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Hispanic link weekly report, September 30, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 30, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Jos6 Villanueva, a staff attorney with the Cleveland Legal Aid Society, is named to the Ohio Civil Rights Commission by Gov. Richard Celeste. He is the first Hispanic named to the OCRC and will serve a five-year term... Andr6s Torres is among 13 deceased persons honored by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission Sept. 23 in Pittsburgh for risking their lives rescuing ortrying to save others. The 19-year-old, unemployed New Yorker saved a 4-year-old boy from drowning in the East River on Dec. 21. Heirs of the honorees receive $2,500 and a medal. .. Jaime Fuster, resident commissioner of Puerto Rico, hosts a reception Oct. 1 for Deborah Carthy Deu, Miss Universe 1985, also from Puerto Rico... Miami Mayor Maurice Ferr6 files qualifying papers and formally announces Sept. 20 his bid for a seventh term in the Nov. 5 elections... Ram6n Rodriguez, chairman
of New York’s Division of Parole, is among 16 named by Gov. Mario Cuomo to the newly-created CrirT|y|fe4*M'£§ Institute Advisory Board... F. Chris Garcia, dean of th^Cwle^eof Arts and Sciences and political science professor at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, is honored by the Am§je|?i Spence Association’s
Committee on the Status of Chicanos in the Profession at the APSA’s annual meeting in New Orleans. Garcia was honored for “advancing the interests of Chicano political scientists and distinguishing himself as a scholar and teacher”. . . Alfonso Alemdn Jr., president of Aleman Food Service Inc. in San Antonio, is appointed to the advisory ‘council of the local district office of the U.S. Small Business Administration ... Guillermo Sarabia, a native of Mazatlan, Mexico, and baritone singer with the Metropolitan and New York City Operas, dies of a cerebral hemorrhage Sept. 19 in Amsterdam, where he lived. He was 49...

U.S. Hispanics Mobilize to Aid Quake Victims
In the wake of Mexico’s worst earthquakes ever Sept. 19 and 20, Hispanics across the United States have mobilized to aid its victims. The quakes prompted Latinos from New York to Los Angeles to marshal their resources.
KM EX-TV, a Los Angeles affiliate of the Spanish International Network(SIN), produced a nine-hour fund-raising telethon aired nationally on Sunday, Sept. 29. The event featured Hispanic celebrities from the United States and Latin American countries.
El Mundo, a New York daily, in conjunction with the United Nations Children’s Fund, organized a group there to raise funds and supplies. Mobilization for Victims of Mexico, headed by Luis Patino, public relations director for El Mundo, is comprised of politicians, businessmen and a representative from the League of Hispanic Baseball Players. The ad hoc committee sponsored a reception Sept.
Bennett vs. Bilingual Ed
U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett kicked off a new campaign to curtail federal involvement in bilingual education Sept. 26, promising to use his regulatory and administrative powers to allow schools to abandon native language instruction.
I n a speech to the Association for a Better New York at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City, he also said he planned to explore the possibility of legislative changes in the Bilingual Education Act.
The $176 million federal program presently serves 234,000 children, 80% of whom are Hispanic.
Bennett charged that after 17 years of federal involvement and $1.7 billion in federal funding, “We have no evidence that the children whom he sought to help... have benefited.”
He was critical of a 4% cap placed by Congress on “alternative” bilingual instruction programs. Such programs allow school districts to use federal money on immersion method teaching, in which non-English-speaking children are taught solely in English.
30 to solicit corporate donations. It also was coordinating a variety benefit at the Manhattan Center this week.
Hector Barreto, president of the U.S. Hispanic? Chamber of Commerce, secured agreements with Ford Motor Co., which offered its dealerships as collection sites for contributions, and Eastern Airlines, which will donate space for transporting items.
In Chicago, the Latino Institute hosted a Mexican Aid Concert Friday, Sept. 27, which was broadcast by almost every Spanish radio and television station in that area. Proceeds are being turned over to the SIN telethon.
Sergio Munoz, managing editor of the Los Angeles Spanish-language daily La Opinion, reported that his publication collected $35,000 in the first five days following the initial quake.
“A great amount of solidarity has been shown,” Muhoz said, adding that some of his reporters have been approached by people on the street with $5 and $10 contributions.
In Kansas City, Mo., Clara Reyes, editor of Dos Mundos, reported the biweekly has helped families in the area locate their families in Mexico.
Church Plea on Latinos
The president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops is calling on the church’s leadership in the United States to do more to reach Hispanics, blacks and recent immigrants “with continued efforts to develop leadership from among them.”
Bishop James Malone of Youngstown, Ohio, issued a report Sept. 15 that was prepared at the request of Pope John Paul II fora special international synod of bishops the Pope has called to examine the results of the Second Vatican Council of 1962-65. The synod, called for “in light of new needs,” will take place in Rome Nov. 5 and last until Dec. 8.
The report stopped short of suggesting that women be ordained to the priesthood. It said the role of women in the church “must be clarified, their rights and dignity must be affirmed, and their advancement to positions of leadership and decision-making must continue.”
Another periodical assisting in the Los Angeles area is Noticias del Mundo. Metro Editor JesCis Hern&ndez says it has published messages from survivors to relatives. The newspaper has also been working closely with the Mexican Consulate to ensure all donations reach their destinations expeditiously. KSKQ-radio, Los Angeles, negotiated an accord with a plane manufacturer to airlift supplies.
Although the outreach effort has been generous and swift there are ironies* Hispanics in Chicago reported that they were unable to find an airline to transport theircontributions. In Washington, D.C., an official with the Inter-american College of Physicians and Surgeons expressed frustration at the U.S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance for failing to respond to its offer to send volunteer bilingual doctors to Mexico City. _ Fe//x Perez
Simpson Bill Criticized
Spokespersons for two major Hispanic civil rights organizations have deplored Senate passage of the immigration bill authored by Sea Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.). They added that a bill by Rep. Peter Rodino (D-N.J.) now moving in the U.S. House of Representatives, while less objectionable than the Senate bill, still needs major revisions to eliminate any adverse effects on U.S. Hispanics.
Richard Fajardo^ who directs the Washington office of the Mexican American Legal Defense & Educational Fund(MALDEF), and Charles j Kamasaki, director of policy analysis for • the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), said that the Simpson bill, approved Sept. 19 by a 69-30 vote, was the worst version yet introduced by Simpson, who offered his first bill in 1981.
