Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, August 5, 1985

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, August 5, 1985
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
Antonia Hernandez, executive vice president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, is appointed president and general counsel of the organization July 27 for an indefinite term. A spokesperson for MALDEF says a new vice president would be chosen soon... Leticia Quezada is the first Hispanic woman, and second Hispanic ever, chosen to serve on the seven-member Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees July 25. She fills a seat vacated by Rick Tuttle who was elected city controller in April... The American Gl Forum re-elects Eduardo Berndldez chairman, Gilbert Ramirez, vice chairman and Luis T6llez, executive secretary, for one-year terms at their 37th annual convention in San Antonio July 22-28... Rev. Alvaro Corrada del Rio, brother of San
Juan, Puerto Rico, Mayor Baltasar Corrada 4LI Rio, isWiLd auxiliary bishop of the District of Columbia Aug. 4 at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Corrada becomes the first native Puerto Rican bishop in the United States. . . One hundred Bexar County, Texas, Republicans share breakfast to hail the switch from Democrat to Republican of Chief Deputy District Attorney Bob Arellano July 20. The switch could signal Arellano’s plans to run for the district court bench seat of Judge Roy Barrera Jr. if Barrera, his brother-in-law, goes after the Republican nomination for state attorney general, as rumored... Clothes designer Betsy Gonzales is named Hispanic Businesswoman of the Year by the New York Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.. .With Rosario Anaya providing the swing vote, the seven-member San Francisco Board of Education fires Superintendent Robert Alioto, replacing him with 30-year veteran Carlos Cornejo as interim superintendent...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Child Support Bureaucracy Freezes Out Latinas
The United States courts grant Hispanic Anglos, $2,475; Hispanas, $1,839; black*, sident of the National Association of Cuban
women a disproportionately low number of child support payment awards, and the amounts awarded are lower than those for Anglo women, according to a new Census Bureau study.
The study, released July 11, showed also that Hispanic women are less likely to collect the court-ordered payments.
The study, “Chjld Support and Alimony: 1983,” counted 790,000 Hispanic women involved in child support cases that year — 8.5% of the total. In only 41% of the Hispanas’ cases were awards made or agreed to. That contrasted to 67% for Anglo women.
Of those cases, 63% of the Hispanas and 77% of the Anglos actually received payments due them in 1983.
The mean benefits received that year were:
Immigration Bill Opposed
Some five Hispanic organizations are opposed to the immigration bill introduced July 25 by Reps. Peter Rodino (D-N.J.) and Romano Mazzoli (D-Ky.) while noting that the bill is an improvement over Sen. Alan Simpson’s (R-Wyo.) bill introduced earlier this year.
The Rodino* Mazzoli bill differs from Simpson’s in calling fortheformation of a newagency to investigate and prosecute charges of immigration-related discrimination practices The new bill would also grant amnesty to undocumented immigrants who entered the country before Jan. 1,1982.
The Simpson bill calls for a 1980 cutoff date, only after a proposed presidential commission has certified that enforcement measures have begun to curtail the flow of the undocumented.
“Rodino’s bill is no closer to achieving a consensus on immigration than any past bills,” Richard Fajardo, acting associate counsel with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said.
Other organizations opposing the bill include the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Council of La Razaandthe National Hispanic Leadership Conference.
$1,465. Yet in mean total income Hispanas were last, $10,067 to $10,188 for blacks and $13,534 for Anglos.
Not everyone agrees on the reasons for the significant differences in patterns of child support established by the report.
Alicia Baro of Coral Gables, Fla., president of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Woman, told Weekly Report that “culturally for H ispanic women, the tendency is either to work, seek welfare services, or depend on family members, rather than to seek solution through court, which is often costly, slow, embarrassing and painful.”
Graciela Beecher of Fort Wayne, Ind., pre-
Chicano Artist Dies
Ralph Maradiaga, well-known Chicano artist, cinematographer and co-founder of San Francisco’s Galeria de la Raza, died after suffering a heart attack July 19 in San Francisco. He was 50.
Maradiaga was co-director of the Galeria which he helped establish in 1970. He served on various national arts organization boards, including the National Endowment for the Arts’ Expanison Arts Program.
A memorial exhibit of his work is planned for November at the Galeria.
American Women, argued, “The figures in the report speak for themselves. Too many Hispanic fathers leave their women with the burden to fend for themselves and their childrea One group just has a higher moral commitment to their families than the other.”
Ivette Torres, chairwoman of the Washington, D.C., chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women, agreed with Baro that Hispanic women tend not to go to court with their child support disputes.
“Hispanic women have to be more aggressive in seeking court solutions,” she said. “However,” she added, “reports such as this one may erroneously portray that most delinquent
Strong Mayor Vote Set
Miami Mayor Maurice Ferr6 failed July 25 to remove from an Aug. 13 special election ballot a proposal to change the city government to a strong mayor system. The bid died when a majority of the five city commissioners refused to vote on it.
Presently the city manager is Miami’s most powerful elected official.
According to the plan, which would become effective in time for the November elections, the mayor and five commissioners would be elected at large.
continued on page 2
ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT CASES IN 1983
(figures in the thousands)
Total Court Cases Percent of Total Number of Cases Where Payments Awarded Percent of Cases Where Payments Awarded
CHILD SUPPORT
White Latino Black
6,183 790 2,341
66.4% 8.5% 25.1%
4,137 323 788
66.9% 40.9% 33.7%
ALIMONY
White Latino Black
14,250 1,103 2,573
79.5% 6.2% 14.3%
2,198 132 163
15.4% 12.0% 6.3%
1983." Census Bureau, U.S.
Source: Current Population Report "Child Support and Alimony: Department of Commerce.


Sin pelos en /a lengua
BAYOF FLORIDA: To paraphrase Porfirio Diaz, "Poor LULAC — so far from God, so near to Miami."
The League of United Latin American Citizens, a tightly-knit Texas Chicano fraternity for more than half a century, is facing more than just a political conversion this year.
If one believes the boasts of Miami educator Carlos Benitez, LULAC’s new conservative president, Oscar Morin of San Antonio, better take a referee’s whistle to future meetings.
