?
Hispanics in Denver? Pomona, Calif.? Guess again. The city is Miami, where Hispanics, unlike their counterparts in Western cities, are viewed as oppressors, not oppressed. With 60% of the population in their camp, Latinos, mostly Cuban, have the potential to dominate city politics.
Left out are the blacks, representing 24% of the population, who need district elections to ensure a voice on the city commission. A new “strong mayor” plan introduced by Mayor Maurice Ferr6, a Puerto Rican, included a provision for a commissioner to be chosen from a predominantly black district.
But Commissioner Demetrio Perez would have none of that. All the commission members should be elected at-large, he said, presenting a modified strong mayor plan at the last minute. Commissioner Joe Carollo and J. L. Plummer agreed. Voters will decide whether to adopt the plan Aug. 13.
Presently, Miller Dawkins is the only black on the 5-member commission. In future at-large elections in this increasingly polarized city, Dawkins or any other black candidate could easily succumb to a Hispanic rival.
ITALIAN POWER: Did you notice that of the 22 individuals appointed to the U.S. Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Commission, half are Italian - and only three have some Hispanic ties?
Remember, please, that the commission was created to mark the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ “voyages of discovery” and to observe “the historic role of Spain” in the New World.
And remember that Columbus’crew was about 75% Spanish (along With assorted Nordics, Portuguese and Italians) and that he did take the Honduras-to-Panama tour.
Yet not one commissioner represents U.S. Hispanics with lineage from Central America or Mexico. Or even New Mexico.
ANDALUSIAN POWER: To advertise their made-in-USA tacos, the Jack-in-the-Box fast-food chain has a Spanish flamenco dancer stomping to the accompaniment of a Mexican mariachi in its Los ' Angeles TV spots, reports Pauline MArquez of the National Association of Hispanic Publications. _ Kay B&rbaro
Coors Support for LULAC Protested
A coalition of 12 Southern California Chicano organizations called on delegates attending LU LAC’s annual convention in Anaheim, Calif, to join them on picket lines last week to protest Coors’ sponsorship of a banquet at the convention.
At a press conference June 26 the organization said it was “difficult to understand how a corporation like Coors” could be allowed to link its name with the League of United Latin American Citizens, the nation’s oldest and largest national Hispanic organization.
The coalition, calling itself the Orange County Coors Boycott Committee, asked LULAC delegates to question the organization’s leadership on the Coors sponsorship and to request that LULAC return the money the Golden, Colo.-based brewery donated to the convention.
Stephanie Lopez, boycott committee spokeswoman, said pickets would be set up June 28, the third day of the five-day conference
Columbus Commission
President Reagan has announced the names of the 22 persons, including three Hispanics, who will plan the 1992 activities marking the 500th anniversary of the discovery of America.
The Hispanic members of the Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission are: Luis A. Ferr6, former governor of Puerto Rico; John Goudie, president of Goudie & Associates in Miami; and Jane Lee Garcia, president of the Bronx Museum of the Arts.
Reagan announced the appointments June 12. Planning for the quincentenary celebration will begin after the commission members are sworn in by Secretary of State George Shultz in July.
In a related item, plans to hold the 1992 World’s Fair in Chicago are apparently dead. A state legislative panel recently issued a report warning that “proceeding with the fair as planned would be a misguided economic decision.”
at the Anaheim Convention Center. It was the organization’s 56th annual convention.
L6pez added that C6sar Chavez, president of the United Farm Workers, had announced he would not attend the convention because of the Coors sponsorship.
The coalition, joined by members of an AFL-CIO Coors boycott committee, said Coors has a history of anti-union activities and that it has supported right-wing groups working against Hispanic interests.
Lopez stressed that the coalition’s complaint was against Coors, not LULAC. “We are not picketing LULAC," she said. “We are doing an informational picket of Coors.” The picket was the latest attack against Coors and its much heralded national agreement with six national Hispanic organizations signed last fall. The criticism moved one signator of the pact, the National Puerto Rican Coalition, to withdraw in May. LULAC did not sign the national agreement.
In early June about 100 protesters gathered in Denver to protest Coors support of the LULAC state convention in Colorado.
Neither Coors nor LULAC officials could be reached for comment.
$8.6 Million for Elderly
The Asociacion Pro Personas Mayores, a Los Angeles-based support group for the elderly, will receive $8.6 million in federal funds to provide jobs for elderly workers, Secretary of LaborWilliam Brock announced.
The funding will go to the Asociacidn's Project Ayuda, which provides 1,740 part-time community service jobs nationwide for low-income workers over 55. Hispanics account for about 71% of all workers participating in Project Ayuda.
Announcement of the funding came June 5. The Asociacion was one of eight organizations receiving $326 million, to be used between July 1,1985, and June30,1986, for services for the elderly.
Naturalization Exam Bill
Senator Charles Mathias (R-Md.) has introduced legislation that would allow persons over 65 years old with five years of residency to take the naturalization exam for U.S. citizenship in the language of their choice.
Senate Bill 1296, introduced by Mathias June 13 and initiated by the Hispanic Republican Club of Montgomery County, Md., seeks to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 that only permitted persons to take the naturalization exam in a foreign language if they were over 50 and had 20 years of U.S. residency.
