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Hispanic link weekly report, October 14, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 14, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin is reported receiving support from President Reagan’s kitchen cabinet as the man some of its members want to see take on U.S. Senator Alan Cranston of
California in 1986 And the name of California physician Tirso del
Junco, an early and effective Reagan backer, is among those mentioned as candidates for Secretary of Health and Human Services, following the departure of Margaret Heckler, who was moved to ambassador to Ireland. . . Irate at Education Secretary William Bennett’s attack on bilingual education, National Council of La Raza President Rail I Yzaguirre has written the president suggesting that Bennett be “promoted to ambassador to Antarctica”... League of United Latin American Citizens President Oscar Mordn presents a $50,000 earthquake relief check to Mexico Embassy representative
A b W0
Leonardo Ffrench in a Washington, D.C., press ceremony. The money represents efforts of 40 LULAC councils in Texas, California, Iowa, Missouri and Florida, with all 400 councils now joining in the continuing campaign, Moran pledges... San Antonio School District Board President Oscar Hernandez becomes the first Hispanic to serve as president of the Texas Association of School Boards, an organization representing more than 1,000 school boards in the state... Jose de Santiago, president of Desco Steel Products in Houston, Texas, is honored as the Small Business Administration’s National Minority Small Business Person of the Year by Vice President George Bush in a ceremony at the White House Oct. 9 as part of Minority Enterprise Development Week.. Dau, Walker, and Associates, a Hispanic women-owned international management consulting firm in Washington, D.C., is selected by the Department of Labor as minority contractor of the year...
Vol. 3 No. 41

Oct 14,1985
LULAC’s New Focus: Dropouts
Snyder Quits LA Council
Los Angeles City Councilman Arthur Snyder resigned from office Oct. 4, opening the way for Latino representation in the city’s most heavily Hispanic district.
Snyder, 52, a councilman representing the 14th district, which is 75% Hispanic, said he was stepping down to return to his law practice. His resignation, after 18 years in office, was eagerly awaited by four His-panics in the district who have expressed a desire to run for the seat. The City Council has tentatively set Dec. 10 as the date for the election. If no candidate gains a majority, a run-off would be scheduled for early next year.
Some contenders criticized the scheduling of the election at such an early date, saying it favors the well-financed candidacy of Democratic Assemblyman Richard Alatorre, whom Snyder has endorsed.
The other Hispanic candidates are: Antonio Rodriguez, executive director of the Los Angeles Center for Law and Justice; urban planner Steve Rodriguez and Gilbert Avila, former aide to Gov. George Deukmejian.
Tijerina May Quit
The founder of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund is considering resigning as associate justice of Texas’ Fourth Court of Appeals in San Antonio for health reasons.
But Pete Tijerina, 63, who was elected to the position in 1982, has not set the date of Nov. 1 to leave public service, as reported in the press there.
Tijerina underwent open heart surgery in 1981 and recently had other related medical problems that could require additional hospitalization.
A graduate of St. Mary’s University School of Law in San Antonio, Tijerina was born in Laredo, Texas.
He launched MALDEF in 1967 after obtaining a $2.2 million grant from the Ford Foundation for that purpose. He served as its president until 1970, when MALDEF mqyed to San Francisco. Choosing to remain in Texas, he returned to private practice.
Hispanic student dropout rates - higher than 50% in many communities - will be the prime target of the League of United Latin American Citizens in the months ahead, LULACs Board of Directors decided at their annual Washington, D.C., meeting Oct. 4-6.
According to Cruz Chavira, special assistant to President Oscar Moran, LULAC has been meeting with representatives of some of the nation’s major corporations to gain support for an all-out offensive on the educational problems of Hispanic youth.
Within the next three months, he expects that the organization will be able to announce major private support for an effort “equal in dimension to the ‘Little School of 400’,” a preschool project launched by LULAC in Houston in 1957 which grew to become a model for the federal Project Head Start.
Los Angeles, El Paso and San Antonio are under consideration for a pilot effort, Chavira said, adding that he hoped the program could spread to the Midwest and East, too.
During their Washington deliberations, LU LAC’s leaders showed general support for the programs and low-key style of Mor&n, a San Antonio insurance analyst, as he completed his first 100 days as their president.
The board heard from Executive Director Joe Trevino that all 56 constitutional amendments supported by the national assembly in
Baca in Mayoral Runoff
Jim Baca and Ken Shultz will meet in a runoff election next month to decide who will become Albuquerque, New Mexico’s next mayor following elections there Oct. 8 in which neither garnered a majority.
Shultz, aCity Council member and Albuquerque car dealer, received 29.5% of the vote or 21,682. Baca, who took a leave of absence from his position as state land commissioner, received 28.7% or 21,095. The City Council will set a date for the November runoff, expected in mid-month.
Should Baca win, he would become the “Duke City’s” first Hispanic mayor.
Pat Baca was the only Hispanic re-elected to the City Council.
Anaheim last June have since been ratified by a majority of LULAC’s400 councils nationwide. It incorporated them formally into the organization’s constitution.
Most of the changes involve non-controversial streamlining. One raises the annual charter fee for councils from $12 to $100.
Another extends the time national elected and appointed officers may serve in one office from two to four years. Officers are elected for one-year terms. Mor6n and past presidents of LULAC would now be eligible to serve a total of four years, Trevifto said. Next elections will be conducted during its annual convention set for Las Vegas, Nev., July 9-
continued on page 2
Guzman Suffers Stroke
Ralph Guzman, the nation’s highest-placed Hispanic in the U.S. State Department during the Carter Administration, suffered a serious stroke at home in Santa Cruz, Calif., Oct. 6.
At press time Oct. 10, he remained on life-support systems in very critical condition in that city’s Dominican Hospital.
Guzm&n,59, served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs in 1978 and 1979. He then returned to the University of California system, where he , was appointed Provost of Merrill College in Santa Cruz by the State Board of Regents in 1982.
Last year, he took a sabbatical from the post to research and write. At the time of his stroke, he was teaching one course in political science, his specialty, at the university.
Born in Moroledn, Guanajuato, Mexico, Guzman came to the U nited States at age 5 with his mother to join his father, a coal miner in Picton, Colorado. When the mines closed, the family worked as migrant farm laborers throughout the Southwest.
