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Hispanic link weekly report, October 7, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 7, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Full Text
OCT 1 ®
Making The News This Week
Alex Mercure, Assistant U.S. Secretary of Agriculture in the Carter Administration, resigns as New Mexico’s Secretary of Economic Development and Tourism - effective Oct. 11 - without announcing future plans... San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros travels to Mexico Sept. 21 with donations for the earthquake victims from the Mexican American community in his city... Irma Lozada, the first female police officer in New York City to be slain in the line of duty, is posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the police department’s highest decoration, Sept. 26. Lozada was slain Sept 1984 as she tried to arrest a suspect in a chain snatching in Brooklyn... President Reagan says he will nominate Puerto Rico lawyer Jos6 Antonio Fuste to replace U.S. district judge for Puerto Rico, Juan Torruelia
del Valle.. . Juan L6pez-Morillas, a professor of Spanish at the University of Texas at Austin, will receive the Order of Queen Isabella the Catholic, an honor bestowed by the King of Spain for contributions in the areas of Spanish culture and language. The Spanish ambassador to the United States will present Lopez^Morillas with the order Oct. 16 in Washington, D.C.... Pablo Cruz, a senior at Miami Coral Park high school, becomes the first student to serve as a non-voting adviser to the Dade County School Board. . . Deborah Carthy-Deu, Miss Universe 1985, and Laura Martinez-Herring, Miss USA 1985, change their home base from New York to Los Angeles following the move there by Miss Universe Inc., producers of both pageants .. Richard Ramirez, whom police in Los Angeles believe isthe“Night Stalker,” is arraigned there on a 68-count indictment charging him with 14 murders and 22 sex assaults which occurred in Los Angeles County between June 27,1984, and last Aug. 8. Ramirez will enter a plea Oct. 17...
Educators, Leaders Attack Bennett’s Proposals
Hispanic educators have joined the community’s organizational and political leaders nationally in denouncing U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett for his views and proposals relating to the federal role in bilingual education.
Bennett delivered his first major speech on the subject in New York Sept 26. He complained that after 17 years and $1.7 billion of federal support for bilingual education, “We have no evidence that the children whom we sought to help... have benefited.”
That comment alone brought rebuke.
New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quihones responded, “I don’t think Mr. Bennett is an expert on bilingual education,” adding
Short Hoe Banned
The California State Labor Board has tentatively adopted a new regulation barring the use of the short-handled hoe by agricultural workers, a tool banned as unsafe by state officials in 1975.
The California Occupational Safety and Health Association proposed a regulation earlier this year relaxing the prohibition by allowing the short-handled hoe to be used up to five minutes a shift.
Opponents of the regulations, including the United Farm Workers, argued that the short-handle was a hazard to workers’ health, causing back and spinal problems. They also said the five-minute rule would be impossible to enforce.
Cal-OSHA is expected to adopt the new rule early next year.
Short tools are defined as those with handles Jp8s than four feet long.
that Bennett “hasn’t been in the forefront” in his support for public urban education.
Gene Ch&vez, the Kansas City, Mo., professor who heads the National Association for Bilingual Education (NABE), told reporters there that “there are seven million kids who are limited-English proficient. Some of us have dedicated our lives to making sure kids learn English. It’s disconcerting when the Secretary of Education leads the country to believe that’s not what’s happening.”
About 80% of students who benefit from federal bilingual education aid are Hispanic. Federally-supported programs served 234,000 students this year, with an authorized budget of $143 millioni
Refugee Funds Released
A group of House members from California, including Reps. Don Edwards and Richard Lehman, have succeeded in their attempt to get the Office of Management and Budget to release $11.5 million of the $89 million that Congress provided this year for refugee social services. The funds go to 21 states with Cuban, Haitian and Indo-Chinese refugees.
The General Accounting Office said Sept. 26 that OM B was improperly impounding the remaining funds administered by Health and Human Services Departments Office of Refugee Assistance. The California representatives filed suit in U.S. District Court in San Jose, Calif., Sept. 27 to get the money released. Judge Robert Aguilar issued a temporary restraining order against OMB Sept. 30.
Of the $11.5 million, $4.7 million is earmarked for California, $3 million for Florida and $500,000 for Illinois.
In spite of Reagan Administration attempts to cut the budget sharply in recent years, Congress has kept the funding level fairly constant since 1982. Federal funding peaked at $167 million in 1980.
Dr. Juan Rosario, who for five years was assistant superintendent in the Newark, N.J., school system, claimed that Bennett’s motives were political, not pedagogical. Rosario, national director of Aspira, a New York-based community development organization, called Bennett’s address “an emotional rampage.”
Bennett promised to use his administrative and regulatory powers to modify the federal role in bilingual ed, and seek changes in the law itself. He called for the removal of a 4% cap on the amount of federal funds that can be used for “alternative” instruction methods, which would include English immersion teaching.
The Bilingual Education Act, first passed in 1968, was refined by Congress last year after three years of debate. It supported Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) - in which students continue to learn some subjects in their hative language while being given heavy doses of English.
Bennett said his proposed changes would give Hispanic parents more power, an assertion quickly denied by Latino leaders They argued that the federal government initially intervened because local districts froze parents out and that the present law builds in their participation.
Lorenza Calvillo-Craig, president of the
California Association for Bilingual Education,
charged that Bennett’s scheme would permit
local school districts to revert to a slightly
refined version of the “sink or swim” methods
used before. “The most pressing concerns at
the local level are fiscal, not educational,”
she said. „
continued on page 2
Test Census in March
The Census Bureau will conduct, beginning March 16, population and housing censuses in 21 communities in Los Angeles County. Among proposed 1990 census changes the bureau will consider testing in those areas is grouping Hispanics in one category instead of classifying them by ethnic subgroups.