The bill does not provide any safeguards against discrimination by employers, nor does it include a legalization program that can be implemented along with sanctions against employers, they pointed out Additionally, they said, its expanded guest worker provisions could lead to exploitation of both U.S. and foreign workers.


Sin pelos en la lengua
THE TORRID TORTILLA: In Muir Woods National Monument, near San Francisco, a tortilla neglected too long on a ranch hand's stove was burning brightly, so the ranchero grabbed it and threw it out the window. Monument officials later identified it as the cause of a blaze which consumed two acres of parkland.
GREAT GALLOPING TORTILLAS! For six years, the folks in Deming, New Mexico, have staged The Great American Duck Race each fall. Lined up seven-abreast in heats, the ducks charge down a 15-foot-long track for the $2,000 first prize. Winning time this yean 1.52 seconds.
The celebration’also offers a second major sporting event the World’sRichestTortillaToss, with$800 in prize money this year. The tortillas are provided by Arnold Orquiz, owner of Amigos Mexican Foods there. The tortillas are, needless to say, cooked crisp. And, claims their creator, aerodynamically designed.
Winners of this year’s $250 first prizes in the adult division competition: (Men’s) Ronnie Parra of Silver City, 212 feet (Women’s)
Jean Garcia of Deming, 107 feet.
The $100 first prize in the 15-and-under category went to Jason Speir.
Jason Speir? Next thing you know, they’ll be beating us at bullfighting CHARACTER BUILDER: The following was reported in the San Antonio Express-News this month:
Mike Remington, owner of the Wagon Wheel restaurant-motel in Jackson, Wyo., bought a Mexican and an Indian wooden mannequin with the idea of putting them in his bar.
“I quickly found I couldn’t do that,” he said, “because they were too popular with the drunks who liked to dance.”
This spring, while Remington was out of town, his Mexican mannequin almost got shot by a Jackson police officer investigating a false burglary alarm.
“My maintenance man opened the door to let the cops in and one of the cops almost blew the Mexican away.
“He was awfully embarrassed. I don’t know why. I thought it would have added character to have a bullet hole in him.”
- Kay Barbaro
Chamber Attracts 5,000 in San Juan
Reading Scores Improve
In spite of an overall improvement in reading skills the past ten years, as many as 80.1% of 17-year-old Hispanicsdo not read well enough to do college work, a report released Sept 18 by the National Assessment of Education Progresssaid. Forwhitesand blacks, the figures are 54.9% and 84.5%.
The report also showed that Hispanic and black children have steadily improved their reading skills since 1975 while white children achieved only minor gains. Children aged 9,13 and 17 were measured.
Using a scale ranging from 350 (advanced) to 150 (rudimentary), the federally-financed study found Hispanic readers ahead of black readers by 2 to 4 points, but still trailing whites by 24 to 27 points The average 13-year-old white student reads almost as well as the average 17-year-old Hispanic. (See chart, page 4.)
The report was compiled from surveys of more than 250,000 students.
SAT Gains Recorded
Mexican American and Puerto Rican students scored the highest gains among college-bound seniors participating in the 1985 Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the College Board revealed Sept. 23.
Overall, between 1984 and 1985, the average SAT verbal score rose five points, to 431; the average mathematical score rosefourpoints, to 475.
On the verbal test, for Mexican Americans the average rose six points, to 382; for Puerto Ricans it rose 10 points, to 368.
On the math test, for Mexican Americans it rose six points, to 426; for Puerto Ricans it rose four points, to 409.
Of nearly a million students who took the test this year, 19,526 (2.2%) were Mexican American and 11,077 (1.2%) were Puerto Rican.
Other Hispanic national origin groups were included in a general category of “other'’ by the Educational Testing Service, which administers the tests of the Admissions Testing Program for the College Board.
More than 5,000 persons, including Vice President George Bush, joined in the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s Sept. 18-22 convention in San Juan, Puerto Rico, causing chamber President Hector Barreto to acclaim the event its most successful ever.
Some 64 U.S.-based corporations and 15 from Puerto Rico participated.
At the gathering, the chamber’s board of directors approved four resolutions to be added to its Hispanic Business Agenda formulated earlier this year. Approved were Actions:
• To support local chamber efforts in gathering food, clothing and other needed items for the earthquake victims in Mexico. (See related story this issue.)
• To oppose bills in Congress that increase excise taxes on cigarettes, liquor and other luxury items.
• To oppose legislation in Congress that would rescind section 936 of the Federal Income Tax Reform Act of 1976 which gives U.S. companies in Puerto Rico a 100% tax credit
• To encourage President Reagan to appoint a Hispanic to the U.S. Supreme Court.
The resolutions came from the more than 1,000 chamber delegates in attendance. The delegates approved an additional 20 resolutions
which will be refined and voted on by the board at its Nov. 9 meeting, set for Kansas City, Mo.
Bush’s remarks drew some criticism for focusing on Cuba and El Salvador rather than addressing the business-related issues of U.S. H ispanics on the mai nland and Puerto Rico.
The convention’s theme, “Hispanic Business, Bridge of the Americas,” underscored its purpose - to strengthen business contacts between Hispanic and non-Hispanic firms in the United States and Latin America.
The seventh convention is scheduled for Sept. 1986 in Denver, Col - Christian Echavarri Jr.
Public Still Pro-Chdvez
The California public likes Cesar Chdvez, but is evenly divided on its opinion of his United Farm Workers; new grape boycott, the California-based Field Institute reported in a survey released Sept 6.
The statewide poll showed Opinion of: Favorable Unfavorable No Opinion Cesar Chavez 52% 33% 15%
Grape Boycott 42% 40% 18%
Chavez had a favorable image with 67% of the polled Democrats and 33% of the polled Republicans.