Editor Ariel Remos reports in Miami’s Diario las Americas:
A 180-degree change in the orientation of LULAC was pointed out in Miami by its member, educator Carlos Benitez.
"We have succeeded in wresting control of LULAC from the liberals, and that was our purpose when we joined the organization," Benitez said
The change has not been easily brought about, but the product of an effort performed throughout the nation, according to Benitez “The fact should not be missed that the majority of LULAC’s members are persons with good intentions, but lacking a political education, thus easy targets for faulty information and disinformation," he affirmed.
Benitez has just returned from LULAC’s convention, held last June 30, in which a new leadership was elected and two resolutions were
passed that he deems very important: One supporting the liberalization of the issuance of visas for those who wish to leave Cuba, and another one calling for legal status to Nicaraguan exiles
“What has been accomplished is important, but we must keep working," Benitez said. “If we get a sufficient number of Cubans to join the organization, we will be able to get LULAC to represent the legitimate interests of all Latin-Americans in this country."
What’s that famous Texas battlecry? Remember Anaheim!
BILINGUAL BOOMERANG: Hispanic advocates continue to express their disgust over Department of Education Secretary William Bennett’s “anti-bilingual education” appointees to the new National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education, targeting chairman Anthony Torresand members Robert Rossierand Howard Hurwitz. Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) is even threatening to cut off the council’s $120,000 appropriation.
There’s another appointee they should look at, too: Cipriano Castillo, an elementary school principal from Garden Grove, Calif. According to the Los Angeles Times’ David Reyes, he’s known back home as a Tio Taco. Reyes quotes him: “When bilingual education first came out, I was a supporter.. . But now, it’s just a bunch of baloney.”
Baloney? At least, he could have called it chorizo.
— Kay Barbaro
Policeman Kills Gardener Child Support Cuts Latinas
UFW Renews Boycott
United Farmworkers President C6sar Chavez, joined by nine members of Congress, launched a new boycott of California table grapes in Washington, D.C., July 31 to protest perceived injustices by that staters Gov. George Deukmejian against farmworkers.
“The issue is one of representation,” Chdvez said, charging that Deukmejian has failed to enforce a 1975 state law that gives the UFW the right to negotiate contracts with employers on behalf of workers
An estimated 36,000 farm workers are still waiting for growers to sign contracts after they voted to be represented by the UFW, Chavez said.
Joining Chavez in support of the boycott were Congressional Hispanic Caucus members Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Esteban Torres(D-Calif).
Field Standard Pursued
A U.S. Court of Appeals July 24 decision to dismiss the suit filed in 1973 by the Migrant Legal Action Program seeking a field sanitation standard for farmworkers does not mean the issue is resolved, a staff attorney with the program said.
Luis Torres, an attorney with the Washington, D.C. -based program, said his office filed an Administrative Procedure Act review with the court on June 24 questioning the Labor Department's decision in April not to issue a standard on the evidence on record. He added that the Labor Department has until Aug. 10 to reply to their papers in court.
The ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia nullified an Aug. 10 deadline facing Labor Secretary William Brock to issue standards requiring farmers to provide toilets, drinking water and handwashing facilities for more than 500,000 farmworkers, mostly Hispanics
Torres said his office will petition the court for a rehearing this week.
A 46-year-old Los Angeles gardener was shot in the face with a 12-gauge shotgun and killed by a Los Angeles police officer July 28.
The teen-age nephews of Francisco Gutierrez said that officer Gariner Beasley, 24, fired on their uncle when he didn’t respond to the officer’s English-language command to “freeze” Gutierrez was a recent arrival from Guadalajara, Mexico.
Cancer Awareness Low
A recent study by the American Cancer Society found that Hispanic Americans are less aware of the seven warning signs of cancer them the general population and are less likely to seek early treatment.
The society’s July 29 study, "Hispanic’s Attitudes Concerning Cancer and Cancer Prevention,” was based on interviews with 800 Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans between December 1984 and February 1985. The society claims it is the first study of its kind among Hispanics.
H ispanic’s awareness of the signs of cancer ranged from 30% to 58%, compared with 46% to 85% in the general population.
Among the warning signs of cancer are a persistent cough or hoarseness, a change in bladder or bowel habits and persistent indigestion or difficulty swallowing.
An earlier cancer society study this year noted that Hispanic men may see a marked increase in their rates of lung cancer and other tobacco-related diseases.
Statistics in the study showed that Hispanic males have a slightly higher smoking rate (41.5%) than white men (39.3%) and blacks (40%). Until now, most studies have shown that Hispanics smoke less frequently than whites and blacks
Hispanic women, however, were shown to have considerably lower rates (27.4%) than either white (35.2%) or black women (39%).
continued from page 1
fathers are Hispanic, and cause them to be singled out for persecution.”
Although one out of three Hispanic fathers owing child support does not pay, delinquent Hispanic fathers are only one in ten of all delinquent fathers, the report showed In Texas, State Attorney General Jim Mattox kicked off a statewide campaign last month to round up men who have failed or refused to pay their child support obligations.
In San Antonio, the Express-News gave prominent page 1 play to the campaign and listed the “ten most wanted delinquent dads” as chosen by the attorney general’s office in Bexar County. Seven of the 10 were Hispanic in a community that is about 50% Hispanic.
On one point there seemed to be agreement. Elvira Valenzuela Crocker of Chevy Chase, Md., a member of the Montgomery County Commission for Women and longtime activist with the Mexican American Women’s National Association, summed up, “The report underlines the need for increased enforcement She added, “For Hispanic women whose economic standing and employment ranking fall below those of white women, child support is even more critical.”
— Juan Marcos Vilar
Latinas Get Less Alimony
Out of a total of 1,103,00 cases in which Hispanic women sought alimony payments, only 132,000 (11.9%) were awarded payment Of those women expecting payment in 1983, only 26,000 (56%) actually received payment according to the Census Bureau report “Child Support and Alimony: 1983.”