FEDERAL FUNDING FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION
(in thousands, by fiscal year)
1969 - $ 7,500 1975 - $ 91,252 1981 - $1 61,427
1970 - $21,250 1976 - $104,870 1982 - $1 38,058
1971 - $25,000 1977 - $123,767 1983 - $1 38,057
1972 - $35,000 1978 - $143,600 1984 - $1 39,365
1973 - $54,067 1979 - $158,600 1985 - $1 42,950
1974 - $68,308 1980 - $166,963
Source:U.S. Department of Education


Sin pelos en la lengua
ENLARGING THE TACO BEAT? “Covered any interesting stories lately?" It seemed as though at least half of the reporters attending the California Chicano News Media Association’s successful scholarship dinner in Los Angeles Sept. 27 could answer that their paper sent them down to Mexico City to report on the devastation there.
The value of their extra dimension is finally being noted by their editor-bosses, noted one. “Too bad,” he added, “that it took an earthquake.”
WHOSE AMERICA IS IT? Bill Moyers wrapped his CBS-TV immigration special around the loaded question: Are immigrants, and the baggage they bring (such as language), bad for good old U.S. A.?
Hispanic leaders protested vigorously. And most have now received their long, pained, personalized responses. For example, the exdefender of the downtrodden wrote LULAC Executive Director Joe Trevino:
“I am such an admirer of LULAC, going back to my work with John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, that I am all the more regretful at your disappointment.”
But he was quick to assure Trevino that Hispanic complainers were - if you’ll pardon the expression - in the minority, with his mail “running 10-1 in praise of the film.”
And as for the endless, gratuitous “commercial” he gave to U.S. English, he confided that he had no idea that Walter Cronkite was on the Board of Advisors for the well-financed lobby group. “Nor did the President of CBS News, who commissioned the documentary, know thia”
ANOTHER CUBAN COUP? The trade magazine Advertising Age notes that Coca-Cola Classic is sweeping the U.S., outselling new Coke by as much as 9-1 in some marketa Chicago playwright AchyObejas, a cubana with a sense of humor, writes to remind us: “Let us not forget who brought back the old Coke. It was a Cuban, Roberto Goizueta, who did it!”
- Kay Barbaro
Doctor Exchange Planned
Hispanic physicians from the United States and South and Central American countries will participate in an exchange program to begin in January in which “non-high technology’ methods will be shared.
A $1.3 million cooperative agreement was signed Aug. 20 between the Interamerican College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Latin American bureau of the Agency for International Development. The four-year agreement calls for 10 U.S. Hispanic and 10 South and Central American doctors to train and teach each other in what a spokesman for the college called “community medicine.” Pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology are some of the branches of medicine to be covered.
While specifics of the program must still be worked out, tentative plans call for the U.S. doctors to train those from Latin countries at yet undetermined sites in this country and abroad. The doctors from the Latin countries will all train in this country and be paid by their respective countries. All U.S. Hispanic physicians will contribute theirtime and skills on a volunteer basis.
Among the 14 Latin countries participating in the program are: Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador.
Dr. Ren6 Rodriguez, president of the college, said the agreement will provide U.S. H ispanic physicians with an opportunity to demonstrate that the Hispanic physician constitutes a valuable economic and foreign policy resource.
President Names Three
President Reagan announced Oct. 2 his intention to appoint three Hispanics to federal posts and to reappoint a fourth.
The new appointees are Dr. Mario Efrain Ramirez, of Roma, Texas, to the American Board of Family Practice; Carlos Benitez, of Miami, to the Commission on Presidential Scholars; and Joe Nunez, of Denver, to The National Council on Vocational Education.
Reappointed is Richard Chavez, of City of Commerce, Calif., to the Architectural Transportation Barriers Compliance Board.
Farmworkers Pick Union
Fourteen Puerto Rican farmworkers in Bridgeton, N.J., unanimously chose a union Sept. 29 to represent them at a fruit and vegetable farm there. It is the first time that New Jersey farmworkers have adopted a bargaining agent.
In a secret ballot election, the workers voted to be represented by the Comite Organizador de Trabajadores Agricolas. A spokesman for the union said the election will set a precedent for future elections in New Jersey, where he estimated some 20,000 workers (60% Puerto Rican, 20% Mexican) toil on the state’s 1,500 farms.
The owners of Cumberland County farm, where the elections were held, were briefly jailed in August after they refused to recognize the union. Following the election Saul Levin, one of the owners, said he would close down the farm and never again hire workers. That prompted County Court Judge Edward Miller to issue an order Sept 30 requiring Issac and Saul Levin to negotiate in good faith with the union. Terms and conditions of employment on the farm are among the issues to be resolved.
SBA Sets Latino Goal
The Small Business Administration plans to increase Hispanic participation in its minority assistance program by 13%, leveling it to Latino numbers in minority business.
Wilfredo J. Gonzalez, associate administrator of SBA’s division of Minority Small Business and Capital Ownership Development, said at a Sept. 17 hearing of the House’s Small Business Committee that the agency will increase by the end of the year the number of contracts given to Hispanics under its 8(a) program, which awards noncompetitive federal contracts to small firms owned by"socially and economically disadvantaged persons.
Gonzalez indicated that from Sept 30,1984 to Sept. 10, 1985, 854 Hispanic business owners - 27% of all program participants -received $635,099,891, which represented 32.6% of all program contracts. In fiscal year 1984, he said, 651 Hispanic owners, representing 24.8% of all participants, received $700,191,349 or 25.9% of all contracts.
Leaders Attack Bennett
continued from page 1
NABE legal counsel James Lyons accused Bennett’s department of “doublespeak,” as it has pushed for parent involvement in education but has recently “zero-funded” its Family English Literacy program, after funding only four proposals out of 48 applications it received for seed-money from school districts.
Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, called outright for his resignation-
Harry Pachon, director of the National As-sociation of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, described Bennetfs proposals as “having an air of Alice-in-language-land.”
And U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), new chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, told Weekly Report: “You have to excuse the ignorant and bigoted world he (Bennett) lives in.”
- Felix Perez
New Voter Drives Planned
A campaign to identify key Hispanic leaders and establish voter education and registration drives will be officially launched during the third annual Midwest Hispanic Leadership Conference Oct. 11-13 in Chicago.
