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Hispanic link weekly report, September 2, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 2, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Making The News This Week
Celso Manuel Garcete, a Paraguayan who became an American citizen five years ago, holds the winning combination to the biggest lottery jackpot in U.S. history-$41 million in New York. Garcete will split the winnings with 20 coworkers who signed an agreement to do so. Two other ticket holders also held the winning combination. Each ticket will pay $13,666,666.66... Cuban native Matty Hirai is sworn in as the first woman and first Hispanic city clerk in Miami. The former assistant city clerk replaces Ralph Ongie upon his retirement.. Alfredo Flores, president of Alamo Music City in San Antonio, is elected president of the National Association of Music Merchants...
Californian Jestis L6pez receives the Golden Poet Award for 1985 as voted by the World of Poetry's board of directors at their convention held recently in Reno, Nev.... A Miami jury awards the family of Luclo Pablo L6pez $855,000 in damages after finding Florida Power & Light Co. and Asplundh Tree Co. negligent in his death. L6pez was electrocuted three years ago when he touched a power line as he picked avocados from a tree in his backyard... Michael Campos, executive director of the California Water Resources Control Board, resigns his post to join a Fresno law firm... Judy Soza is appointed acting state coordinator for three Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) chapters in Kansas. Soza is president of Kansas Capital MADD in Topeka.

Congressional Hearings Set on Latino Issues
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, together with four Congressional subcommittee chairmen, will hold hearings on four issues of importance to Hispanics Sept. 17-20 in Washington, D.C. The hearings will coincide with the celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Week, Sept. 15-21.
This will be the third year hearings are held. However, this year marks the first time they will be conducted by the specific House of Representatives subcommittees which have
Bilingual Students Sharper
Research conducted by a Yale University psycholinguist has found that the more a child uses both Spanish and English, the greater the child’s intellectual advantage in skills underlying reading ability and in nonverbal logic.
Kenji Hakuta, an associate professor of psychology, revealed the findings of his research conducted among Puerto Rican elementary school children in New Haven, Conn., to a meeting of the American Psychological Association in Los Angeles last week.
Hakuta’s research, conducted between 1981-1983 among 392 Spanish dominant kindergarten through sixth graders, also found that forcing bilingual children into English-speaking classes “can be counter-productive, both emotionally and intellectually.”
“Prolonged instruction in the first language is important because it is not at the expense of learning English,” Hakuta said, noting research similar to his which also found that the mind benefits from a diversity of experience.
Another finding of Hakuta’s research showed that bilingual children scored higher on tests of mental flexibility, the ability to consider alternative solutions to problems, than children who spoke only English.
jurisdiction over the four topics. In the past, the hearings took place under only the Subcommittee on Census and Population, chaired by Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.).
Issues to be covered in this year's hearings include small business, housing, higher education and health. They were picked by the caucus because of their current relevance to Hispanics and to legislation the caucus is presently working on.
The scope of the hearings:
• SMALL BUSINESS-Approximately50% of minority-owned businesses are owned by Hispanics. Small businesses have been a particularly important source of employment for Hispanics, says the caucus, which has opposed efforts to abolish such agencies as the Small Business Administration. This hearing will examine the state of Hispanic small bush
Analyst Rejects Sanctions
An analysis by a conservative think tank analyst in Washington, D.C., concludes that employer sanctions in two pending immigration reform bills “are not the answer” to halting illegal immigration.
Stephen Moore, a policy analyst with The Heritage Foundation, said sanctions would encourage discrimination against Hispanics and deter employers from hiring persons who appear to be foreign born. He also estimates that sanctions would cost U.S. businesses more than $2 billion annually in paperwork and taxpayers $1 billion for enforcement
Sen. Alan Simpsor£s(R-Wyo.) bill, S. 1200, would impose fines of up to $10,000 on employers hiring illegal workers. Rep. Peter Rodino’s (D-N.J.) bill, H.R. 3080, includes criminal sanctions against such employers.
nesses, with special attention placed on reaching contracts with the Department of Defense.
• HOUSING - Cuts in federal housing subsidies have dramatically affected the Hispanic community, especially cuts in urban assistance programs. Eighty-eight percent of Hispanics live in urban areas. This hearing will examine these problems and explore alternatives.
• HIGHER EDUCATION-Although Hispanic participation in higher education has doubled since 1970, only 3.7% of college students are Hispanic. This hearing will look at several initiatives to increase these participation rates, such as the proposed increase in Title III funds avilable to institutions with high Hispanic enrollments.
• HEALTH - The present health status of the Hispanic community is largely unknown due to a continuing lack of data. Recent attempts to change this situation have been of little effect. This hearing will examine materials such as the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey that will soon be released by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Public Health Service.
The hearings are intended to bring attention to problems common to many Hispanics, share information on these problems, stimulate solutions to them, and encourage or influence appropriate legislation, said a spokesperson of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.
- Juan Marcos Vilar
FREE TRANSCRIPTS
Individuals or organizations wanting free transcripts of any of the hearings (generally available in 8-12 weeks) should request them from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, H2-557, House Annex #2, Washington, D.C. 20515, or call (202) 226-3430.
DATES, LOCATIONS FOR HOUSE INQUIRIES ON HISPANIC CONCERNS
SMALL BUSINESS
TUESDAY, Sept 17
Committee on Small Business Subcommittee on Small Business Administration.
CHAIR: Parren Mitchell (D-Md.)
PLACE: 2395A, Rayburn HOB TIME: 9:30 am CONTACT: Tracey Pinson (202) 225-4351
HOUSING
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18
Committee on Bank, Finances Urban Affairs: Subcommittee on Housings Urban Development CHAIR: Henry B. Gonzdlez (D-Texas) PLACE: 2222 Rayburn HOB TIME: 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
CONTACT:Gerald McMurray (202) 225-7054
EDUCATION - TITLE III
THURSDAY, Sept. 19
Committee on Education & Labor.
CHAIR: Augustus Hawkins (D-Calif.) PLACE: 2175 Rayburn HOB TIME: 1 pm - 4 p.m.