In contrast out of 14,250,000 cases in which white women sought alimony payments, 2,198,000 (15.4%) were awarded payment. Of those expecting payment in 1983,538,000 (76%) received it.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


I
THE GOOD NEWS
CHILD SUPPORT AND ALIMONY: A 15-page report by the Census Bureau contains statistics on child support and alimony awards and payments to women in the United States for 1983. Copies of the report, “Child Support and Alimony: 1983,” for which a price had not been set as Weekly Report went to press, are available by contacting: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. Request Current Population Report, Series P-23, No. 141.
CANTARE, CANTARAS MEMORABILIA: Posters and T-shirts to augment sales of the Latin American recording Cantarg, cantaras, which will support relief and development projects through UNICEF and USA for Africa, are available by calling, toll free, 1 -800-828-7756.
CANCER AWARENESS: A study by the American CancerSociety finds that Hispanics are less aware of the warning signs of cancer than the general population. Copies of “Hispanic’s Attitudes Concerning Cancer and Cancer Prevention” are available free of charge. Contact American Cancer Society, 1825 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 483-2600.
CANCER REPORT: A study published in the spring issue of World Smoking & Health, a journal of the American Cancer Society, says Hispanic men may see an increase in their lung cancer rates. Free copies of the magazine are available. Contact Adele Paroni, American Cancer Society, 4 West 35th St, New York, N.Y. 10001.
INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED: Deadline for submission of applications for two full-year reporting internships in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Aug. 12. Funded through the Gannett Foundation, the National Puerto Rican Coalition internships pay $15,000 annual salaries to work as reporters with Hispanic Link News Service. Candidates should be of Puerto Rican heritage and committed to a print journalism career. For applications, contact: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
JOBS! JOBS! JOBS! The National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education has a jobline listing employment opportunities throughout the country. Most jobs are in educational fields, but some are for business as well. Contact: NCBE, 1555 Wilson Blvd. Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va 22209 (703) 522-0710. Toll free number is (800) 336-4560.
CENSUS DATA: A variety of 1980 Census publications on Hispanics are available by contacting: Spanish Population Statistics, Bureau of the Census Population Division, Washington, D.C. 20233 (301)763-5219.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
FACULTY POSITION SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY FOR 1986-87 ACADEMIC YEAR POSITION: Assistant Professor (ladder rank). Human Growth and Development RESPONSIBILITIES: Teach and conduct research in the Human Development in the Social Environment sequence with applications to social work and social welfare. REQUIREMENTS: Doctorate in social work/ social welfare or related discipline; expertise required in theories and empirical research relating to issues affecting children and growth. APPLICATION DEADLINE September30,1985 Send vita and list of references to:
Dean
School of Social Welfare University of California Berkeley, Calif. 94720 The University of California is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR sought by the National Foundation for the Improvement of Education (NFIE). Candidates applying for this position should have experience in financial operations, programmatic implementation, personnel management and two or more years full-time teaching experience at the elementary, secondary or higher education level. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience. Candidates for this position should submit a letter of application, current resume relating experience to position qualifications and three references(names, addresses telephone numbers) to the Personnel Manager, Employee Relations National Education Association, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
OUTPATIENT CLINIC DIRECTOR AUSTIN, TEXAS
MASTERS DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICE. MINIMUM FOUR YEARS CLINICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE AT A RESPONSIBLE SUPERVISORY LEVEL IN A COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SETTING. EXPERIENCE SHOULD INCLUDE KNOWLEDGE OF CHILDRENS AND ADULT MENTAL HEALTH, MENTAL RETARDATION, CHEMICAL ABUSE, DSM III MANUAL AND DEVELOPMENT OF TREATMENT PLANS, CONTINUITY OF CARE/AFTERCARE MODELS. CASE MANAGEMENT. CRISIS INTERVENTION, AND SHORT-TERM TREATMENT. KNOWLEDGE OF SPANISH HIGHLY DESIRABLE.
SALARY: $2165 PER MONTH, TO BE INCREASED TO $2229 ON SEPTEMBER 1st AND AGAIN TO $2478 AFTER SIX MONTHS OF EMPLOYMENT. ATTRACTIVE BENEFITS PACKAGE.
APPLY: AUSTIN-TRAVIS COUNTY MHMR, 1430 COLLIER STREET, AUSTIN, TEXAS 78704.
ATOMHMR IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/ AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER.
EDUCATION POLICY FELLOWSHIP
National Hispanic organization announces availability of one-year Washington, D.C., based fellowship. Fellow will analyze education policies affecting Hispanics and prepare policy papers, testimony, etc. Academic ‘and professional background in education required. Spanish/English bilingual. Cash stipend $1,330/ month plus health benefits. Contact Lori S. Orum, National Counci of La Raza, (202) 628-9600.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
FESTIARTES ‘85-HISPANIC FESTIVAL New York Aug. 10
The Association of Hispanic Arts will present a celebration of Hispanic arts and crafts, food, dance and music from 1 p.m. until 8 p.m. at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn.
Millie Perdomo (212) 369-7054
INTENSIVE INTERPRETERS1 WORKSHOPS La Jolla, Calif. Aug. 5-10,12-17 These workshops are for people interested in becoming federal court interpreters. Tuition is $350 per session or $525 for both sessions. Group rates for more than three people are available.