Juan Andrade, executive director of Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, said the purpose of the campaign is to form Midwest C.O.P.S. (Committee for Organizing, Planning and Support). He claimed that the group will become the “largest membership-based, Hispanic, nonpartisan political organization in the country.”
The campaign will be directed and organized by a 100-member central committee, including 10 Hispanic leaders from 10 Midwest states. Andrade said the committee will plan voter registration strategies, organize annual workshops and conferences on leadership, develop political strategies and conduct voter education drives. He added that the committee will identify and recruit key Hispanic leaders in the Midwest’s urban and rural areas.
“This bold concept will dramatically boost Hispanic politics and serve as a catalyst for unparalleled political progress in the Midwest,” Andrade said.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
BENNETTS SPEECH: For a free copy of the 17-page Sept. 26 speech by U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett in which he called for major changes in federal support for bilingual education, write Charlotte Bellamy, U.S. Department of Education, Room 2097, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202.
THE FEDERAL ROLE- TWO VIEWS: Hispanic Link News Service syndicated a summary of U.S. Education Secretary William Bennett’s speech on the federal role in bilingual education and a response by James Lyons, legal counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education. Each is about 1,150 words. For free copies, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: The Good News, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
BILINGUALS SHARPER: An 87-page report by Dr. Kenji Hakuta, “The Causal Relationship Between Bilingualism, Cognition, and Social Cognitive Skills: Vol. 1,” found that what children learn in one language helps in their intellectual development in the other. Copies are $9.15 plus $1.75 for shipping and handling - prepaid orders only. Contact: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, 1555 Wilson Blvd., Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va. 22209 (800) 336-4560.
EFFECTIVENESS OF SERVICES FOR LEP STUDENTS: The Department of Education has prepared a 294-page report titled “National Longitudinal Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Services for Language Minority Limited-English Proficient Students.” Cost $21.40. Contact: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education at above address.
“THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS:” This 300-page book, first printed in 1983 and subtitled “Bilingual-Bicultural Education in the U.S.,” has just been updated to include the latest modifications in Title 7 of the Bilingual Education Act. It was written by Diego Castellanos, assistant director of the Office of Equal Educational Opportunity, New Jersey State Department of Education. Cost: $6 includes postage and handling. Contact New Jersey State Department of Education, Office of Equal Educational Opportunity, CN 500, Trenton, N.J. 08625.
NACCBE ANNUAL REPORT: Free copies of the ninth annual report of the National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education are available from the U.S. Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs. Contact Paul Balach or Leslie Moore, OBEMLA, Dept of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Reporters Building, Room 421, Washington, D.C. 20202-5401 (202) 245-2600.
BILINGUAL EDUCATION OVERVIEW: “Bilingual Education for Hispanic Students in the United States” is a 544-page book that gives a historical overview and discusses basic issues of bilingual education. Cost: $24.95. Contact Teachers College Press, P.O. Box 4540, Hagerstown, Md. 21741. (Order No. 0-8077-2655-9)
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
ATTORNEY
National civil rights organization seeks Associate Counsel to direct D.C. office, monitor legislation and advocate for Hispanics. Requirements: 3-5 years civil rights legal experience, advocacy and legislativev'administnative experience, knowledge of Hispanic issues superior communications, leadership and management skills, bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Resumes with references by 10/15/85 to: Ms. A Herndndez, MALDEF. 28 Geary St, San Francisco Calif. 94108.
PART TIME SECRETARY, Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. National human services organization is seeking a part time bilingual secretary for its human resources department. Candidate must be fluent in Spanish/English and will perform a variety of clerical support functions requiring 50 wpm typing skills, dictation or 80 words per minute shorthand. Some word processing experience would be a plus. We offer competitive salary benefits package and convenient parking. Qualified candidates may call for consideration at (703) 838-8723 between 9:00 am. and4:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday.
RESEARCH DIRECTOR $30,000-$35,000. Graduate level degree in research field with strong training in research methodology and knowledge of computer analysis and of UDAG/ CDBG programs. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Send resume ta National Council of La Raza, Attn: Emily McKay, 20 F St NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.
NEWSRADIO ANCHOR WTOP, Washington, D.C., seeks writer/reporter/host for key slot Minimum 5 years experience, but ‘ad-news' format background less important than a sense of why people listen to the radio. Send writing samples, references, and an aircheck you’re proud of to Holland Cooke, Operations Manager, WTOP,464640th St N W, Washington, D.C. 20016. No calls please. EOE
SER-JOBS FOR PROGRESS, INC., National Office in Dallas, Texas, is seeking a vice president for corporate resource development. The successful candidate should have a bachelor's degree, executive level experience and proven management skills. Corporate communications and/or marketing background a plus SER provides management and technical assistance to a network of employment training centers across the country. Salary will be commensurate with experience. Resumes are due by Oct. 15 and should be addressed to Rolando Esparza, President SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc., 1355 Riverbend Rd., Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75247.
PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALIST
ENTRY LEVEL-To develop and implement diverse communications and public relations projects, including special planning, media relations, internal/external communications and publications. Skills in handling varied writing assignments!. Some national travel. Salary: $16,000 - $20,000. To apply, send resume and brief essay on career goals by Oct. 18 to M. Valencia, Datacom Systems Corp., Glenpointe Centre East Teaneck, N.J. 07666.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media For information call Magdalena Beltr&n (213) 743-7158.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
FINANCING ATELECOMMUNICATIONS PROPERTY Washington, D.C. Oct. 7,8
The Federal Communications Commission will host this seminar to discuss how minorities can effectively manage the financial aspects of a telecommunications property.
Zora Brown Kramer (202) 254-7674
WORLD OF WORK TASK FORCE Las Vegas, N.M. Oct 7-10
Dr. Gilbert S&nchez, president of New Mexico Highlands University, will assemble mostly Hispanic professionals to assist Hispanic college students preparing for the transition from academia to the work force. Rebecca Baca (505) 425-7511
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
HISPANIC CULTURE AND SCHOOLING CONFERENCE
Immaculata, Pa., Oct. 8
The colloquium will explore the relationship between educational patterns of Hispanics and their culture as reflected in educational programs.
