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Hispanic link weekly report, July 22, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 22, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Presidential assistant for Hispanic affairs Cathi Villalpando, who leaves the White House soon to open Washington, D.C., offices for Atlanta-based Communications International, Inc. (she’s senior vice president), receives the 1985 Escuadron Mexicano201 International Award for Excellence on the World War II Mexico flight squadron’s 40th anniversary... The U.S. Senate approves Fernando Rond6n as ambassador to Ecuador July 11. . . Texas Lt. Gov. Bill Hobby celebrates Independence Day with San Antonio’s Community Organization for Public Service, crediting COPS and its leader, Helen Ayala, with the passage of the state’s first indigent health program, a
$70 million package. . . Jos6 P6rez, post office administrator in Bakersfield, Calif., is sworn in July 22 as the first Hispanic postmaster
for Denver, Colo___Associate counsel for Southern California John
Huerta announces his departure from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund to become a name partner in the law firm Gronemeier, Barker and Huerta there, effective Sept. 15... Jos6 Fallad, one of four Hispanic firemen who recently turned down affirmative action promotions in Miami, says accepting a promotion would be admitting “I’m not as good.”. . . Henry Martinez Porter becomes the second Texas prisoner in as many weeks to be put to death by lethal injection July 9 for the murder of a Fort Worth police officer in 1975. He is the fifth man put to death in Texas this year and the ninth since the state resumed executions in 1982...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
JTPA Failing to Serve Latinos, Critics Claim
A program to increase Hispanic participation in the U.S. Department of Labor's Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) awaits Senate backing, while critics continue to say that the act is not properly serving economically disadvantaged Latinos.
Established in late 1983, JTPA provides job training to economically disadvantaged individuals, dislocated workers and others who face significant employment barriers.;
Unlike its predecessor, the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), this program leaves most administrative duties to the states. The labor department disburses block grants to governors who allocate the funds in their states.
On the municipal level, local officials and private sector volunteers allocate funds to
INS ‘Child-Bait9 Charged
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is holding children of undocumented aliens as “hostages” to catch their parents, a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles July 11 claims.
The American Civil Liberties Union, the National Center for Immigrants’ Rights and other advocacy groups are joining in the class action. They charge that the INS is refusing to release children it apprehends to relatives or other legally responsible adults, and that the children lack adequate schooling, recreation, clothing arid protection from adult prisoners in the detention facilities.
The policy will keep some 2,000 children from their parents this year, compared to 800 last year, the groups allege.
The suit asks for an injunction against the policy, which was established in 1983 and formalized last fall, and for the release of the children unless conditions are improved.
An INS spokesperson responds to Weekly Report that the policy is in the children’s best interests to insure that they are not turned over to unauthorized people. He dismisses the charge that the children are “bait” by commenting: “We catch a million people a year. We would not do that to catch a few more.”
qualified local job training programs.
The National Council of La Raza is seeking labor department funding for a new program that would help increase the number of Hispanic training programs participating in JTPA
Hispanics accounted for33,590, or 10%, of the program enrollees in the last half of 1984. Of these, 95% were economically disadvantaged; 40% received some kind of public assistance.
Secretary of Labor William Brock boasted that 68% of the Hispanic enrollees later found jobs at average hourly wages of $4.57, just below the white average of $4.62. CETA had only a 30% placement rate, he said.
Labor Department official Steve McManus attributed the success of JTPA to the fact that 70 cents of every dollar are spent on actual training programs, compared to only 18 cents
Taco Chain Bought Out
The Pallas-based Taco Villa fast-food chain, which operates 146 Mexican fast-food restaurants under the names Del Taco and Taco Villa, bought out Florida’s largest Mexican fast-food chain, Taco Viva, for a reported $23 million July 9.
Taco Viva, based in Fort Lauderdale, operates 74 restaurants in the Southeast. It was launched 15 years ago by J. Brion Foulke. Taco Villa is a subsidiary of W.R. Grace and Company.
Together they anticipate running 400 restaurants for about 16% of the national market. Pepsico’s Taco Bell has 60% of the market, with about 2,000 outlets nationwide.
Few LatinoTeens Working
Only 33.2% of Hispanic teenagers held jobs in June, according to the Roosevelt Centennial Youth Project.
By comparison, 23.8% percent of black teenagers were employed and 46.3% of white teenagers had jobs.
The Washington, D.C. -based advocacy group also found that U.S. 16 to 19-year-olds suffered a net loss of 300,000 jobs since late 1982, even though 7.3 million jobs have been added to the economy since then.
The official unemployment rate among teenagers fell from 18.9% to 18.3% in June.
in CETA. Decentralization has given local JTPA officials greater discretion in funding programs that fill a specific need in the communities, he added.
But Marta Escutia, La Raza legislative director, claimed that needy Hispanics are failing to get into JTPA partly as a result of a shortage of participating programs willing to hire Hispanics.
“Local programs are under pressure to take applicants who will be the easiest to place later,” she said, which often causes them to “cream,” or reject all but the best candidates. Left out are the “hard core” unemployed, including many of the 787,000 unemployed Hispanics, she claimed.
As a solution, La Raza has designed the Technical Assistance in Job Partnerships program which would coach community-based Hispanic organizations in steps to secure JTPA funds. These would then hire disadvantaged Hispanics, Escutia said.
continued on page 2
Challengers Surpass Ferre
Miami Mayor Maurice Ferr6 may face serious competition in his November bid to be reelected that city’s mayor for the seventh time. Three candidates - all Hispanic - have already received more money in campaign contributions to date than the incumbent.
Campaign contribution reports filed with the city clerk’s office July 10 show Miami banker Raul Masvidal leading all candidates with $232,086 raised. Ferre reported $86,735.
Masdival is joined by another political newcomer in Miami mayoral politics, millionaire heiress Gely Gutierrez, who was second with $113,726 raised-$110,016 which she reported came out of her own pocket. Lawyer Xavier Suarez, the front-runner in most early polls, reported raising $104,542. Su&rez fought a bitter race against Ferre in 1983.
Rounding out the field of eight registered candidates are two other Hispanics- military school owner Evaristo Marina and former Cuban national police head Manuel Benitez. Marina reported raising $8,700 while Benitez did not file by the deadline.
The mayoral primary election is Nov. 5 with a run-off, if necessary, scheduled for Nov. 12.


