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Hispanic link weekly report, September 16, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 16, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News This Week
Philadelphia lawyer Gilbert Casellas is appointed to the American Bar Association’s Special Committee on the Delivery of Legal Services by ABA President William Flagstaff. Casellas is a past national president of the Hispanic Bar Association. . . Jorge Hernandez, executive director of Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion in Boston, receives the Distinguished Community Service Award from the National Urban Coalition at its awards dinner Sept. 10 in Washington, D.C— Eppie Archuleta, a Hispanic traditional weaver from Alamosa, Colo., and Julio Negron, a musician and instrument-maker from Morovis, Puerto Rico, are among 12 recipients of a National Heritage Fellowship, the country’s highest award for accomplishment in a traditional arts field. . . Jose Martinez, personnel director at the Lincoln Hall reformatory in Lincolndale, N.Y., is named city personnel director for
Hartford, Conn. . . Elected to a two-year term as president of the Mexican American Dem®^®s 1(I0A$0§ Texas, former LULAC President Rub6n Bonilla ofCbrpus Christi hires William Calder6n of Houston as its executive director. Calderon will open a permanent
MAD office in Austin___ Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and the
L.A. County Board of Supervisors hold award ceremonies honoring Carmelo Robles, Frank Moreno, Faustino Pinon, Manuel de la Torre and Jos6 Burgoin for their role in the capture and arrest of Richard Ramirez, whom police believe to be the Night Stalker... Gonzalo Guell, a career diplomat who served as ambassador, foreign minister and prime minister of Cuba, dies Sept. 1 in Coral Gables, Fla., at age 90... Sacramento Federal District Judge Raul Ramirez rules that an Interior Department program allowing private ranchers to manage public lands is illegal. His decision reverses a policy put in place by James Watt, Interior Secretary in the first three years of the Reagan Administration...
v°' ^^mC8HISPANI^UNkWeK^ REPORT
Farm Legal Service Cuts Protested
Court Says OK to Probe Bilingual Ballot Names
A federal appeals court in San Francisco has upheld the actions of U.S. Attorney Joseph Russoniello who in 1982 sent the names of 168 bilingual ballot applicants to immigration officials to check their citizenship
In a 2-1 ruling Sept. 3/The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that “the government’s need to ensure the sanctity of the polls” outweighs any burden that the investigation placed on voting rights and the political rights of minority organizations.
Russoniello, a Reagan appointee, asked prosecutors in nine counties near San Francisco to send him 25 names of recent applicants for bilingual ballots. Immigration officials were unable to positively identify 113 people as citizens.
The appeals court ruling upholds a series of U.S. District Court rulings against the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. It had brought suit against Russoniello in May 1982 for voting rights violations. Plaintiffs were Jose Olagues, a U.S. citizen who was among those investigated, the Hispanic Coalition for Human Rights, Chinese for Affirmative Action arid San Francisco Latino Voter Registration Education Project.
Dissenting Judge Dorothy Nelson said the investigation was constitutionally suspect because the voters were not only “language minorities” but also foreign-born.
“This investigation intimidated those foreign-bom, recently registered voters who requested bilingual ballots,” Nelson said.
Latino Cops Drop Suit
A Hispanic police officers’ association in Miami won’t pursue a suit it filed in federal court 13 months ago charging the Metro-Dade Police Department with discriminating against Latinos in hiring and promotions.
Officer Mario Beovides, president of the 320-member association, told reporters Sept. 3 that the department is now providing Latino officers with equal treatment.
The association had originally sought $1 million in damages.
Farmworker advocate groups held a press conference in Washington, D.C., Sept. 6 to decry a planned 21.6% funding cut in fiscal 1986 to migrant farmworker legal service programs by the Legal Services Corporation. The corporation’s board of directors has approved the cut, which opponents say will close down 20 of 49 one-attorney migrant offices nationwide when the fiscal year starts Oct. 1,1986.
Spokespersons for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Farmworker Justice Fund, Farm Project Group and the Migrant Legal Action Program said the actions taken by the LSC are based primarily on a study it conducted in 1977. The study showed that the migrant farmworker population had declined. The groups questioned the use of such an outdated study by the LSC.
The most recent data from the Department of Agriculture (1983) showed there were 226,000 migrant workers. LSC used that figure and Agriculture’s 1965 figure of 466,000 migrant
Brock Rejects Standards
Rejecting appeals from more than 50 health, labor and church groups, U.S. Secretary of Labor William Brock refused Sept. 11 to set federal field sanitation standards for farmworkers.
The proposed Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, fought vigorously by the farm lobby in Washington, would have required employers to provide worksite toilets and water for drinking and washing.
Brock decided instead to give individual states another 18 months to set standards of their own, saying that unless enough did, the federal government would take action within six months after his deadline. Presently, 13 states have some regulations.
The field standard battle has been waged within the executive branch, Congress and the courts for 13 years.
U.S. Representatives George Miller (D-Calif.) and Barney Frank (D-Mass.), who have been active proponents of such standards, reacted to Brock’s decision by promising to introduce immediate legislation mandating federal field sanitation standards.
workers recently to explain the decline -which it claims is still understated “considerably.”
Joel Thimell, a spokesman for LSC, said there are drawbacks to all the previous studies aimed at determining the migrant population.
“In fact the Department of Agriculture survey had a 50% problem of non-response,” Thimell said.
The cut represents a $2 million reduction from the 1985 funding level of $9.6 million. Six additional two-attorney programs will be forced to discharge one attorney because of the cut, farmworker advocates said.
Critics of the cut said that while the LSC has indicated an intent to have the basic field programs take over some of the responsibilities of the eliminated migrant programs, “... these field programs clearly do not possess the expertise necessary to deal with the peculiar problems of migrants.” Field programs generally do not involve legal services, and are aimed at a providing basic social assistance in housing, food stamps and other needs of the migrant population.
The LSC assumed responsibility in 1975 for the ten existing migrant programs which had been funded by the Office of Equal Employment, Department of Labor and the Migrant Legal Action Program.
In 1984, 13,670 cases were filed by the migrant workers nationwide. These were mostly for minimum wage violations, workers compensation and exposure to toxic chemicals.
Texas, California, and Florida are among the states where migrant services will be significantly reduced. MRicardo Fouster
Carollo Won’t Run
Miami Commissioner Joe Carollo announced Sept. 4 that he is withdrawing from the city’s Nov. 5 mayoral primary for personal reasons
Still opposing Maurice Ferre in his bid for a seventh two-year term are banker Raul Masvidal, lawyer Xavier Suarez, both Cubans, and black educator Marvin Dunn.