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400
NATIONAL HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND
ENCUENTRO
Chicago Oct. 8
One of ten events designed as an orientation to provide government officials, community leaders and corporations insight into the need for financial support and familiarization with the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund and its programs.
David Garcia (213) 629-4974
MIDWEST HISPANIC POLITICAL LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE
Chicago Oct. 11-13
The Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, in conjunction with the Midwest Hispanic Women, Youth and Elected and Appointed Officials, will host
this conference to promote Hispanic participation in the political process.
Marla Elena Molina (614) 464-1116
MAOPs AZTEC AWARDS DINNER Los Angeles Oct. 11
The Mexican American Opportunity Foundation will honor six individuals who have contributed to the advancement of the Mexican American community. Marie Izagarra (818) 289-7136
SPANISH IN THE UNITED STATES Austin, Texas Oct 11,12
The Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, is presenting this conference to examine Spanish dialects, research and usage in school settings and society.
Dr. Jos6 Lim6n (512) 471-4557
COMING SOON
HISPANIC EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION DINNER Silver Spring, Md. Oct 22 Betty Valdes (301) 840-2515
3


Arts & Entertainment
MILLIONS OF HISPANIC TELEVISION VIEWERS in Spain, the United States, Canada, Italy, Puerto Rico and several Latin American countries were linked in a historic telecast originating in this country, just days before the 493rd anniversary of the first “encounter" between Spanish explorers and Native Americans.
On Sept. 29 the Spanish international Network produced a 12-hour live telethon to raise funds for victims of last month’s two earthquakes in Mexico. The fund-raiser was telecast live to the network’s 364 affiliates in the United States and to Organizacidn de Television Iberoamericana member stations around the world.
A two-hour portion of the program - from 8:05 to 10:05 p.m. EDT-was additionally cablecast in the United States by the Turner Broadcasting System. The telethon was also seen live in Canada and Italy.
“We were able to do it because we have more experience (in multinational satellite communications) than any other U.S. network,” Roxanna Brightwell, SIN spokeswoman, told Weekly Report.
The network reportedly put together the telethon in four days- and raised an estimated $5.3 million in the process.
The telethon, seen by 300 million persons in 22 countries, was a historic broadcast- from a cultural and technological standpoint. Live
segments originating in Argentina, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela - as well as from SIN stations in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Antonio-made Mexico, estamos contigo the largest Hispanic spectacle ever broadcast.
Talent performing live ranged from Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballe in New York to Mexican singer/composer/pianist Armando Manzanero in San Antonio; from a folkloric dance company in Caracas to bands Miami Sound Machine and Tierra in Los Angeles.
Mexico, estamos contigo also provided the latest in SIN’s series of “firsts” in this country’s satellite communications history. The network (partially owned by Mexico’s Televisa) was the first in the United States (in 1980) to take advantage of the Federal Communications Commission's decision to allow companies to order directly from the Communications Satellite Corporation (Comsat).
Since 1980 SIN has been the first company to send programming via satellite to foreign countries and to receive programming, via Comsat from foreign countries.
SIN plans to be able to bypass Intelsat next year when it launches its own satellite. Weekly Report has learned that the Pan American Satellite Corporation (a private company whose chairman Rene Anselmo is also SIN’s president and chairman) has received FCC authorization to launch a satellite next July.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
BENNETT BOOSTERS: While U.S. Spanish-language media expressed general dissatisfaction with William Bennett’s attack on the 1984 Bilingual Education Act, two of the nation’s most influential newspapers, The New York Times and The Washington Post, gave the U.S. Secretary of Education immediate high marks for his rhetoric.
Each responded with favorable editorials the morning following his Sept. 26 New York City speech.
The Los Angeles Times waited until last Monday, Sept. 30, before reacting. Then it chose to disagree with its Eastern rivals.
In its lead editorial, The New York Times assessed: “In one provocative speech, Education Secretary William Bennett has reopened the national debate on bilingual education and done so constructively...”
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion ot Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition | of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at ] your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
It supported Bennetf s proposal to remove the 4% cap which Congress placed on spending for“immersion” programs in which non-English speaking students are taught in English only.
Yet, it urged the federal department to “diligently monitor school districts’ good faith in honoring students’ educational rights.” In New York City, it pointed out, only three-fourths of the 113,000 students eligible for bilingual education are receiving it.
The Washington Post called programs which mandate non-English instruction “intrusive and unnecessary.” It commented, “It is hard enough for administrators to find qualified and dedicated teachers without having to worry about offering chemistry in Farsi or geometry in Hmong.”
The Los Angeles Times conceded that Bennetts proposal to give local school districts more flexibility “sounds good in theory.” But, it warned, “Congress should be wary about making any changes in existing law."
It reasoned: “Districts that didn’t especially
like the concept in the first place might interpret such a move as rolling back the commitment to equal educational opportunity for Latinos, Vietnamese or other affepted groups.”
Less delicate in his criticism of the Secretary’s proposal to reshape the federal role in bilingual education was James J. Lyons, legislative counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education.
In a Hispanic Link News Service op/ed column syndicated to 200 subscribing newspapers, Lyons suggested that Bennett “not only rewrote the history of bilingual education, but he also redefined the meaning of equal educational opportunity.
“It may be that Bennett finally knuckled under to U.S. English, a well-financed private lobby group which opposes use of non-English languages in public education, or for that matter, for any public purpose.” Concluded Lyons: “At best, Bennett is mixed up; at worst, he is malicious.”