After service in World War II, Guzman became a U.S. citizen and went on to graduate from East Los Angeles Junior Collegeand California State University at Los Angeles before earned his doctorate at UCLA.


Sin pelos en la lengua
RICHARDSON FOR PRE2? The five-column, Page 1 headline in the Santa Fe daily New Mexican read: “RICHARDSON: HISPANIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE?” Next to it was a picture of U.S. Rep. William Richardson deep in conversation with Colorado’s ambitious Sen. Gary Hart
To find out when the dimpled second-term New Mexico congressman planned to announce for the White House, we read oa Andon. Andon-until we reached the penultimate paragraph on the jump page.
“Richardson,” it finally told us, “yearns for the day when the United States will be talking about a Hispanic presidential candidate.”
MORE HEADUNE HYPERBOLE: The Miami Herald cried “MEXICO CITY IN RUINS.” The Washington Times shrieked: “MEXICO CITY IN CHAOS.”
Scare headlines by the U.S. press caused much unnecessary and unfounded fear among U.S. Hispanics with families in Mexico? s capital. The truth is that only 1.5% of the city’s metropolitan area was badly affected by the disaster, and the resilient city is now welcoming much-needed tourism as it recovers from the earthquakes which killed more than 5,000 of the citys 17 million inhabitants last month.
Leonardo Ffrench, Mexico’s minister for press and public affairs, was asked at a LULAC news conference in Washington, D.C., Oct 7 whether
such hyperbole by the U.S. press bothered him.
No, he responded; the U.S. press was “quite fair" - particularly when measured against the media in Europe. According to the latter, he said, “Mexico City disappeared from the map.”
TURNING TO VASTWASTELAND: Newspaper reporters don’t have to pronounce names correctly - just spell them right (Mexico’s press minister’s name is spelled F-f-r-e-n-c-h, by the way.)
And maybe we could forgive Meiyl Comer, moderator of the syndicated television show, “It’s Your Business,” if she had mispronounced guest Richard Fajardo’s name.
On the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s immigration debate aired by 150 stations nationwide Oct 6, she did just fine with the director of MALDEFs Washington office, Fa-HARD-oh.
The name that threw her for a loop was Mar-TEEN-es. As in U.S. Rep Matthew (Marty) Martinez.
Before the taped show, she practiced and practiced and seemed to have it right But she blew it twice when she introduced the California congressman when the cameras were rolling. Mar-tin-EZ. So they tried again.
The third time she made it okay past the introductions, but as the debate went on, again and again she lapsed back into Mar-tin-EZ
Oh,well, NBG-TVs Connie Chung was talking about the flood in one-syllable PONCE, Puerto Rico, last week.
- Kay Barbaro
Sediilo Has Heart Attack
DOJ Appeals MALDEF Injunction
Sediilo Has Heart Attack
Pablo Sediilo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the National Catholic Conference since its formation in 1971, suffered a heart attack Oct 3, but is expected to make a full recovery.
Sediilo, 50, was striken while attending a meeting of the secretariats national advisory committee in Kenmore, Wash. A native of Wagon Mound, N.M, he resides in Springfield, Va.
A hospital spokesperson described his attack as a“small one” and projected that it would be about a month before he could return to work at the secretariat office in Washington, D.C.
Student Transfer Plan Set
The publ ic school systems of New York and Puerto Rico will implement a coordination project in November to facilitate the transfer of approximately 10,000 students who move within the two systems each year.
Awilda Aponte, Puerto Rico’s education secretary, and Nathan Quiftones, chancellor of the New York City school system, said atan Oct. 8 press conference that the new project will help curtail the dropout rate among transferring students. They noted that, presently, transfer students are subject to improper grade demotions and course repetition due to lack of information and coordination between the two school systems.
The new project, to be tested for two years, will use “educational transfer passports?’ for students in grades 7 to 12. The “passports” will provide school administrators with information on the students personal and academic background. They will be for use at the discretion of school principals and counselors.
The project is the result of a year of consultations involving both systems It is sponsored by the College Board with a grant from the Ford Foundation
The U.S. Department of Justice joined Oct 7 the state of Texas in appealing a U.S. District Court injunction that prohibits the use of the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PST-P) as an admissions standard for college students entering education courses this fall.
SAVE Tested in Texas
A test program aimed at verifying the legal U.S. residency status of unemployment benefit applicants started Oct. 1 in Houston, Texas. Workers identified as undocumented are denied benefits.
The 60-day program, overseen by the Texas Employment Commission in conjunction with the Immigration and Naturalization Service, is being implemented at three Houston TEC offices. Called Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlement, or SAVE, it was made possible by the recent computerization of INS files.
Four states already have the program -Colorado, Illinois, Florida, and California. Although different versions of the concept have been used, SAVE is a little over a year old, said Verne Jervis, public information officer with the INS in Washington, D.C.
This type of program has “been done on an ad hoc basis for at least six or seven years,” said Jervis.
Bomb Plotters Sentenced
Three suspected members of the Armed Forces of National Liberation, FALN, were sentenced Oct 4 to 35-year prison terms for plotting to bomb two military installations in 1983.
Sentenced in Chicago U.S. District Court were Alejandrina Torres, Edwin Cortes and Alberto Rodriguez. A fourth defendant, Josd Luis Rodriguez, received a suspended sentence and five years probation.
The group was charged with planning to bomb a Marine training center and an Army Reserve center in Chicago Neither was bombed.
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and other civil rights groups were granted the injunction Aug 28. They alleged that the test went against a court decree resulting from a 1970 lawsuit brought by the Justice Department against the Texas school system.
Explaining the department's decision to enter the case, Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds said that the reasoning behind the injunction was legally incorrect and that it should be overturned because it “epitomized the practice of using double standards” in minority students’ education.
If the injunction is lifted 2,000 minority students who are now enrolled in education courses in Texas would be prevented from pursuing teaching degrees, MALDEF said
The injunction does not invalidate the test itself. To become certified teachers in Texas, students must still pass it In the past failure rate on it was 66% f or H ispanics, 78% for blacks, and 27% for Anglos.
The MALDEF challenge of the test is scheduled for trial in February.