Carollo, who long harbored open hopes to become Miami’s first Cuban mayor, said the campaign for the $5,000-a-year post would be “economically suicidal” for him.


Sin pelos en la lengua
THUMBS UP: Everybody wants into the United States, right, Senator Simpson?
Wrong. Not Cipriano Taroc. Last year, the 92-year-old ex-farmworker-blind and feeble - tried to leave, to live out his final days back in the Philippines with his wife and children.
But with our bureaucracy performing at its sterile best, he was told he couldn’t go. It might be bad for his health.
When Taroc was languishing in a Delano, Calif., rest home, Rev. Jaime Neri, a Filippino Catholic priest, found the rpan’s family on the islands. Neri had established a repatriation program for men like Taroc - who were recruited in the ’20s to come labor in our fields.
Neri thought he had the paperwork whipped, Hfc was taking Taroc to the San Francisco airport when he stopped over at a Stockton hospital for the night.
There a social worker and the county Public Conservator teamed to keep him from leaving. Working with Sacramento attorney Don Chajrez, the priest finally got a judge to interview Taroc at his bedside this July. The judge ruled that Taroc couid go home.
Still mentally alert, Taroc was accompanied by a special nurse and a daughter on his flight back to the Philippines Aug. 30.
Sacramento Bee reporter Mike Castro, who followed the story for months, quoted Attorney Chairez’s assessment of the Public Conservator who fought to the end to keep Taroc from leaving: “I do believe (he) was genuinely concerned about the old man’s well-being physically. I don’t think he was concerned about the old man’s emotions.”
A case of values.
THUMBS DOWN: Heading north from the Mexican border early Labor Day weekend, San Antonio television newsman Jesus Javier picked up some friendly looking hitchhikers.
When Javier's car reached an immigration checkpoint north of Harlingen, he had papers to prove he belonged in the U.S. of A., but his passengers were sin papeles. The agents smelled an alien-smuggler and deposited the KWEX-TV anchorman in a less-than-luxurious cell in Rio Grande City jail.
When the local magistrate returned from his holiday two days and two nights later, Javier (who won an award for a documentary on immigration a few years back) was cut loose - no charges filed.
Now, his dilemma: In the future, should he discriminate against Spanish-speaking, “Latino-looking” hitchhikers? Or should he screen them for papers before giving them a ride?
Yet another case of values. Congressional committees are arguing its allegory at this very moment.
- Kay Barbaro
First N. J. Farm Election
Seventeen New Jersey farmworkers, including 15 Puerto Ricans, will be allowed to decide whether they wish to be represented by a union following a court settlement allowing the first farmworker union election ever in that state.
The union, Comite Organizador de Tra-bajadores Agricolas, won the court order Sept. 9 requiring the defendant, farm owner Saul Levin, to permit a representative election at his 500-acre vegetable farm in Rosenhayn.
Bridgeton County Court Judge Edward Miller scheduled the election for Sept. 27.
The New Jersey Farm Bureau estimates that about 1,500 farms employ some 20,000 Puerto Rican and other migrant laborers.
Serrano Doesn’t Concede
New York state Assemblyman Jose Serrano has refused to concede his narrow loss to Stanley Simon in the Sept. 10 New York City Democratic primary race for Bronx borough president. Gaining a surprising 48.4% of the vote, Serrano lost, 57,050 to 53,575. He said he may challenge the result in federal court, charging voting irregularities.
A Democratic primary win virtually assures victory Nov. 5 in New York City elections.
Republicans failed to enter candidates for most offices, including three where Hispanic Gity Council incumbents won: Rafael Colon (Dist. 11, Bronx), Fernando Ferrer (Dist. 13, Bronx), and Victor Robles (Dist. 27, Brooklyn).
Three Hispanics failed in their Democratic primary bids for City Council president Trailing winner Andrew Stein (286,461 votes) in the six-person race were Israel Ruiz Jr. (46,846), Angelo Del Toro (37,938) and Joseph Erazo (34,575).
There were an unprecedented number of Hispanic candidates in the citywide races.
In his easy victory, Mayor Ed Koch carried Hispanic districts by margins as high as 3-1 over five opponents, none Hispanic.
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Ten Colleges Have
Of 286 women presidents heading accredited colleges and universities last year, 10 were Hispanic, according to a survey released Sept. 3 by the American Council on Education.
Seven of the Latinas were in Puerto Rico; one each in New York, California and Florida.
The survey found an increase in women presidents from 148 in 1975 to 286 at the end of 1984 - a 93% gain.
Minorities comprised 9% of the women presidents. There were also 15 blacks and one Asian-Pacific Islander.
A total of 2,800 institutions were surveyed. Most of the minority women were found to be leading two-year institutions.
Report Accuses Cuomo
The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy Inc. in New York claims that while a panel established by the state’s governor has found that the state discriminates against Hispanics, the governor is doing nothing to correct the situatioa
Critiquing the 432-page, Aug. 8 report of Gov. Mario Cuomo’s Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs, the institute issued a 31-page response, “New York State Latinos: An Ignored Minority,” on Aug. 27.
While calling the advisory committee’s report “very useful,” the institute found:
• The 6,137 Hispanics employed by the state in 1984 represent only 2.9% of the total state work force of 208,159, a percentage that has not changed since Cuomo assumed office.
• The State Civil Service Department has a worse record of Latino hiring than most of the agencies it monitors.
• The advisory committee’s report confirms that Cuomo inflated his Latino appointments figure last year, as the Institute had charged earlier. The institute found that Latinos received less that 4% of appointments, while the administration claimed the figure was 8%. The advisory committee report showed that 4.3% of the governor's appointments were Hispanic.
Latina Presidents
Hispana presidents identified on the mainland were:
Flora Mancuso-Edwards, president, Hostos Community College, Bronx, N.Y.
Victoria Viera, president, Indian Valley Community College, Novato, Calif.
Linda L6pez* McAllister, dean, University of South Florida, Fort Myers, Fla.
On the island of Puerto Rico, the Hispanas were:
Enilda Bobadilla-Demorell, director, Arecibo Regional Campus, Catholic University.
Ruth Burgo9-Sasscer, director, Aguadilla Regional College, UPR.
Ruth Fortuno-Calzada, director, Ponce Technical University and College, UPR.
Lilliam Morales, director, Humacao Regional College, UPR.
Miriam Palerm de Setiem, director, Bayamon Regional College, UPR.
Nilda Matos, director, Fajardo Regional College, Interamerican University.
