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Hispanic link weekly report, January 6, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 6, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Roberto Goizueta’s decision to change Coca-Cola’s formula -rescinded following the public’s outcry and criticized as the marketing gaffe of the decade - resulted in the Coke “megabrand” increasing its share of the soft-drink market last year from 39.2% to 40.2%... Anheuser-Busch Inc. announces the signing of Grammy Awardwinning quintet Los Lobos, who will record English and Spanish-language radio commercials for Budweiser beer. The signing marks the first time the brewer has signed with a group to do advertising messages for both markets. . . Cuban composer-lyricist Osvaldo Farres, whose 48-year career included the writing of over 200 songs, including some performed by Nat King Cole and Bing Crosby, dies Dec. 22 at age 83 in North Bergen, N.J_Puerto Rican actor Jose
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Ferrer is among seven individuals honored Jan. 6 with the New York Mayor’s Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture. The biannual awards, established in 1976, are given to creative artists, arts patrons and administrators... The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital in New York names Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) its “Man of the Year" for being instrumental in aiding the hospital New Directions Program, a $100 million modernization plan for the facility. . . Illinois Gov. James Thompson names Raymond Romero, counsel and Midwest director of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, to serve on the state’s Commerce Commission. . . Arthur Gonzales joins First Federal Savings Bank of Arizona as executive vice president and president of Texas operations. . . Clotilde Benitez, director of Washington, D.C.’s S.E.D. Center'(El Centro Hispano de Desarollo Educational) resigns her post following what she termed “a lack of faith” by the agency in her ability to direct it...
(«HISPANjC^N^WEEKLY REPORT 1b) IMBI
House Votes ‘ Pro-Latino’- CEA
W I llw|»yMlvw IV VVUMVII
A special election which could increase Hispanic representation on Chicago’s City Council from one to four members has been set by a federal judge for March 18, with an April 29 runoff vote if needed.
The election, coinciding with the Illinois primary, could make city Latinos a swing power in the running feud between Mayor Harold Washington and anti-administration aldermen, who presently control the council 29-21.
U.S. District Judge Charles Norgle ordered the ballot Dec. 30 to consolidate splintered minority voting strength in the city. Responding to a voting rights suit filed in 1982, he approved new district lines creating three potential new black and three potential new Hispanic districts, retaining but slightly modifying the 31 st ward, now served by Puerto Rican Miguel Santiago.
The new Latino districts:
Ward 22: Incumbent Alderman Frank Stemberk was offered a Cook County Board position by the Democratic Party after he accepted the new district boundaries, which increased Hispanic voting-age population from 57% to 72%.
Ward 25: Incumbent Alderman Vito Marzullo resigned. Hispanics of voting age increased from 58% to 67%.
Ward 26: Incumbent Alderman Michael NardullFs home was removed from the district by the remap. Voting-age Hispanics increased from 56% to 58%.
Hispanic voters dropped slightly, from 57% to 52%, in the 31 st Ward, where Santiago is the incumbent.
Hispanics make up 14% of Chicago’s population. If Hispanic candidates are elected in all four districts, they will represent 8% of the Council’s membership.
With the exception of the immigration bill, the U.S. House of Representatives voted favorably on 20 key bills affecting Hispanics and blacks in 1984, while the Senate, with no Hispanic or black representative, voted favorably on only half of them, an annual ledger which rates Congress’ voting, showed.
Released this week, the 1985 Congressional Education Associates (CEA) ledger rated both chambers on 20 bills vital to Hispanics and blacks during the second session of the 98th Congress.
Maintaining high ratings since the ledger’s first publication in 1982, Hispanic congressmen scored 100%, with the exception of Rep. Manuel Lujan Jr. of New Mexico, who voted “right” - based on CEA’s evaluation of the issues- only 60% of the time. Lujan, the only Republican among Hispanic congressmen, was listed as voting unfavorably on bills relating to educational funds, child nutrition programs, human services cuts and military aid to El Salvador and the Nicaraguan Contras.
In its fourth edition, the CEA Congressional Ledger chose other issues ranging from im-
Massacre Fund Released
Distribution of $500,000 began Dec. 24 to families of the 21 persons killed in the July 1984 shooting by James Huberty at McDonalcfs Restaurant in San Ysidro, Calif. Nineteen of the dead were Hispanic. Huberty was killed by police.
A $1.1 million fund was set up by the McDonald’s Corpi I nitial payments were divided among 53 relatives. Another $110,000 will be split this month among 55 minors involved in the tragedy. The balance will be placed in an interest-bearing account for distribution when the minors reach age 18.
migration, Civil Rights Act amendments and family violence programs to loans for small business and desegregation assistance for schools.
When missed votes were subtracted from the scores, only three Hispanics - Matthew Martinez of California, Henry Gonzalez of Texas and Bill Richardson of New Mexico-recorded 100% ratings. Ninty-five percent scores were given to Reps. Robert Garcia of New York, Edward Roybal of California, E. “Kika” de la Garza and Solomon Ortiz, both of Texas. Albert Bustamante, another Texan who was elected late in 1984, was not included in the voting rating.
The 11 voting Hispanic congressmen-two Latino representatives, one from Puerto Rico
continued on page 2
Latinos in U.S. Military at 3.6%; Officers, 1.5%
Latest Department of Defense figures show Hispanics are serving in the U.S. military at rates substantially below their 6.5% percentage in the civilian work force.
As of Sept. 30, 1985, a total of 76,788 Latinos- 3.6% of all military personnel- were on active duty. The highest percentage, 4.5%, were in the Marines. In each of the other three branches, they accounted for 3.5%.