Jos6 Valera-Ibarra (619) 284-5921
COMING SOON
NATIONAL HISPANIC CONSTRUCTION ENTERPRISES 5th ANNUAL CONVENTION Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Merrillville, Ind. Aug. 15-17 Manuel Rodriguez (219) 944-0440
NATIONAL HISPANIC PASTORAL ENCUENTRO 1 Washington, D.C. Aug. 15-18 Rev. Juan Romero (202) 659-6878
CINE FESTIVAL
San Antonio, Texas Aug. 16-23
Eduardo Diaz (512) 271-9070
VI HEMISPHERIC CONGRESS OF LATIN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Miami Sept. 3-7 Omar Sixto (305) 642-3870
HISPANIC NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION CONVENTION
NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BANQUET
Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 6 Otto Mgrida (702) 385-7367
HISPANIC SYMPOSIUM AND TRAINING CONFERENCE
Bakersfield, Calif. Sept. 12-13 Diane Santill&n (805) 834-7424
NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK Washington, q.C. Sept. 15-21 Louisa Castro (202) 653-1207
FIRST ANNUAL HISPANIC DESIGNERS FASHION SHOW Washington, D.C. Sept. 17 Penny Harrison (703) 620-3374
SPOTLIGHT
The Hispanic Health Council will sponsor a one-day conference entitled “ Alcohol Use and Abuse Among Hispanic Adolescents: State of Knowledge, State of Need,” Sept. 11 in Hartford, Conn. The purpose of the conference is to bring together alcohol and adolescence experts and Hispanic service agencies to provide a clear understanding of alcohol use among Hispanic youth and the potential risks and service needs of this population. A special report detailing conference findings and proposals will be prepared and available for the general public. Preregistration for the conference is Aug. 31. The fee is $12, $7.50 for students For more information contact Lani Davison (203) 527-8004.
3
; New York Sept. 5-8 William Mgndez (212) 488-5189


Arts & Entertainment
A SERIES OF PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS created from the Cantare, cantaras video went on the air on the SIN Television Network July 29.
The PSA’s - in 1, 2 and 3-minute versions - feature the song recorded by over 50 top Latin American recording artists to support relief and development projects through UNICEF and USA for Africa. SIN will air the announcements during its daylong schedule over 364 affiliates, along with a toll-free number where viewers can call in orders for Cantare, cantaras, shirts and posters (see Good News).
Already, SIN’s sister cable system, Galavision, has aired the Cantare, cantaras, video. A half-hour musical special, tapedatafund-raiser event held in June at the Miami Zoo, aired on Galavision’s regularly scheduled program El mundo del espectaculo during the first week of July. Besides the video, the program included interviews with some of the artists that appear on the recording and attended the fund-raiser.
Produced by the non-profit Hermanos, Cantare, cantaras was recorded in Hollywood in April and released (in single and 12-inch single versions) July 22 by CBS Records.
TWO HISPANIC-THEMED PROJECTS ARE AMONG 19 newPublic Television programs to receive funding during the Corporation for Public Broadcasting’s third round of Open Solicitation for fiscal year 1985.
Of the fifteen projects funded for production, one is a 60-minute drama about a young girl from El Salvador who flees to Los Angeles with her mother. Maricela is to be produced by Phyllis Geller of the Los Angeles PBS affiliate KCETand Richard Soto, of Richard Soto Productions.
Another Hispanic project is among four funded for research and development. Mexico, to be produced by Austin Hoyt of WGBH in Boston, will be a series on 20th century Mexican history.
ONE LINERS: Elyssa Davalos has joined the cast of CBS’ series Scarecrow and Mrs. King in a recurring role as a United Nations translator. She will be introduced in the fall in the episode titled Over The Limit... Laredo-born artist Amado Maurilio Pena has presented the city of Austin with Celebracidn de Austin- his interpretation of the city’s celebration of Texas’ Sesquicentennial anniversary next year. ... San Antonio’s Urban 15 company is auditioning people interested in experimental music and dance performance on Aug. 7... MiamPs 2nd annual Festival of Ethnic Theatre begins Aug. 10 at that city’s Museum of Science auditorium...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
PHOTOGRAPHER WINS INS SUIT: The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and two of its agents were ordered July 29 to pay photographer Octavio G6mez and his employer, the Los Angeles Spanish- language newspaper La Opinidn, $295,000 for harassment.
The Newspaper and Gdmez, 51, had filed a suit against INS two years ago asserting that Gdmez was intimidated and assaulted while covering INS actions in 1981.
In her decision following the six-day trial, U.S. District Judge Mariana Pfaelzer labeled the conduct of the INS agents “outrageous” and “intentional.” She awarded compensatory and punitive damages of $195,000 to Gdmez and $100,000 to the paper. I NS agents Stuart Martin and Trevor Avenetti were instructed to pay $15,000 and $5,000 of the awards themselves.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales Reporting: Julio Ojeda, Juan Marcos Vilar, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
' ‘o portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Gdmez has been a La Opinion photographer for seven years. The suit hinged on three separate incidents.
Gdmez testified that on Aug. 20, 1981, agent Martin took his camera and press credentials while he was photographing a demonstration by Catholic nuns who were protesting against the deportation of Salvadorans at the Los Angeles Federal Building.
Gdmez said that even after he presented his La Opinidn press credentials, the agent demanded proof of his legal status and made comments implying that he could be arrested and deported.
Gdmez, a native of Mexico, has been a legal U.S. resident since 1968.
Eight days later while covering an INS round-up of undocumented workers, Gdmez again had his camera taken away and he was physically threatened by agent Avenetti, he testified. He added that agent Martin told him “I have a file on you."
On Sept. 9 the same year, La Opinidn protested the treatment of Gdmez to then-
U.S. Attorney Andrea Ordin. The following day, when La Opinidn reported that a federal investigation of the INS tactics would be conducted, Martin and another agent arrested two men engaged in remodeling work at the La Opinidn building. La Opinidn called the arrests an attempt to intimidate the newspaper. The INS lawyer said that they were pure coincidence, stating that the agents didn’t realize that it was the La Opinidn building.
Both Gdmez and La Opinidn publisher Ignacio Lozano J r. hailed the decision for its principle more than for its monetary award.
Lozano commented that the damage award was secondary to the principle of a journalist being able to do his job without I NS harassment
INS counsel William Odencrantz called the awards exorbitant “Somebody was unkind to Gdmez on two occasions,” he was quoted in the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. “That’s a lot of money to get for having someone be unkind to you.”
He said he planned to recommend that the Judgment be appealed.