Maria de los Angeles Ortiz de Le6n, director, Arecibo Regional College, Interamerican University.
SALAD Raps University
Leaders of an Hispanic and black civil rights organization in Florida have written the state’s governor and chancellor of the state university system asking for“immediate action” to increase the number of minorities in the administration and faculty at Florida International University.
The Aug. 29 letter from the Spanish American League Against Discrimination (SALAD) and the Miami chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People charged that the lack of minorities in professional positions at the university “has now reached a point of crisis.”
In the 1984-85 school year, there were only 25 Hispanics and 16 blacks among the 238 tenured professors at the university. Of the top 50 administrators, 40 were whites, five were blacks, four Hispanics and one Asian. In addition, Hispanics and blacks received the lowest executive salaries.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
JUVENILE JUSTICE INFORMATION: The Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse provides extensive information on youth and the justice system. The clearinghouse has information on minorities and on Puerto Rico. It provided a topical bibliography for the recent conference titled “Minority Crime and the Juvenile Justice System.” Contact: Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse/NCJRS, Box 6000, Rockville, Md. 20850. Phone: (301) 251-5500 or (800) 738-8736 (toll free). Clearinghouse hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
PUBLIC POLICY GRANTS: Individuals and institutions are eligible to apply for grants supporting research on public policy and its impact on Hispanics. Grants range from small, individual awards to large grants for major research efforts. Contact: Ramon Saldivar or Harriett Romo, Inter-University Program for Latino Research, University of Texas at Austin, Center for Mexican American Studies, Student Services Building 4.120, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471-4557.
CONGRESSIONAL FELLOWSHIPS: Eight graduate students studying public policy or related fields will be selected for fellowships offered by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. The fellows receive a $3,000 stipend and work with congressional committees Contact Beverly Ellerman, executive director, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc., 504 C St. NE, Suite 2,'Washington, D.C. 20002(202)543-1771. Deadline: June 14.
HOW TO WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL “Proposal Writing Strategies? provides tips on how to find grant money and how to prepare a grant proposal. The booklet is available from the Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center. Contact: SSMHRC Clearinghouse, A 325 Franz Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 (213) 825-8886. Cost: $4.95. Make check payable to UC Regents.
FOLKLORE AND FOLKWAYS: The Library of Congress has produced a Spanish-language brochure detailing the resources and services available in its American Folklife Center. It’s free. For a copy of El Centro Americano de Tradicion Popular, contact American Folklife Center, The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 20540 (202) 287-6590. English versions also available.
ARTISTS COMPETITION: The Association of Hispanic Arts is accepting designs for a statue of Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos. The winning artist will receive at least$5,000 forthe work. Thestatue will be displayed in New York City. For details on the competition contact: Association of Hispanic Arts, 200 East 87th St., New York, N.Y. 10028 (212) 369-7054.
MINORITIES IN BROADCASTING: The FCC’s 1984 Equal Opportunity Trend Report prepared by state, station class, job category and year contains figures on Hispanic, black, Asian and American Indian representation in television and radio in the United States. A single copy of the report is free. The 600-page state breakdown report can be inspected at the commission’s library only. Contact: Consumer Assistance Office,! 919 M St. N.W. Room 254, Washington, D.C. 20554 (202) 632-7000.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737.. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Milwaukee Boy's and Girl’s Club
. MBGC seeks Executive Director, responsible to the board of trustees, to direct and administer the agency. Position requires college degree arid 12 years relevant experience including at least 10 years defined supervisory and administrative responsibilities. Ideal candidate will have demonstrated experience and success in financial, personnel and resource management of multi-unit, building-centered, nonprofit agency with annual operating budget of $2 million in United Way, government and private support. Person would have energy, imagination, ability to relate well with wide range of people, excellent planning and communication skills. Hiring range $45,771 -$53,676. Excellent benefits. Send resume by June 15 ta Search committee, Milwaukee BoVsand GirT sClub, P.O. Box92159, Milwaukee, Wis. 53202.
WRITER/PRODUCER: KPBS-TV Public Affairs Department has an opening for a writer/producer. Primary assignment producing in-studio programs.
Expected to write scripts, proposals for other station producers. Minimum three years experience with script writing, proposal writing and producing. Strong writing skills required.
Salary range starting at$19,500, depending on experience, with a possible cost-of-living increase anticipated on 7/1/85. Excellent benefit package.
Applications must be received by 7/31/85 at San Diego State University Employment Office, Third Floor-Administration Building, San Diego Calif. 92182.
KPBS-TV/FM is an EEO/AA/Title IX Employer and we welcome all applications.
EDITOR FOR WEEKLY REPORT
HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE, Washington, D.C., seeks editor/reporter for its national news weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly Report Position involves reporting, writing and editing on a broad range of news related to U.S Hispanic concerns Excellent opportunity to report and leam about federal government and the status of Hispanics nationally. Spanish and a sense of humor usef uL
Send inquiries plus references, to Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202)234-0737
DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE - UNDERWRITING: San Diego’s public broadcasting station, KPBS-TV/FM, is seeking someone to obtain underwriting for local, national and regional programming. The position entails identifying funding opportunities from a wide variety of sources, including foundations, corporate and individual entities.
Requirements include equivalent to acollege degree, three years of verifiable, successful fund-raising or sales experience in public television/radio or a related field. Experience with foundations is strongly preferred.
Salary range starting at $29,000, depending upon experience, with a possible cost-of-living increase anticipated on 7/1/85. Excellent benefit package.
Applications must be received by 7/31/85 at San Diego State University Employment Office, Third Floor-Administration Building, San Diego, Calif. 92182.
KPBS-TV/FM is an EEO/AA Title IX Employer and we welcome all applications.
PRESIDENT AND GENERAL COUNSEL: Dynamic attorney with extensive management and fundraising experience to direct a nonprofit Hispanic civil rights organization. Headquartered in San Francisco, MALDEF has regional operations throughout the country. MALDEPs programs emphasize voting and political rights, access to employment and education, immigration and naturalization and Chicana rights. The president and general counsel is responsible for all fiscal and management functions of the organization. He/She reports to a- 40-member national board of directors. Qualifications include significant legal and administrative experience and Hispanic civil rights background. Bilingual candidates perferred. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume and references to Fernando de Necochea, Chairman of the Board, c/o MALDEF, 28 Geary St., Third Floor, San Francisco, Calif. 94108. Deadline: June 30.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
EXPO FAIR ’85 New York June 13-16
A fair focusing on the Hispanic consumer. About 90 companies will exhibit items ranging from black beans to beer.