CONTACT: John Smith (202) 225-0213
HEALTH FRIDAY, Sept. 20 Committee on Energy & Commerce: Subcommittee on Health & Environment CHAIR: Henry Waxman (D-Calif.)
PLACE: 2322 Rayburn HOB TIME: 10 a.m.
CONTACT: Lisa Navarrete (202) 226-3430


Sin pelos en la lengua
(Kay Barbaro is on vacation. Today's column is authored by Antonio Calif a, who recently resigned as Director of Policy and Enforcement Office of Civil Rights, US. Department of Education.)
For seven years, I had worked in the federal government in civil rights enforcement. This summer, the day before I quit, I had to do something bureaucrats naturally hate to do - to expose my boss publicly as: a) less honest than George Washington, or b) badly misinformed.
My supervisor, Harry Singleton, a political appointee serving as Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, is being questioned in a congressional hearing room. The chairman ol the subcommittee, Rep. Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.) is angry. He says thal Singleton had been uncooperative in the investigation which preceded the hearing. Singleton had flatly refused to produce key files on cases involving probable federal law violations which were referred to the Department of Justice for court action.
In the hearing room, Singleton reiterates that the files are not in his possession. When Weiss accuses Singleton of being lax in his enforcement of civil rights, Singleton becomes furious. Like a teenager whose dignity is threatened, he blurts, “If that’s what you think, you know what you can do about it!"
In seven years of service to six assistant secretaries, I had never seen anything like this.
I know my boss is wrong. The office always keeps the original files and sends only copies of certain documents to Justice.
The congressman has done his homework. As chairman of the House Committee on Government Operations’ subcommittee on
intergovernmental relations, Representative Weiss asks who is in charge of the procedure by which files are transferred. Singleton responds that Frank Krueger is in charge. The argument between the two continues.
I am scheduled as the next witness. Singleton has ordered me to testify. So I slip out and call Krueger. I ask him whether OCR sent original enforcement files to Justice. Krueger laughingly tells me that my question is one of the dumbest he has ever heard. Of course OCR didn’t send the originals to Justice - they would get lost
As I return to the hearing room, Weiss is still asking about the files. Finally, he demands that one of Singleton’s numerous staffers call Krueger to check the location of the files. Three staffers rise to make the call.
They come back 45 minutes later and hand a note to Singleton. Singleton stares at it He seems incapable of reading it for the record. He has one of his staff do it The note says that Krueger could not be contacted and that the staffers present aren’t sure who has the files.
It is my turn. Representative Weiss administers the oath to me. I swear to tell the truth. And I do. I testify that original case files are never sent to the Department of Justice. Further, I testify that I had talked to the person Singleton considered an expert in these matters - Frank Krueger- and that Krueger had stated that the Office for Civil Rights has the original files.
The next day was my last as a federal employee. It was a most gratifying day. Singleton sent a letter to Weiss stating that OCR had the files. He blamed his staff for the mistakes in his testimony.
Scores of OCR employees thanked me for telling the truth.
There is, of course, much more to be told.
On Sept. 11, Singleton and Representative Weiss meet again, as the investigation continues.
Hispanic Poverty Grows
While proverty declined among blacks and whites between 1983 and 1984, it increased slightly for Hispanics, the Census Bureau reported Aug. 27.
At the same time, it said, the percentage of white children below the poverty level decreased, while increasing for Hispanic children. For blacks it remained the same.
The census report, using $10,609 as the poverty threshold for a family of four, showed the overall poverty rate declining from 15.3% in 1983 to 14.4% in 1984. That represented a poverty population decrease of 1.8 million people.
White Black Hisp.
’83 Poverty Rate 12.2% 35.7% 28.1%
’84 Poverty Rate 11.5% 33.8% 28.4%
’83 Child Rate 17.5% 46.5% 37.9%
’84 Child Rate 16.5% 46.5% 39.0%
The Hispanic poverty increase continues a trend, Robert Brischetto, research director for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, told Weekly Report. Adjusted Census Bureau figures reveal an increase of Hispanics in poverty from 1978 to 1984 of 6.8%, he said.
The yearly percentages:
’78 ’79 ’80 ’81 ’82 ’83 ’84
21.6 21.8 25.7 26.5 29.9 28.1 28.4
Brischetto added that Hispanics have shown the largest poverty increase of any population group in the country. While some Hispanics are progressing, women and children in particular are losing ground. Between 1980 and 1984, the number of Hispanic children living in poverty increased from 1.8 million to 2.3 million, he reported.
OUR THANKS
With this issue Hispanic Link Weekly Report begins its third year of publication.
As a simple expression of our appreciation for your support as a subscriber, we are enclosing an extra copy this week We hope that you will hand it or mail it to a friend whom you feel can benefit from the timely and useful news Weekly Report provides
Thanks for your trust and support.
Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher
N.Y. Latinos‘Regressing9
New York State’s 1.7 million Hispanic residents are worse off educationally and financially than any other racial or ethnic group, a major report to Gov. Mario Cuomo by his Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs reveals.
The 432-page study was released Aug. 25. Called by Committee Chairman Manuel Diaz Jr. “the first comprehensive analysis of the status of the Hispanic community in New York State,” it is being circulated to state agency heads for response to the governor.
The state’s 1 million Puerto Ricans are the most seriously affected by discrimination and language barriers, it said.
Another report issued at the same time by the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors called New York City “a community in crisis” for Puerto Ricans living there. It compiled studies by city and state social service agencies and refined data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau.
The Association’s chairman, David L6pez, characterized the Puerto Rican community in New York to the media as one which is regressing both socially and economically.
TELACU Case Settled
TELACU Investment Company, a subsidiary of The East Los Angeles Community Union (TELACU), has given up its license to operate as a Small Business Investment Company under U.S. Small Business Administration funds, the groups announced last week.
Under an agreement in which it admitted no wrong, TELACU surrendered its subsidiary’s license, as well as $3.2 million in the investment company assets That amount included moneys SBA provided TELACU to establish the subsidiary, which has been inactive since 1981.