Sin pelos en la lengua
SIGNIFICANT MEETING: The National Hispanic Pastoral Encuentro, set for Washington, D.C., Aug. 15-18, takes on added importance with the elevation of Bishop Roger Mahoney to archbishop for the Los Angeles diocese and the presence of Cesar Chavez as special invitee.
Chavez is about to begin his new national grape boycott in earnest and expects to get between 3% and 5% of the public behind his new high-tech effort. Thafs enough to make it succeed, he says. As always, church support will be critical. (When the United Farm Workers were in vogue with the public in past years, polls showed between 10% and 12% active support for the UFW by the U.S. adult population.)
Mahoney, a key farm worker supporter and major contributorto the church's Hispanic pastoral letter, will share the spotlight with Archbishops Patricio Flores of San Antonio and Roberto Sdnchez of Santa Fe,
N.M., both of whom will deliver statements at the opening mass. One key problem to be discussed: recruiting Hispanics for the priesthood.
Through Flores’ efforts, some 20 young men recruited from Mexico have recently been ordained to serve in the United States. But, points out Moises Sandoval in a recent four-page series on Hispanic Catholics for the National Catholic News Service, of the 1,500 U.S. Hispanics priests, only 185 are native born, down from 200 in 1970.
Sandoval quotes Flores: “Vocations are better than they have been, but in terms of need, they are hardly a drop in the bucket.” He also quotes Hector Madrigal, a seminarian from Brownsville now in theological studies at St Meinrad Seminary in Indiana: “I grew up with the idea that to be a priest you had to be Irish...” Mahoney, serving in the huge, 60% Hispanic Los Angeles diocese, should have real impact in changing those numbers, predicts Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the U.S. Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C.
- Kay Barbaro
JTPA Failing to Serve Hispanics
Islanders Testify on 936
Puerto Rican politicians, businessmen and lobbyists joined forces July 11 to protest President Reagan's proposed elimination of business tax credits for U.S. companies based on the island.
Testifying before the House Ways and Means Committee, Puerto Rico Governor Rafael Hernandez Colon said that a federal tax-free environment has attracted high-tech companies to the island. He argued that the administration’s proposed wage credit system would drive companies away.
“This proposal would destabilize our entire economy, throw thousands of Puerto Ricans out of work and force many to flee to the U.S. mainland in search of jobs, ” he said.
An estimated 90,000 Puerto Ricans work for companies operating under the provision, called section 936 after its number in the tax code. Some analysts believe, however, that “indirect” employment attributable to 936 accounts for one third of jobs on the island.
Millie Torres, chairperson of the Alexandria, Va. -based National Puerto Rican Coalition, said that reduced revenues from the island and increased social services for unemployed Puerto Ricans would cancel out the money saved by axing 936.
No decision on 936 is expected until September, but indications are that Congress will make less drastic changes than those proposed by the Reagan administration. Jaime Fuster, Puerto Rico’s resident commissioner, is confident that committee members opposed to the tax credits are in a minority.
Actor Rafael Campos Dies
Hispanic actor Rafael Campos, who began a 30-year film career with the movie Blackboard Jungle, died of cancerJulyl 1 in Los Angeles. He was 49.
Campos was born in the Dominican Republic and came to the United States in 1949. He was discovered in New York by Blackboard Jungle director Richard Brooks in the movie which also launched the careers of actors Vic Morrow, Sidney Poitier and Jamie Farr.
Campos, who was married and divorced twice, is survived by two daughters, Lucy and Mimi, from his second marriage to model Sally Boyd, and nine brothers and sisters.
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continued from page 1
The labor department has twice refused to fund the La Raza program, but Escutia hopes that House and Senate support will change the outcome this year. The House is expected to recommend the funding in its Appropriations Bill and the Senate may follow sometime in the next month, strengthening La Raza’s case before the department,
A study by the Grinker-Walker& Associates, a research group, found that“minimal” funding, $3.6 billion this year compared to$10.2 billion in 1979, allows assistance to only3%to5% of the eligible population.
The study also found that:
• 80 of JTPA field offices, responsible for allocating funds, were not attempting to determine “those most in need of and able to benefit from its services,” despite a mandate
Pope Picks Mahoney
Long-time activist for farm worker causes Bishop Roger Mahoney was named July 16 by Pope John Paul II as Archbishop of Los Angeles, the nation’s largest Roman Catholic archdiocese. An estimated 60% of its 2.6 million parishioners are Hispanic.
Mahoney, 49, presently serves as Bishop of Stockton in Northern California He is a Los Angeles native and fluent in Spanish. He has fought since the ’60s to improve conditions for California farm workers and served on the writing committee for the pastoral letter approved by the full body of bishops in November 1983 on “Hispanic Presence: Challenge and Commitment.”
In 1975, he was appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown as the state’s first head of the historic Agricultural Labor Relations Board. He took leave from the church to serve for a year.
Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the United States Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C., praised Mahoney as a Hispanic champion on social justice and immigration issues, predicting a much greater leadership role in the church for Hispanics as a result of Mahoney’s appointment.
Mahoney replaces Archbishop Timothy J. Manning, who reached the church’s mandatory retirement age of 75 last November.
to do so.
• Despite a mandate to enroll a percentage of high school dropouts equal to the percentage in the overall disadvantaged population (66.5% last year), the program was only taking in 33.5%. Also, most local JTPA field offices did not have programs in place specifically for high school dropouts. The Hispanic dropout rate in 1982 was 18.7%, the highest in the nation.
These program flaws can be attributed in part to a lack of adequate federal supervision of the field offices, Escutia said.
She did not dispute the labor departmenf s claim that local jurisdictions are the most qualified to determine the JTPA programs best suited for them, but she added, “We’ve gone from one extreme, the overly centralized CETA program, to the other.”
Decentralization also accounts for apparent violations by program offices of existing civil rights anti-discrimination laws, according to a study conducted by the Illinois Unemployment and Job Training Research Project of the University of Chicago.
At the time of the report, dated June 4, the group said that only eight states were found to be in compliance with the civil rights laws.
“Under state administration (of the JTPA program), the guarantees of civil rights laws have ceased to exist” the report said.
— Julio Ojeda
Latina Miss Universe
In a competition in which four of the five selected finalists were Latinas, Deborah Carthy-Deu of San Juan, Puerto Rico, was crowned Miss Universe in Miami July 15.