LULAC Tackles Dropouts
continued from page 1
13. Conventions the following two years are in Corpus Christi and Dallas, Texas.
Moran added membership services and financial management to his office’s responsibilities. Executive Director Trevirto will continue to serve as congressional liaison in Washington, D.C., and to supervise such funded LULAC programs as the Latin America education project, the English-only project and the national health fair program..
During his first hundred days in office, Mor&n said he was on the road, visiting LULAC councils, about 80% of the time. He visited governors to discuss LULAC projects and goals in such states as California, Iowa, Colorado and Arizona, and talked with several members of Congress during his Washington visit
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
EDITING INTERNSHIPS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund is offering 60 internships - work/study/aid packages worth about $6,000 each - for college juniors and seniors. The programs include paid summer jobs. Deadline to request applications: Oct. 31; to return them, Nov. 28. Request from The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P.O. Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540.
CENSUS CATALOG: The Census Bureau’s 1985 catalog is designed to help people understand and locate data available from the bureau. Copies of the 358-page catalog are available for $13 (prepaid orders only). Order GPO stock number003-024-06331 -0 from Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
MODEL AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PLAN: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has developed a comprehensive model affirmative action plan for use by employers in establishing their own guidelines. The 65-page document features details on recruitment, seniority, citizenship and anti-discrimination policies. Copies are $10. Contact Theresa Bustillos, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 629-2512.
COMMUNITY ARTS SERVICES GRANTS: The Manhattan Community Arts Fund will distribute $47,000 in grants of $3,000 or less to community arts organizations in the city which provide services at the local level. For more information and applications, contact Jane Delgado, The Association of H ispanic Arts, 200 East 87 St, New York, N.Y. 10028 (212) 369-7054.
CIVIL RIGHTS INFORMATION: The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases reports on a ongoing basis. The reports and a "Catalog of Publications” listing them are free. Contact U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Distribution Center, 621 North Payne St, Alexandria, Va 22314. Free subscription to the Commission’s monthly newsletter, Civil Rights Update, may be obtained by writing the same office.
ENERGY INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSE: The Department of Energy has opened the National Minority Energy Information Clearinghouse, a center for information about energy programs and their impact on minority businesses and educational institutions A variety of referral services are provided. Contact National Minority Energy Information Clearinghouse, Office of Minority Economic Impact, Energy Department 1000 Independence Ava SW, Room 5B-110, Washington, D.C. 20585 (202) 252-5876.
WEEKLY REPORT FOR CONFERENCES: Current editions of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be obtained in bulk for inclusion in participants? packets at conventions and conferences For details contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link* * 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per.word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
SERJOBS FOR PROGRESS INC., National Office in Dallas, Texas, is seeking a vice president for corporate resource development. The successful candidate should have a bachelor’s degree, executive level experience and proven management skills. Corporate communications and/or marketing background a plus. SER provides management and technical assistance to a network of employment training centers across the country. Salary will be commensurate with experience. Resumes are • due by Oct 15 and should be addressed to Rolando Esparza, President SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc., 1355 Riverbend Rd., Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75247.
PART TIME SECRETARY, Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. National human services organization is seeking a part time bilingual secretary for its human resources department Candidate must be fluent in Spanish/English and will perform a variety of clerical support . functions requiring 50 wpm typing skills, dictation or 80 words per minute shorthand. Some word processing experience would be a plus.
. We offer competitive salary benefits package and convenient parking. Qualified candidates may call for consideration at (703) 838-8723 between9:00 am. and4:30'p.m. Monday thru Friday.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basia Call (301) 251-2252.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse . for Hispanics in the media For information call Magdalena BeltrAn (213) 743-7158.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington. D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated ‘ Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND.
N.A.H.J. EDUCATION SPECIALIST
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists based in Washington, D.C., seeks someone to develop and implement educational activities for Hispanics nationally. Salary is $22,000 -$25,000. Candidate must have:
• 2 years of experience teaching(or working with) students
• Educational background plus on-the-job experience in print or broadcast journalism.
• Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal.
• Willingness to travel
• Good speaking ability and presentation of self.
• Knowledge of the East Coast educational systems including journalism schools and (especially) the*Hispanic experience” in colleges and high schools in the East
• Good interpersonal skills
Send resume tcc Frank Newton, Ph.D, Executive Director, National Association of Hispanic Journalists National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045.
FACULTY VACANCIES
The Department of English at Iowa State University has six tenure-track positions for the Fall of 1986. Applicants must complete all requirements for Ph.D. by May 1986. MLA interview or interview in Ames lows at applicants expense required. All positions listed are available mid-August 1986. Application deadline: Dec.2. The six tenure-track positions are:
Asst Prof.- American Literature; Asst Prof. - American Literature/ Literature by and about Women; Asst Prof.-Creative Writing(Fictk>n/ Essays); Asst Prof. - Creative Writing (Poetry); Asst Prof.- Reading; and Asst Prof.- Secondary English Education.
Send application letter, vita and dossier (creative writing candidates should also send samples of writing) to: Frank E. Haggard, Chair, Department of English, Iowa State University, 203 Ross Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011
Calendar
the demographic characteristics of Mexicans in the Southwest
Cristina Hernandez (714) 625-6607
issues and patterns affecting Hispanics.
Henry Corrales (213) 620-4675
HISPANIC PSYCHOTHERAPY CONFERENCE
THIS WEEK
LATINOS AND PUBLIC OPINION POLLS Austin, Texas Oct 18
The Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, is sponsoring this conference that will examine polling agencies and their effectiveness in canvassing Latinos.
Elizabeth Forsyth (512) 471-4557
LATINO FILM FESTIVAL New York Oct. 18-20
New York City’s El Museo del Barrio presents its 5th annual festival featuring films on Latino music and war veterans.
Linda Gross (212) 732-8775
POLICY STUDIES FORUM Claremont, Calif. Oct 19
The Tom&s Rivera Center will present a lecture on Hispanic Link Weekly Report
COMING SOON
HISPANIC EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION DINNER Silver Spring, Md. Oct 22
The Montgomery County government association will honor individuals for their efforts to improve county services to the Hispanic community.