Mass Bilingual Ed. Hit
A group of Hispanic parents in Boston and six other major Massachusetts cities has charged the state with not providing adequate teaching services to an estimated 12,000 Hispanic students with limited English abilities.
In a class-action suit filed in U.S. District Court in Boston June 14, the parents asked the court to order the state to hire and train more teachers skilled in bilingual education and English as a Second Language. The suit also said that most ESL teachers failed to demonstrate “cultural familiarity and understanding of Hispanic students.”
It named as defendants Gov. Michael Dukakis, the state Board of Education, state Department of Education and school officials in Lynn, a city of 78,000 north of Boston that is 2.6% Hispanic.
Grocery Chain Hiring Pact
A major Southern California supermarket chain has agreed to step up the hiring and promotion of Hispanics under a consent decree announced in Los Angeles June 25.
The five-year agreement was reached by Ralph’s, a 126-store chain, and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. MALDEF reached a similar settlement last year with Vons, another Southern California supermarket chain with more than 170 stores.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
ILLEGALS OVERCOUNTED: The National Academy of Sciences has completed a report, “Immigration Statistics: A Story of Neglect,” which finds that official estimates of the number of illegal aliens in the United States are higher than the actual number here. Cost of the 328-page report is $23.95. Contact National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334-3313.
CIVIL RIGHTS INFORMATION: The U.S. Commission of Civil Rights releases reports on an ongoing basis. The reports and a “Catalog of Publications” listing them are free. Direct inquiries to: U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Distribution Center, 612 North Payne St, Alexandria, Va 22314. Free subscriptions to the commission’s monthly newletter, Civil Rights Update, may be obtained by writing the same office.
FEDERAL REPORTS: The General Accounting Office prepares reports on subjects from national defense and social services to energy and veterans affairs. Single copies are free. To receive the office’s Monthly List of GAO Reports contact U.S. General Accounting Office, Document Handling and Information Services Facility, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS: Since 1976 the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund has awarded $1.6 million to more than 3,000 Hispanic college students For information on Fund activities send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: Selection Committee, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101.
CARTOONISTS, WIN $50: Weekly Report is looking for the best editiorial cartoon depicting the “immersion method” of language instruction. For details, drop a card to: Immersion Method, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
BILINGUAL EDUCATION REPORT: The Department of Education has released a new 294-page report titled “National Longitudinal Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Services for Language Minority Limited-English-Proficient Students.” Cost $21.40. Contact National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, 1555 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va. 22209 (800) 336-4560 or (703) 522-0710.
VETERANS’ MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHI PS: Julyl 5 is the deadline to apply for a scholarship program open to dependents of veterans, particularly those of veterans killed, disabled or wounded in action. The winners, 100 in all, will receive $5,000 each. Applicants must be under 22, have completed their freshman year in college and maintained a 2.75 GPA For an application contact any American Gl Forum chapter or Adolph Coors Company, Veterans’ Memorial Scholarship Fund, Mail Number 329, Golden, Colo. 80401.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
PRESS RELATIONS SPECIALIST sought by the New Jersey Education Association. Candidate should be able to transfer complex ideas into simple, direct prose; should have training and experience in journalism and media operations, including work as a news reporter or in a position requiring day-to-day contact with news reporters; should be familiar with the organization and operation of public schools as well as with the attitudes of school staffs and the activities of their representative organizations. Apply to: Marvin R. Reed, Director, Communications Division, NJEA, 180 W. State Street, P.O. Box 1211, Trenton, N.J. 08607. (609) 599-4561.
DEL MAR CALLEGE, Corpus Christi, Texas, has openings for COMMUNICATIONS INSTRUCTORS. Salary $22,660 minimum per 9 months. JOB DUTIES: Prepare and teach 5 courses each semester, primarily of developmental English. Counsel students and assist them in extracurricular activities. Serve on committees and accept special assignments from supervisor. Perform administrative duties related to teaching assignment. Assists with advising and registration. REQUIREMENTS: Two years of college- level teaching experience, Bachelor’s degree in English plus Master's degree with area of major emphasis in English and/or reading. CONTACT: Del MarCollege, Administrative Service Office, Administration Building-Room 137, Baldwin & Ayers, Corpus Christi, Texas 78404.
TASTEFUL HISPANIC CALENDAR FEATURING TWELVE (HISPANIC) MALE ^models needs financial support to get started and circulated. For details on project, write Robert Rivera, P.O. Box4195, University Park Branch, Las Cruces, N.M. 88003.
EDITOR FOR WEEKLY REPORT HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE, Washington, D.C., seeks editor/reporter for its national news weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly Report. Candidate to start on/about Julyl 5. Position involves reporting, writing and editing on a broad range of news related to U.S. Hispanic concerns. Excellent opportunity to report and learn about federal government and the status of Hispanics nationally. Spanish useful. Send inquiries, plus references, to Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
PRESS/MEDIA COORDINATOR: National Hispanic public interest organization seeks editor to oversee production of bimonthly newsletter, press releases and promotional materials. Prefer experience in copy editing, design and proofreading. Send resume and writing samples to: National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO), 410 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
WRITER/EDITOR for American Republics Branch of the USIA Press Service. Journalistic experience and fluency in Spanish required. Salary commensurate with experience. Submit a standard federal government application SF - 171 to the U.S. Information Agency, M/PDP Room 518,301 Fourth St. SW, Wash-ngton, D.C. 20547. Be sure to indicate announcement number PDP - 347 - 85 on application. All applications must be received by July 12,1985. USIA is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST GS-9/11/12. Office of Justice Programs. Call Sharon May (202) 724-7725.