Carthy-Deu, a 19-year-old university student is the second contestant representing Puerto Rico to win the title. Marisol Malaret won in 1970.
Other Latinas in the top five were Teresa Sanchez (Miss Spain, first runner-up), Silvia Martinez (Miss Venezuela, third runner-up) and Andrea Lopez (Miss Uruguay, fourth runner-up).
Miss USA, Laura Martinez-Herring, a 22-year-old Mexican American from El Paso, was among the pageant’s 10 semifinalists.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
FOR TEENAGERS: The Census Bureau published July 15 a 24-page bilingual booklet Nosotros- We the Hispanic Americans, designed as an educational aid for teenagers. Blending text photos, tables and charts, it offers data on U.S. Hispanics’ status in employment, education, housing, wealth, age, etc. Cost: $1.00. Discount of 25% for 100 copies or more. Order prepaid from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
CIVIL RIGHTS AND JTPA: A 26-page study by a Chicano research group published June 4 examines alleged civil rights violations in the screening of Job Training Partnership Act applicants. To order free copies of the University of Chicago’s Illinois Unemployment and Job Training Research Project, “Civil Rights, the New Federalism and the Job Training Partnership Act,” write to: Ms. Genevieve Galbreath, Room 518, House Annex 1, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 226-7594.
INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED: Deadline for submission of applications for two full-year reporting internships in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Aug. 12. Funded through the Gannett Foundation, the National Puerto Rican Coalition internships pay $15,000 annual salaries to work as reporters with Hispanic Link News Service. Candidates should be of Puerto Rican heritage and committed to a print journalism career. For applications, contact: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link pays $25 for cartoons, editorial or humorous, for publication in Weekly Report Submit to: Carlos Morales, Editor, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
HISPANICS AND JTPA: A 10-page issue brief published by the National Council of La Raza analyzes alleged flaws in the Job Training Partnership Act and their impact on U.S. Hispanics. The brief is based on a report published by Grinker, Walker& Associates, a research group, earlier this year. To order copies of “The First Nine Months of the JTPA - A Hispanic Analysis of the Grinker-Walker Report: Round II,” send $1 to: Marta Escutia, 20 F St NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C, 20001 (202) 628-9600.
PUERTO RICAN STATUE COMPETITION: The Association of Hispanic Arts in New York is sponsoring a sculpture competition for the erection of a Public Arts Statue of the renowned Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos. The statue, to be erected on the patio of the Heckscher Building, which houses El Museo del Barrio, will be the first of its kind devoted to a major Puerto Rican figure and Hispanic woman in the United States. For “Rules and Guidelines for the Julia de Burgos Public Arts Statue Competition,” write: Association of Hispanic Arts, 200 East 87 th Street, 2nd Floor, New York, N.Y. 10028 (212) 369-7054. Deadline: Aug. 2.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N Si NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
EDITOR/WRITER, Office of Public Affairs, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. DUTIES: Editing and writing publicity materials, writing for University magazine, and coordination with news media. QUALI* FICATIONS: Ability to interview faculty for research stories, to write and edit news and feature stories, and to explain feature and news ideas to media in articulate manner. SALARY: Up to $14,000 depending upon qualifications. Send resume to: Office of Personnel, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064.
COPY EDITOR/PROOFREADER for the International City Management Association. We're looking for someone with excellent editorial skills, and a bachelor’s degree, preferably in English, Journalism, Public Administration, or combination Primary duties will be copy editing and proofreading several monthly and quarterly publications on local government management subjects Work also includes copy marking and coordinating production with our production department Starting salary $16275 to $17,900; excellent benefits package. Resume to: Editor Position, ICMA Box 85, Ben Franklin Station, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20004.
WRITER/EDITOR,(GS - 9/11), sought by the U.S. Dept, of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., (Announcement No. EMS-85-225). Incumbent performs writing/editing assignments and other information dissemination tasks Submit Standard Form 171 (Personal Qualifications Statement), performance appraisal and a statement providing examples of relevant experience, training, education and awards related to each of the evaluation criteria Send to: Fran Hresan, EMS, PD. OB, RM- 1403-South Bldg., 14th & Independence Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20250 (202) 447-6130.
THE LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS, Washington, D.C, seeks assistant for LATIN AMERICAN PROJECT. Position involves research, writing, editing and translating on Latin American topics. Must have academic background in Latin American Studies or equivalent work experience. Fluency in Spanish necessary. Beginning salary $17,000 per yean medical benefits included. Send resume and writing sample to: LULAC, 400 First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanic Women's Council, Inc, a membership organization headquartered in Los Angeles, California, seeks qualified applicants for the position of EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. HE/SHE is responsible for fiscal and management functions of this non-profit corporation and reports to a 15-member board of directors. Position requires 2 to 3 years experience in administration or management of a nonprofit organization or business enterprise; experience in fiscal and grant management; strong verbal/written communication skills in English and Spanish. Salary range starting at $30,000 or commensurate with experience. Resume and references must be received by August 2 at HWC, 5803 East Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90022.
PRESS/MEDIACOORDINATOR: National Hispanic public interest organization seeks editor to oversee production of bimonthly newsletter, press releases and promotional materials Prefer experience in copy editing, design and proofreading. Send resume and writing samples to: National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials(NALEO). 410 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC AMERICAN FESTIVAL Washington, D.C. July 21-28 D.C. government, local Latino agencies, businesses and individuals will present musical and cultural performances and workshops culminating in an outdoor parade through the Adams Morgan community on July 28.
Antonio Melus (202) 673-6764
LAW DAY - HISPANIC BAR ASSOCIATION OF D.C.