Nick Lugo (212) 348-2100
COMING SOON
NEW YORK STATE HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS BANQUET New York June 19 Bob Estrada (212) 737-9708
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MINORITY CONTRACTORS
Ft. Worth, Texas June 19-22 Dewey Thomas Jr. (202) 347-8259
IMAGEN AWARDS LUNCHEON
Beverly Hills, Calif. June 25
The National Conference of Christians and Jews is
the sponsor.
Cheryl Fields (213) 385-0491
LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS Anaheim, Calif. June 26-30 Manuel Mdrquez (714) 898-2312
AMERICAN Gl FORUM ANNUAL STATE
CONVENTION
Newark,, Calif. June 27-30
Rudy Venegas (415) 792-2799 •
EL PASO FESTIVAL El Paso July 12-14
Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533-1700
TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Antonio July 17-20 Elena de la Garza (512) 447-9821
SPOTLIGHT
The National Council of La Raza will hold its eighth annual conference July 14-17 in Houston. Conference training seminars and workshops will be held on such topics as immigration, education, employment, civil rights, fund raising, Hispanic demographics and consumer patterns, community organizing and advocacy. For more information call Marialba Martinez (202) 628-9600.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts & Entertainment
THE HISPANIC ADVERTISING WAR between the nation’s two largest soft-drink producers has reached a new height — and the dispute between Coca-Cola and Pepsi Cola has stalled the release of the Cantare, cantaras famine relief record.
Disputes over Cantare, cantaras, produced to aid famine relief groups in Latin America and Africa by Hermanos, a non-profit group, center over the contractu ral appearance of the Pepsi Cola logo on the record album jacket. Pepsi donated $150,000 towards the production of the record and a videotape of the recording session that gathered more than 50 Latino recording stars.
Coca-Cola objects to the appearance of the logo alongside Julio Iglesias, a Coca-Cola spokesman and one of the Cantare, cantaras singers. As of presstime the two soft drink companies and Hermanos were still discussing the issue.
In related news, Coca-Cola announced May 30 in Los Angeles the start of anew advertising campaign featuring Mexican film star Mario Moreno “Cantinflas.” The new campaign starts four months after Pepsi Cola countered Coca-Cola’s hiring of Iglesias with its own set
of commercials featuring the Puerto Rican quintet Menudo. Iglesias, Menudo and “Cantinflas” all contributed to the Cantard, cantaras single.
A STATUE TO HONOR THE MEMORY of a Puerto Rican poet who died in New York will be placed in the city’s Museo del Barrio next summer.
The commissioning of an artist to design the statue is one part of the Julia de Burgos Public Art Project, an effort sponsored by New Yorks Association of Hispanic Arts. Funded by thecitys Department of Cultural Affairs, the project will pay at least $5,000 to the sculptor selected.
ONE LINERS: Eight theater groups from the United States, Canada and the Dominican Republic took part in a New Theater Festival in Washington, D.C., June 5 to 9; performed works included Enrique Buenaventura’s La orgia and Osvaldo Dragun’s Historias para ser contadas... Puerto Rican baritone Pablo Elvira sings the lead role in Puccini’s Manon Lescaut when the New York Metropolitan Opera inaugurates itsf ree Opera in the Park series June 11... and a show of paintings by Raul Guerrero continues at Los Angeles’ Richard Kuhlenschmidt Gallery through June 16...
— Antonio Mejias-Ftentas
Media Report
HISPANICS IN BROADCASTING: While a survey released in April by the American Society of Newspaper Editors found that only 1.5% of the 53,800 newspersons working for U.S. daily newspapers were Hispanic, numbers on Hispanics in comparable broadcast positions are a bit more encouraging.
The broadcast industrys 1984 employment figures compiled by the Federal Communications Commission show2,184 Hispanics employed as announcers, reporters, editors and writers. That’s 4.2% of the 52,430 total. For the past four years the percentage has fluctuated between 4.1% and 4.2%.
For blacks, the 1984 FCC figure was 4,258 (8.1%). Total minority representation was 7,255 (13.8%) for those news categories, compared to ASNEs 5.7% minority representation among reporters, editors and photographers on daily newspapers in 1984.
The FCC figures are for stations with five or more employees.
Altogether, there were 8,185 Hispanics employed in radio and television in 1984 -4.9% of a 168,746 total. The FCC report showed further
• Hispanics were employed least as managers and sales personnel (3.3% each) and most as laborers (14.7%) and service personnel (13.3%).
• Hispanics showed theirgreatest numbers as male technicians (1,599) and female clerical workers (1,587).
• There were more Hispanics working in commercial television (3,277 or5.2%) than in commercial radio (2,729 or 4.6%). The same held true for Latinos in non-commercial television (464 or 6%) and non-commercial radio (108 or 4.2%).
Overall, the FCC counted 25,998 minorities (15.4%) employed in broadcasting in’84. In 1980, the percentage was 14.6%.
AWARDS: Elisabeth Perez-Luna, producer with Toucan Productions in Philadelphia, won the 1985 Corporation for Public Broadcasting public radio program award in the news and public affairs category for the program on San Antonio in her series, “Latin USA: A Tale of Four Cities.”
Alfredo Lanier, assistant editor of Chicago magazine, won the local Peter Lisagor Award for general reporting and an article called “Bilingual Education: Teaching in Subtitles.”