Calendar
COMING SOON
HOUSTON HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RECEPTION Houston July 10 Jorge Colorado (713) 224-5322
ANNUAL NOSOTROS GOLDEN EAGLE AWARDS
Hollywood July 12
Jerry Velasco (213) 466-8566
TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL) ANNUAL MEETING Washington, D.C. July 12-13 Joyce Hutchings (202) 625-4985
EL PASO FESTIVAL
El Paso July 12-14
Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533-1700
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
HISPANIC LEADERSHIPTRAINING PROGRAM Miami July 14
Alina Becker (305) 642-3484
TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Antonio July 17-20 Elena de la Garza (512) 447-9821
NATIONAL HISPANIC PASTORAL ENCUENTRO Washington, D.C. Aug. 15-18 Rev. Juan Romero (202) 659-6878
NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
BANQUET
Las Vegas Sept. 6
Otto Merida (702) 385-7367
UNITED STATES HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL CONVENTION San Juan, P.R. Sept. 18-22 Cindy Hall (816) 842-2228
MIDWEST HISPANIC POLITICAL LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE
Chicago October 11-13
Maria Elena Molina (614) 464-1116
SPOTLIGHT
The Washington Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers will sponsor several events during National Hispanic Heritage Week Sept. 15-21 in Washington, D.C. Representatives of more than 20 federal agencies will gather on Sept. 16 to recognize those federal employees who have made outstanding contributions to the Hispanic Employment Program in the Washington Metropolitan Area.
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20005.
3


Arts & Entertainment
THE FIRST NETWORK TELEVISION SERIES to win an Imagen Award has announced plans for the 1985-86 fall season that include changing the status of its only Latino “regular” character.
Producers of Hill Street Blues, which garnered an Imagen Award during a luncheon in Los Angeles June 25, have announced a variety of changes that will be put into effect when the show returns in the fall. Among those changes, Nicaraguan actor Ren6 Enriquez will no longer be seen in every episode. Enriquez’s character, Lieutenant Ray Calletano, will be promoted to captain of another precinct.
A spokesman for Enriquez said the actor actually will be featured more prominently this fall than in the past Enriquez’s new agreement with MTM Productions, brought about by negotiations initiated by the actor, calls for his character to be featured in at least six episodes next season. The agreement reportedly will allow Enriquez to work on more feature film projects next year.
Hill Street Blues, which is broadcast by NBC, will begin production for the 1985-86 season July 11.
Three Imagen Awards were handed out this year by the Hispanic Media-Image Task Force of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. The other recipients were Gregory Nava’s film El Norte
and NBC,which got an award for having “the most shows featuring Latinos” in the 1984-85 season.
In other fall season news: Patty (Apollonia) Kotero has joined the cast of ABC’s Falcon Crest while Cesar Romero will play a bullfighter and grandfather to Lorenzo Lamas in a “Mediterranean cruise” episode of The Love Boat also on ABC.
A NEW SUBMISSION PROGRAM TO BE LAUNCHED by the Writers Guild of America West this month is being criticized by some WGAW members who claim the program will reduce opportunities for Hispanics and other ethnic groups.
The so-called “non-discrimination script-submission program,” aimed at women, minorities, disabled and older writers, is an expansion of an old WGAW program aimed solely at increasing employment of ethnic minority writers.
The new program “would be a detriment to minorities, ’’according to WGAW member Ram6n Ponce. He told Weekly Report that by increasing the categories for qualification, the new program would actually decrease opportunities for Hispanics.
The new program results from the recently signed WGAW contract in which signatory producers agreed to look at scripts by qualifying writers every month. The contract reads: “Some companies will receive four scripts per month; others will receive one.”
— Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MEDIA VIE FOR SOUTH FLORIDA LATINOS: Spanish-speaking residents in South Florida’s Dade and Broward counties, nearing the one million mark, are being courted by two new television stations and another newspaper.
The two counties, encompassing Miami and Ft. Lauderdale, already have a Spanish International Network affiliate (Channel 23). They saw Blair Spanish Television launch a new station June 2 (Channel 51), and will see yet another station (Channel 69) on the air in early 1986. Blair is a television firm with Spanish-language stations in Puerto Rico, Oklahoma and California. Channel 69 was purchased recently by a group of Miami businessmen, including Miami National Bank Chairman Francisco de Borbon.
Noticias del Mundo, a Spanish-language daily newpaper owned by the Rev. Sun
Myung Moon’s Unification Church and already in New York and Los Angeles, has plans to put out a 30,000-copy daily in Miami in October. Noticias will compete for the Spanish reader with El Diario de las Americas and El Miami Herald which have 49,100 and 75,000 daily circulations, respectively.
South Florida currently has seven Spanish'-' language radio stations.