Betty Valdes (301) 840-2515
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE Denver, Colo. Oct 23-26
Gene ChAvez, president of the National Association for Bilingual Education, will address the conference sponsored by the Colorado Association for Bilingual Bicultural Education.
Rudy Ch&vez (303) 492-5416
MEXICAN AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION
Pasadena, Calif. Oct 24,25
The association’s conference will examine correctional
San Antonio, Texas Oct 30- Nov. 1 The National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizations is co-sponsoring the 2nd annual conference on effective psychotherapy. Tina Knoll (512) 226-3391
SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING SYMPOSIUM Williamsburg, Va Oct 31, Nov. 1 The Small Business Administration’s symposium will discuss topics such as telemarketing, direct mailing, publicity and media usage.
Success’85 1-800-225-2468
MINORITY BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM Denver, Colo. Nov. 4-6
The National Cable Television Association will host its 4th annual symposium covering issues such as the software and hardware marketplace, marketing and a cable services mart Ann Dorman (202) 775-36&0
3


Arts & Entertainment
AS HIS LATEST PROJECT CONTINUES A SLOW, CITY-by-city release this week, one of the United States’ most successful Hispanic filmmakers assures that, in spite of recent isolated hits, there is no trend of Latino movies in this country.
“It’s just the expression of very few groups of people who have done it... like an explosion that has to take place,” director Ledn Ichaso said in Los Angeles days before the opening of his Crossover Dreams.
“There’s no trend, because (Dreams star) Ruben Blades and I wouldn’t have done anything for the sake of a trend The reality is that there are very few (Hispanic films made)... they're very sporadic.
“If we count them, there are less than 10 for every 5 years. That’s definitely not a lot, when you realize how much garbage is done every day and put out by serious men.”
Ichaso made his comments to Nina Lenart, one of the hostesses of Alma del Barrio - a weekend salsa program airing on Los Angeles’ KXLU radio station.
Crossover Dreams, which premiered this summer in New York as part of the Metropolitan Museum’s New Directors series, is the latest film by a company of Cuban American filmmakers headed by Ichaso,
producer Manuel Arce and production designer Octavio Soler. Their Max Mambru Films Ltd, an advertising production company, produced the successful 1977 film El super. Co-directed by Ichaso and Orlando Jimenez-Leal, El super won the Grand Prize at both the Biarritz (France) and Mannheim (West Germany) film festivals.
Besides the singing and acting talents of Blades, Crossover Dreams features Hispanic actors Shawn Elliot, Elizabeth Pena and Frank Robles and the music of Andy Gonzalez, Yomo Toro and Virgilio Marti, among others.
Crossover Dreams - the story of a Puerto Rican salsa singer who attempts a “crossover" into the pop music market - is currently playing in New York, Denver, Albuquerque, Miami, Los Angeles and Washington, D.G. The film opens Oct. 18 in El Paso and Portland, and later this month in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
Blades, whose debut album last year on the Elektra label -Buscando America- won him a 1984 Grammy nomination, appears this month in Sun City, a Manhattan Records 12-inch disc release of an anti-apartheid song (with performers’ royalties going to the Africa Fund administered by the American Committee for Africa).
The salsero opened Oct. 4 a series of concerts at San Juan’s Centro de Bellas Artes as part of the 4th annual Interamerican Festival of the Arts in Puerto Rico. Another Hispanic star on the Elektra label, Linda Ronstadt, sings Silencios - a single for release this fall - with him.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
RIVERA REPLACEMENT: There is much motion but little visible action in the jockeying to replace Federal Communications Commissioner Henry Rivera, who resigned Sept. 15 to join the Washington law firm of Dow, Lohnes and Albert.
The seat calls for a Democrat or independent and is viewed as a“ minority” opening. Rivera was the first Hispanic to serve on the FCC but there’s no guarantee that he will be followed by a Hispanic.
Among Latinos mentioned as competing for the job are David Ochoa, president of Buena Vision Cable Television in East Los Angeles; Joseph Guzman, a senior attorney with GTE Sprint, and Washington communications lawyers Edwin Lavergne (Finley, Kumbie...) and Steven Peha(Gurman, Kurtis & Blask).
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission:
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at, your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen*Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
NEW NEWSLETTER: “Minorities in the Newspaper Business,” an eight-page newsletter which will publish at least quarterly, was inaugurated last month by the American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation. Fora free copy or to contribute news items, contact Rosalind Stark AN PA Foundation, Box 17407, Dulles Airport,. Washington, D.C. 20041.
BILINGUAL GOOD NEIGHBORS: The Los Angeles Times shared its Mexico earthquake coverage with La Opinion, the city’s Spanish-language daily. In Dallas, Texas, El sol de Texas, a Spanish-language weekly, shared its typesetting equipment with the daily Times-Herald. The Times-Herald offered coverage of the quake bilingually (coordinated by assistant state editor Ernie Sotomayor) - a first.
CORPUS CHRISTI CONFERENCE: As many as 100 Texas Latino journalists will gather Oct. 19 in Corpus Christi for their first statewide meeting. The one-day conference,
initiated by Victor Vazquez, Region V representative for the National Association of H ispanic Journalists, includes a home-barbecue sponsored by the Tony Bonilla-led National Hispanic Leadership Conference. Helping coordinate the sessions are Noelia Rodriguez of Corpus Christi’s KRIS-TV and George Gongora of the city’s Caller-Times. They’re forming a Hispanic journalists association there.
HITN HITS BACK: Jose Luis Rodriguez, president of the Hispanic Information and Telecommunications Network, charged in the Oct. 1 Village Voice that the Public Broadcasting Service is trying to block HITN’s educational network applications with the FCC because PBS has plans for one of its own. PBS devotes 0.13% of its broadcast time to Hispanics, he complained.
Alberto Cappas, director of communications for the New York State Division of Youth, has joined HITN’s program advisory committee.