WRITE MOVES: Frank del Olmo, Los Angeles Times’ editorial writer, has been named to the 13-member board of directors for the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund. . . Roberto Rodriguez has joined Caminos magazine as editor following stints as copublisher of the cultural magazine Corazon de Aztlan and photo-journalist with Lowrider magazine,all in LosAngeles... FormerCaminos Editor Katherine Diaz switched to public relations work for Coca-Cola Company there.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report editor Steve Padilla will return home to California in midsummer to take a reporting job with The San Diego Union. . . Also joining the Union is reporter Ernesto Portillo Jr., moving from Massachusetts' Worchester Telegram . . . Julio Ojeda, spring graduate of St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minn., joined Hispanic LinkJune3. He was selected from among30 candidates as its Gannett Foundation reporter-intern for the summer. _ Car/os Mora/es
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Encksen-Mendoza Editor Steve Padilla
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Encksen-Mendoza, Ancel Martinez, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, j Carlos.! Morales, Julio Ojeda
No portion oi Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast \in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Lmk Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Encksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737
j \j j i/ v< HJy ^UNIVERS


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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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HA/Cfi Making The News This Week Hartford, Conn . . . Elected to a two-year as president of the Mexican American Texa _ s •. former LULAC President Ruben Bonilla o corpus Chnst1 h1res Wilham Calderon of Houston as its executive director. Calderon will open a permanent MAD office in Austin .... Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and the L.A Co1.,1nty Board of Supervisors hold award ceremonies honoring Carmela Robles, Frank Moreno, Faustino Piiion, Manuel de Ia Torre and Jose Burgoin for their role in the capture and arrest of Richard Ramirez, whom police believe to be the Night Stalker ... Gonzalo Guell, a career diplomat who served as ambassador, foreign minister and prime minister of Cuba, dies Sept. 1 in Coral Gables, Fla., at age 90 ... Sacramento Federal District Judge Raul Ramirez rules that an Interior Department program allowing private ranchers to manage public lands is illegal . His decision reverses a policy put in place by James Watt, Interior Secretary in the first three years of the Reagan Administration ... Philadelphia lawyer Gilbert Case lias is appointed to the American Bar Association's Special Committee on the Delivery of Legal Services by ABA President William Flagstaff. Casellas is a past national president of the Hispanic Bar Association ... Jorge Hernandez, executive director of lnquilinos Boricuas en Acci6n in Boston, receives the Distinguished Community Service Award from the National Urban Coalition at its awards dinner Sept. 10 in Washington, D.C .... Eppie Archuleta, a Hispanic traditional weaver from Alamosa, Colo., and Julio Negron, a musician and instrument-maker from Morovis, Puerto Rico, are among 12 recipients of a National Heritage Fellowship, the country's highest award for accomplishment in a traditional arts field ... Jose Martinez, personnel director at the Lincoln Hall reformatory in Lincolndale, N.Y . , is named city personnel director for CourtSaysOKto Probe Bilingual Ballot Names A federal appeals court in San Francisco has upheld the actions of U.S. Attorney Joseph Russoniello who in 1982 sent the names of 168 bilingual ballot applicants to immigration officials to check their citizenship. In a 2-1 ruling Sept. 3, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that "the governmenfs need to ensure the sanctity of the polls" outweighs any burden that the investigation placed on voting rights and the political rights of minority organizations. Russoniello, a Reagan appointee, asked prosecutors in nine counties near San Francisco to send him 25 names of recent applicants for bilingual ballots . Immigration officials were unable to positively identify 113 people as citizens. The appeals court ruling upholds a series of U.S. District Court rulings against the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. It had brought suit against Russoniello in May 1982 for voting rights violations. Plaintiffs were Jose Olagues, a U.S. citizen who was among those investigated, the Hispanic Coalition for Human Rights, Chinese for Affirmative Action arid San Francisco Latino Voter Registration Education Project. Dissenting Judge Dorothy Nelson said the investigation was constitutionally suspect because the voters were not only"language minorities" but also foreign-born. "This investigation intimidated those foreign born, recently registered voters who requested bilingual ballots," Nelson said. Latino Cops Drop Suit A Hispanic police officers' association in Miami won't pursue a suit it filed in federal court 13 months ago charging the Metro Dade Police Department with discriminating against Latinos in hiring and promotions. Officer Mario Beovides, president of the 320-member association, told reporters Sept. 3 th(l.t the department is now providing Latino officers with equal treatment. The association had originally sought $1 million in damages. Farmworker advocate groups held a press conference in Washington, D . C., Sept. 6 to decry a planned 21.6% funding cut in fiscal 1986 to migrant farmworker legal service programs by the Legal Services Corporation. The corporation's board of directors has approved the cut, which opponents say will close down 20 of 49 one-attorney migrant offices nationwide when the fiscal year starts Oct. 1, 1986. Spokespersons for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Farmworker Justice Fund , Farm Project Group and the Migrant Legal Action Program said the actions taken by the LSC are based primarily on a study it conducted in 1977. The study showed that the migrant farmworker population had declined. The groups questioned the use of such an outdated study by the LSC. The most recent data from the Department of Agriculture ( 1983) showed there were 226,000 migrant workers. LSC used that figure and Agriculture's 1965 figure of 466,000 migrant Brock Rejects Standards Rejecting appeals from more than 50 health, labor and church groups, U.S. Secretary of Labor William Brock refused Sept. 11 to set federal field sanitation standards for farm workers. The proposed Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, fought vigorously by the farm lobby in Washington, would have required employers to provide worksite toilets and water for drinking and washing. Brock decided instead to give states another 18 months to set standards of their own, saying that unless enough did, the federal government would take action within six months after his deadline. Presently, 13 states have some regulations. The field standard battle has been waged within the executive branch, Congress and the courts for 13 years. U.S. Representatives George Miller(D-Calif.) and Barney Frank (D-Mass.), who have been active proponents of such standards, reacted to Brock's decision by promising to introduce immediate legislation mandating federal field sanitation standards. . workers rec;ently to explain the decline which it claims is still understated "considerably." Joel Thimell, a spokesman for LSC, said there are drawbacks to all the previous studies aimed at determining the migrant population. "In fact, the Department of Agriculture survey had a 50% problem of non-response,'.' Thimell said. The cut represents a $2 million reduction from the 1985 funding level of $9.6 million. Six additional two-attorney programs will be forced to discharge one attorney because of the cut, farmworker advocates said . Critics of the cut said that while the LSC has indicated an intent to have the basic field programs take over some of the responsibilities of the eliminated migrant programs," ... these field programs clearly do not possess the expertise necessary to deal with the peculiar problems of migrants." Field programs generally do not involve legal services, and are aimed at a providing basic social assistance in housing, food stamps and other needs of the migrant population. The LSC assumed responsibility in 1975 for the ten existing migrant programs which had been funded by the Office of Equal Employment, Department of Labor and the Migrant Legal Action Program. In 1984, 13,670 cases were filed by the migrant workers nationwide. These were mostly for minimum wage violations, workers com pensation and exposure to toxic chemicals. Texas, California, and Florida are among the states where migrant services will be significantly reduced. Ricardo Fouster Carollo Won't Run Miami Commissioner Joe Carollo announced Sept. 4 that he is withdrawing from the city's Nov. 5 mayoral primary for personal reasons. Still opposing Maurice Ferre in his bid for a seventh two-year term are banker Raul Masvidal, lawyer Xavier Suarez, both Cubans, and black educator Marvin Dunn . Carollo, who long harbored open hopes to become Miami's first Cuban mayor, said the campaign for the $5,000-a-year post would be "economically suicidal" for him .