PUBLICATION CEASES: Hispanic Monitor, the eight-page monthly newsletter that covered Hispanic political and economic news nationwide and debuted in January 1984, announced June 21 that it will “temporarily cease publication.” The New York-based monthly served between 200-300 subscribers.
HOM E FOR N AH J: The board of directors of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, meeting in New York June 22-23, selected Washington, D.C., as its national headquarters. Frank Newton, executive director of NAHJ, expects to move into the new office, located in D.C.’s National Press
Building, in September.
The board also chose Los Angeles as the site for NAH J’s 1987 conference (next year's is in Miami) and to send a three-person committee to Puerto Rico in July to develop better ties. (NAHJ currently has only two members from the island.)
Joining the association’s officers and at-large representatives (Weekly Report May 6) were seven newly elected regional representatives: (Puerto Rico, Region 1, has not elected a representative)! Region 2, Evido de la Cruz, reporter, El Diario-La Prensa, New York; Region 3, Elisabeth Perez Luna, independent producer, Toucan Productions, Philadelphia; Region 4, Evelyn Hernandez, reporter, The Miami Herald; Region 5, Victor V4squez, news director, KINT-TV, El Paso, Texas; Region 6, Rosa Morales (alternate Elisa Alfonso attended), producer, WKAR-TV, East Lansing, Mich.; Region 7, Don Flores, assistant managing editor, Tucson Citizen; Region8, Julio Mor&n, reporter, Los Angeles Times.
- Carlos Morales
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Steve Padilla
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Carlos Morales, Julio Ojeda.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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HR/C R Making The News This Week to launch a nationwide boycott of California t'lP.\flrflrap es The boycott, which will employ tto 400,000 consumers a month, hopes to focus on what Chavez calls anti-uni o n efforts by the administration of Gov. George Deukmejian . . . Me an while, Deukmejian names Los Angeles police Capt. Joe Sandoval as new chief of the California State Police .. . Armando Albarran, a San Antonio native who lost both legs in combat in Vietnam, is nam e d 1985 Disabled Veteran of the Year by the Disabled Ameri c an Veterans ... In Austin , Gov. Mark White meets with members of the Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce to discuss Hispanic business concerns. Association President Rudy Flores says other meetings are planned ... Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif . ) chairs an oversight hearing in Montebello, Calif . , on the Job Training Partnership Act June 28. President Reagan says he'll nominate Henry M. Ventura, executive director of the National Advisory Council on Adult Education , to be deputy director of ACTION, the agency overseeing volunteer service programs. The California native would be second in line to Donna Alvarado, the agency's director ... Robert Alvidrez, an employee of Wang Laboratories in Lowell, Mass., is among six U.S. citizens slain in a terrorist attack in El Salvador June 19. Also killed are four U.S . Marines ... Arnold Torres, former executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens, is hired by the Ford Foundation as a consultant on Hispanic issues ... United Farm Workers President Gesar Chavez leads 150 pickets outside a San Francisco supermarket LINK WEEKL July1, 1985 Latino Youth Suicide Trend Tied to Culture Loss A new study shows that while Hispanic .suicide rates generally are well below the national average, the percentage of Hispanic suicide victims who are young and male is unusually high. Some suicide experts say the trend could be connected to a diminishing influence of cultural values that probably act as a buffer against factors that can lead to suicide. The experts, a team of three researchers at the nationaiCenters for Disease Control in Atlanta, warn that research on Hispanics and suicide is sparse. Their study, published in the spring issue of the journals Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, focused on His panics in California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. National figures on Hispanics are not yet available . Still, the figures merit attention, especially in light of another report released by the CDC June 23. That report shows a 50% increase between 1970 and 1980 in the suicide rates for all men nationwide between 15 and 24 years old. The rate for women in the same age group increased 5% . The largest increase was among young white males. The rate for those males between 15 and 19 moved from 9.4 suicides per 100,000 in 1970 to "15 per 1 00,000 in 1980. For ages 20-24, the increase was from 19.3 to 27 . 8 and for ages 25-29 from 19. 8 to 27.5. The study on Hispanics compared their suicide rates with those of whites from 1976 to 1980. The five-year average white rate of 18. 5 was almost twice the Hispanic 10.5 figure . Hispanic women had the lowest rate of all groups, 4 suicides per 100,000. White women had a rate of 1 0 .6. The Hispanic male rate of 17.8 was well below the white male rate of 27.6. In raw figures, this translates to 2,868 suicides among Hispanic men and 23,083 suicides among white men during the study period. What interests researchers is that 32. 9% of all Hispanics who committed suicide were under age 25, compared with 17.3% for whites. Among males, the white suicide victim tended to be older and the Hispanic victim younger (half of the Hispanic male suicides were under age 30) . Hispanics had higher rates than whites in three young age groups: between ages 15-19 a rate of 10. 7 to 6.0; between 20-24,22.6 to 12.9; between 25-29, 15. 