While a slight increase in Hispanic representation in the officer ranks was recorded, Hispanics still comprised only 1.5% in that category. They made up 3.9% of the enlisted personnel in the nation’s all-volunteer force.
The September report showed further that of the 209,370 women in military service, there were 6,265 Latinas. They made up 3.0% of female personnel-3.2% of the enlisted women and 1.8% of the officers.
Broken down by service, their representation was: Navy and Marines, 3.7%; Air Force, 3.1 %, and Army, 2.3%.
The Department of Defense did not conduct separate counts of Hispanics in the military until 1979. Studies by Hispanic researchers showed, however, that Hispanics did serve and die in disproportionately large numbers in the U.S. military during the Vietnam and Korean wars.
One such study on the Vietnam War found that Hispanos - who made up 27% of the population of New Mexico in 1970 - comprised 69% of its draftees and accounted for 44% of its combat deaths.
HISPANICS IN THE MILITARY On Active Duty as of Sept. 30,1985
Hispanic % of No. &%of No. & % of
Personnel Total Enlisted Pers. Officers
Army 27,188 3.5% 25,823 (3.9%) 1,365 (1.2%)
Navy 19,613 3.5% 18,666 (3.9%) 947 (1.3%)
Air Force 20,884 3.5% 18,745 (3.8%) 2,139 (2.0%)
Marines 9,103 4.5% 8,786 (4.9%) 317 (1.6%)
Total 76,788 3.6% 72,020 (3.9%) 4,768 (1.5%)
Source: Department of Defense - Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart


Sin pelos en la lengua
PATTERNS AND TRENDS: For U.S. Hispanics, 1985 was the year of the ? ? ? ?
From our perch on the eroding banks of the Potomac, where Latinos and Latinas from Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico, Central America and everywhere else flow together, we observed some good and bad flotsam bob into view.
These are some of the trends we noted:
• Using their own resources, national Hispanic advocacy organizations are recovering from their cold-turkey federal support cut-off of the early Reagan years, coming back strong, stable and independent.
• Xenophobia, racism and nativism are becoming more overt.
• Hispanics in Congress, individually and as a group, are gaining muscle - but not enough to stop a bad immigration bill in ’86.
• The national media is starting to give undocumented workersthe “Marielito” treatment - going out of its way to identify wrongdoers prominently as “illegal aliens,” whether their status has anything to do with their alleged transgressions (like winning lotteries) or not.
• The administration is digging tunnels to undermine bilingual education, for motives that are disgustingly political.
• Henry Cisneros is positioning himself artfully to move from San
Antonio City Hall to the Democratic candidacy for vice-president.
Those are for starters. Everyone knows that folks who fish the polluted Potomac too long become afflicted with foggy vision.
So, from your vantage points in the tortilla-baskets of Gringolandia, what did you see? Share your visions with me and I will share them with others.
YES, HISPANICS ARE BORN: Latino readers of the establishment press have for years complained that, based on what you read in the daily press, people with names like L6pez, Corona and Ramirez are never born, never die and never attend social events worthy of note. They just get arrested.
Weekly Report was a target for similar criticism at year’s end - by none other than its own publisher, H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza. Thumbing through our 1985 archives, he observed that readers of Weekly Report must conclude that Hispanic leaders die but are never born.
To help correct the omission, he provided me with the following:
BORN: Cristina Lynn, 8 pounds, 10 ounces, Nov. 5, to Ronda and Hector Ericksen-Mendoza.
To prove that I’m not playing favorities, there’s also:
Maria Lucia, 7 pounds, 14 ounces, Dec. 17, to activist Chicana attorney Linda Hanten and husband, Lupe Pacheco, an administrator with the Washington, D.C., government.
- Kay Barbaro
\
Ledger Rates Congress on 20 Issues
continued from page 1
and one from the Virgin Islands, do not vote-were united against passage of the immigration bill and its employer sanctions amendment, as were the chamber's 21 black members of Congress, with the exception of Maryland Democrat George Mitchell, who voted against the bill’s passage but in favor of sanctions.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1984 never became law because differences in the House and Senate versions were not resolyed in Conference Committee.
High ratings for white congressmen representing areas of Latino concentration may be indicative of the impact of Hispanic voters. In congressional districts with more than 29% Hispanic population, 10 of 12 congressmen scored between 80% and 100%. Bobbi Fiedler of California and Joe Skeen of New Mexico, the only two Republicans in this group, scored 70% and 35%, respectively.
Miami Officers Arrested
Three Hispanics on the Miami police force were arrested and charged Dec. 27 in Miami with first-degree murder and cocaine trafficking following the deaths of three men and the disappearance of more than 300 kilograms of cocaine.
According to a police report, six individuals dressed as police officers entered a boat yard in Miami on July 28 and.approached six other men guarding the drugs. “The approach caused the six guards to jump into the Miami River, causing the death of three of them,” the report read.
Charged were officers Armando Estrada, 26; Roman Rodriguez, 29; and Armando Garda, 23. Two other Miami policemen were also arrested (one on Dec. 30) and charged wth cocaine trafficking, murder conspiracy and aggravated battery. Also arrested were civilians Pedro Baez, 43 (second-degree murder), and Ruben Ortiz, 32 (cocaine trafficking).
Two other former Miami police officers, also Hispanics, were arrested and charged Dec. 26 with stealing 150 pounds from a 1,000-pound cocaine seizure taken in May.
The ratings revealed a pronounced difference along party lines, with Democrats showing more support for Hispanic interests and issues In the Senate, 15 Democrats earned 100% (discounting missed votes), while 82% was the highest score earned by a Republican. The lowest rating for a Democrat was 50% - by Sen. Edward Zorinsky of Nebraska - while Republican Sen. John East of North Carolina scorest the lowest (15%), followed by fellow Republicans Jeremiah Denton of Alabama, Steve Symms of Idaho and Don Nickles of Oklahoma, all with 20% scores.