SAT® AVERAGES BY ETHNIC GROUP, 1976-1985
SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST- VERBAL
>76* ’77 ’78 ’79 ’80 ’81 ’82 ’83 ’84 ’85 tr (0
Black 332 330 332 330 330 332 341 339 342 346 £ O
Mexican-American 371 370 370 370 372 373 377 375 376 382 t? o CL
Puerto Rican 364 355 349 345 350 353 360 358 358 368 0> cc
White 451 448 446 444 442 442 444 443 445 449 > m
SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST - MATHEMATICAL Black 354 357 354 358 360 362 366 369 373 376 c â–¡
Mexican-American 410 408 402 410 413 415 416 417 420 426 o , c
Puerto Rican 401 397 388 388 394 398 403 403 405 409 i <0 , a
White 493 489 485 483 482 483 483 484 487 491 X
*1976 is the first year for which SAT scores by ethnic group are available.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
HISPANIC READING LEVEL A 72-page report by the National Assessment of Education Progress shows the progress Hispanic and black children have made in the last four years as compared to whites. The study was financed by the National Institute of Education, U.S. Department of Education. Cost: $9 plus $1.50 postage and handling. Contact: NAEP, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710 (800) 223-0267.
EDITING INTERNSHIPS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund is offering 60 internships - work/study/aid packages worth about $6,000 each-for college juniors and seniors. The programs include paid summer jobs. Deadline to request applications: Oct. 31; to return them, Nov. 28. Request from The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P.O. Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540.
CAMERA SEMINAR: The American Newspaper.Publishers Association Foundation will hold its first Camera Training Seminar for minorities- limited to six particfpants- Dec. 9-13 at The Newspaper Center, Reston, Virginia The seminars are free, with sending publication paying travel and lodging. Contact: Nancy Osborn, AN PA Foundation, The Newspaper Center, Box 17407, Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041 (703) 648-1000.
COMPARABLE WORTH REPORT: The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has published its final report on comparable worth recommending that civil rights enforcement agencies and Congress reject the doctrine. For a free copy of the 81 -page report, “Comparable Worth: An Analysis and Recommendations,” send a postcard request to: U.S.C.C.R. Distribution Center, 621 North Payne St., Alexandria, Va. 22314.
COLLEGE-BOUND SENIORS: “National College-Bound Seniors, 1985,” a 22-page summary of the results of The College Board’s Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) administered to nearly one million high school seniors, is available free. It measures results by such criteria as high school record, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and college plans. Request a copy from The College Board, Box AF, 888 Seventh Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10106.
PUBLIC BROADCASTING DIRECTORY: The Corporation for Public Broadcasting has published its 1985-86 edition of the CPB Public Broadcasting Directory listing CPB-qualified radio and television stations, including staff, national and regional public broadcasting organizations, state agencies and commissions. Cost: $5. Contact Publications Sales, CPB, 111116th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 293-6160. All orders must be pre-paid.
WOMEN AND EMPLOYMENT: A new report discusses employment trends among women between 1976 and 1985. Statistics on Hispanics are included in “The United Nations Decade for Women: 1976-1985: Employment in the United States.” Single copies are free. Contact Women’s Bureau, Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20210 (202) 523-6611.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PUERTO RICAN LEGAL DEFENSE & EDUCATION FUND, INC.
Position: Staff Counsel-two posi-
tions available.
Requirements: Admitted to practice, pre-
ferably in New York State; bilingual in Spanish preferred.
attention of Mildred Rivera, Puerto Rican Legal Defenses Education Fund, Inc., 99 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10013.
PRLDEF IS AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
Duties:
Starting Date: Salary:
Application
Deadline:
Procedure:
Preference will be given j to attorneys with civil rights and federal court experience; knowledge of administrative procedures in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, State Division of Human Rights, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development helpful. Interview and counsel clients in person or on telephone; prepare factual • summary and legal analysis of cases for presentation : at staff meetings. Draft! all pleadings (summons, • complaints, affidavits, | motions, orders, memo- { randum of law, briefs and consent decrees) correspondence and other pre-and post-trial materials. Assume complete responsibility for case development case theory and actual trial litigation Keep contemporaneous time . records of work done on cases.
Occasionally seve as representative of the Fund at legislative hearings, panel discussions, workshops and other public relations functions Draft comments to proposed legislation and/or regulations Participate in addressing students interest j in law careers and public interest law.
Immediate
Salary is based on year of graduation
Open
Send letter of application along with resume and salary requirements to the
ATTORNEY
National civil rights organization seeks Associate Counsel to direct D.C. office, monitor legislation and advocate for Hispanics Requirements 3-5 years civil rights legal experience, advocacy and legislative/administrative experience, knowledge of Hispanic issues superior communications leadership and management skills bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Resumes with references by 10/15/85 to: Ms A Hernandez, MALDEF, 28 Geary St, San Francisco Calif. 94108.
SER-JOBS FOR PROGRESS, INC., National Office in Dallas Texas is seeking a vice president for corporate resource development. The successful candidate should have a bachelor's degree, executive level experience and proven management skills Corporate communications and/or marketing background a plus SER provides management and technical assistance to a network of employment training centers across the country. Salary will be commensurate with experience. Resumes are due by Oct 15 and should be addressed to Rolando Esparza, President SER-Jobs for Progress Ins, 1355 Riverbend Rd., Suite 350, Dallas Texas 75247.
PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALIST
ENTRY LEVEL-To develop and implement diverse communications and public relations projects including special planning, media relations internal/external communications and publications Skills in handling varied writing assignments. Some national travel. Salary: $16,000 - $20,000. To apply, send resume and brief essay on career goals by Oct. 18 to M. Valencis Datacom Systems Corp., Glenpointe Centre East Teaneck, N.J. 07666.
EDITORS/WRITERS BILINGUAL (Spanish) editors/writers for elementary text book Start immediately. Three month project Call Alexandris Vs (703) 683-1500.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
2nd HISPANIC RECOGNITION AWARDS BANQUET Columbus, Ohio Oct. 1
The Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will host its second banquet recognizing citizens of Ohio who are exemplars of public service and stalwarts of the Hispanic community.
Cecilia Hernandez (614) 466-8333
HISPANIC BANKERS RECOGNITION RECEPTION Los Angeles Oct. 3
The Hispanic Bankers Association will pay tribute to
Hispanics instrumental in the banking community. Ralph Carmona (213) 228-2937
COMERCIO '85 Fresno, Calif. Oct. 4-6
Sponsored by the Central California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, this event will be geared toward Hispanic small business needs such as financing, marketing strategies and computer use.
Carmen Navarro (209) 442-0199
13th ANNUAL BORDER FOLK FESTIVAL El Paso, Texas Oct. 4-6
Presented by the National Park Service, this festival will feature music, dance and a charreada (a Mexican rodeo).