Washington, D.C. July 24
Lectures and counseling opportunities will be offered on topics such as immigration, domestic relations, landlord-and-tenant disputes and government benefits.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Thomas Gonzalez (202) 659-5500
COMING SOON
CONSORTIUM OF NATIONAL HISPANIC
ORGANIZATIONS
Washington, D.C. Aug. 1
Pepe Barron (202) 387-3300
LATINO YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Sacramento, Calif., Aug 4-10 Roberto Gracia (916) 445-7777
INTENSIVE INTERPRETERS’ WORKSHOPS La Jolla, Calif. Aug. 5-10,12-17 Jose Valera-Ibarra (619) 284-5921
NATIONAL HISPANIC PASTORAL ENCUENTRO Washington, D.C. Aug. 15-18 Rev. Juan Romero (202) 659-6878
CINE FESTIVAL
San Antonio, Texas Aug 16-23
Eduardo Diaz (512) 271-9070
VI HEMISPHERIC CONGRESS OF THE LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF USA Miami Sept. 3-7 Omar Sixto (305) 642-3870
HISPANIC NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION CONVENTION
New York Sept. 5-8
William Mendez (212) 488-5189
NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BANQUET
Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 6 Otto Merida (702) 385-7367
CONFERENCE ON HUMAN RESOURCES
DEVELOPMENT
Dallas Sept. 11-12 •
Gwen Breaux (214) 767-8218
NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK Washington, D.C. Sept. 15-21 Louisa Castro (202) 653-1207
3


Arts & Entertainment
AN EMOTIONAL, POSTHUMOUS HOMAGE TO DOMINICAN actor Rafael Campos and the “discovery’ of two Hispanic celebrities highlighted the 15th annual Nosotros Golden Eagle Awards held July 12 in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Rafael Campos, who began his career in 1955 when he was cast as a young Puerto Rican in Richard Brooks’ Blackboard Jungle, died July 9 at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 49.
Nosotros founder and first President Ricardo Montalban said, in presenting the Golden Eagle for a “most consistent performance by an actor in motion pictures and television,” that Campos “was one of the most remarkable young men I have ever met. He knew he was going to receive this award and he was very happy.”
As in recent years, the Golden Eagle Awards is an occasion for the entertainment industry to “discover” some of its Latino celebrities. Acknowledging their Hispanic heritage this year were Hank Grant, a columnist with the Hollywood Reporter, and writer/choreographer Nicholas Dante.
“When I first started as a singer,” Grant confessed, “a Spanish name indicated that you would sing nothing but Spanish songs.” At
the urging of mentor Rudy Vallee, audience, he
Anglicized his given name of Enrique Victor Galante.
Nicholas Dante, a co-writer ofthe ^
Chorus Line, said upon receiving his Qc(^n£algl9j.m^ he found his first name (Conrado) “ugly and his last name (Morales) “boring.” Dante, who has won a Pulitzer and a Tony award for A Chorus Line, was born to Puerto Rican parents in New York.
“I would like to accept this award not as Nicholas Dante... but in my parents’ honor... as Conrado Morales Jr.”
AN ESSAY ABOUT THE DECADES OLD SEARCH FOR the head of Mexican outlaw and mythical figure Joaquin Murrieta is featured as the July cover story of California Magazine.
Written by Richard Rodriguez (whose Hunger of Memory was a best seller in 1982), the essay was inspired by a California Jesuit priest’s desire to revindicate the memory of Murrieta, find his head and give it Christian burial.
According to Rodriguez, Father Alberto Huerta wrote a letter to California Gov. George Deukmejian (with copies mailed to “well-known Hispanics”), asking for help in finding the severed head. Historians, disagree on the identity or cause of death of Murrieta; more than one legend claimed that he was shot by a California Ranger in 1853 and that his head was cut off and preserved in ajar.
— Antonio Mejias-RentdJS
of Hispanic Journalists. Last month the new NAHJ board met in New York and approved the president*s suggestion that it bestow an annual award on a U.S. Hispanic newsperson for journalism excellence, starting at the fourth national Hispanic media conference in Miami next April.
The board concurred And it concurred with the president’s recommendation that the award be named in honor of Guillermo Martinez Marquez.
Guillermo Martinez has found his way to say thanks.
DATEBOOK: The National Association of Black Journalists holds its annual conference in Baltimore July 31 through Aug. 4... Jorge Mas Canosa, Chairman of the Presidential Advisory Board on Radio Broadcasting to Cuba, will speak at the July 31 lunch meeting of the Hispanic Public Affairs Association In Washington, D.C.
— Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales Reporting: Julio Ojeda, Juan Marcos Vilar,-Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Media Report
ROLE MODEL: Based in Miami, 85-year-1 old Guillermo Martinez Marquez writes six columns a week for newspapers in Los Angeles, New York and Miami and more than a dozen periodicals in Latin America.
He is a founding past president of the Inter American Press Association and, after 61 years in the business, is “probably the best-known Cuban-born journalist in this hemisphere,” by his son’s estimation.
His son, Guillermo Martinez, is a well-known journalist himself. He is a provocative columnist and editorial board member with The Miami Herald.
Last October, Guillermo took a columnist’s prerogative to write about his father. The occasion was the senior Martinez’s act - at age 84 — of taking out United States citizenship
As a journalist, Martinez M&rquez had opposed
all dictatorships, Guillermo recalled— “often risking his life in the process.” Three times he had been exiled, twice by the right, once by the left “He would not accept press censorship, either under Fulgencio Batista or Fidel Castro.
“My father sent me away to preparatory school in Connecticut at 17 to prevent my getting involved in the island’s political turmoil ... and so I could learn English. He explained that one day I would thank him for it...