Among House Democrats, G.V. “Sonny” Montgomery of Mississippi scored the lowest (26% if missed votes are discounted). Republicans Williams Dannemeyer of California and Robert Smith of Oregon recorded zeros, followed by Norman Shumway of New York, Dan Lungren of California, Philip Crane of Illinois and Howard Nielson of Utah, all 5%.
The 126-page voting report is compiled annually by CEA, a private minority consulting firm based in Washington, D.C.
- Dora Delgado
MECHA on Move Again
The California student organization Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MECHA) has started petition drives and other actions, including injunctions to push for equal Latino access to that state’s college and university systems.
The organization, vocal and influential in the ’60s, has been revived in recent months in response to falling Hispanic enrollment in California’s higher educational institutions and threatened tougher college entry standards.
A statewide meeting at the University of California, Northridge, attracted 450 students from 22 higher education institutions and three high schools Nov. 23. It was followed by a regional conference Dec. 21.
According to MECHA spokesperson Stephanie Lopez, a high school student outreach program, manned by MECHA members* will start Feb 1. The program, called Escalera, will be headquartered in Rancho Santiago Community College in Santa Ana.
She said that the organization is also planning a mid-February rally in the state capital, Sacramento.
LA. Tapeworm Increase
A total of 497 cases of cysticercosis - a potentially fatal tapeworm infection - were treated between 1973 and 1983 in four Los Angeles hospitals, the Dec. 27 edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association reported. Ninety-five percent of the cases involved Hispanics.
Centers for Disease Control doctors attributed 11 deaths to the infection and noted an increase in the disease, also found in other U.S.- Mexico border regions* paralleling increased immigration from Latin America.
The tapeworm, common in pigs, enters human systems through contaminated food and water. It works its way into heart, brain, liver and other tissues, causing headaches, seizures and other neurological reactions.
The condition accounts for 9% of the neurological cases in Mexico and is treatable, the doctors reported. They said that 12 of the Los Angeles victims had not lived or traveled south of the border.
Chicago Deseg. Aided
The U.S. Department of Education was ordered Dec. 23 by Federal Judge Marvin Aspen to pay the Chicago Board of Education $88 million in the next five years for desegregation assistance.
The federal government agreed to pay $5.7 million - in part for bilingual education -within 45 days, but said it will appeal Aspen’s decision. The ruling resulted from a 1980 consent decree on desegregation.
“We’re happy that the judge finally has tried to wind this down to hard numbers,” Board Chairman George Munoz told reporters.
S. F. Declares Sanctuary
San Francisco joined a growing list of U.S. cities Dec. 23 when its Board of Supervisors voted 8-3 to declare the city a sanctuary for Salvadoran and Guatemalan refugees.
The vote, largely symbolic and not carrying the force of law, encourages city employees not to turn in “law-abiding refugees.”
Among other cities which have declared sanctuary are Los Angeles, Berkeley, Sacramento, New York and Cambridge, Mass.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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THE GOOD NEWS
CONGRESSIONAL VOTING RECORD: The CEA Congressional Ledger 1985 is a 126-page report that rates the voting performance of members of Congress on 20 issues, or bills, of importance to Hispanics and blacks Price: 1-5 copies, $8 each; 6-24, $7 each; 25-99, $6 each; 100-300, $5 each. Call for prices on orders over 300. Include $2 for shipping and handling and mail to: Congressional Education Association, P.O. Box2996, Washington, D.C. 20013(202) 547-9000.
TAPEWORM STUDY: Copies of the Dec. 27 edition of the Journal of the American Medicaj'Association’s article “Cysticercosis in Los Angeles County" are available free by writing to: James Stacey, AM A, 535 North Dearborn, Chicago, III. 60610 (312) 645-4417.
EEOC FACT SHEETS: The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has published fact sheets on “National Origin,” “Age Discrimination and Employment Act,” “The Equal Pay Act ” “Title VII” (of the Civil Rights Act of 1964) and instructions on “Filing a charge.” The latter four are available in Spanish. Also available is the EEOC poster, required of employers by law, which describes rights under Title VII. Request free copies from your local EEOC office or from Publications Unit, EEOC, 2401 E St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 634-6922.
BENEFIT PROGRAMS: The General Accounting Office has published “Federal Benefit Programs: A Profile, ” which describes 150 federal benefit programs providing cash or non-cash assistance. For a free copy indicate Acc. No. 128233 (GAO/H RD-86-14), Oct. 14. Contact: GAO, Document Handling and Information Services Facility, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
CANCER PREVENTION: The American Cancer Society has issued two pamphlets in Spanish: “Tomando el Controloutlining ten steps for cancer prevention, and “La Nutricion y el Cancer, Cuestion de Sentido Comun," listing nutritional guidelines for cancer prevention. For free copies contact: Susan Hernandez, American Cancer Society, 4 West 35th St.,New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 736-3030.
CALIFORNIA HISPANICS: The Population Reference Bureau has published “Population Change and California’s Future,” which includes data on the growth of the state’s Hispanic population. Price: $10, (orders of $20 or less must be prepaid with $1 for postage and handling.) Contact: Circulation Department, Population Reference Bureau, P.O. Box 35012, Washington, D.C. 20013 (202) 785-4664.