Other TELACU ventures are not affected by the action, a spokesperson said, adding that since 1980, TELACU’s assets have grown from $40 million to$80 million and its revenues from $4.6 million to $20 million. Some of TELACU’s interests include a community thrift and loan, a building supply company, an industrial park and a real estate development firm.
Search Ruling Upheld
A U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judge in San Francisco has upheld a federal judge’s decision that immigration officers cannot stop cars just because their passengers look Hispanic.
In her Aug. 16 ruling, 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Mary Schroeder said “ H ispanic-looking appearance” is not enough to justify stopping a vehicle to interrogate the occupants.
U.S. District Judge Robert McN ichols ruled April 18, 1984, that the Immigration and Naturalization Service must keep records of every car it stops and the“specific articulable facts? that justified the stop. His order stemmed from a case in Washington State in which 22 people challenged INS officers for stopping them to question their citizenship.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
EMPLOYER SANCTIONS: An analysis of employer sanctions found in two pending immigration reform bills in Congress was prepared by Stephen Moore, a policy analyst with The Heritage Foundation. Copies of the 10-page analysis are $2. Contact: The Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 2Q002 (202) 546-4400 ext 579.
NEW YORK STATE HISPANICS: A432-page study by New York Gov. Mario Cuomo’s Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs, “New York State Hispanics: A Challenging Minority,” describes the status of the Hisp^riic community in the state. For a free copy contact Governor's Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs, 2 World Trade Center, Suite 5777, New York, N.Y. 10047 (212) 587-2266.
PUERTO RICAN NEW YORKERS: A35-page report by the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors, “A Call to Action: Puerto Rican New Yorkers,” finds that the Puerto Rican community concentrated in New York City is“a community in crisis.” For copies of the report, at $4.50 each, contact Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors, 853 Broadway, Room 2007, New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 460-5120.
BILINGUALS SHARPER: An 87-page report by Dr. Kenji Hakuta, “The Causal Relationship Between Bilingualism, Cognition, and Social Cognitive Skills: Vol. 1,” found that what children learn in one language helps in their intellectual development in the other. Copies are $9.15 plus $1.75 for shipping and handling - prepaid orders only. Contact National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, 1555 Wilson Blvd, Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va. 22209 (800) 336-4560.
IMMIGRATION IN CALIFORNIA: The Urban Institute's project, Study of the Impacts on Immigration in California, has released the first two in a series of discussion papers aimed at improving the policy-making process. Copies of “Recent Immigrants to Los Angeles: Characteristics and Labor Market Impacts” (30 pages) and “Mexican Immigration to Southern California: Issues of Job Competition and Worker Mobility” (28 pages) are $2.75 each. Contact: The Urban Institute, Library/lnformation Clearinghouse, P.O. Box7273, Dept C, Washington, D.C. 20044 (202) 833-7200. Add shipping charges of $1.75 for one paper, $2.15 for two. Prepayment required with all orders.
GUIDE TO HISPANIC ORGANIZATIONS: A75-page booklet by Philip Morris U.S.A. lists 131 national, state and regional Hispanic organizations, including addresses, officers, publications, etc. Single copies are free. Contact Mary Taylor, manager communications, Philip Morris U.S.A., 120 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017 (800) 235-7501.
THF EDUCATION OF HISPANICS: SELECTED STATISTICS: A 40-page report by the National Council of La Raza shows that Hispanics do not benefit from or participate in the nation’s educational system to the same degree as other population groups. For a copy, send $5 to: National Council of La Raza, Twenty F St NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N Si NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA BARBARA
The Department of Chicano Studies anticipates a tenure-track joint appointment with instructional responsibilities in Chicano Studies and the Department of Sociology. Position affective J uly 1,1986. A Ph. D., and evidence of excellence in teaching and research are required. Assistant professor level preferred, although exceptionally well-qualified persons whose background and experience warrant a tenure-level appointment are also encouraged to apply. Salary and rank dependent on qualifications.
Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents and arrange to have at least three professional evaluations sent by November 30.1985 to:
Dr. Mario T. Garcia, Chairperson Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara, Calif. 93106 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer._______________________________
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanic Women's Council Inc., a membership organization headquartered in Los Angeles, California, seeks qualified applicants for the position of EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. HE/SHE is responsible for fiscal and management functions of the non-profit corporation and reports to a 15-member board of directors. Position requires2 to3 years experience in administration or management of a non-profit organization or business enterprise; experience in fiscal and grant management strong verbaU written communication skills in English and Spanish. Salary range starting at $30,000 or commensurate with experience. Resume and references must be received by Sept 13 at HWC, 5803 East Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles Calif. 90022.
DEPUTY STREETS &
TRAFFIC DIRECTOR Street Maintenance $39,374- -59,051
The Deputy Streets & Traffic Director/Street Maintenance performs highly responsible managerial and professional engineering work in planning, directing and reviewing the work of the Street Maintenance Division. This position is responsible for independently applying engineering principles and techniques to the solution of street maintenance and traffic problems and for the development of long range program planning. Successful performance as an administrator is as important as competence as an engineer.
Deputy Directors are also assigned to other technical divisions of the Department therefore, applicants might also expect to rotate to other program areas as needed.
Essential requirements forthis position are 5 years administrative experience in Public Works Administration or Street Management/ Maintenance Operations and a bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering, including related course work in highway design or materials management. An APA or MBA is desirable. Must be registered as professional engineer in the state of Arizona by the end of a 1 -year probationary period.
Applications will be accepted until further notice and can be requested by calling (602) 262-6277 or by writing to: CITY OF PHOENIX Personnel Dept, 300 W. Washington, Phoenix, Az. 85003. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F.
POSITIONS WANTED
SPANISH TUTOR, native speaker, for beginners and advanced students Washington, D.C. Call Patricia at (202) 547-5113 or 543-5771.