“Early in Castro’s regime, the dictator accused my father of having accepted payola under Batista. My father took the evidence of his innocence on television and accused Castro of lying. . . The consequences forced us to leave Cuba. My father came to the United States with nothing. He was 60 years old.” Guillermo completed his lengthy tribute: “I never told him how proud I am of him; of his life; of the example he set for me... ”
Three months ago, Guillermo Martinez was •elected president of the National Association
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week $70 million package . . . Jose Perez, post office administrator in Bakersfield , Calif . , is sworn in July22 as the first His panic postmaster for Denver, Colo . . . . Associate counsel for Southern California John Huerta announces his departure from the Mex ican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund to become a name partner in the law firm Grone meier, Barker and Huerta there, effective Sept. 15 ... Jose Fallad, one of four Hispan ic firemen who recently turned down affirmative action promotions in Miami, says accepting a promotion would be admitting " I'm not as good." ... Henry Martinez Porter becomes the second Te x as prisoner in as many weeks to be put to death by lethal injection July 9 for the murder of a Fort Worth police officer in 1975. He is the fifth man put to death in Te x as this year and the ninth since th e stat e resum e d e xecutions in 1982 ... Presidential assistanrtor Hispanic affairs Cathi Villalpando, who leaves the White House soon to open Washington, D . C., offices for Atlanta-based Communications International, Inc . ( she ' s senior vice president), receives the 1985 Escuadr6n Me x icano 201 International Award for Excellence on the World War II Mexico flight squadron ' s 40th anniversary ... The U.S . Senate approves Fernando Rond6n as ambassador to Ecuador July 11 . . . Texas Lt. Gov . Bill Hobby celebrates Independence Day with San Antonio ' s Community Organi zation for Public Service, crediting COPS and its leader, Helen Ayala, with the passage of the state ' s first indigent health program , a Vol. 3 No. 29 HISPANIC LINK EEKL EPORT July 22, 1985 *JTPA Failing t o Serve Latinos, Critics Claim A program to increase Hispanic participation in the U .S. Depa rtment of Labor's Job Training . Partnership Act (JTPA) awaits Senate backing , while critics continue to say that the act is not properly serving economically disadvantaged Latinos. Established in late 1983,. JTPA provides job training to economically disadvantaged individuals, dislocated workers and others who face significant employment barriers. ; . Unlike its predecessor , the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), this program leaves most administrativ e duties to the states. The labor department disburses block grants to governors who allocate the funds in their states. On the municipal level, local officials a nd private sector volunteers allocate funds to INS 'Child-Baif Charged The U.S. Immigration and Naturali zation Service is holding children of undocumented aliens as "hostages" to catch their parents, a suit filed in U . S . District Court in Los Angeles July 11 claims. The American Civil Liberties Union, the National Center for Immigrants' Rights and other advocacy groups are joining in the class action . They charge that the INS is refusing to release children it apprehends to relatives or other legally responsi ble adults, and that the children lack adequate schooling, recreation , clothing and protection from adult pri soners in the detention facilities. The policy will keep some 2,000 children from their parents this year, compared to 800 last year, the groups allege . The suit asks for an injunction against the pol i cy, which was established in 1983 and formalized last fall , and for the release of the children unless condit ions are improved . An INS spokesperson responds to Weekly Report that the policy is in the children ' s best interests to insure that they are not turned over to unauthori zed people. He dismisses the charge that the children are "bait" by commenting: " We catch a m i llion people a year. We would not do that to catch a few more. " qualified local job tra i ning prog rams. The National Council of La Raza is seeking labo r department fund i ng for a new program that would help inc rease the numbe r of Hispanic training programs participating in JTPA Hispanics accounte d for33,590, or 10% , of the program enrollees in the last half of 1984. Of these, 95 % were economically disadvantaged ; 40% received some kind of public assistance. Secretary of Labor William Brock boasted that 68% of the Hispanic enrollees later found jobs at average hourly wages of $4.57, just below the white average of $4.62. CETA had only a 30% placement rate , he said . Labor Department official Steve McManus attributed the success of JTPA to the fact that 70 cents of every dollar are spent on actual training programs , compared to only 18 cents Taco Chain Bought Out Th e Pallasbased Taco Villa fast-food chain, which operates 146 Mex ican fast-food restau rants under the names Del Taco and Taco Villa , bought out Florida ' s largest Mexican fast-food chain, Taco Viva , for a reported $23 million July 9 . Taco Viva , based in Fort Lauderdale, operates 74 restaurants in the Southeast. It was launched 15 years ago by J . Brion Foulke. Taco Villa is a subsidiary of W .R. Grace and Company. Together they anticipate running 400 restau rants for about 16% of the national market. Pepsico ' s Taco Bell has 60% of the market, with about 2 ,000 outlets nationwide. Few Latino Teens Working Only 33. 2 % of H i spanic teenagers held jobs in June, according to the Roosevelt Centennial Youth Project. By comparis on , 23. 8 % percent of black teenagers were employed and 46. 3 % of white teenagers had jobs. ' T he Washington , D .C. based advocacy group also found that U.S. 16 to 19-year-olds suffered a net loss of 300,000 jobs since late 1982, even though 7.3 million jobs have been added to the e conomy since then. The official unemployment rate among teen agers fell from 18. 9 % to 18. 3 % in June. in CETA. Decentralization has given local JTPA officials greater discretion in funding programs that fill a specific need in the com m unities, he added. But Marta Escutia, La Raza legislati v e director , claim e d that needy Hi s p an ics a r e failing to get into JTPA, p a r t ly as a result of a shortage of pa r tici pating prog rams willing to hire Hispan i c s . " Local p rograms are under pressure to take applicants who will be the easiest to place later," she said , which often causes them to " cream ," or reject all but the best candidates. Left out are the " har d core" unemployed, including many o f the 787,000 un e mployed Hispanics, she claimed. As a solution, La Raza h a s d esigned the Technical Assistance in Job Partnerships program which would coac h community-based Hispanic organizations in steps to secure JTPA funds. These would then hire dis . advantaged Hispani cs, Escutia said. c o n tinue d o n page 2 Challengers Surpass Ferre Miam i Mayor Maurice Ferre may face serious competition in his November bid to be re elected that city's mayor for the seventh time. Three candidatesall Hispanic-have already received more money in campaign contributions to date than the incumbent. Campaign contribution reports filed with the city clerk' s office July 10 show Miami banker Raul Masvidal l e adi n g all candidates with $232,086 raise d . F e rr e reported $86,735. Masdival is joined by another political newcom e r in Miami mayoral politics, m i llionaire he ir e s s G ely Gutierre<., wroo was second with $113,726 rai sed -$110,016 which she reported came out of her own pocket. Lawyer Xav ier Suarez , th e front-runner in most early polls, reported raising $104,542. Suarez fought a bitter race against Ferre in 1983. Rounding out the field of eipht registered candidates are two other H ispanics-military school owner Evar isto Marina and former Cuban nat ional police head Manuel Benitez. Marina reported raising $8,700 while Benitez did not file by the deadline. The mayoral primary election is Nov. 5 with a run-off , if necessary, scheduled for Nov. 12.