ENERGY INDUSTRY OPPORTUNITIES: The Office of Minority Economic I mpact of the Department of Energy released “A Resource Guide for Small Minority-Owned Energy Business,” a guide listing opportunities in various segments of the energy industry for minority entrepreneurs. Free copies of the two-volume guide are available from: National Minority Energy Information Clearinghouse, Office of Minority Economic Impact, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. 20805 (202) 252-5876.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let H ispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234*0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS The Alabama Education Association seeks a director of Public Relations. Position vacant January 1. Starting Salary is $28,075. For further information contact Mike Martin, Division Director of Public Relations, Alabama Education Association, P.O. Box 4177, Montgomery, Alabama 36195.
DIRECTOR
. OF ADMINISTRATION Responsible foroverallfinancial management including: Planning, forecasting, budgeting, accounting, quality control, investments, audits, reporting and fiscal analysis In-depth experience in office automation required. Seeking someone who will build a strong, service-oriented department.
$31,000 - $33,000. Send resume and references to: Executive Director, American Society for Public Administration, 1120 G St. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20005 by Jan. 20.
WRITER/EDITOR, DS-1082-9 Government of
The District of Columbia Serves with the Publication and Information Branch, and performs the following duties: Assists in writing or editing budgetary reports and materials for publication; assists in editing District agency budget justifications in preparation for their submission to the Council, Congress and the President for review and approval; assists in preparing press releases, feature news articles and presentations about the budget process for use at community meetings.
EXPERIENCE: Five years experience in specialized writing or editing articles, speeches, pamphlets, or news releases designed for publication in such media as the daily or weekly press, general, scientific, technical or trade magazines.
HOW TO APPLY: All applicants must submit a completed SF-171 to: D.C. Office of Personnel, Servicing Personnel Office #4, EOM Personnel Unit, Room 218,1350 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20004.
INDIANA UNIVERSITY, Bloomington, is seeking a senior administrator to serve as Dean for Women’s Affairs beginning July 1, 1986. The Dean for Women’s Affairs is an advocate for women in matters of equity and reports directly to the Vice-President, the chief administrator of IUB. The appointment is 3/4 time, with 1/4 time teaching. Candidate must be eligible for tenure in an academic discipline presently existing at Indiana University, Bloomington.
QUALIFICATIONS:
1. Demonstrated commitment to principles of equality in the university with particular reference to women.
2. Demonstrated ability to relate to and work effectively with a wide range of persons: faculty, students, staff, administrators, and the general public.
3. Demonstrated ability to create and to implement innovative programs.
4. Established research reputation. Salary commensurate with qualifications INTERVIEWS WILL BEGIN MARCH 3, 1986.
Applicants should send a letter of application, vita and three letters of recommendation to: Professor Phyllis R. Klotman, Chair, Search and Screen Committee for Dean for Women’s Affairs, Memorial Hall East M27, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington, D.C. based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link.(202) 234-0737.
GLOMB, HANTEN & BACA LAW FIRM: Immigration-civil litigation - commercial law-employment law - federal agency practice. 1815 H St. NW, Suite 1000, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 466-2250.
Calendar
COMING SOON
BILINGUAL EDUCATION San Francisco Jan. 15-18
The California Association for Bilingual Education is sponsoring a conference with workshop sessions including primary language education and the dropout rate.
Mary Jew (415) 239-0295
CONGRESSMAN GONZALEZ TRIBUTE San Antonio Jan. 18
New York Gov. Mario Cuomo will keynote a banquet in recognition of Rep. Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas), beginning his 25th year in Congress.
Gail Beagle (202) 225-3236
HISPANIC ENTREPRENEURS Washington, D.C. Jan. 22
The 1 st General Assembly of Hispanic Entrepreneurs by the Ibero American Chamber of Commerce will examine topics such as finance and obtaining federal
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
government contracts.
Lourdes Monzon (202) 296-0335
SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Angeles Jan. 30
The Personnel Management Association of Aztlan is sponsoring its 2nd annual dinner.
Cecilia Alatorre (213) 972-2168
AN PA MINORITIES TASK FORCE Reston, Va. Jan. 30, 31
The American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation’s Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business will elect its leadership and discuss activities for 1986.
Nancy Osborn (703) 648-1000
CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan. 30, 31
Workshop topics for CNPC’s annual conference include media coverage of ethnic events and ethnicity and politics.
Guarione Diaz (305) 642-3484
HISPANIC THEATERS CONFERENCE San Antonio Feb. 7-9
The Conferencia Nacional de Teatros Hispanos, conducted by several regional Hispanic theater groups, looks to establish a national theater circuit
and to showcase Hispanic works.
Mario Sanchez (305) 643-1660 Ext. 156
JOURNALISM JOBS FAIR Los Angeles Feb. 7, 8
The California Chicano News Media Association is sponsoring its 7th annual fair for Hispanics interested in media-related careers.
Connie Rivera (213) 743-7158
SPOTLIGHT
The Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters will hold its convention concurrently with its parent organization, National Religious Broadcasters, Feb. 2-5 in Washington, D.C. Some of the areas to be covered include fund raising, management techniques, improving production and establishing broadcasting ministries For further information call H.O. Espinoza at (512) 824-3322.
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community free of charge. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name of event, date, location, contact person and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report. 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20005.
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Arts & Entertainment
END-OF-THE-YEAR TRADE PUBLICATIONS and national media organizations selected Hispanic entertainers in their “best” lists for 1985.
Actors Raul Julia and William Hurt shared the“best actor'’ award by the National Film Review Board for their performances in Kiss of the Spider Woman - a film based on the novel by Argentine writer Manuel Puig. Hurt was also named “best actor'’ by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, while the Argentine film The Official Story shared “best foreign film” with Japan’s Ran.
a “year in review* article published in music trade magazine Cashbox’s Dec. 28 issue, Peter Holden listed Los Lobos among “artists normally championed as underdogs (who) have been embraced by the music industry at large.” The magazine named Linda Ronstadt one of the year's top five female adult/contemporary recording artists, while Sheila E in Romance 1600 was listed among the 50 top black contemporary albums.