-Charlie Ericksen
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

dfUCA Making The News This Week llf:l f-\ . 10Qt::; I Juan , Puerto Rico, Mayor Baltasar Corrada 1s Brdg' med auxiliary bishop of the District of Columbia Aug . 4 at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception . Corrada becomes the first native Puerto Rican bishop in the United States . . . One hundred Bexar County, Texas, Republicans share breakfast to hail the switch from Democrat to Republican of Chief Deputy District Attorney Bob Arellano July 20. The switch could signal Arellano's plans to run for the district court bench seat of Judge Roy Barrera Jr. if Barrera, his brother-in-law, goes after the Republican nomination for state attorney general, as rumored . . . Clothes designer Betsy Gonzales is named Hispanic Businesswoman of the Year by the New York Hispanic Chamber of Commerce . . . With Rosario Anaya providing the swing vote, the seven-member San Francisco Board of Education fires Superintendent Robert Alioto, replacing him with 30-year veteran Carlos Cornejo as interim superintendent. . . Antonia Hernandez, executive vice president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, is appointed president and general counsel of the organization July 27 for an indefinite term. A spokesperson for MALDEF says a new vice president would be chosen soon ... Leticia Quezada is the first Hispanic woman, and second Hispanic ever, chosen to serve on the seven-member Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees July 25. She fills a seat vacated by Rick Tuttle who was elected city controller in April. . . The American Gl Forum re-elects Eduardo Bernaldez chairman, Gilbert Ramirez, vice chairman and Luis Tellez, executive secretary, for one-year terms at their 37th annual convention in San Antonio July 22 ... Rev. Alvaro Corrada del Rio, brother of San Vol. 3 No. 31 PANIC LINK WEE Aug.5,1985 .J{ Child Support Bureaucracy Freezes Out Latinas The United States courts grant Hispanic Anglos, $2,475; Hispanas, $1 ,839; blaclcc:. sident of the National Association of Cuban women a disproportionately low number of child support payment awards, and the amounts awarded are lower than those for Anglo women, according to a new Census Bureau study . The _ study, released July 11, showed also that Hispanic women are less likely to collect the court-ordered payments. The study, " Child Support and Alimony: 1983," counted 790,000 Hispanic women involved in child support cases that year-8.5% of the total . In only41% of the Hispanas' cases were awards made or agreed to. That contrasted to 67% for Anglo women. Of those cases, 63% of the Hispanas and 77% of the Anglos actually received payments due them in 1983. The mean benefits received that year were: Immigration Bill Opposed Some five Hispanic organizations are opposed to the immigration bill introduced July 25 by Reps. Peter Rodino (DN.J.) and Romano Mazzoli (DKy.) while noting that the bill is an improvement over Sen. Alan Simpson's (R Wyo.) bill introduced earlier this year. The Rodino-Mazzoli bill differs from Simpson's in calling for the formation of a new agency to investigate and prosecute charges of immigration related discrimination practices. The new bill would also grant amnesty to undocumented immigrants who entered the country before Jan. 1, 1982. The Simpson bill calls for a 1980 cutoff date, only after a proposed presidential com mission has certified that enforcement measures have begun to curtail the flow of the un documented. "Rodino's bill is no closer to achieving a consensus on immigration than any past bills," Richard Fajardo, acting associate counsel with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said. Other organizations opposing the bill include the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Council of La Raza and the National Hispanic Leader ship Conference. $1,465. Yet in mean total income Hispanas were last, $10,067 to $10,188 for blacks and $13,534 for Anglos. Not everyone agrees on the reasons for the significant differences in patterns of child support established by the report. Alicia Bar6 of Coral Gables, Fla . , president of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Woman, told Weekly Report that "culturally for Hispanic women, the tendency is either to work, seek welfare services, or depend on family members, rather than to seek solution through court, which is often costly, slow, embarrassing and painful." Graciela Beecher of Fort Wayne, Ind., preAmerican Women, argued, "The figures in the 'eport speak for themselves . Tc'o many His panic fathers leave their women with the burden to fend for themselves and their children One group just has a higher moral com mitment to their families than the other." lvette T orres, chairwoman of the Wash ington, D .C., chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women , agreed with Bar6 that Hispanic women tend not to go to court with their child support disputes. "Hispanic women have to be more aggressivt in seeking court solutions," she said. "However," she added, "reports such as this one may erroneously portray that most delinquent continued on page 2 ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT CASES IN 1983 (figures in the thousands) CHILD SUPPORT ALIMONY White Latino Black White Latino Black Total Court Cases 6,183 790 2,341 14,250 1,103 2,573 Percent of Total 66.4% 8 . 5% 25.1% 79. 5% 6 . 2% 14.3% Number of Cases Where Payments Awarded 4,137 323 788 2,198 132 163 Percent of Cases Where Payments Awarded 66. 9% 40. 9% 33.7% 15 . 4% 12.0% 6 . 3% Source : Current Population Report "Child Support and Alimony : 1983."Census Bureau, U . S . Department of Commerce . Chicano Artist Dies Ralph Maradiaga, well-known Chicano artist, cinematographer and co-founder of San Francisco's Galeria de Ia Raza, died after suffering a heart attack July 19 in San Francisco. He was 50. Maradiaga was co-director of the Galeria which he helped establish in 1970. He served on various national arts organization boards, including the National Endowment for the Arts' Expanison Arts Program. A memorial exhibit of his work is planned for November at the Galeria. Strong Mayor Vote Set Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre failed July 25 to remove from an Aug. 13 special election ballot a proposal to change the city govern ment to a strong mayor system. The bid died when a majority of the five city commissioners refused to vote on it. Presently the city manager is Miami's most powerful elected official. According to the plan , which would become effective in time for the November elections. the mayor and five commissioners would be elected at large.