WANTED: Bilingual Director, new Hispanic MEDIA POSITION WANTED: Fresh college Senior Center, Cleveland. Degree preferred, journalism graduate, new to Washington, D.C., Administration experience essential. Great wants to pursue career in media. Will take potential.Salary to $18,000. temporary or permanent position to learn the
Resume to Selection Committee,3000 Bridge business From Puerto Rico via California Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 44113 by September 9. Fully bilingual. Call Ricardo at Hispanic Link (216)771-7297. News Service (202) 234-0737.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
VI HEMISPHERIC CONGRESS OF LATIN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Miami Sept. 3-7
Business and government sectors from 25 American nations will gather to discuss the important role of the United States’ Hispanics in developing inter-American trade. The Latin Chamber of Commerce of the U.S. is host. The conference culminates Sept. 7 with the Congress’ 20th anniversary celebrating banquet.
Omar Sixto (305) 642-3870
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
LOS ANGELES' 204th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION Los Angeles Sept. 4
A “California Barbeque” celebrating Los Angeles^ 204th birthday will honor Deputy Mayor Grace Mont&hez Davis, the first Hispanic woman to hold that position.
Ali Webb (213) 485-5182
OHIO COMMISSION ON SPANISH SPEAKING AFFAIRS CONFERENCE
Cleveland Sept. 5, 6
Designed for teachers, counselors and all who work ij with Hispanic youths and families, the conference will cover topics such as drug and alcohol abuse and family therapy.
Cecilia Mern&ndez (614) 466-8333
HISPANIC NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION
CONVENTION
New York Sept. 5-8
Fourteen seminars on legal topics of concern to Hispanics will be conducted.
William M6ndez (212) 488-5189
COMING SOON
CAFE de CAUFORNIA TRAINING CONFERENCE Bakersfield, Calif. Sept. 12,13 Diane Santill&n (805) 834-7424
U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 6th
ANNUAL CONVENTION
San Juan, Puerto Rico Sept. 18-22
Cindy Hill (816) 842-2228
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Arts & Entertainment
WITH THIS WEEK’S SPANISH- LANGUAGEhome video release of The Cotton Club, the United States home entertainment companies accelerate their entry into the country’s Hispanic market.
Embassy Home Entertainment is releasing The Cotton Club in a subtitled Spanish-language version (along with a dubbed French version) Sept. 4, joining a cluster of smaller, mostly Hispanic companies already competing for the booming Spanish-language market.
One of those companies- the Clovis, Calif, -based Vid Dimension, Inc.-began earlier this year to market whafs being billed as“the first Spanish-language workout video.” Starring Mexican actress Amparo DeAnda, Andale Aerobics has been released in 32 states.
Other titles in the Vid Dimension catalog include Mexican films El reportaie (for which Emilio “El Indio" Fernandez won the directing
hr/cr
SEP 3 1985
award at the 1963 Cannes Film Festival, Sangre derramada (1973) and Mexico de mis amores (1978).
Meanwhile, another video cassette distribution company was launched in the United States last July with an initial release of 25 first-run theatrical films. Owned by Mexico’s television giant Televisa, Video Visa has pledged to increase its supply by ten titles a month to offer a catalog of about 500 titles Already the company has announced it will release dubbed and/or subtitled Spanish video cassette versions of films in the Paramont Pictures library.
ONE LINERS: El Paso’s Fiesta de las Flores comes to a close on September 2... Also on September 2, the New York Salsa Festival culminates with a show by Willie Rosario and Ray Barreto (and their orchestras) at the Big Apple’s Village Gate club... West Side Story opens Sept. 3 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C— and Rita Moreno is among stars chosen to appear in the seventh edition of the “I LOVE NEW YORK’ television commercials for that state...
- Antonio Mejias-Ftentas
Media Report
Guest column by Michael Dougan TV Columnist, San Francisco Examiner
Henry Rivera is resigning from the Federal Communications Commission and that*s bad news for all of us. Rivera is the only commission member who believes that the broadcast industry should operate in the best interests of the public, which owns the airwaves it uses to make billions of dollars annually.
Rivera has been a special champion to those in need of better service by the television and radio outlets of the land. He has been, especially, a loud and lone voice on behalf of America's children - who are, without doubt, the most abused by television.
Though only one vote out of seven, Rivera has used his position to further the notion that TV should provide more and better programming aimed at kids. Emphasis on better.
Rivera probably isn’t the only FCC commis: sioner who realizes television exploits, rather than serves, our youngsters. But he’s the only one who gives a damn.
The FCC used to exist to regulate broadcasting, to establish mandates and limits. But an industry spoiled bv incredible profits and
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420‘N’Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Juan Marcos Vilar, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio MejiaS-Rentas.Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen* Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Nominated by President Reagan to the FCC in June 1981, New Mexico Attorney Henry Rivera became at age 34 the first Hispanic to serve on the 50-year-old body. He resigns Sept 15 to join the Washington, D.C., law firm of Dow, Lohnes and Alberston.
few restrictions howled about having to toe any line, no matter how thin and fragile it might be.
When Ronald Reagan (who is, don’t forget, a creature of Hollywood and television) came into office, he appointed Mark Fowler as Chairman of the FCC. Fowler has been to broadcasting what James Watt was to the environment. Again, Reagan had the fox guarding the hen house.
The results were predictable.
Rather than attempt to regulate broadcasting, Fowler set out to emasculate his own agency.
All along, the FCC has turned a deaf ear to pleas from groups like Action for Children’s Television that the medium be made accountable for what it is doing (and not doing) to our kids. Only one commissioner listened and understood.
Henry Rivera.
What Rivera wanted was this: All TV stations should devote a certain number of hours per week(and not just on Saturdays mornings) to
children’s shows. Whafs more, robots cutting each other in half or coyotes chasing road-runners wouldn’t count. These should be programs that not only entertain the kiddies, but help them grow.
Rivera felt that the most important communications medium in the world should use its power responsibly.
He understood that childrens series, especially on the local level, don’t make a profit. He didn’t care. Rivera once told me this should be part of the price station owners pay in order to justify their phenomenal profits. To him if s a simple matter of social responsibility.
In truth, Rivera was not fanatically in favor of regulation. Even his critics concede that he voted the “right" way on many matters. Rivera understood the needs of the industry, and responded positively to those needs. He just wanted the public to get something back in return.