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua SIGNIFICANT MEETING: The National Hispanic Pastoral Encuentro, set for Washington, D .C., Aug . 15-18, takes on added importance with the elevation of Bishop Roger Mahoney to archbishop for the Los Angeles diocese and the presence of Cesar Chavez as special fnvitee. N M both of whom will deliver statements at the opening mass. One to be discussed : recruiting Hispanics for the priesthood. Chavez is about to begin his new national grape boycott in earnest and expects to get between 3% and 5% of the public behind his new high-tech effort. That's enough to make it succeed, he says. As always, church support will be critical. (When the United Farm Workers were in vogue with the public in past years , polls showed between 10% and 12% active support for the UFW by the U .S. adult population. ) Through Flores' efforts, some 20 young men recruited from Mexico have recently been ordained to serve in the United States. But, points out Moise's Sandoval in a recent four-page series on Hispanic Catholics for the National Catholic News Service, of the 1 ,500 U . S . Hispanics priests, only 185 are native born, down from 200 in 1970. Sandoval quotes Flores: "Vocations are better than they have been, but in terms of need, they are hardly a drop in the bucket. " He also quotes Hector Madrigal, a seminarian from Brownsville now in theologiciil studies at St. Meinrad Seminary in Indiana: " I grew up with the idea that to be a priest you had to be Irish ... " Mahoney, serving in the huge, 60% Hispanic Los Angeles diocese, should have real impact in changing those numbers, predicts Pablo Sedillo , director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the U.S. Catholic Conference in Washington, D . C . Mahoney, a key farm worker supporter and major contributor to the church's Hispanic pastoral letter, will share the spotlight with Archbishops Patricio Flores of San Antonio and Roberto Sanchez of Santa Fe , -Kay Barbaro lslandersTestityon936 JTPA Failing to Serve Hispanics Puerto Rican politicians, businessmen and lobbyists joined forces July 11 to protest President Reagan's proposed elimination of business tax credits for U . S . companies based on the island . Testifying before the House Ways and Means Committee, Puerto Rico Governor Rafael Hernandez Colon said that a federal tax-free environment has attracted high-tech companies to the island. He argued that the administrat i on ' s proposed wage credit system would drive companies away. "This proposal would destabilize our entire economy, throw thousands of Puerto Ricans out of work and force many to flee to the U.S. mainland in search of jobs," he said . An estimated 90,000 Puerto Ricans work for companies operating under the provision , called section 936 after its number in the tax code. Some analysts believe , however, that "indirect" employment attributable to 936 accounts for one third of jobs on the island . Millie Torres, chairperson of the Alexandria, Va. -based National Puerto Rican Coalition , said that reduced revenues from the island and increased social services for unemployed Puerto Ricans would cancel out the money saved by axing 936. No decision on 936 is expected until September, but indications are that Congress will make less drastic changes than those proposed by the Reagan administration. Jaime Fuster, Puerto Rico ' s resident commissioner, is confident that committee members opposed to the tax credits are in a minority. Actor Rafael Campos Dies Hispanic actor Rafael Campos, who began a 30-year f ilm career with the movie Blackboard Jungle, died of cancer July 11 in Los Angeles . He was 49. Campos was born in the Dominican Republic and came to the United States in 1949. He was discovered in New York by Blackboard Jungle director Richard Brooks in the movie wh i ch also launched the careers of actors Vic Morrow, Sidney Poitier and Jamie Farr . Campos, who was married and divorced twice, is survived by two daughters, Lucy and Mimi , from his second marriage to model Sally Boyd , and nine brothers and sisters. 2 continued from page 1 The labor department has twice refused to fund the La Raza program, but Escutia hopes that House and Senate support will change the outcome this year. The House is expected to recommend the funding in its Appropriations Bill and the Senate may follow sometime in the next month , strengthening La Raza ' s case before the department, A study by the Grinker Walker & Associates, a research group, found that"minimal " funding, $3.6 billion this year compared to $1 0 . 2 billion in 1979, allows assistance to only3o/o to5o/o of the eligible population. The study also found that: e 80 of JTPA field offices, responsible for allocating funds, were not attempting to determine " those most in need of and able to benefit from its services," despite a mandate Pope Picks Mahoney Long-time activist for farm worker causes Bishop Roger Mahoney was named July 16 by Pope John Paul II as Archbishop of Los Angeles, the nation ' s largest Roman Catholic archdiocese. An estimated 60% of its 2.6 million parishioners are Hispanic . Mahoney, 49, presently serves as Bishop of Stockton in Northern California . He is a Los Angeles native and fluent in Spanish . He has fought since the '60s to improve conditions for California farm workers and served on the writing committee for the pastoral letter approved by the full body of bishops in November 1983 on "Hispanic Presence : Challenge and Commitment. " In 1975, he was appointed by Gov . Jerry Brown as the state' s first head of the historic Agricultural Labor Relations Board . He took leave from the church t6 serve for a year. Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the United States Catholic Conference in Washington, D.C., praised Mahoney as a Hispanic champion on social justice and immigration issues , predicting a much greater leadership role in the church for Hispanics as a result of Mahoney's appointment. Mahoney replaces Archbishop Timothy J . Manning , who reached the church's mandatory retirement age of 75 last November. to do so. • Despite a mandate to enroll a percentage of high school dropouts equal to the percentage in the overall disadvantaged population (66 . 5% last year) , the program was only taking in 33. 