8 to 12.3. The parallel rates among young men could Miami to Vote on Strong Mayor Plan The Miami electorate will decide Aug. 13 whether to scrap the existing city manager form of government in favor of a "strong mayor'' system . Adoption of such a system would likely increase Cuban-American political clout in the city. A 3-2 vote of the city commission June 13 cleared the way for the general election. Mayor Maurice Ferre and Commissioner Miller Dawkins, who is black, voted against the plan introduced by Commissioner Demetrio Perez May 29 and supported by Commissioners Joe Carollo and J. L. Plummer. Predicting the outcome of the election is "nearly impossible," Mayor's Assistant Nestor Toledo told Weekly Report, citing Cuban American support for and black-white opposition to the .strong mayor plan. According to the plan , which would become effective in time for the November elections, the mayor would become the chief adminis trator of the city. Presently, it is the city manager. The mayor and five commissioners would be elected at large. This plan modifies Ferre ' s original proposal which called for seven commission members, three elected from city districts with predominantly black, white or Hispanic populations. Ferre has maintained that district elections are essential to insure continued representation of blacks and non-Hispanic whites on the commission. Hispanics account for 60% of the Miami population. Although Ferre originally indicated that he would not run for re-election in November if the strong mayor plan were adopted, his supporters now believe he may change his mind . reflect a loss of protective cultural values, said Jack Smith, one of the researchers, in a telephone interview. He noted that the study suggested two Hispanic values may protect against suicide: close family ties and the concept of family honor. The report noted: "A cultural incentive not to dishonor one's family with a suicide and the ability of close family ties to decrease the risk of social isolation may work together to diminish an individual's risk of suicide." The report added that the incidence of suicide among Hispanics may be tied to the extent that cultural traditions continue to be held within Hispanic communities. Focusing on Mexican Americans in the Southwest, the report said, " The assimilation into the American culture has undoubtedly diminished the power of cultural traditions to influence behavior, particularly among Hispanic youth. " Steve Padilla Official Illegal Alien Count Too High, Says New Study A study released by the National Academy of Sciences last week said the number of illegal aliens in the United States is lower than official estimates. The academy report released June 24, "Immigration Statistics : A Story of Neglect," was produced by a 14-member panel following a request from the Immigration and Natu ralization Service. The panel estimated that there are 2 to 4 million illegal aliens in the United States and found no sharp increase in their numbers in recent years. It said INS records suggest that the illegal population has "increased little, if at all, since 1977, although entry attempts may have increased. " The Census Bureau estimate in 1980 that there were 3 to 6 million illegals in the United States in 1978 has been the most often used figure, the study said. While a spokesman for INS contends the number has grown since then, he said the service has not updated the Census Bureau's estimate.

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Sin. pelos en Ia lengua Presently , Miller Dawkins is the only black on the 5-member commission. In future at-large elections in this increasingly polarized city, Dawkins or any other black candidate could easily succumb to a Hispanic rival. CUBAN POWER: In which U .S. city is an ethnic population now bitterly protesting a proposed at-large election system that, they fear , would deny equal representation in government? Hispanics in Denver? Pomona , Calif.? Guess again. The city is Miami, where Hispanics, unlike their counterparts in Western cities, are viewed as oppressors , not oppressed. With 60% of the population in their camp, Latinos, mostly Cuban, have the potential to dominate city politics. ITALIAN POWER: Did you notice that of the 22 individuals appointed to the U .S. Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Commission, half are Italianand only three have some Hispanic ties? Remember, please, that the commission was created to mark the 500th anniversary of Columbus' "voyages of discovery" and to observe "the historic role of Spain" in the New World . Left out are the blacks, representing 24% of the population, who need district elections to ensure a voice on the city commission. A new "strong mayor" plan introduced by Mayor Maurice Ferre, a Puerto Rican , included a provision for a commissioner to be chosen from a predominantly black district. And remember that Columbus' crew was about75% Spanish(along with assorted Nordics, Portuguese and Italians) and that he did take the Honduras-to-Panama tour. Yet not one commissioner represents U .S. Hispanics with lineage from Central America or Mexico. Or even New Mexico. But Commissioner Demetrio Perez would have none of that. All the commission members should be elected at-large, he said , presenting a modified strong mayor plan at the last minute. Commissioner Joe Carollo and J. L. Plummer agreed. Voters will whether to adopt the plan Aug . 13. ANDALUSIAN POWER: To advertise their made-in-USA tacos, the Jackinthe-Box fast-food chain has a Spanish flamenco dancer stomping to the accompaniment of a Mexican mariachi in its Los ' Angeles TV spots , reports Pauline Marquez of the National Association of Hispanic Publications. _Kay Barbaro Coors Support for LULAC Protested A coalition of 12 Southern California Chicano organizations called on delegates attending LULAC's annual convention in Anaheim, Calif., to join them on picket lines last week to protest Coors' sponsorship of a banquet at the convention. At a press conference June 26 the organization said it was "difficult to understand how a corporation like Coors" could be allowed to link its name with the League of United Latin American Citizens, the nation ' s oldest and largest national Hispanic organization. The coalition , calling itself the Orange County Coors Boycott Committee, asked LULAC dele gates to question the organization ' s leadership on the Coors sponsorship and to request that LU LAC return the money the Golden, Colo . based brewery donated to the convention. Stephanie Lopez, boycott committee spokeswoman, said pickets would be set up June 28, the third day of the five-day conference