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Sin pelos . en Ia lengua Sacramento Bee reporter Mike Castro, who followed the story for months, quoted Attorney Chaireis assessment of the Public Conservator who fought to the end to keep Taroc from leaving: "I do believe (he) was genuinely concerned about the old man's well-being physically. I don't think he was concerned about the old man's emotions." THUMBS UP: Everybody wants into the United States, right, Senator Simpson? A case of values. Wrong . Not Cipriano Taroc. Last year , the 92-year-old ex-farmworker blind and feeble--: tried to leave, to live out his final days back in the Philippines with his wife and children. But with our bureaucracy performing at its sterile best, he was told he couldn't go. It might be bad for his health. THUMBS DOWN: Heading north from the Mexican border early Labor Day weekend, San Antonio television newsman Jesus Javier picked up some friendly looking hitchhikers. When Taroc was languishing in a Delano, Calif., rest home, Rev . When Javier's car reached an immigration checkpoint north of Harlingen, he had papers to prove he belonged in the U.S. of A., but his passengers were sin papeles. The agents smelled an aliensmuggler and deposited the KWEX-TV anchorman in a less-thanluxurious cell in Rio Grande City jail. Jaime Neri, a Filippino Catholic priest, found t_he man's family on the islands. Neri had .established a repatriation program for men like Taroc-who were recruited in the '20s to come labor in oudields. N ' eri thought he had the paperwork whipped. He was taking Taroc to the San Francisco airport when he stopped over at a Stockton rospital for the night. . There a social worker and the county Public Conservator teamed to keep him from leaving . Working with Sacramento attorney Don Chairez, the priest finally got a judge to interview Taroc at his bedside this July. The judge ruled that Taroc could go home. When the .local magistrate returned from his holiday .two days and two nights later, Javier (who won an award for a documentary on immigration a few years back) was cut looseno charges filed . Now, his dilemma: In the future, should he discriminate against Spanish-speaking, "Latinolooking" hitchhikers? Or should he screen them for papers before giving them a ride? Still mentally alert, Tarocwas accompanied by a special nurse and a daughter on his flight back to the Philippines Aug. 30. Yet another case of values. Congressional committees are arguing its allegory at this very moment. . Kay Barbaro First N.J. Farm Election Seventeen New Jersey farmworkers, including 15 Puerto Ricans, will be allowed to decide whether they wish to be represented by a union following a court settlement allowing the first farmworker union election ever in that state. The union, Comite Organizador de Trabajadores Agricolas, won the court order Sept. 9 requiring the defendant, farm owner Saul Levin, to permit a representative election at his 500-acre vegetable farm in Rosenhayn . Bridgeton County Court Judge Edward Miller scheduled the election for Sept. 27. The New Jersey Farm Bureau estimates that about 1,500 farms employ some 20,000 Puerto Rican and other migrant laborers. Serrano Doesn't Concede New York state Assemblyman Jose Serrano has refused to concede his narrow loss to Stanley Simon in the Sept. 10 New York City Democratic primary race for Bronx borough president. Gaining a surprising 48.4% of the vote, Serrano lost, 57,050 to 53,575. He said he may challenge the result in federal court, charging voting irregularities. A Democratic primary win virtually assures victory Nov. 5 in New York City elections. Republicans failed to enter candidates for most offices, including three where Hispanic City Council incumbents won: Rafael Colon (Dist. 11, Bronx), Fernando Ferrer (Dist. 13, Bronx), and Victor Robles(Dist. 27, Brooklyn) . Three Hispanics failed in their Democratic primary bids fo r City Council president Trailing winner Andrew Stein (286,461 votes) in the six-person race were Israel Ruiz Jr. (46,846), Angelo DelToro (37 ,938) and Joseph Erazo (34,575). There were an unprecedented number of Hispanic candidates in the citywide races. In his easy victory, Mayor Ed Koch carried Hispanic districts by margins as high as 3-1 over five opponents, none Hispanic. 2 Ten Colleges Have Latina Presidents Of 286 women presidents heading accredited colleges and universities last year, 10 were Hispanic, according to a survey released Sept. 3 by the American Council on Education. Seven of the Latinas were in Puerto Rico; one each in New York, California and Florida. The survey found an increase in women presidents from 148 in 1975 to 286 at the end of 1984-a 93% gain. Minorities comprised 9% of the women presidents. There were also 15 blacks and one Asian-Pacific Islander. A total of 2,800 institutions were surveyed . Most of the minority women were found to be leading two-year institutions. Report Accuses Cuomo The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy Inc. in New York claims that while a panel established by the state's governor has found that the state discriminates against Hispanics, the governor is doing nothing to correct the situation. Critiquing the 432-page, Aug . 8 report of Gov . Mario Cuomo's Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs , the institute issued a 31page response, "New York State Latinos: An Ignored Minority, " on Aug . 27. While calling the advisory committee's report "very useful , " the institute found: • The 6,137 Hispanics employed by the state in 1984 represent only 2 . 9% of the total state work force of 208,1 59, a percentage that has not changed since Cuomo assumed office. • The State Civil Service Department has a worse recordof Latino hiring than most of the agencies it monitors. • The advisory committee's report confirms that Cuomo inflated his Latino appointments figure last year, as the Institute had charged earlier . The institute found that Latinos received less that 4% of appointments, while the administration claimed the figure was 8%. The advisory committee report showed that 4 .3% of the governor's appointments were Hispanic . Hispana presidents identified on the main land were: Flora Mancuso-Edwards, president, Hostos Community College, Bronx, N . Y . Victoria Viera, president, Indian Valley Community College, Novato , Calif. Linda LopezMcAllister, dean , University of South Florida, Fort Myers , Fla . On the island of Puerto Rico, the Hispanas were: Enilda Bobadilla-Demorell, director, Arecibo Regional Campus, Catholic University. Ruth Burgo&Sasscer, director, Aguadilla Regional College, UPR. Ruth Fortuno-Calzada, director , Ponce Technical University and College, UPR. Lilliam Morales, director, Humacao Regional College , UPR. Miriam Palerm de Setiem, director, Bayamon Regional College, UPR. Nilda Matos, director, Fajardo Regional College, lnteramerican University. Marla de los Angeles Ortiz de Leon, director, Arecibo Regional College, lnteramerican University . SALAD Raps University Leaders of an Hispanic and black civil rights organization in Florida have written the state's governor and chancellor of the state university system asking for"immediate action" to increase the number of minorities in the administration and faculty at Florida International University. The Aug . 29 letter from the Spanish American League Against Discrimination (SALAD) and the Miami chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People charged that the lack of minorities in professional positions at the university "has now reached a point of crisis." In the 1984-85 school year, there were only 25 Hispanics and 16 blacks among the 238 tenured professors at the university. Of the top 50 administrators, 40 were whites, five were blacks, four Hispanics and one Asian. In addition, Hispanics and blacks received the lowest executive salaries. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS JUVENILE JUSTICE INFORMATION: The Juvenile Justice Clearing house provides extensive information on youth and the justice system . The clearinghouse has information on minorities and on Puerto Rico . It provided a topical bibliography for the recent conference titled "Minority Crime and the Juvenile Justice System." Contact: Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse/NCJRS, Box 6000, Rockville, Md. 20850. Phone: (301) 251-5500 or(800) 738-8736 (toll free). Clearing house hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. PUBLIC POLICY GRANTS: Individuals and institutions are eligible to apply for grants supporting research on public policy and its impact on Hispanics. Grants range from small, individual awards to large grants for major research efforts. Contact: Ramon Saldivar or Harriett Romo, Inter-University Program for Latino Research, University of Texas at Austin, Center for Mexican American Studies, Student Services Building 4.120, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471-4557. CONGRESSIONAL FELLOWSHIPS: Eight graduate students studying public policy or related fields will be selected for fellowships offered by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. The fellows receive a $3,000 stipend and work with congressional committees. Contact Beverly Ellerman, executive director , Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc., 504 C St. NE, Suite 2,•Washington , D.C . 20002 (202) 543-1771. Deadline: June 14. HOW TO WRITE A GRANT PROPOSAL: "Proposal Writing Strategies" provides tips on how to find grant money and how to prepare a grant proposal. The booklet is available from the Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center. Contact: SSMHRC Clearinghouse, A 325 Franz Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 (213) 825-8886. Cost: $4.95. Make check payable to UC Regents. FOLKLORE AND FOLKWAYS: The Library of Congress has produced a Spanish-language brochure detailing the resources and services available in its American Folklife Center. It's free. For a copy of El Centro Americana de Tradici6n Popular, contact American Folklife Center, The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 20540 (202) 2876590. English versions also available. ARTISTS COMPETITION: The Association of Hispanic Arts is accepting designs for a statue of Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos. The winning artist will receive at least$5,000 for the work. The statue will be displayed in New York City. For details on the competition contact: Association of Hispanic Arts, 200 East 87th St., New York, N.Y. 10028 (212) 369-7054. MINORITIES IN BROADCASTING: The FCC's 1984 Equal Opportunity Trend Report prepared by state, station class, job category and year contains figures on Hispanic, black, Asian and American Indian representation in television and radio in the United States. A single copy of the report is free. The 600-page state breakdown report can be inspected at the commission's library only. Contact: Consumer Assistance Office, 1919 M St. N.W. Room 254, Washington, D.C. 20554 (202) 632-7000. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link. 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737 .. Ad copy received by 5 p m I En Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch . EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Milwaukee Boy's and Girl's Club . MBGC seeks Executive Director, responsible to the board of trustees. to direct and administer the agency. Position requires college degree arid 12 years rele ' vant experience including at least 1 0 years defined supervisory and administrative responsibilities. Ideal candidate will have demonstrated experience and success in financial, personnel and resource manage ment of multi-unit, building-centered, non profit agency with annual operating budget of $2 million in United W'4y, government and private support. Person would have energy, imagination , ability to relate well with wide range of people , excellent planning and communication skills. Hiring range $45,771 -$53,676. Excellent benefits. Send resume by June 15 to : Search committee, Milwaukee Boy's and Girls Club, P.O. Box92159, Milwaukee , Wis . 53202. WRITER / PRODUCER : KPB& TV Publi c Affairs Department has an opening for a writer/producer. Primary assignment producing programs. Expected to write scripts, proposals for other station producers. Minimum three years experience with script writing , proposal writing and producing. Strong writing skills required . Salary range starting at$19,500, depending on experience, with a pos sible costoHivin'g increase anticipated on 7 / 1 / 85. Excellent benefit package. Applications must be received by 7/31/85 at San Diego State University Employment Office , Third Floor-Administration Building , San Diego Calif. 92182. KPB& TV/ FM is an EEO/ANTitle IX Employer and we welcome all applications. EDITOR FOR WEEKLY REPORT HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE, Washing!Of\ D.C., seeks editor/reporter fo . r its national new s weekly, Hispanic Link Weekly Report . Position involves reporting , writing and editing on a broad range of news related to U.S. Hispanic concerns. Excellent opportunity to report and learn about federal government and the status of H is panics nationally . Spanish and a sense of humor useful Send inquiries, plus references,. to ChaMie Ericksen Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St NW , Washingtof\ D.C. 20005 (202) 234 DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE UNDER WRITING: San Di ego's public broadcasting station, KPB& TV/ FM, i s se eking someone to obtain underwriting for local, national and regional programming. The position entails identifying funding opportunities from a wide variety of sources, including foundations, corporate and individual entities. Requirements include equivalent to a colleg e degree, three yea r s of verifiable, successful fund-raising or sa le s experience in publi c television/radio or a related field . E x perience with foundation s is strongly preferred . Salary range starti ng at$29,000, depending upon experience, with a possible cost-of living increase anticipated on 7/1/85. Excellent benefit package . Applications must be received by7/31/85 at San Diego State University Employment Office , Third Floor-Administration Building , San Diego , Calif . 92182. KPB& TV/FM is an EEO/ AA Title IX Employer and we welcome all applications. PRESIDENT AND GENERAL COUNSEL: D y namic attorney with extensive management and fundraising experience to direct a non pro fit Hispanic civil rights organization. Head q uartered i n San Francisco , MALDEF has regio nal operations throughout the country. MALDEPs prog ra ms emphasize voting and political rights , access to employment and education, immigration and naturalization and Chicana rights. The president and general counsel is responsible for all fiscal and management fun c tion s of the organization. He/She report s to a 40-member nati o nal board of directors. Qualifications include s ignificant legal and administrative experience and Hispanic c ivil right s background . Bilingual candidates perferred . Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume and references " t o Fernando de Necoc hea , Chairman of the B oard, c/o MALDEF , 28 Geary St., Third Floo r , San Francisco, Calif. 