PAGE 2

Sin pelos en Ia lengua passed that he deems very important: One supporting the liberalization of the issuance of visas for those who wish to leave Cuba, and another one calling for legal status to Nicaraguan exiles. BAY OF FLORIDA: To paraphrase Porfirio Dlaz, "Poor LV LACso far from God, so near to Miami . " The League of United Latin American Citizens, a tightly-knit Texas Chicano fraternity for more than half a century, is facing more than just a political convers i on this year . "What has been accomplished is important, but we must keep working," Benitez said "If we get a sufficient number of Cubans to join the organization, we will be able to get LULAC to represent the legitimate interests of all Latin-Americans in this country." If one believes the boasts of Miami educator Carlos Benitez, LULAC's new conservative president, Oscar Moriln of San Antonio, better take a referee's whistle to future meetings. Editor Ariel Remos reports in Miami's Diario las Americas : A 180-degree change in the orientation of LULAC was pointed out in Miami by its member, educator Carlos Benitez. we have succeeded in wresting control of LULAC from the liberals, and that was our purpose when we joined the organization," Benitez said. What's that famous Texas battlecry? Remember Anaheim! BILINGUAL BOOMERANG: Hispanic advocates continue to express their disgust over Department of Education Secretary William Bennett's "anti-bilingual education" appointees to the new National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education, targeting chairman Anthony Torres and members Robert Rossler and Howard Hurwitz. Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) is even threatening to cut off the council's $120,000 appropriation. The change has not been easily brought about, but the product of an effort performed throughout the nation, according to Benitez. "The fact should not be missed that the majority of LULAC's members are persons with good intentions, but Jacking a political education, thus easy targets for faulty information and disinformation," he affirmed. There's another appointee they should look at, too: Cipriano Castillo, an elementary school principal from Garden Grove, Calif. According to the Los Angeles Times' David Reyes, he's known back home as a Tio Taco. Reyes quotes him: "When bilingual education first came out, I was a supporter . . . But now, it's just a bunch of baloney." . Benitez has just returned from LULAC's convention, held last June 30, in which a new leadership was elected and two resolutions were Baloney'? At least, he could have called it chorizo . UFW Renews Boycott United Farm Workers President cesar Chavez, joined by nine members of Congress, launched a new boycott of California table grapes in Washington, D.C., July 31 to protest perceived injustices by that state's Gov . George Deukmejian against farmworkers. " The issue is one of representation," Chavez said, charging that Deukmejian has failed to enforce a 1975 state law that gives the UFW . the right to negotiate contracts with employers on behalf of workers. An estimated 36,000 farm workers are still waiting for growers to sign contracts after they voted to be represented by the UFW, Chavez said. Joining Chavez in support of the boycott were Congressional Hispanic Caucus members Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) Edward Roybal (DCalif.) and Esteban Torres(D-Calif.). Field Standard Pursued A U.S. Court of Appeals July 24 decision to dismiss the suit filed in 1973 by the Migrant Legal Action Prog(am seeking a field sanitation standard for farmworkers does not mean the issue is resolved, a staff attorney with the program said. ' Luis Torres, an attorney with the Washington, D .C. -based program, said his office filed an Administrative Procedure Act review with the court on June 24 questioning the Labor Department's decision in April not to issue a standard on the evidence on record. He added that the Labor Department has until Aug. 10 to reply to their papers in court. The ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia nullified an Aug. 1 0 deadline facing La bot' Secretary William Brock to issue standards requiring farmers to provide toilets, drinking water and handwashing facilities for more than 500,000 farmworkers, mostly Hispanics. Torres said his office will petition the court for a rehearing this week. 2 Kay Barbaro Policeman Kills Gardener Child Support Cuts Latinas A 46-year-old Los Angeles gardener was shot in the face with a 12-gauge shotgun and killed by a Los Angeles police officer July28. The nephews of Francisco Gutierrez said that officer Gariner Beasley, 24, fired on their uncle when he didn't respond to the officer's English-language command to."freeze.• Gutierrez was a recent arrival from Guadalajara, Mexico. Cancer Awareness Low A recent study by the American Cancer Society found that Hispanic Americans are less aware of the seven warning signs of cancer than the general population and are less likely to seek early treatment. The society's July 29 study, "Hispanic's Attitudes Concerning Cancer and Cancer Prevention," was based on interviews with 800 Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans between December 1984 and February 1985. Tl:le society claims it is the first study of its kind among Hispanics. Hispanic's awareness of the signs of cancer ranged from 30% to 58%, compared with 46% to 85% in the general population. Among the warning signs of cancer are a persistent cough or hoarseness, a change in bladder or bowel habits and persistent in digestion or difficulty swallowing . An earlier cancer society study this year noted that Hispanic men may see a marked increase in their rates of lung cancer and other tobacco-related diseases . Statistics in the study showed that Hispanic males have a slightly higher smoking rate (41.5%) than white men (39.3%) and blacks (40%). Until now, most studies have shown that Hispanics smoke less frequently than whites and blacks. Hispanic women, however, were shown to have cons, iderably lower rates (27.4%) than either white (35.2%) or black women (39%). continued from page 1 fathers are Hispanic, and cause them to be singled out for persecution.'' Although one out of three Hispanic fathers owing child support does not pay, delinquent Hispanic fathers are only one in ten of all delinquent fathers, the report showed. In Texas, State Attorney General Jim Mattox kicked off a statewide campaign last month to round up men who have failed or refused to pay their child support obligations. In San Antonio, the Express-News gave prominent page 1 play to the campaign and listed the "ten most wanted delinquent dads" as chosen by the attorney generars office in Bexar County. Seven of the 1 0 were Hispanic in a community that is about 50% Hispanic . On one point there seemed to be agree ment. Elvira Valenzuela Crocker of Chevy Chase, Md., a member of the Montgomery County Commission for Women and longtime activist with the Mexican American Women's National Association, summed up, " . The report underlines the need for increased enforcement She added, "For Hispanic women whose economic standing and employment ranking fall below those of white women, child support is even more critical." -Juan Marcos Vi/ar Latinas Get Less Alimony Out of a total of 1,1 03,00 cases in which Hispanic women sought aiimony payments, only 132,000 (11.9%) were awarded payment Of those women expecting payment in 1983, only 26,000 (56%) actually received payment, according to the Census Bureau report, "Child Support and Alimony: 1983." In contrast, out of 14,250,000 cases in which white women sought alimony payments, 2,198,000 ( 15.4%) were awarded payment. Of those expecting payment in 1983 , 538,000 (76%) received it. Hispanic link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