5% . Also, most local JTPA field offices did not have programs in place specifically for high school dropouts. The Hispanic dropout rate in 1 982 was 18.7% , the highest in the nation. These program flaws can be attributed in part to a lack of adequate federal supervision of the field offices , Escutia said. She d i d not dispute the labor department's claim that local jurisdictions are the most qualified to determine the JTPA programs best suited for them, but she added , "We've gone from one extreme, the overly centralized CETA program, to the other. " Decentralization also accounts for apparent violations by program offices of existing civil rights anti-discrimination laws , according to a study conducted by the Illinois Unemployment and Job Training Research Project of the University of Chicago. At the time of the report , dated June 4, the group said that only eight states were found to be in compliance with the civil rights laws . "Under state administration (of the JTPA program), the guarantees of civil rights laws have ceased to exist," the report said . -Julio Ojeda Latina Miss Universe In a competition in which four of the five selected finalists were Latinas, Deborah Carthy-Deu of San Juan , Puerto Rico , was crowned Miss Universe in Miami July 15. Carthy-Deu, a 19-year-old university is the second contestant representing Puerto Rico to win the title. Marisol Mala ret won in 1970. Other Latinas in the top five were Teresa Sanchez (Miss Spain, first runner-up), Silvia Ma rtinez (Miss Venezuela, third runner-up) and Andrea Lopez (Miss Uruguay, fourth rur\ner-up). Miss USA, Laura Martinez-Herring, a 22year-old Mexican American from El Paso , was among the pageant's 10 semifinalists. Hi s p a ni c Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS FOR TEENAGERS: The Census Bureau published July 15 a 24page bilingual booklet, Nosotros-We the Hispanic Americans, designed as an educational aid for teenagers. Blending text, photos, tables and charts, it offers data on U.S. Hispanics' status in employment, education, housing, wealth, age, etc. Cost: $1. 00. Discount of 25% for 1 00 copies or more. Order prepaid from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402. CIVIL RIGHTS AND JTPA: A 26-page study by a Chicano research group published June4 examines alleged c i vil rights violations in the screening of Job Training Partnership Act applicants. To order free copies of the University of Chicago' s Illinois Unemployment and Job Training Research Project, "Civil Rights, the New Federalism and the Job Training Partnership Act," write to: Ms. Genevieve Galbreath, Room518, House Annex 1 , Washington, D . C . 20515(202) 226-7594. INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED: Deadline for submission of applications for two full-year reporting internships in Washington, D .C., has been extended to Aug. 12. Funded through the Gannett Foundation, the National Puerto Rican Coalition internships pay $15,000 annual salaries to work as reporters with Hispanic Link News Service . Candidates should be of Puerto Rican heritage and committed to a print journalism career. For applications, contact: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 2340280. CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link pays$25 for cartoons, editorial or humorous, for publication in Weekly Report . Submit to: Carlos Morales, Editor, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20005. HISPANICS AND JTPA: A 1 0 page issue brief published by the National Council of La Raza analyzes alleged flaws in the Job Training Partnership Act and their impact on U . S . Hispanics . The brief is based on a report published byGrinker, Walker& Associates, a research group, earlier this year. To order copies of "The First Nine Months of the JTPA-A Hispanic Analysis of the Grinker-Walker Report: Round II," send $1 to: Marta Escutia, 20 F St. NW , 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C . . 20001 (202) 628-9600. PUERTO RICAN STATUE COMPETITION: The Association of Hispanic Arts in New York is sponsoring a sculpture competition for the erection of a Public Arts Statue of the renowned Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos. The statue, to be erected on the patio of the Heckscher Building, which houses El Museo del Barrio, will be the first of its kind devoted to a major Puerto Rican figure and Hispanic woman in the United States. For " Rules and Guidelines for the Julia de Burgos Public Arts Statue Competition," write: Association of Hispanic Arts, 200 East 87th Street, 2 nd Floor, New York, N.Y. 10028 (212) 369-7054. Deadline : Aug. 2 . CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates : 75 cents per word. Display rates : $35 per column inch . EDITOR/WRITER, Office of Publi c Affairs, THELEAGUEOFUNITEDLATlNAMERICAN The Catholic University of America. Washington, CITIZENS, Washington , D.C., seeks assistant D.C. DUTIES : Editing and writing publicity for LATIN AMERICAN PROJECT . Position materials, writing for University magazine, involves research. writing, editing and translat and coordination with news media . OUALIing o n Latin American topics. Must ha ve FICATIONS : Ability to interview fa cu lt y for academic backgroundinLatinAmericanStudies research stories, to write and edit news and o r equivalent work experience. Fluency in feature stories. and to explain feature and Spanish necessary. Beginning salary $17 ,000 news ideas to media in articulate manner. per ye ar; medical benefits included. Send SALARY: Up to $14,000 depending upon resume and writing sample to : LULAC, 400 qualifications. Send resume to: Office of First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C . Personnel , The Catholic University of America, 20001 . Washington, D . C . 20064. ,.....--------------, COPY EDITOR/PROOFREADER for the International City Management Association Were looking for someone with exc ellent editorial skills, and a bachelors degree, preferably in English, Journalism , Public Administration, or combination Primary duties will be copy editing and proofreading several monthly and quarterl y publications on local government management subjects. Work also includes copy marking and coordinating production with our production department Starting salary$16,275 to$17 ,900; excellent benefits package . Resume to: Editor Position, ICMA, Box 85, Ben Franklin Station, 1200 Pennsyl vania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20004. WRITER/EDITOR,(GS9 /11 ) , sought by the U . S . Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., (Announcement No. EM&85). In cumbent performs writing/editing assignments and other information disseminatio n tasks. Submit Standard Form 171 (Personal Ouali fications Statement) , performance appraisal and a statement providing examples of relevant experience, training, education and awards related to each of the evaluation criteria. Send to : Fran Hresa n , EMS, PO, OB, RM1403-South Bldg., 14th & Independence Ave. SW, Washington, D .C. 20250 (202) 447. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanic Women's Council Inc., a member ship organization headquartered in Los Angeles , California , seeks qualified appli ca nts for the posi tion of EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. HE/SHE is responsible for fiscal and management functions of this nonprofit corporation and reports to a 15member board of directors. Position requires 2 to 3 years experience in ad ministration or management of a non profit organization or business enterprise; experience in fiscal and grant m a nagement. strong verbal/written communication skills in English and Spanish . Salary range s tarting at $30,000 or commensurate with e x perien ce. Resume and references must be received by August 2 at HWC. 5803 East Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. Calif. 