- Charlie Ericksen
4
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HR/CR . OCi 7 1985 Making The News This Week Alex Mercure, Assistant U . S . Secretary of Agriculture in the Carter Administration, resigns as New Mexico's Secretary of Economic Development and Tourism-effective Oct. 11 -without announcing future plans . .. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros travels to Mexico Sept. 21 with donations for the earthquake victims from the Mexican American community in his city. . . Irma Lozada, the first female police officer in New York City to be slain in the line of duty, is pesthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the police departmenfs highest decoration, Sept. 26. Lozada was slain Sept. 1984 as she tried to arrest a suspect in a chain snatching in Brooklyn . . . President Reagan says he will nominate Puerto Rico lawyer Jose Antonio Fuste to replace U.S. district judge for Puerto Rico , Juan Torruella del Valle ... Juan L6pezMorillas, a professor of Spanish at the University of Texas at Austin, w i ll receive the Order of Queen Isabella the Catholic, an honor bestowed by the King of Spain for contributions in the areas of Spanish culture and language . The Spanish ambassador to the United States will present L6pez; Morillas with the order Oct. 15 in Washington, D.C .. . . Pablo Cruz, a senior at Miami Coral Park high school, becomes the first student to serve as a non-voting adviser to the Dade County School Board . . . Deborah Carthy-Deu, Miss Universe 1985, and Laura Martinez-Herring, Miss USA 1985, change their home base from New York to Los Angeles following the move there by Miss Universe Inc., producers of both pageants . . . Richard Ramirez, whom police in Los Angeles believe is the" Night Stalker, " is arraigned there on a 68-count indictment charging him .with 1 4 murders and 22 sex assaults which occurred in los Angeles county between June 27, 1984, and last Aug . 8. Ramirez will enter a plea Oct. 17 ... Vol. 3 No. 40 HISPANIC LINK WEE Educators, Leaders Attack Bennett's Proposals Hispanic educators have joined the com munity's organizat i onal and pol i tical leaders nationally in denouncing U .S. Secretary of Education William Bennett for his views and proposals relating to the federal role in bilingual education. Bennett delivered his first major speech on the subject in NewYorkSept26 . He complained that after 17 years and $1. 7 billion of federal support for bilingual education , "We have no evidence that the children whom we sought to help ... have benefitted . " That comment alone brought rebuke. New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones responded, "I don't think Mr . Bennett is an expert on bilingual education," adding that Bennett" hasn't been in the forefronf' in his support for public urban education . Gene Chavez, the Kansas City, Mo . , professor who heads the National Association for Bilingual Education (NABE), told reporters there that " there are seven million kids who are limited English proficient. Some of us have dedicated our lives to making sure kids learn English. It's disconcerting when the Secretary of Education leads the country to believe that ' s not what's happening." About 80% of students who benetit from federal bilingual education aid are Hispanic . Federally-supported programs served 234,000 students this year, with an authorized budget of $ .143 million , FEDERAL FUNDING FOR BiLINGUAL EDUCATION (in thousands, by fiscal year) . 1969 1970 1971 1972. 1973 1974 -$ 7,500 $21,250 $25,000 $35,000 $54,067 $68,308 1975 -$ 91,252 1976 $104,870 1977 -$123,767 1978 $143,600 1 979 -$1 58,600 1980 -$166,963 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 -$161,427 $138,058 $138,057 -$139,365 $142,950 Short Hoe Banned The California State Labor Board has tenta tively adopted a new regulation barring the use of the short-handled hoe by agricultural workers, a tool banned as unsafe by state officials in 1975. The California Occupational Safety and Health Association proposed a regulation earlier this year relaxing the prohibition by allowing the short-handled hoe to be used up to five minutes a shift. Opponents of the regulations, including the United Farm Workers, argued that the short-handle was a hazard to workers' health, causing back and spinal problems . They also said the five-minute rule would be impossible to enforce. Cal-OSHA is expected to adopt the new rule early next year . _ Short tools are defined as those with handles wss than four feet long. Source: U.S. Department of Education Refugee Funds Released A group of House members from California , including Reps . Don Edwards and Richard Lehman , have succeeded in their attempt to get the Office of Management and Budget to release $11 . 5 million of the $89 million that Congress provided this year for refugee social services. The funds go to 21 states with Cuban, Haitian and Indo-Chinese refugees. The General Accounting Office said Sept. 26 that OM B was improperly impounding the remaining funds administered by Health and Human Services Departmenfs Office of Refugee Assistance . The California representatives filed su i t in U.S. District Court in San Jose, Calif., Sept. 27 to get the money released. Judge Robert Aguilar issued a temporary restraining order against OMB Sept. 30. Of the $11.5 million, $4.7 million is earmarked , for California, $3 million for Florida and $500,000 for Illinois. In spite of Reagan Administration attempts to cut the budget sharply in recent years , Congress has kept the funding level fairly constant since 1982 . Federal funding peaked at $167 million in 1980. Dr. Juan Rosario , who for five years was assistant superintendent in the Newark, N.J. , school system, claimed that Bennett's motives were not pedagogical. Rosario, national director of Aspira, a New York-based com munity development organization, called Bennett's address "an emotional rampage." Bennett promised to use his administrative and regulatory powers to modify the federal role in bilingual ed, and seek changes in the law itself . He called for the removal of a 4% cap on the amount of federal funds that can be used for"alternative" instruction methods, which would include English immersion teaching. The Bilingual Education Act, first passed in 1968, was refined by Congress last year after three years of debate . It supported Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE)-in which students continue to learn some subjects in their native language while being given heavy doses of English. Bennett said his proposed changes would give Hispanic parents more power, an assertion quickly denied by Latino leaders. They argued that the federal government initially intervened because local districts froze parents out and that thEl present law builds in their participation Lorenza Calvillo-Craig , president of the CaHfornia Association for Bilingual Education, charged that Bennett's scheme would permit local school districts to revert to a slightly refined version of the "sink or swim" methods used before. "The most pressing concerns at the local level are fiscal, not educational, " she said. continued on page 2 Test Census in March The Census Bureau will conduct, beginning March 16, population and housing censuses in 21 communities in Los Angeles County. Among proposed 1990 census changes the bureau will consider testing in those areas is grouping Hispanics in one category instead of classifying them by ethnic subgroups.