Carlos Chavez (915) 541-7780
INTERNATIONAL YOUTH SERVICESCONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 6-9
Sponsored by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, the conference will conduct workshops on topics ranging from family life and education to juvenile justice and development. Linda Coon (213) 917-4118
SECOND ANNUAL MINORITY PROCUREMENT FAIR
Washington, D.C. Oct. 6-8
This Small Business Administration fair will involve more than 200 minority firms.
Devera Redmond (202) 653-6770
MINORITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT WEEK Washington, D.C. Oct. 6-12 A tribute to this nation’s minority-owned businesses, the Commerce Department’s Minority Business Development Agency will sponsor activities and present awards to outstanding ethnic firms.
Hattie Bickmore (202) 377-5196
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


Arts & Entertainment
“I’M TORN BETWEEN THE CATASTROPHE in Mexico City and this honor right now,” actor Edward James Olmos said as he accepted an Emmy award bestowed on him in Pasadena, Calif, Sept 22 by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.
Olmos, the only Hispanic actor nominated for an award this year, picked up his Emmy in the “Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series" category for his role as Lt. Castillo on NBC’s Miami Vice. His was the only award given to the show, which had been nominated in 15 categories - more than any other show in the 1984-85 awards period.
Olmos is the fourth Hispanic performer nominated for an Emmy since 1977 (when the Los Angeles-based ATAS took over the job of handing out the awards for prime time programming) and the third to receive the award. Nominated a total of four times, Rita Moreno picked up Emmys in 1977 and 1978 for roles in the Muppet Show and The Rockford Files. Ricardo Montalban picked up his Emmy in 1978 for his performance in How the West Was Won Part II. In 1979 Joe Santos was nominated for an Emmy for a supporting role in The j Rockford Files.
Born to Mexican American parents in East Los Angeles, Olmos began his career in the’60s as a rock’n’ roll singer. His first film role
in 1971 was Aloha Bobby and Rose; in 1978 he got his first paying stage role in Luis Valdez’s loot Suit. The actor took Zoot Suit from Los Angeles to New York where he received a Tony nomination in 1980. He starred in the film version released in 1981.
REPRESENTATIVES FROM A DOZEN THEATER companies will gather in San Antonio next year for the first ever National Conference of Hispanic Theatres.
The conference is scheduled for Feb. 7-9. The Arts Council of San Antonio has received a Ford Foundation grant of $114,414 to host the conference, with the establishment of a national touring network to be the main topic of discussion.
Members of the conference planning committee are expected to hold their first meeting in October. Sitting on that committee are Ruben Sierra (representing The Group from Seattle), Jose Saucedo (Teatro de la Esperanza, Santa Barbara, Calif.), Phil Esparza (El Teatro Campesino, San Juan Bautista, Calif.), Carmen Zapata (Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, Los Angeles), Nita Luna (Teatro Aguacero, Albuquerque, N.M.), Jorge Pina and Ruby P6rez (Teatro Guadalupe, San Antonio), Ana Maria Garcia (Latino Chicano Theater, Chicago), Mario Ernesto Sanchez (Teatro Avante, Miami), Miriam Col6n Edgar (Puerto Rican Traveling Theater, New York), Gilberto Zaldivar (Repertorio Espanol, New York), Dennis Ferguson Acosta (Intar, New York), and Idalia Perez Garay(GrupoTeatrodel60, San
Juan, Puerto Rico). ..... „ . i
- Antonio Mepas-Rentas \
Media Report
EDITOR ’APOLOGIZES: Responding to complaints by local Hispanic organizations, San Diego Union editor Gerald Warren apologized to the Latino community there Sept. 20 for an editorial cartoon characterized as anti-Hispanic and racist. The cartoon appeared the day before.
The artist, Steve Kelley, was reacting to a published allegation that City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez may have used a city credit card for numerous unauthorized meal expenses In the cartoon, Kelley portrayed Martinez as an enormously fat Mexican, with sombrero, serape, guitar and holster with a VISA credit card protruding, singing, “I am thefreeload bandido (sic)... ”
Irma Castro, director of the county-wide Chicano Federation, called the depiction “demeaning and degrading to the Hispanic
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix P6rez, Charlie Erioksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
population.”
In a prominent apology, Warren commented: “The relationship of trust between all communities in the San Diego-Tijuanaarea demands a greater sensitivity... We are taking steps to make sure that it doesn’t happen again.”
EDITOR DOESN’T: No such apology was forthcoming following a Sept. 11 column by Jimmy Breslin in the New York Daily News in which the columnist stated flatly that Puerto Ricans are anti-black and anti-woman.
It did run a brief protest letter from Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy:
“Jimmy Breslin’s column on Puerto Ricans was insulting (and) irresponsible...
“His statements that you ‘couldn’t get a Puerto Rican to vote for a black if you put a shotgun to his back and that‘Puerto Ricans also are against any advancements for women’ are unbelievably racist.
“Last year, over a third of Puerto Rican voters in the city cast ballots for the Rev.
Jesse Jackson; in 1983, over 80% of Puerto Rican voters in Chicago supported the election of Harold Washington as mayor; over 60% in Boston voted for Mel King for mayor last year; more recently over80% voted for David Dinkins for Manhattan borough president
“Breslin betrays a total ignorance of the history, culture and politics of Puerto Rican people.”
N.A.H.J. UPDATE: The planning committee for the April 1986 Hispanic Media Conference will convene in its host city, Miami, during the National Association of Hispanic Journalists board meeting there Oct. 5-6.
NAHJ executive director Frank Newton has completed the association’s move from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., and is ensconced in the National Press Building, a few blocks from the White House.
New address and phone: NAHJ, Room #634, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 783-6228.