- Charlie Ericksen
4
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f'<> 0'L r1 l.r"'9 y " Making The News This Weel.t Ffrench in a Washington, D . C . , press ceremony. The money represents efforts of 40 LULAC councils in Texas, California, Iowa, Missouri and Florida, with all 400 councils now joining in the continuing campaign, Moran pledges ... San Antonio School District Board President Oscar Hernandez becomes the first Hispanic to serve as president of the Texas Association of School Boards, an organization representing more than 1 ,000 school boards in the state . . . Jose de Santiago, president of Desco Steel Products in Houston, Texas, is honored as the Small Business Administration' s National Minority Small Business Person of the Year by Vice President George Bush in a ceremony at the White House Oct. 9 as part of Minority Enterprise Development Week . . Dau, Walker, and Associates, a Hispanic women-owned international mana _gement consulting firm in Washington , D .C., is selected by the Department of Labor as minority contractor of the year . . . U .S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin is reported rece i ving support from President Reagan ' s kitchen cabinet as the man some of its members want to see take on U.S . Senator Alan Cranston of California in 1986 .... And the name of California physician Tirso del Junco, an early and effective Reagan backer, is among those mentioned as candidates for Secretary of Health and Human Services, following the departure of Margaret Heckler, who was moved to ambassador to Ireland. . . Irate at Education Secretary William Bennett's attack on bilingual education , National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre has written the president suggesting that Bennett be "promoted to ambassador to Antarctica . " ... League of United Latin American Citizens President Oscar Moran presents a $50,000 earthquake relief check to Mexico Embassy representative 3!!No!!. o.t•• , ... LULAC's New Focus: Dropouts Snyder Quits LA. Council Los Angeles City Councilman Arthur Snyder resigned from office Oct. 4, opening the way for Latino representation in the city's most heavily Hispanic district. Snyder, 52, a councilman representing the 14th district, which is 75% Hispanic , said he was stepping down to return to his law practice. His resignation, after 18 years in office, was eagerly awaited by four His panics in the district who have expressed a desire to run for the seat. The City Council has tentatively set Dec . 1 0 as the date for the election. If no candidate gains a majority, a run-off would be scheduled for early next year. Some contenders criticized the scheduling of the election at such an early date, saying it favors the well-financed candidacy of Democratic Assemblyman Richard Alatorre, whom Snyder has endorsed. The other Hispanic candidates are: Antonio Rodriguez, executive director of the Los Angeles Center for Law and Justice; urban planner Steve Rodriguez and Gilbert Avila, former aide to Gov . George Deukmejian . Tijerina May Quit The founder of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund is considering resigning as associate justice of Texas' Fourth Court of Appeals in San Antonio for health reasons . But Pete Tijerina, 63, who was elected to the position in 1982, has not set the date of Nov. 1 to leave public service , as reported in the press there. Tijerina underwent open heart surgery in 1981 and recently had other related medical problems that could require additional hos pitalization. A graduate of St. Mary's University School of Law in San Antonio, Tijerina was born in Laredo, Texas . He launched MALDEF in 1967 after obtaining a $2. 2 million grant from the Ford Foundation for. that purpose. He served as its president until 1970, when MALDEF mo_ved to San Francisco. Choosing to remain in Texas, he returned to private practice. Hispanic student dropout rates-higher than 50% in many communitieswill be the prime target of the League of United Latin American Citizens in the months ahead, LULACs Board of Directors decided at their annual Washington, D.C. , meeting Oct. 4-6. According to Cruz Chavira, special assistant to President Oscar Moran, LULAC has been meeting with representatives of some of the nation's major corporations to gain support for an all out offensive on the educational problems of Hispanic youth . Within the next three months, he expects that the organization will be able to announce major private support for an effort " equal in dimension to the 'Little School of 400', " a preschool project launched by LULAC in Houston in 1957 which grew to become a model for the federal Project Head Start. Los Angeles, El Paso and San Antonio are under consideration for a pilot effort, Chavira said, adding that he hoped the program could spread to the Midwest and East , too. During their Washington deliberations, LU LAC ' s leaders showed general support for the programs and low-key style of Moran, a San Antonio insurance analyst, as he com pleted his first 100 days as their president. The board heard from Executive Director Joe Trevino that all 56 constitutional amend ments supported by the national assembly in Baca in Mayoral Runoff Jim Baca and Ken Shultz will meet in a runoff election next month to decide who will become Albuquerque, New Mexico's next mayor following elections there Oct. 8 in which neither garnered a majority . Shultz, a City Council member and Albuquerque car dealer, received 29. 5% of the vote or 21,682. Baca, who took a leave of absence from his position as state land commissioner, received 28.7% or 21,095. The City Council will set a date for the November runoff, expected in mid-month. Should Baca win, he would become the "Duke City's" first Hispanic mayor. Pat Baca was the only Hispanic re-elected to the City Council. Anaheim l.ast June have since been ratified by a majority of LU LAC 's400 councils nation wide. It incorporated them formally into the organization ' s constitution. Most of the changes involve non-controversial streamlining . One raises the annual charter fee for councils from $12 to $1 00. Another extends the time national elected and appointed officers may serve in one office from two to four years. Officers are elected for one-year terms. Moran and past presidents of LULAC would now be eligible to serve a total of four years, Trevino said . Next . elections will be conducted during its annual convention set for Las Vegas , Nev. , July 9-continued on page 2 Guzman Suffers Stroke Ralph Guzman, the nation's highest placed Hispanic in the U.S. State Department during the Carter Administration, suffered a serious stroke at home in Santa Cruz, Calif . , Oct. 6 . At press time Oct. 1 0, he r emained on life support systems in very critical condition in that city's Dominican Hospital. Guzman, 59, served as Deputy AssistaAt Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs in 1978 and 1979. He then returned to the University of California system, where he 1 was appointed Provost of Merrill College in Santa Cruz by the State Board of Regents in 1982. Last year, he took a sabbatical from the post to research and write. At the time of his stroke, he was teaching one course in political science, his specialty, at the univers ity. Born in Morole6n, Guanajuato, Mexico, Guzman came to the United States at age5 with his mother to join his father, a coal miner in Picton, Colorado. When the mines closed, the family worked as mig rant farm laborers throughout the Southwest. After service in World War II, Guzman became a U.S. citizen and went on to graduate from East Los Angeles Junior Collegeand California State University at Los Angeles before earned his doctorate at UCLA.