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua "I am such an admirer of LULAC, going back to my work with John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, that I am all the more regretful at your disappointment." ENLARGING THE TACO BEAT? " Covered any interesting stories lately?" It seemed as though at least half of the reporters attending the California Chicano News Media Association's successful scholarship dinner in Los Angeles Sept. 27 could answer that their paper sent them down to Mexico City to report on the devastation there. But he was quick to assure Trevino that Hispanic complainers were if you'll pardon the expression in the minority, with his mail "running 10-1 in praise of the film . " And as for the endless, gratuitous "commercial" he gave to U .S. English, he confided that he had no idea that Walter Cronkite was on the Board of Advisors for the well-financed lobby group. "Nor did the President of CBS News, who commissioned the documentary, know this." The value of their extra dimension is finally being noted by their editor-bosses, noted one. " Too bad," he added, "that it took an earthquake. " WHOSE AMERICA IS IT? Bill Moy e r s wrappe d his CBS-TV immigration special around the loaded question: Are immigrants, and the baggage they bring (such as language), bad for good old U .S.A.? ANOTHER CUBAN COUP? The trade magazine Advertising Age notes that Coca-Cola Classic is sweeping the U.S . , outselling new Coke by as much as 9-1 in some markets. Hispanic leaders protested vigorously . And most have now received their long, pained, personalized responses. For e x ample, the e x defender of the downtrodden wrote LULAC Executive Director Joe Trevll\o: Chicago playwright Achy Obejas, a cuban a with a sense of humor, writes to remind us: "Let us not forget who brought back the old Coke. It was a Cuban, Roberto Goizueta, who did it!" Doctor Exchange Pla nned Hispanic physicians from the United States and South and Central American countries will participate in an exchange program to begin in January in which " non-high technology" methods will be shared. A $1. 3 million cooperative agreement was signed Aug . 20 between the lnteramerican College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Latin American bureau of the Agency for International Development. The four-year agreement calls for 10 U .S. Hispanic and 10 South and Central American doctors to train and teach each other in what a spokesman for the college called "community medicine. " Pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology are some of the branches of medicine to be covered. While specifics of the program must still be worked out, tentative plans call for the U . S . doctors to train those from Latin countries at yet undetermined sites in this country and abroad. The doctors from the Latin countries will all train in this country and be paid by their respective countries. All U . S. Hispanic physicians will contribute their time and skills on a volunteer basis . Among the 14 Latin countries participati ng in the program are : Mex ico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. Dr . Rene Rodriguez , president of the coll e ge , said the agreement will provide U . S. Hispanic physicians with an opportunity to demonstrate that the His panic physician constitutes a valuable economic and foreign policy resource . President Names Three President Reagan announced Oct. 2 his intention to appoint three Hispanics to federal posts and to reappoint a fourth. The new appointees are Dr. Mario Efrain Ramirez, of Roma , Texas, to the American Board of Family Practice; Carlos Benitez, of Miami, to the Commission on Presidential Scholars; and Joe Nunez, of Denver, to The National Council on Vocational Education. Reappointed is Richard Chavez, of City of Commerce, Calif. , to the Architectural Trans portation Barriers Compliance Board. 2 Farmworkers Pick Union Fourteen Puerto Rican farmworkers in Bridgeton, N .J., unanimously chose a union Sept. 29 to represent them at a fruit and vegetable farm there. It is the first time that New Jersey farmworker s have adopted a bargaining agent. In a secret ballot election, the workers voted to be represented by the Comite Organizador de Trabajadores Agrfcolas . A spokesman for the union said the election will set a precedent for future elections in New Jersey, where he estimated some 20,000 workers (60% Puerto Rican , 20% Mexican) toil on the state's 1,500 farms. The owners of Cumberland County farm, where the elections were held, were briefly jailed in August after they refused to recognize the union. Following the election Saul Levin, one of the owners, said he would close down the farm and never again hire workers. That prompted County Court Judge Edward Miller to issue.an order Sept. 30 requiring Issac and Saul Levin to negotiate in good faith with the union. Terms and conditions of employment on the farm are among the issues to be resolved. SBA Sets Latino Goal The Small Business Administration plans to increase Hispanic participation in its minority assistance program by 13%, leveling it to Latino numbers in minority business. Wilfredo J. Gonzalez , associate administrator of SBA' s division of Minority Small Business and Capital Ownership Development, said at a Sept. 17 hearing of the House' s Small Business Committee that the agency will inc rease by the end of the year the number of contracts given to Hispanics under its 8(a) program , which awards noncompetitive federal contracts to small firms owned bfsocially and economically disadvantaged persons. Gonzalez indicated that from Sept. 30, 1984 to Sept. 10, 1985, 854 Hispanic business owners-27% of all program participantsreceived $635,099,891, which represented 32. 6 % of all program contracts. In fiscal year 1984, he said, 651 Hispanic owners, repre senting 24. 8 % of all participants, received $700, 191 ,349 or 25. 9 % of all contracts. Kay Barbaro Leaders Attack Bennett con tinued from page 1 NABE legal counsel James Lyons accused Bennett's department of "doubl espeak, " as it has pushed for parent involvement in education but has recently "zero-funded" its Family English Literacy program, after funding only four proposals out of 48 applications it received for seed-money from school districts. Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza , called outright for his resignation. Harry Pach6n, director of the National As sociation of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, described Bennett's proposals as " having an air of Alice-in-language-land. " And U . S . Rep . Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), new chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, told Weeklx Report: "You have to excuse the ignorant and bigoted world he (Bennett) lives in. " Felix Perez New Voter Drives Planned A campaign to identify key Hispanic leaders and establish voter education and registration drives will be officially launched during the third annual Midwest Hispanic Leadership Conference Oct. 11-13 in Chicago. Juan Andrade, executive director of Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, said the purpose of the campaign is to form Mid west C . O.P .S. (Committee for Organizing, Planning and Support) . He claimed that the group will become the "largest membership based, Hispanic, nonpartisan political organi zation in the country." The campaign will be directed and organized by a 1 00-member central committee, including 10 Hispanic leaders from 10 Midwest states. Andrade said the committee will plan voter registration strategies, organize annual work shops and conferences on leadership, develop political strategies and conduct voter education drives. He added that the committee will identify and recruit key Hispanic leaders in the Midwest's urban and rural areas. "This bold concept will dramatically boost Hispanic politics and serve as a catalyst for unparalleled political progress in the Midwest, " Andrade said. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS BENNETT'S SPEECH: For a free copy of the 17-page Sept. 26 speech by U.S . Secretary of Education William Bennett in which he called for major changes in federal support for bilingual education, write Charlotte Bellamy, U.S. Department of Education, Room 2097, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202. THE FEDERAL ROLE-TWO VIEWS: Hispanic Link News Service syndicated a summary of U.S. Education Secretary William Bennett's speech on the federal role in bilingual education and a response by James Lyons, legal counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Edu cation. Each is about 1 ,150 words. For free copies, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: The Good News, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. BILINGUALS SHARPER: An 87-page report by Dr. Kenji Hakuta, "The Causal Relationship Between Bilingualism, Cognition, and Social Cognitive Skills: Vol. 1 ,"found that what children learn in one language helps in their intellectual development in the other. Copies are $9.15 plus $1.75 for shipping and handlingprepaid orders only. Contact: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Educati on , 1555 Wilson Blvd., Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va. 22209 (800) 336-4560. EFFECTIVENESS OF SERVICES FOR LEP STUDENTS: Th e Department of Education has prepared a 294-page report ti t led "National Longitudinal Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Services for Language Minority Limited-English Proficient Students. " Cost $21.40. Contact: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education at above address. "THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS:" This 300-page book, first printed i n 1983 and subtitled" Bilingual-Bicultural Education in the U.S .," has just been updated to include the latest modifications in Title 7 of the Bilingual Education Act. It was written by Diego Castellanos, assistant director of the Office of Equal Educational Opportunity, New Jersey State Department of Education. Cost: $6 includes postage and handling. Contact New Jersey State Department of Education, Office of Equal Educational Opportunity, CN 500, Trenton, N.J . 08625. NACCBE ANNUAL REPORT: Free copies of the ninth annual report of the National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education are available from the U.S. Office of Bilingual Education .and Minority Languages Affairs. Contact: Paul Balach or Leslie Moore, OBEMLA, Dept. of Education , 400 Maryland Ave . SW, Reporters Building, Room 421, Washington, 20202-5401 (202) 245-2600. BILINGUAL EDUCATION OVERVIEW: "Bilingual Education for Hispanic Students in the United States" is a 544-page book that gives a historical overview and discusses basic issues of bilingual .education. Cost: $24.95. Contact: Teachers College Press, P.O. Box -1..540, Hagerstown, Md. 21741. (Order No. 0-8077-2655-9) CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Wa shington, D .C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports maile d Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents pe r word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. ATTORNEY National civil lights organization seeks Associate Counse l t o direct D.C. office. monitor legislation a nd advocate for Hispanics. ReQuirements: 3 years c iv i l rights l ega l exper ien ce, advocacy and experience , knowledge of Hispan ic issues. superior comm u nications. le aders hip and ma n agement skills, bilingual ( Engli sh/Spa n ish) preferred. Resumes wit h r e ferences by 1 0/15/85 to : Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF . 28 Geary Sl, San Fra ncisco Calil . 94108. PART TIME SECRETARY, Old Town Alexand r ia, Virginia. National human services organization is seeking a part tim e bilingual sec ret ary for its human resources department. Ca ndidate must be fluent in Spanish/ English an d Will perform a vanety of clencal support functions requiring 50 wpm typing skills, dic tation or80 words per minute s horthand . So me word processing experience would b e a plus. We offer competitive salary benefits packege a nd conv e nient parking. Qualified ca nd idates may call for cons ideration at(703) 838 between9:00 a m . and4:30 p . m . Mondaythru Fri . day. RESEARCH DIRECTOR $30 ,()()(}$35,000 . Graduate level degree in research field with strong training in research methodology and know ledg e of computer analysis and of UDAG/ CDBG programs. Bilingu al (English/Spanish) preferred. Send resume to: National Council of La R aza, Attn : Emily McKay, 20 F St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20001. NEWSRADIO ANCHOR WTOP, Washington, D.C., seeks writer/reporter/host for key slot. Minimum 5 years experience, but 'aiiMnews' format background less important than a se nse of why people listen t o the rad io . Send w riting sampl es. references. and a n aircheck yo u'r e proud otto Holland Cooke, Operations Manager, WTOP ,464640th St NW , Washington, D.C. 20016. No calls plea se . EO E. SERJOBS FOR PROGRESS, INC., Natio n al Office in Dallas, T exas, is seeking a vice president for corporate resource deve lopment The successful candidate s h o uld have a bache lors degree, executive leve l e x perience a nd prove n m aRageme nt skills. Corporate commun icatio ns and/or marketing background a plus. SEA provides management and technical assistanc_ e to a network of empl oyme nt training centers across th e country. Salary will be com mensurate with experience. Resumes are due b y Oct 15 and should be addressed to Rolando E sparza. Pr esident, SERJobs for Progress, In c . , 1355 Riverbend Rd., Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75247. PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALIST ENTRY LEVEL-To develop and implement diverse communications and public relations projects, including special planning, media relations, in ternal / e xternal communications and publications. Skills in handling varied writing assignments! . Some national trav el. Salary: $16,000 $20 ,0 00. T o apply, s end resum e and brief essay on career goals by Oct 18 to M. Valencia , Datacom Systems Corp. , Glenpointe Centre East, Teaneck, N.J. 07666. ENmY LEVEL POSmONSwtth Montgomery County, Maryland, are availa ble on a continuous basis. Ca ll (301) 251. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Bel tra n (213) 743 58. THE CATHOUC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated IVIondays, tor positions at the university. Call (202) 635LAND. Calendar HISPANIC CULTURE AND SCHOOLING CON FERENCE this conference to promote Hispanic participation in the politica l process . THIS WEEK FINANCING A TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROPERTY Washington, D . C . Oct. 7,8 The Federal Communications Commission will host this seminar to discuss how minorities can effectively manage the financial aspects of a telecommunications property. Zora Brown Kramer (202) 254-767 4 WORLD OF WORK TASK FORCE Las Vegas, N .M. Oct. 7 10 Dr. Gilbert Sanchez, president of New Mexico Highlands University, will assemble mostly Hispanic professionals assist Hispanic college students preparing for the transition from academia to the work force . Bac a (505) 425-7511 Hispanic link Weekly Report Immaculata, Pa., Oct. 8 The colloquium will explore the relationship between educational patterns of Hispanics and their culture as reflected in educational programs . Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400 NATIONAL HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND ENCUENTRO Chicago Oct. 8 One of ten events designed as an orientation to provide government officials, community leaders and corporations insight into the need for financial support and familiarization w it h the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund and its programs. David Garcia (213) 629-497 4 MIDWEST HISPANIC POLITICAL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 11-13 The Midwest Voter Registrat ion Education Project, in conjunction with the Midwest Hispanic Women , Youth and Elected and Appointed Officials, will host Maria Elena Mol ina (614) 464-1116 MAOF's AZTEC AWARDS DINNER los Angeles Oct. 11 The Mexican American Opportunity Foundation will honor six individuals who have contributed to the advancement of the M e x ican American community. Marie l zagarra (818) 289-7136 SPANISH IN THE UNITED STATES Austin , Texas Oct. 11, 1 2 The Center fo. r Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, is presenting this conference to examine Spanish dialects , research and usage in school settings and society . Dr. Jos e lim6n (512) 471-4557 COMING SOON HISPANIC EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION DINNER Silver Spring, Md. Oct 22 Betty Valdes (301) 840-2515

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Arts & Entertainment segments originating in Argentina, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela -as well as from SIN stations in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Antoniomade Mexico, estamos contigo the largest Hispanic spectacle ever broadcast. MILLIONS OF HISPANIC TELEVISION VIEWERS in Spain, the United States, Canada, Italy, Puerto Rico and several Latin American countries were linked in a historic telecast originating in this country, just days before the 493rd anniversary of the first "encounter" between Spanish explorers and Native Americans . On Sept. 29 the Spanish International Network produced a 12-hour live telethon to raise funds for victims of last month's two earthquakes in Mexico. The fund-raiser was telecast live to the Joetwork's 364 affiliates in the United States and to Organizaci6n de Televlsi6n lberoamericana member stations around the world. Talent performing live ranged from Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballe in New York to Mexican singer/composer/pianist Armando Manzanero in San Antonio; from a folkloric dance company in Caracas to bands Miami Sound Machine and Tierra in Los Angeles. A two-hour portion of the program-from 8:05 to 10:05 p . m . EDT was additionally cablecast in the United States by the Turner Broadcasting System. The telethon was also seen live in Canada and Italy. Mexico, est amos contigo also provided the latest in Sl N's series of "firsts" in this country's satellite communications history. The network (partially owned by Mexico's Televlsa) was the first in the United States (in 1980) to take advantage of the Federal Communications Commission's decision to allow companies to order directly from the Communications Satellite Corporation (Comsat) . Since 1980 SIN has been the first company to send programming via satellite to foreign countries and to receive programming, via Comsat, from foreign countries. "We were able to do it because we have more experience (in multinational satellite communications) than any other U.S. network," Roxanna Brightwell, SIN spokeswoman, told Weekly Report. The network reportedly put together the telethon in four days-and raised an estimated $5. 3 million in the process. The telethon, seen by 300 million persons in 22 countries, was a historic broadcast-from a cultural and technological standpoint. Live SIN plans to be able to bypass lntelsat next year when it launche:s its own satellite. Weekly Report has learned that the Pan American Satellite Corporation (a private company whose chairman Rene Anselmo is also SIN's president and chairman) has received FCC authorization to launch a satellite next July. Media Report . BENNETT BOOSTERS: While U . S . Spanishlanguage media expressed gen eral dissatis faction with William Bennetfs attack on the 1984 Bilingual Education Act, two of the nation's most influential newspapers, The New York Times and The Washington Post, gave the U.S. Secretary of Education immediate high marks for his rhetoric . Each responded with favorable editorials the morning following his Sept. 26 New York City speech. The Los Angeles Times waited until last Monday, Sept. 30, before reacting. Then it chose to disagree with its Eastern rivals . In its lead editorial, The New York Times assessed: "In one provocative speech, Edu cation Secretary William Bennett has reopened the national debate on bilingual education and done so constructively ... " HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat1onal publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N. W . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Cha r lie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen Mendoza. No port1on of H 1spamc Lmk. Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast many form w1thout advance permissiOn. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Incl ude the latest ed1t1on ol Hispan1c Lmk Weekly Repo rt in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector E"cksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737. 4 It supported Bennetfs proposal to remove the 4% cap which Congress placed on spending for"immersion" programs in which non-English speaking students are taught in English only. Yet , it urged the federal department to "diligently monitor school districts' good faith in honoring students' educational rights." In New York City, it pointed out, only threefourths of the 113,000 students eligible for bilingual education are receiving it. The Washington Post called programs which mandate non-English instruction "intrusive and unnecessary." It commented, "It is hard enough for administrators to find qualified and dedicated teachers without having to worry about offering chemistry in Farsi or geometry in Hmong." The Los Angeles Times conceded that Bennetfs proposal to give local school districts more flexibility "sou rids good in theory." But, it warned, "Congress should be wary about making any changes in existing law . " It reasoned: "Districts that didn't especially -Antonio Mejias-Rentas like the concept in the first place might interpret such a move as rolling back the commitment to equal educational opportunity for Latinos, Vietnamese or other affe<;:ted groups." Less delicate in his criticism of the Secretary's proposal to reshape the federal role in bilingual education was James J. Lyons, legislative counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education. In a Hispanic Link News Service op/ed column syndicated to 200 subscribing news papers, Lyons suggested that Bennett "not only rewrote the history of bilingual education, but he also redefined the meaning of equal educational opportunity. "It may be that Bennett finally knuckled under to U.S. English, a well-financed private lobby group which opposes use of non English languages in public education, orfor that matter, for any public purpose." Concluded Lyons: "At best, Bennett is mixed up; at worst, he is malicious." Charlie Ericksen 11 l'rn usin9 -the immersion I Hispanic Link Weekly Report