90022. PRESS/MEDIACOOROINATOR: National Hispanic public interest organization seeks editor to oversee pro du c tion of bimonthly news letter, press releases and promotional materials. Prefer experience in copy editing, design and proofreading. Send resume and writing samples to: National Association of L a tino Elected and Appointee Offi cia ls(NALEO), 410 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, D .C. 20003. Calendar Thomas Gonzalez (202) 659-5500 VI HEMISPHERIC CONGRESS OF THE LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF USA THIS WEEK HISPANIC AMERICAN FESTIVAL Washington, D . C . July 21-28 D . C . government, local Latino agencies, businesses and individuals will present musical and cultural performances and workshops culminating in an outdoor parade through the Adams Morgan community on July 28. Antonio Melus (202) 673-6764 LAW DAYHISPANIC BAR ASSOCIATION OF D.C. Washington, D.C . July 24 Lectures and counseling opportunities will be offered on topics such as immigration, domestic relations, landlord-and-tenant disputes and government benefits. Hispani c Link Weekly Report COMING SOON CONSORTIUM OF NATIONAL HISPANIC ORGANIZATIONS Washington, D . C . Aug . 1 Pepe Barron (202) 387-3300 LATINO YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Sacramento, Calif., Aug . 4-10 Roberto Grac(a (916) 445-7777 INTENSIVE INTERPRETERS' WORKSHOPS La Jolla, Calif. Aug. 5-10, 12-17 Jose ValeraIbarra (619) 284-5921 NATIONAL HISPANIC PASTORAL ENCUENTRO Washington, D .C. Aug. 15-18 Rev. Juan Romero (202) 659-6878 CINE FESTIVAL San Antonio, Texas Aug . 16-23 Eduardo Diaz (512) 271-9070 Miami Sept. 3 -7 Omar Sixto (305) 642 HISPANIC NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION CONVENTION New Ymk Sept. 5-8 William Mendez (21 2) 488-5189 NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BANQUET Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 6 Otto Merida (702) 385-7367 CONFERENCE ON HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT Dallas Sept. 11-12 Gwen Breaux(214) 767-8218 NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK Washington, D.C. Sept. 15-21 Louisa Castro (202) 653-1207 3

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Arts & Entertainment the urging of mentor Rudy Vallee , audience, he Anglicized his given name of Enr ique Vic t M efa'tt'n M AN EMOTIONAL, POSTHUMOUS HOMAGE TO DOMINICAN actor Rafael Campos and the "discovery" of two Hispanic celebrities highlighted the 15th annual Nosotros Golden Eagle Awards held July 12 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Nicholas Dante, a co-writer of the JilPRUI; musical A Chorus Line , said upon receiving his he found his first name (Conrado) " ugly " and his last name (Morales) "boring." Dante , who has won a Pulitzer and a Tony award for A Chorus Line, was born to Puerto Rican parents in New York . Rafael Campos, who began his career in 1955 when he was cast as a young Puerto Rican in Richard Brooks' Blackboard Jungle, died July 9 at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 49. " I would like to accept this award not as Nicholas Dante ... but in my parents ' honor . . . as Conrado Morales Jr." AN ESSAY ABOUT THE DECADES OLD SEARCH FOR the head of Mexican outlaw and mythical figure Joaquin Murri eta is featu red as the July cover story of California Magazine . Nosotros founder and first President Ricardo Montalban said , in presenting the Golden Eagle for a "most consistent performance by an actor in motion p ictures and television," that Campos " was one of the most remarkable young men I have ever met. He knew he was going to receive this award and he was very happy." Wr itten by Richard Rodriguez (whose Hunger of Memory was a best seller in 1982), the essay was inspired by a California Jesuit pries t' s desire to revindicate the memory of Murrieta, find his head and give it Ch r istian burial. As in recent years, the Golden Eagle Awards is an occasion for the entertainment industry to "discover" some of its Latino celebrities. Acknowledging their Hispanic heritage this year were Hank Grant , a columnist with the Hollywood Reporter, and writer/choreographer Nicholas Dante. According to Rodr iguez, Father Alberto Huerta wrote a letter to California Gov . George Deukmejian (with copies mailed to "well known Hispanics " ) , asking for help i n finding the severed head H i storians . disag ree on the identity or cause of death of Murrieta; more than one legend claimed that he was shot by a Cal i fornia Ranger in 1853 and that his head was cut off and preserved in a jar. "When I first started as a singer," Grant confessed, "a Spanish name indicated that you would sing nothing but Spanish songs. " At Media Report ROLE MODEL: Based in Miami , 85-yearl old Guillermo Martinez Marquez w rites si x columns a week for newspapers in Los Angeles, New York and Miami and more than a dozen periodicals i n Latin America . He is a founding past president of the Inter American Press Association and, after 61 years in the business, is "probably the best known Cuba!l"bom journalist in this hemisphere," by his son ' s estimation. H i s son , Guillermo Martinez , is a well-known journalist himself . He is a provocative column ist and editorial board member with The Miami Herald. Last October, Guillermo took a columnist's prerogative to write about his father. The occasion was the senior Martinez' s act-at age 84-of taking out United States citizenship. As a journalist Martinez Marquez had opposed . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A n at i ona l p u b lication of : Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street, N. W . Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publish er. H ector Erick s en-Mendo z a Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Julio Ojeda, Juan Marc o s Vilar , Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-R entas. No port ion o f H ispani c Link W eekl y Report maybe reproduced or b r oa dcast in a n y fo r m w ithout adva nce permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. all dictatorships, Guillermo recalled-" often r i sking his life in the process." Three times he had been exiled, twice by the right, once by the left " He would not accept press censor ship, either under Fulgencio Batista or Fidel Castro . "My father sent me away to preparatory school in Connecticut at 17 to prevent my getting involved in the island's political turmoil .. . and so 1 could learn English . He explained that one day I would thank him for it. .. "Early in Castro ' s regime , the dictator accused my father of having accepted payola under Batista . My father took the evidence of his innocence on television and accused Castro of lying ... The consequences forced us to leave Cuba . My father came to the United States with nothing. He was 60 years old." Gui l lermo completed his lengthy tribute: " I never told him how proud I am of him; of his life; of the example he set for me ... " .Three months ago, Guillermo Martinez was . elected president of the National Association -Antonio Mejias-RentaJ> of Hispanic Journalists. Last month the new NAHJ board met in New York and approved the presi d ent's suggesti on that it bestow an annual award on a U.S . Hispanic newsperson for journalism excellence, starting at the fourth national Hispanic media conference in Miami ne x t April. The board concurred. And it concurred with the president's recommendation that the award be named in honor of Guillermo Martinez Marquez. Guillermo Martinez has found his way to say thanks. DATEBOOK: The National Association of Black Journalists holds its annual con ference in Baltimore July31 through Aug . 4 . .. Jorge Mas Canosa , Chairman of t he Presi dential Advisory Board on Radio Broadcasting to Cuba, will speak at the July 31 lunch meeting of the Hispanic Public Affairs As sociation In Washington, D.C. Charlie Ericksen C O NFEREN C E COO RDINAT O RS: Incl ud e t h e l atest e d it i on o f H is p a ni c Lin k Weekl y R e p o rt in parti c ip a nts' p ac kets a t yo ur n ex t co n fere n ce or con ventio n . For de t a ils, con tact H ec t o r Ericksen M e nd o z a ( 2 0 2 ) 234-0737. CHILD HOSTAGES-I.N.S. BUILDS A BETTER MOUSETRAP 4 Hisp a ni c Link W ee kl y Rep o rt