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua such hyperbole by the U.S. press bothered him. No, he responded; the U.S. press was "quite fair"-particularly when measured against the media in Europe. According to the latter, he said, "Mexico City disappeared from the map." RICHARDSON FOR PREZ? The five-column, Page 1 headline in the Santa Fe daily New Mexican read: "RICHARDSON: HISPANIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE?" Next to it was a picture of U.S. Rep. Wittiam Richardson deep in conversation with Colorado's ambitious Sen. Gary Hart. TURNING TO VASTWASTELAND: Newspaper reporters don't have to pronounce names correctlyjust spell them right. (Mexicds press minister's name is spelled F+r-e-n-c-h, by the way . ) To find out when the dimpled second-term New Mexico congressman planned to announce for the White House, we read on. And on . And on until we reached the penultimate paragraph on the jump page. And maybe we could forgive Meryl Comer, moderator of the syndicated television show, "lfs Your Business," if she had mispronounced guest Richard Fajardo's name. On the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's immigration debate aired by 150 stations nationwide Oct. 6, she did just fine with the director of MALDEPs Washington office, Fa-HARD-oh. "Richardson," it finally told us, "yearns for the day when the United States will be talking about a Hispanic presidential candidate." MORE HEADUNE HYPERBOLE: The Miami Herald cried "MEXICO CITY IN RUINS." The Washington Times shrieked: "MEXICO CITY IN CHAOS." The name that threw her for a loop was MarTEEN-es. As in U.S. Rep. Matthew (Marty) Martinez. Scare headlines by the U.S. press caused much unnecessary and unfounded fear among U.S. Hispanics with families in Mexicds capital The truth is that only 1.5% of the city's metropolitan area was badly affected by the disaster, and the resilient city is now welcoming much-needed tourism as it recovers from the earthquakes which killed more than 5,000 of the city's 17 million inhabitants last month. Before the taped show, she practiced and practiced and seemed to have it right But she blew it twice when she introduced the California congressman when the cameras were rolling. Mar-tin-EZ. So they tried . The third time she made it okay past the introductions, but as the debate went on, again and again she lapsed back into Mar-tin-EZ. Oh,well, NBC. TVs Connie Chung was talking about the flood in Leonardo Ffrench, Mexico's minister for press and public affairs, was asked at a LULAC news conference in Washington, D.C., Oct 7 whether one-syllable PONCE, Puerto Rico, last week. Kay Barbaro Sedillo Has Heart Attack Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the National Catholic Conference since its formation in 1971, suffered a heart attack Oct. 3 , but is expected to make a full recovery. Sedillo, 50, was striken while attending a meeting of the secretariafs national advisory committee in Kenmore, Wash. A native of Wagon Mound, he resides in Springfield, Va. A hospital spokesperson described his attack as a" small one" and projected that it would be about a month before he could return to work at the secretariat office in Washington, D.C. Student Transfer Plan Set The public school systems of New York and Puerto Rico will implement a coordination project in November to facilitate the transfer of approximately 1 0,000 students who move within the two systems each year. Awilda Aponte, Puerto Rico's education secretary, and Nathan Quinones, chancellor of the New York City school system, said alan Oct. 8 press conference that the new project will help curtail the dropout rate among trans ferring students. They noted that, presently, transfer students are subject to improper grade demotions and course repetition due to lack of information and coordination between the two school systems. The new project, to be tested for two years, will use "educational transfer passports'' for students in grades 7 to 12. The "passports" will provide school administrators with infor mation on the students' personal and academic background. They will be for use at the dis cretion of school principals and counselors. The project is the result of a year of consul tations involving both systems. It is sponsored by the College B6ard with a grant from the Ford Foundation 2 DOJ Appeals MALDEF Injunction The U . S . Department of Justice joined Oct. 7 the state of Texas in appealing a U.S. District Court injunction that prohibits the use of the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PST-P) as an admissions standard for college students entering education courses this fall. SAVE Tested in Texas A test program aimed at verifying the legal U.S. residency status of unemployment benefit applicants started Oct. 1 in Houston, Texas. Workers identified as undocumented are denied benefits. The 60-day program, overseen by the Texas Employment Commission in conjunction with the Immigration and Naturalization Service, is being implemented at three Houston TEC offices. Called Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlement, or SAVE, it was made possible by the recent computerization of INS files. Four states already have the program Colorado, Illinois, Florida, and California . Although different versions of the concept have been used, SAVE is a little over a year old, said Verne Jervis, public information officer . with the INS in Washington, D.C. This type of program has "been done on an ad hoc basis for at least six or seven years," said Jervis . Bomb Plotters Sentenced Three suspected members of the Armed Forces of National Liberation, FALN, were sentenced Oct. 4 to 35-year prison terms for plotting to bomb two military installations . in 1983. Sentenced in Chicago U.S. District Court 1 were Alejandrina Torres, Edwin Cortes and Alberto Rodriguez. A fourth defendant, Jose Luis Rodriguez, received a suspended sentence and five years probation. The group was charged with planning to bomb a Marine training center and an Army Reserve center in Chicago. Neither was bombed The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and other civil rights groups were granted the injunction Aug. 28. They alleged that the test went against a court decree resulting from a 1970 lawsuit brought by the Justice Department against the Texas school system. Explaining the departmenfs decision to enter the case, Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds said that the reasoning behind the injunction was legally incorrect and that it should be overturned because it "epitomized the practice of using double standards" in minority students' education. If the injunction is lifted, 2 ,000 minority students who are now enrolled in education courses in Texas would be prevented from putsuing teaching degrees, MALDEF said The injunction does not invalidate the test itself . To become certified teachers in Texas, students must still pass it In the past, failure rate on it was 66% for Hispanics, 78% for blacks, and 27% for Anglos. The MALDEF challenge of the test is scheduled for trial in February. . LULAC Tackles Dropouts continued from page 1 13. Conventions the following two years are in Corpus Christi and Dallas, Texas. Moran added membership services and financial management to his office's responsi bilities. Executive Director Trevino will continue to serve as congressional liaison in Washington, D.C., and to supervise such funded LULAC programs as the Latin America education project, the English-only project and the national health fair program. . During his first hundred days in office, Moran said he was on the road, visiting LU LAC councils, about 80% of the time. He visited governors to discuss LULAC projects and goals in such states as California, Iowa, Colorado and Arizona, and talked with several members of Congress during his Washington visit. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS EDITING INTERNSHI. PS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund is CORPORATE CLASSIFIE. DS offering 60 in te rnsh ips -work/ study/ aid packages worth about 1 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;; $6,000 each-for college juniors and seniors. The programs include 11 paid summer jobs. Deadline to request applications: Oct. 31; to. return them, Nov. 28. Request from The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P.O . Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. CENSUS CATALOG: The Census Bureau's 1985 catalog is designed to help people understand and locate data available from the bureau. Copies of the 358-page catalog are available for $13 (prepaid orders only). Order GPO stock number003-024-06331-0 from Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. MODEL AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PLAN: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has developed a comprehensive model affirmative action plan for use by employers in establishing their own guidelines. The 65-page documentfeatures details on recruitment, seniority, citizenship and anti-discrimination policies. Copies are $10. Contact: Theresa Bustillos, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 629-2512. COMMUNITY ARTS SERVICES GRANTS: The Manhattan Community Arts Fund will distribute $47,000 in grants of $3,000 or less to community arts organizations in the city which provide services at the local level. For more information and applications, contact Jane Delgado, The.Association of Hispanic Arts, 200 East 87 St., New York, N .Y. 10028 (212) 369-7054. CIVIL RIGHTS INFORMATION: The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases reports on a ongoing basis. The reports and a "Catalog of Publications'' listing them are free . Contact U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Distribution Center, 621 North Payne St, Alexandria, Va 22314. Free subscription to the Commission's monthly newsletter, Civil Rights Update, may be obtained by writing the same office. ENERGY INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSE: The Department of Energy has opened the National Minority Energy Information Clearing house, a center for information about energy programs and their impact on minority businesses and educational institutions. A variety of referral services are provided. Contact National Minority Energy Information Clearinghouse, Office of Minority Economic Impact, Energy Department, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 5&11 0, Washington, D.C. 20585 (202) 252-5876. WEEKLY REPORT FOR CONFERENCES: Current editions of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be obtained in bulk for inclusion in participants' packets at conventions and conferences. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Calendar PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. . Mail or phone you.r corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (En Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same we. ek. Ad rates: 75 cents per. word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. SERJOBS FOR PROGRESS, INC., National Office in Dallas, Texas. is seeking a vice president for corporate resource development. The successful candidate should have a bachelo( s degree, executive level experience and proven management skills. Corporate communications and/or marketing background a plus. SER provides management and technical assistance to a network of employment training centers across the country. Salary will be com mensurate with experience . Resumes are • due by Oct 15 and should be addressed to Rolando Esparza, President, SERJobs for Progress, Inc., 1355 Riverbend Rd., Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75247. N.A.H.J. EDUCATION SPECIALIST The National Association of Hispanic Journalists. based in Washington, D.C., seeks someone to develop and implement educational activities for Hispanics nationally. Salary is $22,000-$25,000. Candidate must have: e 2 years ofexperienceteaching(orworking with) students. e Educational background plus on-the-job experience in print or broadcast journalism. e Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verl>al. • Willingness to travel e Good speaking ab i lity and presentation of self. e Knowledge of the East Coast educational .wstems. including journalism schools and .,_ _____________ (especiaiM the"Hispanic experience" in colleges PART TIME SECRETARY, Old Town Alexandria, Virginia Nat i onal human services organization is seeking a part time bilingual secretary for its human resources department Candidate must be fluent in Spanish/English and will perform a variety of clerical support functions requi r ing 50 wpm typing skills. dic tation or 80 words per minute shorthand. Some word processing experience would be a plus. We otter competitive salary benefits package and convenient parking. Qualified candidates may call for consideration at (703) 838 between9:00 am. and4:30.p.m. Mondaythru Fri . day. ENTRY LEVEL Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse . for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltran (213) 7 43 7158. ' D .C., has prerecorded job listings, updated • Mondays, for positions at the university . Call (202) 635-LAND. and high schools in the East • Good interpersonal skills. Send resume ta Frank Newlon, Ph.D. ExecutNe Director , National Association of Hispanic Journalists. National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington. E>.C. 20045. FACULTY VACANCIES The Department of English at Iowa State Univers ity has six tenure-track positions for the Fall of 1 g86. Applicants must complete all requirementsforPh.D.byMay1986. MLA interview or interview in Ames, Iowa, at applicanfs expense required . All positions listed are available mid-August 1986. Application deadline: Dec.2. Thesixtenure-trackpositions are: Asst. Prof.American Literature; Asst. Prof. -American Literature/Literature by and about Women; Asst Prof.-GreativeWriting(Fiction/ Essays); Asst Prof.