Now Rivera is going to work for a Washington communications firm, where he'll specialize in matters pertaining to cable TV. After working hard for us, he’s out to make a few bucks for himself. (Rivera concedes that the move is primarily economic.)
We can’t hold that against him. He’s done all that he could in the FCC. That this amounts to nothing is not his fault. At least Henry Rivera tried.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Celso Manuel Garcete, a Paraguayan who became an American citizen five years ago, holds the winning combination to the biggest lottery jackpot in U.S. history-$41 million in New York. Garcete will split the winnings with 20 coworkers who signed an agreement to do so. Two other ticket holders also held the winning combination. Each ticket will pay $13,666,666.66 ... Cuban native Matty Hirai is sworn in as the first woman and first Hispanic city clerk in Miami. The former assistant city clerk replaces Ralph Ongie upon his retirement. .. Alfredo Flores, president of Alamo Music City in San Antonio, is elected president of the National Associafion of Music Merchants ... Californian Jesus L6pez receives the Golden Poet Award for 1985 as voted by the World of Poetry's board of directors at their convention held recently in Reno, Nev . .. . A Miami jury awards the family of Lucio Pablo L6pez $855,000 in damages after finding Florida Power & Light Co. and Asplundh Tree Co . negligent in his death . L6pez was electrocuted three years ago when he touched a power line as he picked avocados from a tree in his backyard ... Michael Campos, executive director of the California Water Resources Control Board, resigns his post to join a Fresno law firm ... Judy Soza is appointed acting state coordinator for three Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) chapters in Kansas. Soza is president of Kansas Capital MADD in Topeka . Vol. 3 No. 35 HISPANIC LINK EEKL PORT _ Congressional Hearings Set on Latino Issues The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, together with four Congressional subcommittee chair men, will hold hearings on four issues of importance to Hispanics Sept. 17 in Washington, D.C. The hearings will coincide with the celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Week, Sept. 15. This will be the third year hearings are held . However, this year marks the first time they will be conducted by the specific House of Representatives subcommittees which have Bilingual Students Sharper Research conducted by a Yale University psycholinguist has found that the more a child uses both Spanish and English, the greater the child's intellectual advantage in skills underlying reading ability and in nonverbal logic. Kenji Hakuta, an associate professor of psychology, revealed the findings of his research conducted among Puerto Rican elementary school children in New Haven, Conn., to a meeting of the American Psychological As sociation in Los Angeles last week. Hakuta's research, conducted between 1981 1983 among 392 Spanish dominant kinder garten through sixth graders, also found that forcing bilingual children into English-speaking classes "can be counter-productive, both emotionally and intellectually." "Prolonged instruction in the first language is important because it is not at the expense of leaming English," Hakuta said, noting research similar to his which also found that the mind benefits from a diversity of experience. . Another finding of Hakuta's research showed that bilingual children scored higher on tests of mental flexibility, the ability to consider alternative solutions to problems, than children who spoke only English. jurisdiction overthe four topics. In the past, the hearings took place under only the Sub committee on Census and Population, chaired by Rep . Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.). Issues to be covered in this year's hearings include small business, housing, higher education and health. They were picked by the caucus because of their current relevance to Hispanics and to legislation the caucus is presently working on. The scope of the hearings: e SMALL BUSINESS-Approximately 50% of minority-owned businesses are owned by Hispanics . Small businesses have been a particularly important source of employment for Hispanics , says the caucus, which has opposed efforts to abolish such agencies as the Small Business Administration. This hearing will examine the state of Hispanic small busi-Analyst Rejects Sanctions An analysis by a conservative think tank analyst in Washington, D.C., concludes that employer sanctions in two pending immigration reform bills "are not the answer'' to halting illegal immigration . Stephen Moore, a policy analyst with The Heritage Foundation , said sanctions would encourage discrimination against Hispanics and deter employers from hiring persons who appear to be foreign born. He also estimates that sanctions would cost U.S. businesses more than $2 billion annually in paperwork and taxpayers $1 billion for enforcement. Sen. Alan (RWyo.) bill, S. 1200, would impose fines of up to $10,000 on employers hiring illegal workers. Rep. Peter Rodino's (D-N.J.) bill, H.R. 3080, includes criminal sanctions against such employers. nesses. with special attention placed on reaching contracts with the Department of Defense . e HOUSING Cuts in federal housing subsidies have dramatically affected the His panic community, especially cuts in urban assistance programs. Eighty-eight percent of Hispanics live in urban areas. This hearing will examine these problems and explore alternatives. e HIGHER EDUCATIONAlthough Hispanic participation in higher education has doubled since 1970, only3.7% of college students are Hispanic. This hearing will look at several initiatives to increase these participation rates, such as the proposed increase in Title Ill funds avilable to institutions with high Hispanic enrollments. • HEALTH-The present health status of the Hispanic community is largely unknown due to a continuing lack of data. Recent attempts to change this situation have been of little effect. This hearing will examine materials such as the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey that will soon be released by the Department of Health and Human Services' Public Health Service. The hearings are intended to bring attention to problems common to many Hispanics, share information on these problems, stimulate solutions to them, and encourage or influence appropriate legislation, said a spokesperson of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. -Juan Marcos Vilar FREE TRANSCRIPTS Individuals or organizations wanting free transcripts of any of the hearings (generally available in8 weeks) should requestthem from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, H2, ljouse Annex #2, Washington, D.C. 20515, or call (202) 226. DATES, LOCATIONS FOR HOUSE INQUIRIES ON HISPANIC CONCERNS SMALL BUSINESS TUESDAY, Sept. 17 Committee on Small Business: Sutx:ommittee on Small Business Administration . CHAIR: Parren Mitchell (D-Md.) PLACE: 2395A, Rayburn HOB TIME: 9:30 a . m . CONTACT: Tracey Pinson (202) 225-4351 HOUSING WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18 Committee on Bank, Finance& Urban Affairs: Sutx:ommittee on Housing& Urban Development CHAIR: Henry B. Gonzalez (DTexas) PLACE: 2222 Rayburn HOB TIME: 1 p . m . 4 p.m. CONTACT:Gerald McMurray (202) 225 EDUCATION-TITLE Ill THURSDAY, Sept. 19 Committee on Education & Labor . CHAIR: Augustus Hawkins (D-Calif.) PLACE: 2175 Rayburn HOB TIME: 1 p.m.-4 p.m. CONTACT: John Smith (202) 225-0213 HEALTH FRIDAY, Sept. 20 Committee on Energy & Commerce : Sub committee on Health & Environment CHAIR: Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) PLACE: 2322 Rayburn HOB TIME: 10 a . m . CONTACT: Lisa Navarrete (202) 226