Billboard, another entertainment trade magazine, published its “year-end” charts in its Dec. 28 issue. The magazine named Placido Domingo as 1985’s top classical artist Three of his albums were ranked 3rd, 12th and 23rd among the year’s top 25 classical
recordings. Domingo’s recording of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Requiem also placed 5th among top compact disc classical recordings.
Latinos had three of the top 50 jazz albums - Linda Ronstadt*s Lush Life (ranked 28th), Tania Maria’s Made in New York (29th), and Dave Valentin’s Jungle Garden (45th). Brazilian Tania Maria was named among the top 25 jazz album artists.
In pop music categories, a single album by a Latino act made the year's top 100. Los Lobos’ How Will the Wolf Survive ranked 94th. Ronstadt, Sheila E and Julio Iglesias made the top 100 album artists list; Sheila E was also included among top pop singles female artists (ranked 17th) and top pop album female artists (10th) along with Suzanne Vega (19th). Julio Iglesias came in at No. 25 among the top album male artists, and Sidewalk Talk, a recording by Jellybean Benitez, placed as the 20th top dance club play album or single.
Billboard’s year-end charts are compiled based on the magazine’s weekly charts during the November 1984 through November 1985 period. No Latin music charts were published this year due to a new ranking format implemented by the magazine in July.
Two U.S. Hispanic recordings were listed among the top 10 songs of 1985 in a list compiled by Latin American entertainment correspondents for United Press International. The Hermanos recording of Cantare, cantaras placed 7th, followed by Miami Sound Machine’s Conga-artists from Spain and throughout the continent placed in all of the s*°fs- - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report ]
ADVERTISING CONTRACTS: La Vardad\ and La Nacidn, described by The Miami! Herald as two of Miami’s shrillest anti-Castro tabloids, will share in $250,000 city legal advertising revenues in 1986.
New Mayor Xavier Su&rez, a frequent past target of La Verdad (along with ex-Mayor Maurice Ferr6), told the Herald that the awards! to the Spanish-language weeklies were “patronage” and that he opposes the La Verdad contract because of the “vulgar language'* it uses.
Neither paper applied for the advertising rights, but were selected by a 4-1 City Commission vote over Patna, which had received $9,000 in city ad revenues last year and had applied again. Commissioners Joe Carollo led the “pro” voters; Suarez cast the lone “no” vote.
Other publications sharing in the revenues will be The Miami Herald, the Miami Times, the Miami Review and Diario las Americas.
EXCELLENCE AWARD: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists inaugurates its$1,000 journalism excellence award in 1986.
The prize, honoring octogenarian international columnist Guillermo Martfnez-Marquez, will be presented at the NAHJ-sponsored National Hispanic Media Conference, set for Miami April 23-26. Cuba-born Martinez-Marquez now writes out of Miami.
The award will be presented for the best news story or series- print, radio or television - in 1985 by a U.S. Hispanic journalist. Submission deadline is Feb. 15. For details, contact Frank Newton, NAHJ, National Press Building Suite634,52914th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE: The school of Communications at Washington, D.C.’s, Howard University will conduct its 15th annual Communications Conference Feb. 13-16, measuring “Communications: A Key to Economic and Political Change.”
For information, contact its coordinator, Oscar Gandy, School of Communications,
Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059 (202) 636-7491.
MEXICO’S QUAKES: National Public Radio will air the Jose McMurray half-hour bilingual documentary “Mexico: The Earthquake” on Feb. 28. Part of NPR’s Latino series, it examines how the city is coping after the two September jolts which killed 7,000 people.
“The Mexican people lost lives and they lost homes, but they never lost their spirit, reflects McMurray.
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Rick Lozano, sportscaster for KMOL-TV in San Antonio, moves to Los Angeles’ KABC-TV in February ... Linda Rios Brooks is promoted from vice president of San Antonio’s KENS-TV to president and general manager... Lee Llambelis joins the office of New York Mayor Ed Koch as press aide... Former Southern California journalist Chuck Halloran- Los Angeles Times, Orange Country Register - has joined San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and the Institute for American Studies there to help research and write on South Texas’ longterm economic growth policies...
- Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P&rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
ABOUT THE ARTIST
Esteban E. Torres, first elected to Congress on Nov. 2, 1982, serves in the U.S. House of Representatives for California’s 34th District
He is also a gifted artist In fact, he studied to become a commercial artist when he entered East Los Angeles Community College in the late 1950s. He went on to gain a bachelors degree from California State University, Los Angeles, and study economics at the University of Maryland and international labor at American University in Washington, D.C.