-Creative Writing ( Poet..W; As.st Prof.Reading; and Asst Prot.Secondary English Education. Send application letter, vita and dossier (creative writing candidates should also send samples of writing) to: E. Haggard, Chair, Department of English, Iowa State University, 203 Ross Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011 issues and patterns affecting Hispanics. Henry Corrales (213) 620.4675 THIS WEEK COMING SOON HISPANIC PSYCHOTHERAPY CONFERENCE San Antonio, Texas Oct 3(} Nov. 1 LATINOS AND PUBLIC OPINION POLLS Austin, Texas Oct. 18 The Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, is sponsoring this conference that will examine polling agencies and their effectiveness in canvassing Latinos. Elizabeth Forsyth (512) 471-4557 LATINO FILM FESTIVAL New York Oct. 18-20 New York City's El Museo del Barrio presents its 5th annual festival featuring films on Latino music and war veterans . Linda Gross (212) 732 8775 POLICY STUDIES FORUM Claremont, Calif. Oct. 19 The Tomas Rivera Center will present a lecture on Hispanic Link Weekly Report HISPANIC E;MPLOYEES ASSOCIATION DINNER Silver Spring, Md. Oct. 22 The Montgomery County government association wilf honor individuals for their efforts to improve county services to the Hispanic community. Betty Valdes (301) 840-2515 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE Denver, Colo. Oct. 23-26 • Gene Chavez. president of the National Association for Bilingual Education, will address the conference sponsored by the Colorado Association for Bilingual Bicultural Education. Rudy Chavez (303) 492-5416 MEXICAN AMERICAN CORRECTIONALASSOCIATION Pasadena, Calif . Oct 24,25 The association's conference will examine correctional The National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Services Organizations is co-sponsoring the 2nd annual conference on effective psychotherapy. Tina Knoll(512) 226 SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING SYMPOSIUM Williamsburg. Va Oct 31, Nov. 1 The Small Business Administration's symposium will discuss topics such as telemarketing. direct mailing. publicity and media usage. Success '85 1-800-225-2468 MINORITY BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM Denver, Colo. Nov. 4-6 The National Cable)'elevision Association will host its 4th annual symposium covering issues such as the software and hardware marketplace, marketing and a cable services mart. Ann Dorman (20;1) 775-36SO 3

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Arts & Entertainment producer Manuel Arce and production designer Octavio Soler. Their Max Mambru Films Ltd., an advertising production company, produced the successful1977 film El super. Co-directed by lchaso and Orlando Jimenez-Leal, El super won the Grand Prize at both the Biarritz AS HIS LATEST PROJECT CONTINUES A SLOW, CITY-by-city this week, one of the United States' most successful Hispanic filmmakers assures that, in spite of recent isolated hits, there is no trend of Latino movies in this country. . . . . (France) and Mannheim (West Germany) film festivals. Besides the singing and acting talents of Blades, Crossover Dreains features Hispanic actors Shawn Elliot, Elizabeth Pefia and Frank .Robles and the music of Andy Gonzalez, Yomo Toro and Virgilio Marti, among others. "It's just the expression of very few groups of people who have done it. . . like an explosion that has to take place, " director. Ledn lchaso said in Los Angeles days before the opening of his Crossover Droam& . "There's no trend, because (Dreams star) Ruben Blades and 1 wouldn't have done anything for the sake of a trend. The reality is that there are very few(Hispanic films made) . .. they're very sporadic. Crossover Dreams-the story of a Puerto Rican sa/sa singer who attempts a "crossover'' into the pop music market is currently playing in New York, Denver, Albuquerque, Miami, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. The film opens Oct. 18 in El Paso and Portland, and later this month in San Juan, Puerto Rico. "If we count them, there are less than 10 for every 5 years . That's definitely not a lot, when you realize how much garbage is done every Blades , whose debut album last year on the Elektra label -Buscando America-won him a 1984 Gram my nomination, appears this month in Sun City, a Manhattan Records 12-inch disc release of an anti-apartheid song (with performers' royalties going to the Africa Fund administered by the American Committee for Africa). day and put out by serious men." lchaso made his comments to Nina Lenart, one of the hostesses of Alma del Barrio-a weekend salsa program airing on Los Angeles' KXLU radio station. Crossover Dreams, which premiered this summer in New York as part of the Metropolitan Museum's New Directors series, is the latest film by a company of Cuban American filmmakers headed by lchaso, The sa/sere opened Oct. 4 a series of concerts at San Juan's Centro de Bellas Artes as part of the 4th annuallnteramerican Festival of the Arts in Puerto Rico . Another Hispanic star on the Elektra label , Linda Ronstadt , sings Silencios-a single for release this fallwith him. Media Report RIVERA REPLACEMENT: There is much motion but little visible action in the jockeying to replace Federal Communications Com missioner Henry Rivera , who resigned Sept. 15 to join the Washington law firm of Dow, Lohnes and Albert. The seat calls for a Democrat or independent and is viewed as a " minority' ' opening. Rivera was the first Hispanic to serve on the FCC but there's no guarantee that he will be followed by a Hispanic. Among Latinos mentioned as competing for the job are David Ochoa, president of Buena Vision Cable Television in East Los Angeles; Joseph Guzman , a senior attorney with GTE Sprint, and Washington communi cations lawyers Edwin Lavergne (Finley, Kumbie ... ) and Steven Pefia (Gurman, Kurtis & Blask) . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publtcatton of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N. W . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Heclor EricksenMendoza Editor' Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas , Elsa Ericksen Mendoza. No portion of H1spamc Lmk. WeeklyRepor1 maybereproducedor broadcast many form w1thout advance permission. Annual subscription (52 isaues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include lhe late st ed1t io n of H1span ic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference o r convention. F o r details, contact Hector (202) 234737. 4 NEW NEWSLETTER: "Minorities in the Newspaper Business," an eight-page newsletter which will publish at least quarterly, was inaugurated last month by the American Newspaper Publishers Association Foun dation. For a free copy or to contribute news items, contact Rosalind Stark, AN PA Foundation, Box 17 407, Dulles Airport • . Washington, D .C. 20041 ' BILINGUAL GOOD NEIGHBORS: The Los Angeles Times shared its Mexico earthquake coverage with La Opinion, fhe city's Spanish language daily. In Dallas, Texas, El sol de Texas, a Spanish-language weekly, shared its typesetting equipment with the daily Times Herald. The Times-Herald offered coverage of the quake bilingually (coordinated by assis tant state editor Ernie Sotomayor)-a first. CORPUS CHRISTl CONFERENCE: As many as 1 00 Texas Latino journalists wili gather Oct. 19 in Corpus Christi for their first statewide meeting. The one-day conference, THIS IS' I"'Y ANTc;Niq_""' Wl-le)c; jUST "'DtSCO'.'EREi) II-IE UNH'E'P '?lATe; or= .AtiiEP.\CA-Antonio Mejias-Rentas initiated by Victor Vazquez, Region V representa tive for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, includes a home-barbecue sponsored by the Tony Bonilla-led National Hispanic Leadership Conference. Helping coordinate the sessions are Noelia Rodriguez of Corpus Christi's KRI5-TV and George Gongora of the city's Caller-Times. They're forming a Hispanic journalists association there. HITN HITS BACK: Jose Luis Rodriguez, president of the Hispanic Information and Telecommunications Network, charged in the Oct. 1 Village Voice that the Public Broadcasting Service is trying to block HITN's educational network applications with the FCC because PBS has plans for one of its own. PBS devotes 0.13% of its broadcast time to Hispanics, he complained. Alberto Cappas, director of communications for the New York State Division of Youth, has joined HITN ' s program advisory committee. Ch,firfie Ericksen