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua intergovernmental relations, Representative Weiss asks who is in charge of the procedure by which files are transferred. Singleton responds that Frank Krueger is in charge . The argument between the two continues. -(Kay Barbaro is on vacation. Today's column is authored by Antonio Califa, who recently resigned as Director of Policy and Enforcement, Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education.! 1 am scheduled as the next witness . Singleton has ordered me to testify. So 1 slip out and call Krueger. I ask him whether OCR sent original enforcement files to Justice . Krueger laughingly tells me that my question is one of the dumbest he has ever heard . Of course OCR didn't send the originals to Justicethey would get lost. For seven years, I had worked in the federal government in civil rights enforcement. This summer, the day before I quit, I had to do something bureaucrats naturally hate to do to expose my boss publicly as: a) less honest than George Washington, or b) badly misinformed. My supervisor, Harry Singleton, a political appointee serving as Ass istant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, is being questioned in a congressional hearing room. The chairman o1 the subcommittee, Rep. Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.) is angry. He says tha1 Singleton had been uncooperative in the investigation which preceded the hearing. Singleton had flatly refused to produce key files on cases involving probable federal law violations which were referred to the Department of Justice for court action . As I return to the hearing room, Weiss is still asking about the files. Finally. he demands that one of Singleton's numerous staffers call Krueger to check the location of the files. Three staffers rise to make the call. They come back 45 minutes later and hand a note to Singleton. Singleton stares at it. He seems incapable of reading it for the record. He has one of his staff do it. The note says that Krueger could not be contacted and that the staffers present aren't sure who has t he files . In the hearing room, Singleton reiterates that the files are not in his possession. When Weiss accuses Singleton of being lax in his enforcement of civil rights, Singleton becomes furious. Like a teen ager whose dignity is threatened, he blurts, "If that's what you tl)ink, you know what you can do about it!" It is my turn. Representative Weiss administers the oath to me . I swear to tell the truth. And I do. I testify that original case files are never sent to the Department of Justice. Further, I testify that I had talked to the person Singleton considered an expert in these matters -Frank Krueger-and that Krueger had stated that the Office for Civil Rights has the original files. The next day was my last as a federal employee. It was a most gratifying day. Singleton sent a letter to Weiss stating that OCR had the files. He blamed his staff for the mistakes in his testimony. In seven years of service to six assistant secretaries, I had never seen anything like this. I know my boss is wror)g. The office always keeps the original files and sends only copies of certain documents to Justice. Scores of OCR employees thanked me for telling the truth. There is, of course, much more to be told. The congressman has done his homework. As chairman of the House Committee on Government Operations' subcommittee on On Sept. 11, Singleton and Representative Weiss meet again, as the investigation continues . Hispanic Poverty Grows While proverty declined among blacks and whites between 1 983 and 1984, it increased slightly for Hispanics, the Census Bureau reported Aug. 27. At the same time, it said, the percentage of white children below the poverty level decreased, while increasing for Hispanic children . For blacks it remained the same . The census report, using $1 0,609 as the poverty threshold for a family of four, showed the overall poverty rate declining from 15.3% in 1983 to 14.4% in 1984. That represented a poverty population decrease of 1.8 million people. White Black Hlsp. '83 Poverty Rate 12.2% 35.7% 28.1% '84 Poverty Rate 11.5% 33.8% 28.4% '83 Child Rate 17.5% 46.5% 37.9% '84 Child Rate 16.5% 46.5% 39.0%The Hispanic poverty increase continues a trend, Robert Brischetto, research director for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project , told Weekly Report. Ad justed Census Bureau figures reveal an increase of Hispanics in poverty from 1978 to 1984 of 6.8%, he said. The yearly percentages: '78 '79 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 21.6 21.8 25. 7 26. 5 29. 9 28.1 28.4 Brischetto added that Hispanics have shown the largest poverty increase of any population group in the country . While some Hispanics are progressing, women and chil dren in particular are losing ground. Between 1980 and J 984, the number of Hispanic children living in poverty increased from 1.8 million to 2 . 3 million, he reported. 2 OUR THANKS With this issue. Hispanic Link Weekly Report begins its third year of publication. As a simple expression of our appreciation for your support as a subscriber, we are enclosing an extra copy this week. We hope that you will hand it or mail it to a friend whom you feel can benefit from the timely and useful news Weekly Report provides. Thanks for your trust and support. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher N.Y. Latinos' Regressing' New York State's 1.7 million Hispanic residents are worse off educationally and financially than any other racial or ethnic group, a major report to Gov. Mario Cuomo by his Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs reveals. The 432-page study was released Aug . 25. Called by Committee Chairman Manuel Diaz Jr. "the first comprehensive analysis of the status of the Hispanic community in New York State," it is being circulated to state agency heads for response to the governor. The state's 1 million Puerto Ricans are the most seriously affected by discrimination and language barriers, it said. Another report issued at the same time by the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors called New York City"a community in crisis" for Puerto Ricans living there. It compiled studies by city and state social service agencies and refined data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau. The Association's chairman, David L6pez, characterized the Puerto Rican community in New York to the media as one which is regressing both socially and economically. TELACU Case Settled TELACU Investment Company, a subsidiary of The East Los Angeles Community Union (TELACU), has given up its license to operate as a Small Business Investment Company under U.S. Small Business Administration funds, the groups announced last week. Under an agreement in which it admitted no wrong, TELACU surrendered its subsidiary's license, well as $3.2 million in the investment company assets: That aoolOUnt included moneys SBA provided TELACU to establish the sub sidiary, which has been inactive since 1981. Other TELACU ventures are not affected by the action, a spokesperson said, adding that since 1980, TELACU's assets have grown from $40 million to $80 million and its revenues from $4.6 million to $20 million . Some of TELACU's interests include a community thrift and loan, a building supply company, an industrial park and a real estate development firm. Search Ruling Upheld A U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judge in San Francisco has upheld a federal judge's decision that immigration officers cannot stop cars just because their passengers look Hispanic . In her Aug. 16 ruling, 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Mary Schroeder said" Hispanic looking appearance" is not enough to justify stopping a vehicle to interrogate the occupants: U.S. District Judge Robert McNichols ruled April 18, 1984, that the Immigration and Naturalization Service must keep records of every car it stops and the" specific articulable facts'' that justified the stop. His order stemmed from a case. in Washington State in which 22 people INS officers for stopping them to que$tion their citizenship . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS EMPLOYER SANCTIONS: An analysis of employer sanctions found in two pending immigration reform bills in Congress was prepared by Stephen Moore, a policy analyst with The Heritage Foundation . Copies of the 1 0-page analysis are $2. Contact: The Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave . NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 5464400 ext. 579. NEW YORK STATE HISPANICS: A432-page study by New York Gov . Mario Cuomo's Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs, "New York State Hispanics: A Challenging Minority," describes the status of the Hispa"nic community in the state . For a free copy contact Gover nor's Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs, 2 World Trade Center, Suite 5777, New York, N . Y . 10047 (212) 587-2266. PUERTO RICAN NEW YORKERS: A35-page report by the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors, "A Call to Action: Puerto Rican New Yorkers," finds that the Puerto Rican community concentrated in New York City is"acommunity in crisis." For copies of the report, at $4.50 each, contact: Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors, 853 Broadway, Room 2007, New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 460-5120. BILINGUALS SHARPER: An 87-page report by Dr. Kenji Hakuta, "The Causal Relationship Between Bilingualism, Cognition, and Social Cognitive Skills: Vol . 1," found that what children learn in one language helps in their intellectual development in the other. Copies are $9.15 plus $1.75 for shipping and handling-prepaid orders only. Contact National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, 1555 Wilson Blvd., Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va. 22209 (800) 336-4560. IMMIGRATION IN CALIFORNIA: The Urban Institute's project, Study of the Impacts on Immigration in California, has released the first two in a series of discussion papers aimed at improving the policy-making process. Copies of "Recent Immigrants to Los Angeles: Characteristics and Labor Market Impacts" (30 pages) and"Mexican Immigration to Southern California: Issues of Job Competition and Worker Mobility" (28 pages) are $2.75 each . Contact: The Urban Institute, Library/Information Clearinghouse, P.O. Box 7273, Dept C, Washington, D.C. 20044 (202) 833-7200. Add shipping charges of $1.75 for one paper, $2.15 for two. Prepayment required with all C''iers. GUIDE TO HISPANIC ORGANIZATIONS: A 75-page booklet by Philip Morris U .S.A. lists 131 national, state and regional Hispanic organizations, including addresses, officers, publications, Single copies are free. Contact: Mary Taylor , manager communications. Philip Morris U.S.A., 120 Park Avenue, New York, N . Y . 10017 (800) 235-7501. CORPORATE CLASS IFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ED Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch . UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA BARBARA The Department of Chicano Studies anticipates a appointment with instruc• tiona! •esponsibilities in Chicano Studies and the Department of Sociology. Position effective July 1 , 1986. A Ph. D .. and evidence of excellence in teaching and research are required. Assistant professor level preferred, although exceptionally per!!4)ns whose background and experience warrant a tenure-level appointment are al!!4) encouraged to apply. Salary and rank dependent on qualifieations. Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents and arrange to have at least three professional evaluations sent by November 30. 1985 to: Dr. Mario T . Garcia. Chairperson Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa B'arbara , Calif. 93106 An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanic Women ' s Council Inc., a membership organization headquartered in Los Angeles, Califomla, seeks qualified applicants for the position of EXECUTIVE Dl RECTOR. HE/SHE is responsible for fiscal and management functions of the non-profit corporation and reports to a 15member board of directors. Position requires2 to3 years experience in adminis tration or management of a non-profit organization or business enterprise; experience in fiacal.,cc gran!' management strong verbaV written communication skills in English ancj Spanish. Salary range starting at $30,000 or commensurate with experienca. Resume and references must be received by SaP!. 13 at HWC, 5803 East Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles Calif. 90022. DEPUTY STREETS & TRAFFIC DIRECTOR Street Maintenance $39,374 -59,051 The Deputy Streets& Traffic Director/Street Maintenance performs highly responsible managerial and professional engineering work i n planning, directing and reviewing the work of the Street Maintenance Division. This position is responsible for independently applying engineering principles and techniques to the solution of street maintenance and traffic problems and for the development of long range program planning. Successful perfor mance as an administrator is as important as competence as an engineer. Deputy Directors are also assigned to other technical divisions of the Department therefore, applicants might also expect to rotate to other program areas as needed . Essential requirements for this position are 5 years administrative experience in Public Works Administration or Street Management/ Maintenance Operations and a bachelo(s degree in Civil Engineering, including related course work in highway design or materials management. An APA or MBA is desirable. Must be registered as professional engineer in the state of Arizona by the end of a 1year probationary period. Applications will be accepted until further notice and can I;Je requested by calling (602) 262 or by writing to: CITY OF PHOENIX. Personnel Dept. 300 W. Washington, Phoenix. Az. 85003. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F. POSITIONS WANTED SPANI$H TUTOR, native speaker. for beginners and advanced students Washington, D.C. Call Patricia at (202) 547 or 5435771. WANTED: Bilingual Director, new Hispanic MEDIA POSITION WANTED: Fresh college Senior Center. Cleveland . Qegree preferred. journalism graduate, new to Washington. D.C .