Charlie Ericksen
AVERAGE READING PROFICIENCY TRENDS BY ETHNICITY
Reading Skills 350 Advanced 300 Adept 250 Intermediate 200 Basic 150 Rudimentary
Age 1975 1980 1984 tr (0 £
BLACK 17 244.0 246.1 263.5 O 11 Q
13 224.4 231.9 236.8 a 0)
9 181.9 188.9 188.4 tr >
HISPANIC 17 254.7 261.7 268.7 JC 4> 0)
13 231.1 236.0 239.2 £
9 182.9 189.1 193.0 C â–¡
WHITE 17 290.7 291.0 294.6 o c CO
13 260.9 263.1 263.4 m
9 215.9 219.7 220.1 X
Source: National Assessment of Educational Progress
A
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week of New York ' s Division of Parole, is among 16 named by Gov . Mario Cuomo to the newly-created Institute Board ... F. Chris Garcia, dean of Arts and Sc1ences and political science professo r at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque , is honored by the eP@ciDSGie_nce Association ; s Committee on the Status of Ch1canos m the Profess1on at the APSA s annual meeting in New Orleans. Garcia was honored for"advancing the interests of Chicano political scientists and distinguishing himself as a scholar and teacher'' . . . Alfonso Aleman Jr., president of Aleman Food Service Inc. in San Antonio, is appointed to the advisory council of the local district office of the U.S. Small Business Administration ... Guillermo Sarabia, a native of Mazatlan, Mexico, and baritone singer with the Metropolitan and New York City Operas, dies of a cerebral hemorrhage Sept. 19 in Amsterdam , where he lived. He was 49 ... Jose Villanueva, a staff attorney with the Cleveland Legal Aid Society, is named to the Ohio Civil Rights Commission by Gov. Richard Celeste. He is the first Hispanic named to the OCRC and will serve a five-year term ... Andres Torres is among 13 deceased persons honored by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission Sept. 23 in Pittsburgh for risking their lives rescuing or trying to save others . The 19-year-old, unemployed New Yorker saved a 4-year-old boy from drowning in the East River on Dec . 21. Heirs of the honorees receive $2,500 and a medal. . . Jaime Fuster, resident commissioner of Puerto Rico, hosts a reception Oct. 1 for Deborah earthy Deu, Miss Universe 1985, also from Puerto Rico . .. Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre files qualifying papers and formally announces Sept. 20 his bid for a seventh term in the Nov . 5 elections ... Ram6n Rodriguez, cha i rman voi .• No.••l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Sept30, 1985 U.S. Hispanics Mobilize to Aid Quake Victims In the wake of Mexico's worst earthquakes ever Sept. 19 and 20, H i spanics across the United States have mobilized to aid its victims. The quakes prompted Latinos from New York to Los Angeles to marshal thei r resources : KMEX-TV, a Los Angeles affiliate of the Spanish International Network(SIN), produced a nine-hour fund-raising telethon aired nationally . on Sunday , Sept. 29. The event featured Hispanic celebrities from the United States and Latin American countries. El Mundo, a New York daily, in conjunction with the United Nations Children's Fund, organized a group there to raise funds and supplies . Mobilization for Victims of Mexico, headed by Luis Patino, public relations director for El Mundo, is comprised of politicians , businessmen and a representative from the League of Hispanic Baseball Players. The ad hoc committee sponsored a reception Sept. Bennett vs. Bilingual Ed U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett kicked off a n ew campaign to curtail federal involvement in bilingual education Sept. 26, promising to use his regulatory and administrative powers to allow schools to abandon native language instruction. In a speech to the Association for a Better New York at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City, he also said he planned to explore the possibility of legislative changes in the Bilingual Education Act. The $176 million federal program presently serves 234,000 children, 80% of whom are Hispanic. Bennett charged. that after 17 years of federal involvement and $1.7 billion in federal funding, " We have no evidence that the children whom *e sought to help ... have benefited." He was critical of a 4% cap placed by Congress on "alternat ive" bilingual instruction programs . Such programs allow school districts to use federal money on immersion method teaching, in wh ich non-English speaking children are taught solely in English. 30 to solicit corporate donations . It also was . coordinating a variety benefit at the Manhattan Center this week. Hector Barreto, president of the U .S. His panic Chamber of Commerce, secured agree ments with Ford Motor Co., which offered its dealerships as collection sites for contributions , and Eastern Airlines, which will donate space for transporting items. In Chicago, the Latino Institute hosted a Mexican Aid Concert Friday , Sept. 27, which was broadcast by almost every Spanish radio and television station in that area. Proceeds are being turned over to the SIN telethon. Sergio Munoz, managing editor of the Los Angeles Spanish-language daily La Opinion, reported that his publication collected $35 ,000 in the first five days following the initial quake . "A great amount of solidarity has been shown, " Muiioz said , adding that some of his reporters have been approached by people on the street with $5 and $10 contributions. In Kansas City, Mo., Clara Reyes , editor of Dos Mundos, reported the biweekly has helped families in the area locate their families in Mexico. Church Plea on Latinos The president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops is calling on the church' s leadership in the United States to do more to reach Hispanics, blacks and recent immigrants "with continued efforts to develop leadership from among them. " Bishop James Malone of Youngstown , Ohio, issued a report Sept. 15 that was prepared at the request of Pope John Paul II for a special international synod of bishops the Pope has called to examine the results of the Second Vatican Council of 1962-65. The synod, called for "in light of new needs," will take place in Rome Nov . 5 and last until Dec. 8. The report stopped short of suggesting that women be ordained to the pr i esthood . It said the role of women in the church "must be clarified , their rights and dignity must be affirmed, and their advancement to positions of leadership and decision-making must continue. " Another peri odical assisting in the Los Angeles area is Noticias del Mundo. Metro , Editor Jesus Hernandez says it has published messages from survivors to relatives . The newspaper has also been working closely with the Mexican Consulate to ensure all donations reach their destinations expeditiously . KSKQ-radio, Los Angeles, negotiated an accord with a plane manufacturer to airl i ft supplies . Although the outreach effort has been generous and swift, there are ironies. Hispanics in Chicago reported that they were unable to find an airline to transport their contributions. In Washington, D .C., an official with the Inter american College of Physicians and Surgeons expressed frustration at the U .S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance for failing to respond to its offer to send volunteer bilingual doctors to Mexico City. Felix Perez Simpson Bill Criticized Spokespersons for two major Hispanic civil rights organizations have deplored Senate passage of the immigration bill authored by Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.) . They added : that a bill by Rep . Peter Rodino(D-N.J.) now moving in the U .S. House of Representatives, while less objectionable than the Senate bill , still needs major revisions to eliminate any adverse effects on U .S. Hispanics. Richard Fajardo, who directs the Washington office of the Mexican American Legal Defense & Educational Fund(MALDEF), and Charles ! Kamasaki, director of policy analysis for ; the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), said that the Simpson bill, approved Sept. 19 by a 69-30 vote, was the worst version yet introduced by Simpson, who offered his first bill in 1981. The bill does not provide any safeguards . against discrimination by employers, nor does it include a legalization program that can be implemented along with sanctions against employers, they pointed out. Addi. tionally, they said, its expanded guest worker provisions could lead to exploitation of both U.S. and foreign workers.