THE GOOD NEWS CHILD SUPPORT AND ALIMONY: A 15-page report by the Census Bureau contains statistics on child support and alimony awards and payments to women in the United States for 1983. Copies of the report, "Child Support and Alimony: 1983," for which a price had not been set as Weekly Report went to press, are available by contacting: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783. Request Current Population Report, Series P-23, No. 141. CANT ARE, CANTARAS MEMORABILIA: Posters and Tshirts to augment sales of the Latin American recording Cantare, cantanis, which will support relief and development projects through UNICEF and USA for Africa, are available by calling, toll free, 1 7756. CANCER AWARENESS: A study by the American Cancer Society finds that Hispanics are less aware of the warning signs of cancer than the general population. Copies of "Hispanic's Attitudes Con cerning Cancer and Cancer Prevention" are available free of charge. Contact: American Cancer Society, 1825 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 483. CANCER REPORT: A study published in the spring issue of World Smoking & Health, a journal of the American Cancer Society, says Hispanic men may see an increase in their lung cancer rates. Free copies of the magazine are available. Contact: Adele Paroni, American Cancer Society, 4 West 35th St., New York, N.Y. 10001. -..""'"------...,.-INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED: Deadline for submission of applications for two full-year reporting internships in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Aug. 12. Funded through the Gannett Foundation, the National Puerto Rican Coalition internships pay $15,000 annual salaries to work as reporters with Hispanic Link News Service. Candidates should be of Puerto Rican heritage and committed to a print journalism career. For applications, contact: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-<>280. JOBS! JOBS! JOBS! The National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education has a jobline listing employment opportunities throughout the country. Most jobs are in educational fields, but some are for business as well. Contact: NCBE, 1555 Wilson Blvd. Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va 22209 (703) 522 0. Toll free number is (800) 336 4560. CENSUS DATA: A variety of 1980 Census publications on His panics are available by contacting: Spanish Population Statistics, Bureau of the Census Population Division, Washington, D.C. 20233 (301) 763. Merrillville, Ind. Aug. 15 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Lir.k help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: S35 per column inch. FACULTY POSITION SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY FOR 1986-87 ACADEMIC YEAR POSITION: Assistant Professor (ladder rank). Human Growth and Development. RESPONSIBILITIES: Teach and conduct research in the Human Development in the Social Environment sequence with applfcation3 to social work and social welfare. REQUIREMENTS: Doctorate in social work/ social welfare or related discipline; expertise required in theories and empirical research relating to issues affecting children and growth. APPLICATION DEADLINE: September30,1985 Send vita and list of references to: Dean School of Soci al Welfare University of California Berkeley, Calif. 94720 The University of California is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer. OUTPATIENT CLINIC 'DIRECTOR AUSTIN, TEXAS MASTER'S DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICE. MINIMUM FOUR YEARS CLINICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE AT ARE& PONSIBLE SUPERVISORY LEVEL IN A COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SETIING. EXPERIENCE SHOULD INCLUDE KNOW LEDGE OF CHILDREN'S AND ADULT MENTAL HEALTH, MENTAL RETARDATION, CHEMICAL ABUSE, DSM Ill MANUAL AND DEVELOPMENT OF TREATMENT PLANS, CONTINUITY OF CARE/AFTERCARE MODELS, CASE MANAGEMENT, CRISIS INTERVENTION, AND SHORT-TERM TREATMENT. KNOWLEDGE OF SPANISH HIGHLY DESI RABLE. SALARY: $2165 PER MONTH , TO BE IN CREASED TO $2229 ON SEPTEMBER 1st AND AGAIN T0$2478 AFTER SIX MONTHS OF EMPLOYMENT. ATIRACTIVE BENEFITS PACKAGE. APPLY: AUSTIN-TRAVIS COUNTY MHMR, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR sought by the 1430 COLLIER STREET, AUSTIN, TEXAS National Foundation for the Improvement of 78704. Education (NFI E). Candidates applying for ATOMHMR IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/ this position should have experience in financial AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. operations, programmatic implementation, personnel management and two or more EDUCATION POLICY FELLOWSHIP years teaching experience at the elementary, secondary or higher education National Hispanic organization announces level Salary is competitive and commensurate availability of on&year Washington, D . C., with experience. Candidates for this position based fellowship. Fellow will analyze should submit a letter of application, current' education policies affecting Hispanics and resume relating experience to position prepare policy papers, testimony, etc. Academic ficationsandthreereferences(names,addresses. 'and professional Nlckground in education telephone numbers) to the PerSonnel Manager, required. Spanish/English bilingual. Cash Employee Relations. National Education stipend Si ,330/ month plus health benefits. Association, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, Contact LoriS. O r um, National Counci of La D.C. 20036. Raza, (202) 628-9600. Bakersfield, Calif . Sept. 1 2-13 __ Calendar_ Manuel Rodriguez (219) 944 Diane Santillan (805) 834 . NATIONAL HISPANIC PASTORAL ENCUENTRO -------------------1( Washington, D.C. Aug. 15 THIS WEEK FESTIARTES '85-HISPANIC FESTIVAL New York Aug. 10 The Association of Hispanic Arts will present a celebration of Hispanic arts and crafts, food, dance and music from 1 p.m. until 8 p.m. at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn . Millie Perdomo (212) 369 7054 INTENSIVE INTERPRETERS' WORKSHOPS La Jolla, Calif. Aug. 5 o, 1 2 7 These workshops are for people interested in be coming federal court interpreters. Tuition is $350 per session or $525 for both sessions . Group rates for more than three people are available. Jose Valera Ibarra (619) 284 COMING SOON NATIONAL HISPANIC CONSTRUCTION ENTERPRIS . ES 5th ANNUAL CONVENTION Hispanic Link Weekly Report Rev. Juan Romero (202) 659 CINE FESTIVAL San Antonio, Texas Aug. 16 Eduardo Diaz (512) 271-9070 . VI HEMISPHERIC CONGRESS OF LATIN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Miami Sept. 3 Omar Sixto (305) 642 HISPANIC NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION CONVENTION :New York Sept. 5 William Mendez (212) 488 5189 NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BANQUET Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 6 Otto Merida (702) 385 HISPANIC SYMPOSIUM AND TRAINING CONFERENCE NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK Washington, q.c. Sept . 15 Louisa Castro (202) 653 FIRST ANNUAL HISPANIC DESIGNERS FASHION SHOW Washington, D.C. Sept. 17 Penny Harrison (703) 620-3374 SPOTLIGHT The Hispanic Health Council will sponsor a one-day conference entitled" Alcohol Use and Abuse Among Hispanic Adolescents: State of Knowledge , State of Need," Sept. 11 in Hartford. Conn. The purpose ot the conference is to bring together alcohol and adolescence experts and Hispanic service agencies to provide a clear understanding of alcohol use among Hispanic youth and the potential risks and service needs of this population. A-special report detailing conference findings and proposals will be prepared and available tor the general public. Pre registration for the conference is Aug. 31. The tee is $12,$7.50 for students. For more information contact Lani Davison (203) 527-8004. 3 \ ..