Columbus Commission President Reagan has announced the names of the 22 persons, including three Hispanics, who will plan the 1992 activities marking the 500th anniversary of the dis covery of America. The Hispanic members of the Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission are : Luis A Ferre, former governor of Puerto Rico; John Goudie, president of Goudie & Associates in Miami; and Jane l,.ee Garcia, president of the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Reagan announced the appointments June 12. Planning for the quincentenary cele bration will begin after the commission members are sworn in by Secretary of State George Shultz in July. In a related item, plans to hold the 1992 World's Fair in Chicago are apparently dead. A state legislative panel recently issued a report warning that "proceeding with the fair as planned would be a misguided eco nomic decision. " 2 at the Anaheim Convention Center. It was the organization ' s 56th annual convention. Lopez added that Cesar Chavez, president of the United Farm Workers, had announced he would not attend the convention because of the Coors sponsorship. The coalition, joined by members of an AFLCIO Coors boycott committee, said Coors has a history of anti-union activities and that it has supported right-wing groups working against Hispanic interests . Lopez stressed that the coalition's complaint was against Coors , not LULAC . "We are not picketing LULAC," she said . " We are doing an informational picket of Coors." The picket was the latest attack against Coors and its much heralded national agreement with six national Hispanic organizations signed last fall. The criticism moved one signa tor of the pact , the National Puerto Rican Coalition, to withdraw in May. LULAC did not sign the national agreement. In early June about 1 00 protesters gathered in Denver to protest Coors support of the LU LAC state convention in Colorado. Neither Coors nor LULAC officials could be reached for comment. $8.6 Million for Elderly The Asociaci6n Pro Personas Mayores, a Los Angeles-based support group for the elderly, will receive $8. 6 million in federal funds to provide jobs for elderly workers, Secretary of Labor William Brock announced. The funding will go to the Asociaci6n's Project Ayuda, which provides 1,740 part time community service jobs nationwide for low income workers over 55. Hispanics account for about 71% of all workers participating in Project Ayuda . Announcement of the funding came June 5 . The Asociaci6n was one of eight orgarii zations receiving $326 million, to be used . between July 1, 1985, and June 30, 1986, for services for the elderly. Naturalization Exam Bill Senator Charles Mathias (RMd.) has intro duced legislation that would allow persons over 65 years old with five years of residency to take the naturalization exam for U.S. citizen ship in the language of their choice. Senate Bill 1296, introduced by Mathias June 13 and initiated by the Hispanic Republican Club of Montgomery County, Md . , seeks to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 that only permitted persons to take the naturalization exam in a foreign language if they were over 50 and had 20 years of U . S . residency. Mass Bilingual Ed. Hit A group of Hispanic parents in Boston and six other major Massachusetts cities has charged the state with not providing adequate teaching services to an estimated 12,000 Hispanic students with limited English abilities. In a class-action suit filed in U.S. District Court in Boston June 14, the parents asked the court to order the stafe'to hire and train more teachers skilled in bilingual education and English as a Second Language . The suit also said that most ESL teachers failed to demonstrate "cultural familiarity and understanding of Hispanic students." It named as defendants Gov . Michael Dukakis, the state Board of Education, state Department of Education and school officials in Lynn, a cityof78,000 north of Boston that is 2.6% Hispanic . Grocery Chain Hiring Pact A major Southern California supermarket chain has agreed to step up the hiring and promotion of Hispanics under a consent decree announced in Los Angeles June 25. The five-year agreement was reached by Ralph's, a 126-store chain, and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. MALDEF reached a similar settlement last year with Vons, another Southern California supermarket chain with more than 170 stores. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS ILLEGALS OVERCOUNTED: The National Academy of Sciences has completed a report, "Immigration Statistics: A Story of Neglect," which finds that official estimates of the number of illegal aliens in the United States are higher than the actual number here. Cost of the 328-page report is $23.95. Contact: National Academy Press , 21 01 Constitution Ave . N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334-3313. CIVIL RIGHTS IN-FORMATION: The U.S . Commission of Civil Rights releases reports on an ongoing basis . The reports and a "Catalog of Publications" listing them are free . Direct inquiries to: U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Distribution Center, 612 North Payne St, Alexandria, Va 22314. Free subscriptions to the commission's monthly newletter, Civil Rights Update, may be obtai ned by writing the same office. FEDERAL REPORTS: The General Accounting Office prepares reports on subjects from national defense and social services to energy and veterans affairs . Single copies are free. To receive the office's Monthly List of GAO Reports contact U .S. General Accounting Office, Document Handling and Information Services Facility, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241. COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS: Since 1976 the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund has awarded $1.6 million to more than 3,000 His panic college students. For information on Fund activities send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: Selection Committee, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, P.O . Box 748, San Francisco , Calif . 