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Jean Garcia of Deming, 107 feet. The $1 00 first prize in the 15-and-under category went to Jason Speir. THE TORRID TORTILLA: In Muir Woods National Monument, near San Francisco, a tortilla neglected too long on a ranch hand's stove was burning brightly, so the ranchero grabbed it and threw it out the window. Monument officials later identified it as the cause of a blaze which consumed two acres of parkland . Jason Speir? Next thing you know , they'll be beating us at bullfighting. CHARACTER BUILDER: The following was reported in the San Antonio Express-News this month : Mike Remington, owner of the Wagon Wheel restaurant-motel in Jackson, Wyo., bought a Mexican and an Indian wooden mannequin with the idea of putting them in his bar. GREAT GALLOPING TORTILLAS! For six years, the folks in Deming, New Mexico, have staged The Great American Duck Race each fall. Lined up seven-abreast in heats , the ducks charge down a 15-foot-long track for the $2,000 first prize. Winning time this year. 1.52 seconds. " I quickly found I couldn ' t do that," he said , "because they were too popular with the drunks who liked to dance." This spring, while Remington was out of town, his Mexican mannequin almost got shot by a Jackson police officer investigating a false burglary alarm. The celebration "also offers a second major sporting event the World's Richest Tortilla Toss, with $800 in prize money this year . The tortillas are provided by Arnold Orquiz, owner of Amigos Mexican Foods there. The tortillas are, needless to say, cooked crisp. And, claims their creator, aerodynamically designed. "My maintenance man opened the door to let the cops in and one of the cops almost blew the Mexican away. "He was awfully embarrassed. I don't know why. I thought it would have added character to have a bullet hole in him." Winners of this year's $250 first prizes in the adult division competition: (Men 's) Ronnie Parra of Silver City, 212 feet; (Women's) Kay Barbaro Reading Scores Improve In spite of an overall improvement in reading skills the past ten years, as many as 80.1% of 17 -year-old His panics do not read well enough to do college work, a report released Sept. 18 by the National Assessment of Education Progress said. For whites and blacks, the figures are 54.9% and 84.5%. The report also showed that Hispanic and black children have steadily improved their reading skills since 1975 while white children achieved only minor gains. Children aged 9, 13 and 17 were measured . Using a scale ranging from 350 (advanced) to 150 (rudimentary), the federally-financed study found Hispanic readers ahead of black readers by 2 to 4 points, but still trailing whites by 24 to 27 points. The average 13-year-old white student reads almost as well as the average 17-year-old Hispanic. (See chart, page 4 . ) The report was compiled from surveys of more than 250,000 students. SAT Gains Recorded Mexican American and Puerto Rican students scored the highest gains among college bound seniors participating in the 1985 Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the College Board revealed Sept. 23. Overall, between 1984 and 1985, the average SAT verbal score rose five points, to 431 ; the average mathematical score rose four points, to 475. On the verbal test, for Mexican Americans the average rose six points, to 382; for Puerto Ricans it rose 1 0 points, to 368. On the math test, for Mexican Americans it rose six points, to 426; for Puerto Ricans it rose four points, to 409. Of nearly a million students who took the test this year , 19,526 (2 .2%) were Mexican American and 11,077 (1 .2%) were Puerto Rican . Other Hispanic national origin groups were included in a general category of "other" by the Educational Testing Service, which administers the tests of the Admissions Testing Program for the College Board. 2 Chamber Attracts 5,000 in San Juan More than 5,000 persons, including Vice President George Bush, joined in the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce's Sept. 18-22 convention in San Juan, Puerto Rico, causing chamber President Hector Barreto to acclaim the event its most successful ever. Some 64 U.S. -based corporations and 15 from Puerto Rico participated. At the gathering, the chamber's board of directors approved four resolutions to be added to its Hispanic Business Agenda formulated earlier this year. Approved were actions : • To support local chamber efforts in gathering food, clothing and other needed items for the earthquake victims in Mexico . (See related story this issue.) • To oppose bills in Congress that increase excise taxes on cigarettes, liquor and other luxury items. • To oppose legislation in Congress that would rescind section 936 of the Federal Income Tax Reform Act of 1976 which gives U.S. companies in Puerto Rico a 100% tax credit. • To encourage President Reagan to appoint ' a Hispanic to the U.S. Supreme Court. The resolutions came from the more than 1,000 chamber delegates in attendance. The delegates approved an additional20 resolutions which will be refined and voted on by the board at its Nov. 9 meeting, set for Kansas City, Mo. Bush's remarks drew some criticism for focusing on Cuba and El Salvador rather than addressing the business-related issues of U .S. Hispanics on the mainland and Puerto Rico. The convention's theme, "Hispanic Business, Bridge of the Americas," underscored its purpose-to strengthen business contacts between Hispanic and non-Hispanic firms in the United States and Latin America . The seventh convention is scheduled for Sept. 1986 in Denver, Colq. Christian Echavarri Jr. Public Still The California public likes Cesar but is evenly divided on its opinion of his United Farm Workers' new grape the California based Field Institute reported in a survey released. Sept.6. The statewide poll showed Opinion of: Favorable Unfavorable GesarCh8vez 52% 33% Grape Boycott 42% 40% No Opinion 15% 18% Chavez had a favorable image with 67% of the polled Democrats and 33% of the polled Republicans. SA'r AVERAGES BY ETHNIC GROUP, 1976 SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TESTVERBAL '76* '77 '78 '79 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 t:: .. Black 332 330 332 330 330 332 341 339 342 346 .r: 0 Mexican-American 371 370 370 370 372 373 377 375 376 382 t:: 0 0. Puerto Rican 364 355 349 345 350 353 360 358 358 368 ., a: White 451 448 446 444 442 442 444 443 445 449 >-:;;: ., SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TESTMATHEMATICAL ., 01: Black 354 357 354 358 360 362 366 369 373 376 c :.:; Mexican-American 41 0 408 402 410 413 415 416 417 420 426 .!J Puerto Rican 401 397 388 388 394 398 403 403 405 White 493 489 485 483 482 483 483 484 487 491 *1976 is the first year for which SAT scores by ethnic group are available . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS HISPANIC READING LEVEL: A 72-page report by the National Assessment of Education Progress shows the progress Hispanic and black children have made in the last four years as compared to whites . The study was financed by the National Institute of Education, U.S. Department of Education. Cost: $9 plus $1.50 postage and handling. Contact: NAEP, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541 0 (800) 223. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PUERTO RICAN LEGAL DEFENSE & EDUCATION FUND, INC. attention of Mildred Rivera, Puerto Rican Legal Defense& Education Inc., 99 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10013. EDITING INTERNSHIPS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund is offering 60 internships -work/study/aid packages worth about $6,000 each-for college juniors and seniors. The programs include paid summer jobs. Deadline to request applications: Oct. 31; to return them, Nov . 28. Request from The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P . O . Box 300, Princeton, N .J. 08540. CAMERA SEMINAR: The American Newspaper. Publishers As sociation Foundation will hold its first Camera Training Seminar for minoritieslimited tci six partici'pants.:. Dec. 9 at The Newspaper Center , Reston, Virginia The seminars are free , with sending publication paying travel and lodging. Contact: Nancy Osborn, ANPA Foundation, The Newspaper Center, Box 17 407, Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041 (703) 648 000. COMPARABLE WORTH REPORT: The U . S . Commission on Civil Rights has published its final report on comparable worth recommending that civil rights enforcement agencies and Congress reject the doctrine. For a free copy of the 81-page report, " Comparable Worth: An Analysis and Recommendations," send a postcard request to: . U.S.C.C .R. Distribution Center, 621 North Payne St., Alexandria, Va. 22314. COLLEGE-BOUND SENIORS: "National College-Bound Seniors, 1985," a 22-page summary of the results of The College Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) administered to near(y one million high school seniors, is available free. It measures results by such criteria as high school record, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and college plans. Request a copy from The College Board, Box AF, 888 Seventh Avenue, New York, N.Y . 10106. PUBLIC BROADCASTING DIRECTORY: The Corporation for Public Broadcasting has published its 1985 edition of the CPB Public Broadcasting Directory listing CPB-qualif i ed radio and television stations, including staff, national and regional public broadcasting organizations, state agencies and commissions. Cost: $5. Contact Publications Sales , CPB , 1111 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 293. All orders must be pre-paid. WOMEN AND EMPLOYMENT: A new report discusses em ployment trends among women between 1976 and 1985. Statistics on Hispanics are included in "The United Nations Decade for Women: 1976 , 985: Employment in the United States." Single ' copies are free . Contact Women's Bureau , Department of Labor, 200 Consti tution Ave. NW, Washington, D .C. 20210 (202) 523. Position : Requirements: Duties : Starting Date : Salary: Application Deadline: Procedure: Staff Counseltwo posi tions ava i lable . Admitted to practice. ferably in New York State; bilingual in Spanish !erred. Preference will be given • to attorneys with civil rights and federal court experi ence ; knowledge of ad ministrative procedures in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, State Division of Human Rights, U .S. Department of Housing and Urban Development helpful. Interview and counsel ents in person or on tele phone; prepare factual summary and legal analysis of cases for presentation i at staff meetings. Draft l all pleadings (summons, : compla i nts, affidavits , i motions, orders , memo randum of law , briefs and consent decrees) corres pondence and other and posttrial materials. Assume complete res ponsibility for case develop ment , theory and actual tria l lijigation Keep contemporaneous time records of work done on cases. PRLDEF IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER ATTORNEY National civil rights organization seeks Associate C o unsel to direct D . C . office , monitor legislat i on and advocate for Hispanics. Requirements: 3 years civil rights legal expe ri ence , advocac y and legislative/administrntive e x perience, know ledge of Hispanic issues, superior communications, leadership and management skills, bilingual (English/Spani sh) preferred . Resumes with references by 1 0 /15/85 to: Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF . 28 Geary Sl, San Francisco Calif . 94108. SERJOBS FOR PROGRESS, INC. , National Office in Dallas, Texas, is seeking a vice president for corporate resource development. The successful candidate should have a bachelofsdegree, execut iv e l evel experience and proven management skills. Corporate communications and/or marketing background a plus. SEA provides management and technical assistance to a networkofemploymenttrnining centers across the country. Salary will be com mensurate with experience. Resumes are due by Oct. 15 and should be addressed to Rolando Esparza, President SERJobs for Progress, Inc., 1355 Riverbend Rd., Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75247. PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALIST ENTRY LEVEL-To develop and implement diverse communications and public relations projects, including special planning, medi a comments to proposed relations, internaVexternal communtcations legislationand/orregulaand publications. Skills in handling varied lions. Participate in ad. writing assignments. Some national travel. dressing students' interest I Salary: $16,000-$20,000. To apply, send in law careers and public resume and brief essay on career goals by Interest law. I Oct. 18 to M . Valencia, Datacom Systems Occasionally seve as presentative of the Fund at legislative hearings, panel discussions, work shops and other public relations functions. Draft Immediate Corp., Glenpointe Centre East Teaneck, N . J . Salary is based on year 07666. of graduation Open Send letter of application along with resume and salary requirements to the EDITORS/WRITERS Bill NGUAL (Spanish) editorS/writers for elementary text book. Start immediately . Three month project Call Alexandria, Va. (703) 683. Hispanics instrumental in the banking community . Sponsored by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, the conference will conduct workshops on topics ranging from family life and education to juvenile justice and development. Linda Coon (213) 917 Calendar THIS WEEK 2nd HISPANIC RECOGNmON AWARDS BANQUET Columbus , Ohio Oct. 1 The Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will host its second banquet recognizing citizens of Ohio who are exemplars of public service and stalwarts of the Hispanic community. Cecilia Hernandez (614) 466 HISPANIC BANKERS RECOGNITION RECEPTION Los Angeles Oct. 3 The Hispanic Bankers Association will pay tribute J o Hispanic Link Weekly Report Ralph Carmona (213) 228 COMERCIO '85 Fresno, Calif. Oct. 4 Sponsored by the Central California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, this event will be geared toward Hispanic small business needs such as financing, marketing strategies and computer use. Carmen Navarro (209) 442 13th ANNUAL BORDER FOLK FESTIVAL El Paso, Texas Oct. 4 6 Presented by the National Park Service, this festival will feature music, dance and a charreada(a Mexican rodeo) . Carlos Chavez (91 5) 541 7780 INTERNATlONAL YOUTH SERVICESCONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 6 SECOND ANNUAL MINORITY PROCUREMENT FAIR Washington, D . C . Oct. 6 This Small Business Administration fair will involve more than 200 minority firms . Devera Redmond (202) 653 MINORITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT WEEK Washington, D.C. Oct. 6 A tribute to this nation's minority-owned businesses, the Commerce Departmenfs Minority Business . Development Agency will sponsor activ ities and present awards to outstanding ethnic firms . . Hattie Bickmore (202) 377 3