94108. Deadline : June 30. Calendar NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MINORITY CONTRACTORS EL PASO FESTIVAL El Paso July 12 THIS WEEK EXPO FAIR '85 New York June 13-16 A fair focusing on the Hispanic consumer. About 90 companies will exhibit items ranging from black beans to beer. Nick Lugo (212) 348 2100 COMING SOON NEW YORK STATE HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS BANQUET New York June 19 Bob Estrada (212) 737-9708 Hispanic Link Weekly Report Ft. Worth, Texas June 1 !l-22 Dewey Thomas Jr. (202) 347-8259 IMAGEN AWARDS LUNCHEON Beverly Hills, Calif. June 25 The National Conference of Christians and Jews is the sponsor. Cheryl Fields (213) 385-0491 LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS Anaheim, Calif . June 26-30 Manuel Marquez (714) 898-231 2 AMERICAN Gl FORUM ANNUAL STATE CONVENTION Newark,, Calif. June 27-30 Rudy Venegas (415) 792-2799 Mary Ann Hedderson (915) 533-1700 TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE CONVENTION San Antonio July 17-20 Elena de Ia Garza (512) 447-9821 SPOTLIGHT The National Council of La Raza will hold its eighth annualconferenceJuly14-17 in Houston. Conference training seminars and workshops will be held on such topics as immigration, education , employment, civil rights, fund raising, Hispanic demographics and consumer patterns. community organizing and advocacy. For more information call Marialba Martinez (202) 628-9600. 3

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Arts & Entertainment of commercials featuring the Puerto Rican quintet Menudo. Iglesias, Menudo and "Cantinflas" all contributed to the Cantara, cantaras single. THE HISPANIC ADVERTISING WAR between the nation's two largest soft-drink producers has reached a new height -and the between Coca-Cola and Pepsi Cola has stalled the release of the Cantara, cantaras famine relief record. A STATUE TO HONOR THE MEMORY of a Rican poet who died in New York will be placed in the city's Museo del Barrio next summer. Disputes over Cantara, cantaras, produced to aid famine relief groups in latin America and Africa by Hermanos, a non-profit group, center over the contractural appearance of the Pepsi Cola logo on the record album jacket. Pepsi donated $150,000 towards the production of the record and a videotape of the recording session that gathered more than 50 Latino recording stars. The commissioning of an artist to design the statue is one part of the Julia de Burgos Public Art Project, an effort sponsored by New York's Association of Hispanic Arts. Funded by the city's Department of Cultural Affairs, the project will pay at least $5,000 to the sculptor selected. ONE LINERS: Eight theater groups from the United States, Canada and the Dominican Republic took part in a New Theater Festival in Washington, D.C., June 5 to 9; performed works included Enrique Buenaventura's La orgia and Osvaldo Dragun's Historias para ser contadas ... Puerto Rican baritone Pablo Elvira sings the lead role in Puccini's Manon Lescaut when the New York Metropolitan Opera inaugurates its free Opera in the Park series June 11 ... and a show of paintings by Raul Guerrero continues at los Angeles' Richard Kuhlenschmidt Gallery through june 16 ... Coca-Cola objects to the appearance of the logo alongside Julio Iglesias, a Coca-Cola spokesman and one of the Cantara, cantaras singers. As of presstime the two soft drink companies and Hermanos were still discussing the issue. In related news, Coca-Cola announced May30 in Los Angeles the start of anew advertising campaign featuring Mexican film star Mario Moreno "Cantinflas. " The new campaign starts four months after Pepsi Cola count.ered Coca-Cola's hiring of Iglesias with its own set Media Report HISPANICS IN BROADCASTING: While a survey released in April by the American Society of Newspaper Editors found that only 1.5% of the 53,800 newspers0ns working for U.S. daily newspapers were' Hispanic, numbers on Hispanics in comparable broadcast positions are a bit more encouraging. The broadcast industry's 1984 employment figures compiled by the Federal Communi cations Commission show2,184 Hispanics employed as announcers, reporters, editors and writers. That's 4 . 2% of the 52,430 total. For the past four years the percentage has fluctuated between 4.1 o/o and 4.2% . For blacks, the 1984 FCC figure was 4,258 (8.1 %). Total minority representation was 7,255 (13.8%) for those news categories, compared to ASNE's 5.7% minority representation among reporters, editors and photographers on daily newspapers in 1984. The FCC figures are for stations with five or more employees. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat1onal publ1cation of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 • N ' Street, N . W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publtsher: Hector Encksen Mendoza Ed•tor: Steve Padtlla Reporting : Charlie Ericksen, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza Ancel Martinez , Antonio Mejias-Rentas, : Carlos' Morales, Julio Ojeda No port•on o f Hi spa RIC Lmk Weekly Report maybe reproduced o r broadcast m any form w ithout advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trtal subscnotion 113 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COOROINATORS : Include the latest edition of H•soan•c L•nk Weekly R eport on partlc •pants ' packets at your next conference or convention. For details. contact Hector ErocksenMendoza 12021 234 4 Altogether, there were 8 ,185 Hispanics employed in radio and television in 1984 4.9% of a 1 68, 7 46 total. The FCC report showed further. • Hispanics were employed least as managers and sales personnel (3.3% each) and most as laborers (14.7%) and service personnel (13 .3%). • Hispanics showed their greatest numbers as male technicians (1 , 599) and female clerical workers (1 ,587) . • There were more Hispanics working in commercial television (3,277 or 5.2%) than in commercial radio (2,729 or4.6o/o) . The same held true for Latinos in non-commercial television (464 or 6%) and non-commercial radio (1 08 or 4.2%) . Overall, the FCC counted 25,998 minorities (15.4%) employed in broadcasting in '84. In 1980, the percentage was 14. 6% . AWARDS: Elisabeth Perez-Luna, producer with Toucan Productions in Philadelphia, won the 1985 Corporation for Public Broad casting public radio program award in the news and public affairs category for the program on San Antonio in her series, "latin USA: A Tale of Four Citi es." -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Alfredo Lanier, assistant editor of Chicago magazine , won the local Peter lisagor Award for general reporting and an article called " Bilingual Education : Teaching in Subtitles." WRITE MOVES: Frank del Olmo, Los Angeles Times' editorial writer, has been named to the 13-member board of directors for the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund ... Roberto Rodriguez has joined Caminos magazine as editor following stints as copublisher of the cultural magazine Coraz6n de Aztlan and photo-journalist with Lowrider magazine, all in los Angeles. .. FormerCaminos Editor Katherine Diaz switched to public relations work for Coca-Cola Company there. Hispanic Link Weekly Report editor Steve Pad.illa will return home to California in mid summer to take a reporting job with The San Diego Union. . . Also joining the Union is reporter Ernesto Portillo Jr., moving from Massachusetts' Worchester Telegram ... Julio Ojeda, spring graduate of St. John's University, Collegeville, Minn., joined Hispanic LinkJune3. He was selected from among30 candidates as its Gannett Foundation reporter intern for the summer. _Carlos Morales Hispanic Link Weekly Report .