94101. CARTOONISTS, WIN $50: Weekly Report is looking for the best edi tiorial cartoon depicting the "immersion method" of language instruction. For details, drop a card to: Immersion Method, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. BILINGUAL EDUCATION REPORT: The Department of Education has released a new 294-page report titled "National Longitudinal Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Services for Language Minority Limited-English-Proficient Students" Cost: $21.40. Contact. National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, 1555 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va. 22209 (800) 336-4560 or (703) 522-0710. VETERANS' MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS: July 15 is the deadline to apply for a scholarship program open to dependents of veterans, particularly those of veterans killed, disabled or wounded in action. The winners, 100 in all, will receive $5,000 each . Applicants must be under 22, have completed their freshman year in college and maintained a 2 .75 GPA For an application contact any American Gl Forum chapter or Adolph Coors Company, Veterans' Memorial Scholarship Fund, Mail Number 329, Golden, Colo. 80401. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in yo ur search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone yo ur corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates : 75 cents per word . Display rates: $35 per column inch. PRESS RELATIONS SPECIALIST sought EDITOR FOR WEEKLY REPORT by the New Jersey Edu ca tion Association. HISPANIC LIN K NEWS SERVICE, Wash i ngtof\ Candidate should be able to transfer complex D.C., seeks editor/reporter for its national ideas into simple, direct prose; should have new s weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly R eport. training and experience in journalis m and Candidate to start on/aboutJ uly 15. Position media operations, including work as a news involves reporting, writing and editing on a reporter or in a position requiring day-tO""da y broad range o f news related to U.S . H ispanic contact with news reporters; should be fam iliar concerns. Excellent opportunity to report with the organization and operation of public and learn about federal government and the schoolsaswellaswiththeattitudesofschool statu s of Hispanics nationally. Spanish usefuL staffs and the activities of their representative Send inquiries, plus references, to Charlie organizations. Apply to : Marvin R. Reed, Ericksen, Hispan ic Lin k News Service, 1420 Director , Communications Division, NJEA 180 N St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234W. State Slreet, P.O. Bo x 1211 , Trenton , N.J. 0737. 08607. (609) 599. DEL MAR CALLEGE, Corpus Christi, Texas, has openings for COMMUNICATIONS IN STRUCTORS. Salary $22,660 minimum per 9 months. JOB DUTIES : Prepare and te ac h 5 courses each semester, primarily of develop mental English. Counsel students and assist them in extracurricular activities. Serve on committees and accept special assignments from supervisor. Perform administrative duties related to teaching assignment. Assists with advising and registration. REQUIREMENTS : Two years of college-level teaching experien ce, Bachelor's degree in English plus Master's degree with area of major emphasis in English and/orreading. CONTACT: Del Mar College, Administrative Service Office, Administration Building-Room 137, Baldwin& Ayers , Corpus Christi, Te xas 78404. TASTEFUL HISPANIC CALENDAR FEATURING TWELVE (HISPANIC) MALE •models needs financial support to get started PRESS/MEDIA COORDINATOR : Natio nal Hispanic public interest organization seeks editor to oversee production of bimonthl y newsletter, press releases and promotional mat e rials. Prefer experience in copy editing, design and proofreading. Send resume and writing samples to: National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO), 410 South Capitol St. SE , Washington, D .C. 20003. WRITER/EDITOR for American Republics Branch of the USIA Pre ss Service. Journalistic experience and fluency in Spanish required. Salary commens urate with experience. Submit a standard federal government application SF 171 to the U.S. Information Agency, M/PDP Room 518,301 Fourth St. SW, Wash ngton, D.C. 20547. Be sure to indicate an nouncement number PDP -34 7 -85 on application. All applications must be received by July 12, 1985. USIA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. and circulated. For details on project, write PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Robert Rivera, P.O. Box4195, University Park G&9/11/ 12. Office of Justice Programs. Call Branch, Las Cruces, N .M. 88003. Sharon May (202) 724 7725. Calendar HISPANIC LEADERSHIPTRAINING PROGRAM Miami July 14 CONFERENCE Chicago October 11-13 Maria Elena Molina (614) 464-1116 COMING SOON HOUSTON HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RECEPTION Houston July 10 Jorge Colorado (713) 224-5322 ANNUAL NOSOTROS GOLDEN EAGLE AWARDS Hollywood July 12 Jerry Velasco (213) 466-8566 TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL) ANNUAL MEETING Washington, D.C. July 12-13 Joyce Hutchings (202) 625-4985 EL PASO FESTIVAL El Paso July 12-14 Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533-1700 Hispanic Link Weekly Report Alina Becker (305) 642-3484 TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Antonio July 17-20 Elena de Ia Garza (512) 447-9821 NATIONAL HISPANIC PASTORAL ENCUENTRO Washington, D.C. Aug. 15-18 Rev. Juan Romero (202) 659-6878 NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BANQUET Las Vegas Sept. 6 Otto Merida (702) 385-7367 UNITED STATES HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL CONVENTION San Juan , P .R. Sept. 18-22 Cindy Hall (816) 842-2228 MIDWEST HISPANIC POLITICAL LEADERSHIP SPOTLIGHT The Washington Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers will sponsor several events during National Hispanic Heritage Week Sept. 15-21 in Washington , D.C. Representatives of more than 20 federal agencies will gather on Sept. 16 to recognize those federal employees who have made outstanding contributions to the His panic Employment Program in the Washington Metropolitan Area. Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor , Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C., 20005. 3