This drawing was made for his campaign contributors.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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( 719861 . . Making The News 1(his Week Ferrer is among seven individuals honored Jan. 6 with the New York Mayor's Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture. !he biannual awards, established in 1976, are given to creat1ve art1sts , arts patrons and administrators ... The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital in New York names Rep . Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) its "Man of the Year'' for being instrumental in aiding the hospitars New Directions Program, a$100 million modernization plan for the facility . . . Illinois Gov. James Thompson names Raymond Romero, counsel and Midwest director of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund , to serve on the state's Commerce Commission. . . Arthur Gonzales joins First Federal Savings Bank of Arizona as executive vice president and president of Texas operations. . . Clotilde Benitez, director of Washington, D.C.'s S.E.D. Center (EI Centro Hispano de Desarollo Educational) resigns her post following what she termed " a lack of faith" by the agency in her ability to direct it. . . I Roberto Goizueta's decision to change aoca-Cola's formula rescinded following the public's outcry and crit f cized as the marketing gaffe of the decade-resulted in the Coke "megabrand" increasing its share of the soft-drink market last year from 39.2% to 40.2% ... Anheuser-Busch Inc. announces the signing of Grammy Award winning quintet Los Lobos, who will record English and Spanish language radio commercials for Budweiser beer. The signing marks the first time the brewer has signed with a group to do advertising messages for both markets. . . Cuban composer-lyricist Osvaldo Farres, whose 48-year career included t he writing of over 200 songs, including some performed by Nat King Cole and Bing Crosby, dies Dec. 22 at age 83 in North Bergen, N.J .... Puerto Rican actor Jose Voi.4Nol I HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT lli Jan.B.1986 ! I Chicago Voters May Add 3 Hispanics to Council House Votes 'Pro-Latino'-CEA A special election which could increase Hispanic representation on Chicago's City Council from one to four members has been set by a federal judge for March 18, with an Ap ril 29 runoff vote if needed. The election, coinciding with the Illinois primary, could make city Latinos a swing power in the running feud between Mayor Haro ld Washington and anti-administration aldermen, who presently control the council 29-21. U.S. District Judge Charles Norgle ordered t he ballot Dec. 30 to consolidate splintered minor ity voting strength in the city . Responding to a voting rights suit filed in 1982, he approved new district lines creating three potential new black and three potential new Hispanic districts, reta ining but slightly modifying the 31st ward , now served by Puerto Rican Miguel Santiago. The new Latino districts: Ward 22: Incumbent Alderman Frank Stemberk was offered a Cook County Board position by the Democratic Party after he accepted the new district boundaries, which increased Hispanic voting-age population from 57% to 72%. Ward 25: Incumbent Alderman Vito Marzullo resigned. Hispanics of voting age increased from 58% to 67%. Ward 26: Incumbent Alderman Michael Nardullfs home was removed from the district by the remap. Voting-age Hispanics increased from 56% to 58% . Hispanic voters dropped slightly, from 57% to 52%, in the 31st Ward, where Santiago is the incumbent. Hispanics make up 14% of Chicago's population. If Hispanic candidates are elected in aU four districts, they will represent 8% of the Council's membership. With the exception of the immigration bill, the U.S. House of Representatives voted favorably on 20 key bills affecting Hispanics and blacks in 1984, while the Senate, w ith no Hispanic or black representative, voted favorably on only half of them, an annual ledger which rates Congress' voting, showed. Released this week, the 1985 Congressional Education Associates (CEA) ledger rated both cha mbers on 20 bills vital to Hispanics and blacks during t he second session of the 98th Congress . Maintaining high ratings since the ledger's first publication in 1982, Hispanic congressmen scored 1 00%, with the exception of Rep. Manuel Lujan Jr. of New Mexico, who voted "righf'based on CEA's eva luation of the issues-only 60% of the Lujan, the only Republican among Hispanic congressmen, was listed as voting unfavorably on bills relating to educational funds, chi ld nutrition programs , human services cuts and military aid to El Salvador and the Nicaraguan Contras. In its fourth edition, t he CEA Congressional Ledger chose other issues ranging from im-Massacre Fund Released Distribution of $500,000 began Dec . 24 to fam ilies of the 21 persons killed in the July 1984 shooting by James Huberty at McDonald's Restaurant in San Ysidro, Calif. Nineteen of the dead were Hispanic. Huberty was killed by police. A $1.1 million fund was set up by the McDonald's Corp. Initial payments were divided among 53 relatives . Another $110,000 ',\/ill be split this month among 55 minors involved in the tragedy. The balance will be placed in an interest-bearing account for distribution when the minors reach age 18. HISPANICS IN THE MILITARY On Active Duty as of Sept. 30,1985 Hispanic Personnel Army 27,188 Navy 19,613 Air Force 20,884 Marines 9,103 Total 76,788 Source: Department of Defense % of Total 3.5% 3 .5% 3.5% 4.5% 3.6% No. & % of No . & % of Enlisted Pers. Officers 25,823 (3.9%) 1,365 (1. 2%) 18,666 (3 . 9%) 94 7 ( 1 . 3%) 18,7 45 (3.8%) 2,139 (2.0%) 8,786 (4.9%) 317 (1.6%) 72,020 (3.9%) 4,768 (1.5%) -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart migration , Civil Rights Act amendments and family violence programs to loans for small b usin e ss and desegregation assistance for schools. When missed votes were subtracted from the scores, only three Hispanics-Matthew Martinez of California, Henry Gonzalez of Texas and Bill Richardson of New Mexicorecorded 1 OOo/o rati n gs. Ninty-five percent scores were given to Reps. Robert Garcia of New York , Edward Roybal of California, E. "Kika" de Ia Garza and Solomon Ortiz, both of Texas. Albert Bustamante, another Texan who was elected late in 1984 , was not included in the voting rating. The 11 voting Hispanic congressmen-two Latino representatives, one from Puerto Rico continued on page 2 Latinos in U.S. Military at 3.6/o; Officers, 1 .so;o Latest Department of Defense figures show Hispanics are serving in the U.S. military at rates substantially below their6.5o/o percentage in the civilian work force. As of Sept. 30, 1985, a total of 76,788 Latinos-3.6% of all milita ry personnel-were on active duty. The highest percentage, 4.5%, were in the Marines. In each of the other . three branches, they accounted for 3.5%. While a slight increase in Hispanic re presentation in the officer ranks was recorded Hispanics still comprised only 1.5% in that category. They made up 3 . 