• Administration experience essential. Great wants to pursue career in media . Will take potentiat.Salary to S 1 8,00Q. temporary or permanent position to learn the ResumetoSelectionCommittee,3000Bridge business. From Puerto Rico via California. Ave., Cleveland , Ohio 44113 by September9. Fully bilingual. Call Ricardo at Hispanic Link THF EDUCATION OF HISPANICS: SELECTED STATISTICS: A 40-page report by the National Council of La Raza shows that Hispanics do not benefit from or participate in the nation's educational system to the same degree as other population groups. For a copy, send $5 to: National Council of La Raza, Twenty F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D .C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. (216) 771 7297. . News Service (202) 234. Calendar THIS WEEK VI HEMISPHERIC CONGRESS OF LATIN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Miami Sept. 3 Business and government sectors from 25 American nations will gather to discuss the important role of the United States' Hispanics in developing inter American trade. The Latin Chamber of Commerce of the U.S. is host. The conference culminates Sept. 7 with the Congress' 20th anniversary celebrating banquet. Omar Sixto (305) 642 Hispanic Link Weekly Report LOS ANGELES' 204th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION . Los Angeles Sept. 4 A "California celebrating Los Angeles' 204th birthday will honor Deputy Mayor Grace Montanez Davis, the first Hispanic woman to hold that position. Ali Webb (213) 485 OHIO COMMISSION ON SPANISH SPEAKING AFFAIRS CONFERENCE Cleveland Sept. 5, 6 Designed for teachers, counselors and all who work• with Hispanic youths and families, the conference will cover topics such as drug and alcohol abuse and family therapy . Cecilia l
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NR!CR SEP 3 1985 Arts & Entertainm .ent award at the 1963 Cannes Film Festival, Sangre derramada (1973) and Mexico de mis amores (1978). W'TH THIS WEEK'S SPANISHLANGUAGE home v ideo release of The Cotton Club, the United home entertainment companies accelerate their entry into the country's Hispanic market. Meanwhile , another video cassette distribution company was launched in the United States last July with an initial release of 25 first-run theatrical films. Owned by Mexico's television giant Televlsa, Video Visa has pledged to increase its supply by ten titles a month to offer a catalog of about 500 titles. Already the company has announced it will release dubbed and/or subtitled Spanish video cassette versions of films in the Paramont Pictures library. Embassy Home Entertainment is releasing The Cotton Club in a subtitled Spanish-language vers i on (along with a dubbed French version) Sept. 4 , joining a cluster of smaller, mostly Hispanic companies already competing for the booming Spanish-language market. One of those companies-the Clovis, Calif. -bas!'ld Vid Dimension, Inc.began earlier this year to market what's being billed as"the first Spanish-language workout video . " Starring Mexican actress Amparo DeAnda, Andale Aerobics has been released in 32 states. Other titles in the Vid Dimension catalog include Mexican films El reportaje (for which Emilio "EI Indio" Fernandez won the directing ONE LINERS: El Paso's Fiesta de las Flores comes to a close on September 2. . . Also on September 2, the New York Salsa Festival culminates with a show by Willie Rosario and Ray Barreto (and their orchestras) at the Big Apple's Village Gate club.. . West Side Story opens Sept. 3 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C .... and Rita Moreno is among stars chosen to appear in the seventh edition of the "I LOVE NEW YORK'' television commercials for that state ... Media Report Guest column by Michael Dougan TV San Francisco Examiner Henry Rivera is resigning from the Federal Communications Commission and that's bad news for all of us. Rivera is the only commission member who believes that the broadcast industry should operate in the best interests of the public, which owns the airwaves it uses to make billions of dollars annually . Rivera has been a special champion to those in need of better service by the television and radio outlets of the land. He has been, especially, a loud and lone voice on behalf of America's childrenwho are, without doubt, the most abused by television. Though only one vote out of seven, Rivera has used his position to further the notion that TV should provide more and better pro gramming aimed at kids. Emphasis on better . Rivera probably isn't the only FCC commis sioner who realizes television exploits, rather than serves, our youngsters . But he's the only one who gives a damn. The FCC used to exist to regulate broad casting, to establish mandates and limits. But an industry spoiled bv incredible profits and HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N. W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Juan Marcos Vilar, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,Eisa Ericksen Mendoza No portio n of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues). $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen Mendoza (202) 234. 4 Nominated by PresidentReagan to the FCCin June 1981, New Mexico Attorney Henry Rivera became at age 34 the first Hispanic to serve on the 50-year-old body. He resigns Sept 15 to join the Washington, D.C., lawflrmofDow, LohnesandAiberston. few restrictions howled about having to toe any line, no matter how thin and fragile it might be . When Ronald Reagan(who is, don't forget, a creature of Hollywood and television) came into office, he appointed Mark Fowler as chairman of the FCC. Fowler has been to ' broadcasting what James Watt was to the environment. Again, Reagan had the fox guarding the hen house. The results were predictable. Rather than attempt to regulate broadcasting, Fowler set out to emasculate his own agency. All along, the FCC has turned a deaf ear to pleas from groups like Action for Children's Television that the medium be made accountable for what it is doing (and not doing) to our kids. Only one commissioner listened and understood. Henry Rivera. What Rivera wanted was this: All TV stations should devote a certain number of hours per week (and not just on Saturdays mornings) to -Antonio Mejias-Rentas , children's shows. What's more, robots cutting each other in half or coyotes chasing road runners wouldn't count. These should be pro grams that not only entertain the kiddies, but help them grow. Rivera felt that the most important communi cations medium in the world should use its power responsibly. He understood that children's series, especial ly on the local level, don't make a profit. He didn't care. Rivera once told me this should be part of the price station owners pay in order to justify their phenomenal profits. To him ifs a simple matter of social responsibility. In truth, Rivera was not fanatically in favor of regulation. Even his critics concede that he voted the" righr way on many matters. Rivera understood the needs of the industry, and responded positively to those needs. He just wanted the public to get something back in return . Now Rivera is going to work for a Washington communications firm, where he'll specialize in matters pertainirtg to cable TV. After working hard for us, he's out to make a few bucks for himself. (Rivera concedes that the move is primarily economic.) We can't hold that against him. He's done all that he could in the FCC. That this amounts to nothing is not his fault. At least Henry Rivera tried. Hispanic Link Weekly Report