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Arts & Entertainment in 1971 was Aloha Bobby and Rose; in 1978 he got his first paying stage role in Luis Valdez's Zoot Suit. The actor took Zoot Suit from Los Angeles to New York where he received a Tony nomination in 1980. He starred in the film version released in 1981 . "I'M TORN BETWEEN THE CATASTROPHE in Mexico City and this honor right now," actor Edward James Olmos said as he accepted an Emmy award bestowed on him in Pasadena, Calif . , Sept. 22 by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. REPRESENTATIVES FROM A DOZEN THEATER companies will gather in San Antonio next year for the first ever National Conference of Hispanic Theatres . The conference is scheduled for Feb. 7-9. The Arts Council of San Antonio has received a Ford Foundation grant of $114,414 to host the conference, with the establishment of a national touring network to be the main topic of discussion . Olmos, the only Hispanic actor nominated for an award this year, picked up his Em my in the "Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series" categor-Y for his role as Lt. Castillo on NBC's Miami Vice. His was the only award given to the show, which had been nominated in 15 categoriesmore than any other show in the 1984-85 awards period. Members of the conference planning committee are expected to hold their first meeting in October. Sitting on that committee are Ruben Sierra (representing The Group from Seattle), Jose Saucedo (Teatro de Ia Esperanza, Santa Barbara, Calif .), Phil Esparza (EI Teatro Campesino, San Juan Bautista, Calif . ) , Carmen Zapata (Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, Los Angeles), Nita Luna (Teatro Aguacero, Albuquerque, N.M.), Jorge Pif\a and Ruby Perez (Teatro Guadalupe, San Antonio), Ana Maria Garcia (Latino Chicano Theater, Chicago) , Mario Ernesto Sanchez (Teatro Avante, Miami), Miriam Colon Edgar (Puerto Rican Traveling Theater, New York), Gilberte Zaldivar (Repertorio Espai'iol; New York), Dennis Ferguson Acosta (lntar, New York), and Idalia Perez Garay(GrupoTeatrodel60, San Olmos is the fourth Hispanic performer nominated for an Emmy since 1977 (when the Los Angeles-based ATAS took over the job of handing out the awards for prime time programming) and the third to receive the award. Nominated a total of four times, Rita Moreno picked up Emmys in 1977 and 1978 for roles in the Muppet Show and The Rockford Files. Ricardo Montalban picked up his Em my in 1978 f o r his performance in How the West Was Won Part 11. In 1979 Joe Santos was nominated for an Emmy for a supporting role in The Rockford Files . Born to Mexican American pa rents in East Los Angeles, Olmos began his career in the '60s as a rock 'n' roll singer. His first film role Juan , Puerto Rico) . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas ! 'Media Report . EDITOR 'APOLOGIZES: Responding to complaints by local Hispanic organizations, San Diego Union editor Gerald Warren apolo gized to the Latino community there Sept. 20 for an editorial cartoon characteri zed as anti Hispanic and racist. The cartoon appeared the day before. The artist, Steve Kelley, was reacting to a published allegation that City Councilman U valde Martinez may have used a city credit card for numerous uniluthorized meal expenses. In the cartoon, Kelley portrayed Martinez as an enormously fat Mexican, with sombrero, serape , guitar and holster with a VISA credit card protruding, singing , " I am the freeload bandido (sic) ... " Irma Castro, director of the coun ty-wide Chicano Federation, called the depiction "demeaning and degrading to the Hispanic HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N. W . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector EricksenMendoza Editor Ca rlos Morales Reporting : Dora Delgado, Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen Mendoza. No port ton o f Htspamc Lmk Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadc a s t m any form w 1thout advance permi s sion. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (t 3 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include lhe latest edition of Link Weekly Report in participants packets at y o ur nex t conference or convention. F o r details, contact Hector Er icksen Mendoza (202) 2 3 4 0737. 4 population." In a prominent apology, Warren commented: "The relationship of trust between all com munit i es in the San DiegoTijuana area demands a greater sensitivity .. . We are taking steps to make sure that it doesn't happen again." EDITOR DOESN'T: No such apology was forthcoming following a Sept. 11 column by Jimmy Breslin in the New York Daily News in which the columnist stated flatly that Puerto Ricans are anti-black and anti-woman . It did run a brief protest letter from Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy: "Jimmy Breslin ' s column on Puerto Ricans was insulting (and) irresponsible ... "His statements that you 'couldn't get a Puerto Rican to vote for a black if you put a shotgun to his back' and that' Puerto Ricans also are against any advancements for women' are unbelievably racist. "Last year, over a third of Puerto R i can voters in the city cast ballots for the Rev . AVERAGE READING Jesse Jackson; in 1983, over 80% of Puerto Rican voters in Chicago supported the election of Harold Washington as mayor, over 60% in Boston voted for Mel King for mayor last year, more recentJy over 80% voted for David Dinkins fo r Manhattan bo r ough president. "Breslin betrays a total ignorance of the history, culture and politics of Puerto Rican people." N.A.H.J. UPDATE: The planning committee for the April1986 Hispanic Media Conference will convene in its host city, Miami, during the National Association of Hispanic Joumalists' board meeting there Oct. 5. NAHJ executive director Frank Newton has completed the association's move from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., and is ensconced in the National Press Building, a few blocks from the White House . New address and phone : NAHJ, Room #634, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 783-6228. Reading Skills 350 Advanced 300 Adept PROFICIENCY TRENDS 250 Intermediate BY ETHNICITY I 200 Basic 150 Rudimentary Age 1975 1980 1984 t: "' .c BLACK 0 17 244.0 246.1 263.5 t: 0 13 224.4 231.9 236.8 0. 4> 9 181.9 188. 9 188.4 a: ,., HISPANIC :;;: 17 254.7 261.7 268. 7 4> 4> 13 231.1 236. 0 239. 2 9 182. 9 189. 1 193. 0 WHITE 17 290.7 291.0 13 260.9 263. 1 9 215.9 219.7 Source : National Assessment of Educational Hispanic Link Weekly Report