9% of the enlisted personnel in the nation ' s all-volunteer force. The September report showed further that of the 209,370 women in military service, there were 6,265 Latinas. They made up 3.0% of female personnel-3.2% of the enlisted women and 1.8% of the officers. Broken down by service , their representation was : Navy and Marines, 3.7%; Air Force, 3 . 1 %, and Army, 2 . 3%. The Department of Defense did not conduct separate counts of Hispanics in the military until1979. Studies by Hispanic researchers showed, however, that Hispanics did serve. and die in disproportionately large numbers in the U.S . military during the Vietnam and Korean wars. One such study on the Vietnam War found that Hispanos-who made up 27% of the population of New Mexico in 1970comprised 69% of its draftees and accounted for44o/o of 1ts combat deaths.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Antonio City Halt to the Democratic candidacy for vice-president. Those are for starters. Everyone knows that folks who fish the polluted Potomac too long become afflicted with foggy vision. PATTERNS AND TRENDS: For U.S. Hispanics, 1985 was the year of the? ? ? ? So, from your vantage points in the tortilla-baskets of Gringolandia, what did you see? Share your visions with me and I will share them with others. From our perch on the eroding banks of the Potomac, where Latinos and Latinas from Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico, Central America and everywhere else flow together, we observed some good and bad flotsam bob into view. These are some of the trends we noted: • Using their own resources, national Hispanic advocacy organizations are recovering from their cold-turkey federal support cut-off of the early Reagan years , coming back strong, stable and independent. YES, HISPANICS ARE BORN: Latino readers of the establishment press have for years complained that, based on what you read in the daily press , people with names like L6pez, Corona and Ramirez are never born, never die and never attend social events worthy of note. They just get arrested. • Xenophobia, racism and nativism are becoming more overt. Weekly Report was a target for similar criticism at year's end-by none other than its own publisher, Hector Ericksen-Mendoza. Thumbing through our 1985 archives, he observed that readers of Weekly Report must conclude that His panic leaders die but are never born. • Hispanics in Congress, individually and as a group, are gaining musclebut not enough to stop a bad immigration bill in '86. To help correct the omission, he provided me with the following : • The national media is starting to give undocumented workers the "Marielito" treatment-going out of its way to identify wrongdoers prominently as " illegal aliens," whether their status has anything to do with their alleged transgressions (like winning lotteries) or not. BORN: Cristina Lynn, 8 pounds, 10 ounces, Nov. 5, to Ronda and Hector Ericksen-Mendoza. To prove that I ' m not playing favorities , there' s also : • The administration is digging tunnels to undermine bilingual education, for motives that are disgustingly political. Maria Lucia, 7 pounds, 14 ounces, Dec . 17 , to activist Chicana attorney Linda Hanten and husband, Lupe Pacheco , an administrator with the Washington, D .C., government. • Henry Cisneros is positioning himself artfully to move from San Ledger Rates Congress on 20 Issues continued from page 1 and one from the Virgin Islands , do not votewere united against passage of the immigration bill and its employer sanctions amendment, as were the chamber's 21 black members of Congress, with the exception of Maryland Democrat George Mitchell , who voted against the bill's passage but in favor of sanctions. The tmmigratton Reform and Control Act of 1984 never became taw because differences in the House and Senate versions were not resolved in Conference Committee. High ratings for white congressmen re presenting areas of Latino concentration may be indicative of the impact of Hispanic voters. In congressional districts with more than 29% Hispanic population, 10 of 12 congressmen scored between 80% and 100% . Bobbi Fiedler of California and Joe Skeen of New Mexico,. the only two Republicans in this group, scored 70% and 35%, respectively. 2 Miami Officers Arrested Three Hispanics on the Miami police force were arrested and charged Dec . 27 in Miami with first-degree murder and cocaine trafficking following the deaths of three men and the disappearance of more than 300 kilograms of cocaine. According to a police report, six individuals dressed as police officers entered a boat yard in Miami on July 28 and.approached six other men 9uarding the drugs. "The approach caused the six guards to jump into the Miami River, causing the death of three of them," the report read . Charged were officers Armando Estrada , 26; Roman Rodriguez, 29; and Armando Garcia , 23. Two other Miami policemen were also arrested (one on Dec . 30) and charged wth cocaine trafficking, murder conspiracy and aggravated battery. Also arrested were civilians Pedro Baez , 43 (second-degree murder), and Ruben Ortiz, 32 (cocaine trafficking). Two other former Miami police officers, a lso Hispanics, were arrested and charged Dec. 26 with stealing 150 pounds from a 1,000-pound cocaine seizure taken in May. The ratings revealed a pronounced difference along party lines, with Democrats showing more support for Hispanic interests and issues. In the Senate, 15 Democrats earned 100% (discounting missed votes) , while 82% was the highest score earned by a Republican . The lowest rating for a Democrat was 50% by Sen. Edward Zorinsky of Nebraska -while Republican Sen . John East of North Carolina scores! the lowest (15%), followed by fellow Republicans Jeremiah Denton of Alabama , Steve Symms of Idaho and Don Nickles of Oklahoma, all with 20% scores. Among House Democrats, G . V . "Sonny" Montgomery of Mississippi scored the lowest (26% if missed votes are discounted) . Republicans Williams Dannemeyer of California and Robert Smith of Oregon recorded zeros, followed by Norman Shumway of New York , Dan Lungren of California , Philip Crane of Illinois and Howard Nielson of Utah , all 5% . The 126-page voting report is compiled annually by CEA, a private minority consulting firm based in Washington, D .C. Dora Delgado MECHA on Move Again The California student organization Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MECHA) has started petition drives and other actions, including injunctions to push for equal Latino