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Arts & Entertainment and NBC ,which got an award for having "the most shows featuring Latinos" in the 1984-85 season. THE FIRST NETWORK TELEVISION SERIES to win an Imagen Award has announced plans for the 1985-86 fall season that include changing the status of its only Latino " regular" character. In other fall season news: Patty (Apollonia) Kotero has joined the cast of ABC's Falcon Crest, while Cesar Romero will play a bullfighter and grandfather to Lorenzo Lamas in a "Mediterranean cruise" episode of The Love Boae also on ABC. Producers of Hill Street Blues, which garnered an Imagen Award during a luncheon in Los Angeles June 25, have announced a variety of changes that will be put into effect when the show returns in the fall. Among those changes, Nicaraguan actor Rene Enriquez will no longer be seen in every episode. Enriquez's character, Lieutenant Ray Calletano, will be promoted to captain of another precinct. A NEW SUBMISSION PROGRAM TO BE LAUNCHED by the Writers Guild of America West this month is being criticized by some WGAW members who claim the program will reduce opportunities for Hispanics and other ethnic groups. A spokesman for Enrl:.juez said the actor actually will be featured more prominently this fall than in the past. Enriquez' s new agreement with MTM Productions, brought about by negotiations initiated by the actor, calls for his character to be featured in at least six episodes next season. The agreement reportedly will allow Enriquez to work on more feature film projects nex t year. The so-called " non discrimination scri pt-submission program," aimed at women, minorities, disabled and older writers, is an expansion of an old WGAW program aimed solely at increasing employment of ethnic minority writers. The new program "would be a detriment to minorities, "according to WGAW member Ramon Ponce . He told Weekly Report that by increasing the categories for qualification, the new program would actually decrease opportunities for Hispanics. Hill Street Blues, which is broadcast by NBC, will begin production for the 1985-86 season July 11. Three Imagen Awards were handed out this year by the Hispanic Medial mage Task Force of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. The other recipients were Gregory Nava ' s fi!m El The new program results from the recently signed WGAW contract in which signatory producers agreed to look at scripts by qualifying w riters e very month. The contract reads : "Some companies will receive four scripts per month; others will receive one. " Media Report MEDIA VIE FOR SOUTH FLORIDA LATINOS: Spanish-speaking residents in South Florida's Dade and Broward counties, nearing the one million mark, are being courted by two new television stations and another newspaper. The two counties, encompassing Miami and Ft. Lauderdale, already have a Spanish International Network affiliate (Channel23). They saw Blair Spanish Television launch a new station June 2 (Channel 51), and will see yet another station (Channel69) on the air in early 1986. Blair is a television firm with Spanish-language stations in Puerto Rico, Oklahoma and California. Channel 69 was purchased recently by a group of Miami business men , includ i ng Miam i National Bank Chairman Francisco de Borb6n. Noticias del Mundo, a Spanish-language daily newpaper owned by the Rev. Sun HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nati o n al publication o f : Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street, N. W. Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Pub lish er: H ector Eri c ksen -Mendoza Editor: St eve Padill a Report ing: Charlie Eric ksen , Antonio Mej i as-Rentas, Carlos Morales, Julio Ojeda. No portion of Hispanic Link Week l y R e p o rt mayb e r e p rod u c e d o r broadcast in any for m without advance per missio n . Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CON FEREN C E CO ORDIN A T O RS: In c lud e th e late s t e diti o n of Hispanic Li nk Weekly R e port in p a rti c i pa nt s ' pa c k e t s a t your next conference or convent io n . F o r details, con tac t Hector Ericksen M e nd o z a ( 2 02) 234737 . Myung Moon ' s Unification Church and already in New York and Los Angeles, has plans to put out a 30,000-copy daily in Miami in October . Noticias will compete for the Spanish reader with El Diario de las Americas and El Miami Herald which have 49,100 and 75,000 daily circulations, respectively. f South Florida currently has seven Spanish"J language radio stations. .' PUBLICATION CEASES: Hispanic Monitor, the eight-page monthly newsletter that covered Hispanic political and economic news nationwide and debuted in January 1984, announced June 21 that it will "temporarily cease publication." The New York-based monthly served between 200-300 subscribers. HOME FOR NAHJ: The board of directors of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, meeting in New York June 22-23, selected Washington, D .C., as its national headquarters. Frank Newton, executive director of NAHJ , expects to move into the new office, located in D.C.'s National Press -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Building, in September. The board also chose Los Angeles as the site for NAHJ ' s 1987 conference (next year's is in Miami) and to send a th . ree-person com mittee to Puerto Rico in July to develop better ties. (NAHJ currently has only two members from the island.) Joining the association's officers and at large representatives (Weekly Report May 6) were se . y en newly elected regional represen tatives : ' (Puerto Rico , Region 1, has not elected a representative)( Region 2, Evido de Ia Cruz, reporter, El Diario-La Prensa, New York; Region 3, Elisabeth Perez Luna, independent producer, Toucan Productions, Philadelphia ; Region 4 , Evelyn Hernandez, reporter, The Miami Herald; Region 5, Victor Vasquez, news director, KINTTV, El Paso, Texas; Region 6 , Rosa Morales(altemate Elisa Alfonso attended), producer, WKARTV, East Lansing, Mich.; Region 7 , Don Flores , assistant managing editor, Tucson Citizen; Region 8, Julio Moran , reporter, Los .Angeles Times. Carlos Morales Hispanic Link Weekly Report