PAGE 4

Arts & Entertainment TWO HISPANICTHEMED PROJECTS ARE AMONG 19 new Public Television programs to receive funding during the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's third round of Open Solicitation for fiscal year 1985. A SERIES OF PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS created from the Cantare, cantaras video went on the air on the SIN Television Network July 29. The PSA ' s in 1, 2 and 3-minute versions-feature the song recorded by over 50 top Latin American recording artists to support relief and development projects through UNICEF and USA for Africa. SIN will air the announcements during its daylong schedule over 364 affiliates. along with a toll free number where viewers can call in orders for Cantare , cantaras, shirts and posters (see Good News) . Of the fifteen projects funded for production, one is a 60-minute drama about a young girl from El Salvador who flees to Los Angeles with her mother. Maricela is to be produced by Phyllis Geller of the Los Angeles PBS affiliate KCET and Richard Soto, of Richard Soto Productions. Another Hispanic project is among four funded for research and development. Mexico, to be produced by Austin Hoyt of WGBH in Boston, will be a series on 20th century Mexican history. Already , SIN ' s sister cable system , Gatavision, has aired the Cant are, cantaras, video . A half hour musical special, taped at a fund raiser event held in June at the Miami Zoo, aired on Gatavision's regularly scheduled program El mundo del espectaculo during the first week of July . Besides the video , the program included interviews with some of the artists that appear on the recording and attended the fund-raiser . ONE LINERS : Elyssa Davalos has joined the cast of CBS' series Scarecrow and. Mrs. King in a recurring role as a United Nations translator . She will be introduced in the fall in the episode titled Over The Limit. . . Laredo-born artist Amado Maurilio Peria has presented the city of Austin with Celebracion de Austin-his interpretation of the city's celebration of Texas ' Sesquicentennial anniversary next year . . . . San Antonio's Urban 15 comp,any is auditioning people interested in experimental music and dance performance on Aug. 7 . . . Miami's 2nd annual Festival of Ethnic Theatre begins Aug . 10 at that city's Museum of Science auditorium ... Produced by the non-prof i t Hermanos, Cantare , cantaras was recorded in Hollywood in April and released (in single and 12-inch single versions) July 22 by CBS Records. Media Report PHOTOGRAPHER WINS INS SUIT: The U .S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and two of its agents were ordered July 29 to pay photographer Octavio Gomez and his employer , the Los Angeles Spanish-language newspaper La 0pini6n, $295,000 for harassment. The Newspaper and Gomez , 51. had filed a suit against INS two years ago asserting that Gomez was intimidated and assaulted while covering INS actions in 1981 . In her decision following the six-day trial, U.S . District Judge Mariana Pfaelzer labeled the conduct of the INS agents "outrageous" and "intentional." She awarded compensatory and punitive damages of$195,000 to Gomez and $100,000 to the paper . INS agents Stuart Martin and Trevor Avenetti were instructed to pay $15,000 and $5,000 of the awards themselves . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication o f : Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street, N. W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publ i sher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor: Carlos Morales Reporting: Julio Ojeda, Juan Marcos Vilar , Charlie Eri cksen. Antonio MejiasRentas. ' o port1on o f Htspanic Link Wee k ly Report maybe reprodu ced o r broad c a s t tn any form w i thout a d vanc e permission . Annual subscription (52 issues) 596. Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26. Gomez has been a La Opinion photographer for seven years. The suit hinged on three separate incidents . Gomez testified that on Aug . 20, 1981 , agent Martin took his camera and press cre dentials while he was photographing a demon stration by Catholic nuns who were protesting against the deportation of Salvadorans at the Los Angeles Federal Building. Gomez said that even after he presented his La Opinion press credentials, the agent demanded proof of his legal status and made comments implying that he could be arrested and deported. Gomez , a native of Mexico, has been a legal U .S. resident since 1968. Eight days later while covering an INS round-up of undocumented workers. G6mez again had his camera taken away and he was physically threatened by agent Avenetti, he testified . He added that agent Martin told him " I have a file on you . " On Sept. 9 the same year , La Opinion protested the treatment of Gomez to then ' -Antonio Mejias-Rentas U . S . Attorney Andrea Ordin. The following day , when La Opinion reported that a federal investigation of the INS tactics would be conducted, Martin and another agent arrested two men engaged in remodeling work at the La Opinion building . La Opinion called the arrests an attempt to intimidate the newspaper. The INS lawyer said that they were pure coincidence, stating that the agents didn't realize that it was the La Opinion building . Both Gomez and La Opinion publisher Ignacio Lozano Jr. hailed the decision for its principle more than for its monetary award . Lozano commented that the damage award was secondary to the principle of a journalist being able to do his job without INS harassment INS counsel William Odencrantz called the awards exorbitant. "Somebody was unkind to Gomez on two occasions," he was quoted in the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. "Thafs a lot of money to get for having someone be unkind to you . " He said he planned to recommend that the Judgment be appealed. C O NFEREN C E C OORD I NATOR S: In clude the lat es t edi tion ot Ht spanic Ltnk Weekl y Repo rt in p a rti cipants' packets a t you r next conference or con ven tion. F o r d e ta i l s , contact H ec t o r E rtc k se n M e nd oza (202) 234. CHILD SUPPORT: FOR HISPANIC WOMEN, A DIFFERENT STANDARD 4 Hispanic Link