access to that state's college and university systems . The organization, vocal and influential in the '60s, has been revived in recent months in response to falling Hispanic enrollment in California ' s higher educational institutions and threatened tougher college entry standards. A statewide meeting at the University of California, Northridge , attracted 450 students from 22 higher education institutions and three high schools Nov. 23 . It was followed by a regional conference Dec. 2 1 . According to MECHA spokesperson Stephanie Lopez, a high school student outreach program , manned by MECHA members, will start Feb. 1 . The program , called Escalera, w ill be head quartered in Rancho Santiago Community College in Santa Ana . She said that the organization is a lso plannin g a mid-February ratty in th e state capital, Sacramento. Kay Barbaro LA. Tapeworm Increase A total of 497 cases of cysticercosis • a potentially fatal tapeworm infection-were treated between 1973 and 1983 in four Los Angeles hospitals, the Dec . 27 edition of the Journal of the American Medical ation reported. Ninety-five percent of the cases involved Hispanics. Centers for Disease Control doctors at tributed 11 deaths to the infection and noted an increase in the disease , also found in other U.S. Mexico border regions, paralleling increased immigration from Latin America . The tapeworm, common in pigs, enters human systems through contaminated food and water. It works its way into heart, brain , liver and other tissues, causing headaches, seizures and other neurological reactions. The condition accounts for 9% of the neurological cases in Mexico and is treatable , the doctors reported. They said that 1 2 of the Los Angeles victims had not lived or traveled south of the border. Chicago Deseg. Aided The U.S . Department of Education was ordered Dec. 23 by Federal Judge Ma r vin Aspen to pay the Chicago Board of Education $88 million in the next five years for desegregation assistance. The federal government agreed to pay$5.7 million in part for bilingual education within 45 days , but said it witt appeal Aspen ' s decision. The ruling resulted from a 1980 consent decree on desegregation. " We 're happy that the judge finally has tried to wind this down to hard numbers," Board Chairman George Munoz told reporters . S. F. Declares Sanctuary San Francisco joined a growing list of U . S . cities Dec. 23 when its Board of Supervisors voted 8 3 to declare the city a sanctuary for Salvadoran and Guatemalan refugees. The vote, largel y symbolic and not carrying the force of law , encourages city employees not to turn in "law-abiding refugees. " Among other cities which have declared sanctuary are Los Angeles, Berkeley , Sacramento , New York and Cambridge, Mass. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS CONGRESSIONAL VOTING RECORD: The CEA Congressional Ledger 1985 is a 126-page report that rates the voting performance of members of Congress on 20 issues, or bills, of importance to Hispanics and blacks. Price: 1-5 copies, $8 each; 6-24, $7 each; 25-99, $6 each; 100-300, $5 each. Call for prices on orders over 300. Include $2 for shipping and handling and mail to: Congressional Education Association, P.O. Box 2996, Washington, D.C. 20013 (202) 547-9000. TAPEWORM STUDY: Copies of the Dec. 27 edition of the Journal of the American Medica! •Association's article "Cysticercosis in Los Angeles County'' are available free by writing to: James Stacey, AMA, 535 North Dearborn, Chicago, Ill . 60610 (312) 645-4417. . EEOC FACT SHEETS: The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has published fact sheets on" National Origin," "Age Discrimination and Employment Act," "The Equal Pay Act" "Title VII" (of the Civil Rights Act of 1964) and instructions on " Filing a charge." The latter four are available in Spanish. Also available is the EEOC poster, required of employers by law, which describes rights under Title VII. Request free copies from your local EEOC office or from Publications Unit, EEOC, 2401 ESt. NW, Washington, D .C. 20506 (202) 634-6922. BENEFIT PROGRAMS: The General Accounting Office has published "Federal Benefit Programs: A Profile," which describes 150 federal benefit programs providing cash or non-cash assistance. For a free copy indicate Ace . No. 128233 (GAO/HRD-86-14). Oct. 14. Contact: GAO, Document Handling and Information Services Facility, P.O . Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241. CANCER PREVENTION: The American Cancer Society has issued two pamphlets in Spanish: "Tomando el Control, " outlining ten steps for cancer prevention. and " La Nutrici6n y el Cancer. Cuesti6n de Sentido Comun," listing nutritional guidelines for cancer prevention . For free copies contact: Susan Hernandez, American Cancer Society, 4 West 35th St. , New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 736-3030. CALIFORNIA HISPANICS: The Population Reference Bureau has published "Population Change and California's Future," which includes data on the growth of the state's Hispanic population . Price : $10, (orders of $20 or less must be prepaid with $1 for postage and handling.) Contact: Circulation Department, Population Reference Bureau, P .O. Box 35012, Washington, D.C. 20013 (202) 785-4664. ENERGY INDUSTRY OPPORTUNITIES: Th e Office of Minority Economic Impact of the Department of Energy released " A Resource Guide for Small Minority-Owned Energy Business," a guide listing opportun1t1es 1n vanous segments of the energy industry for minority entrepreneurs. Free copies of the two-volume guide are available from: National Minority Energy Information Clearinghouse, Office of Mmonty Econom1c Impact, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D . C . 20805 (202) 252-5876. government contracts. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let H1span' c L1nk help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail o r phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washmgton. D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy re ce1ved by 5 p .m. lET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Fnday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. D1splay rates: $35 per column inch. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS The Alabama Education Association seeks a director of Public Relat io ns. P osition vacant January 1. S larting Salary is $28,075. For further information contact Mike Martin, Divi s ion Director of Public Relations, Alabama Education Association, P . O. Box 4177, Montgomery, Alabama 36195. DIRECTOR . OF ADMINISTRATION Responsible for overall financial management including: Planning, forecasting, budgeting, accoun ting, investments. audits, reporting and fiscal analysis In-depth experience in office automation r equired Seeking someone who will bui ld a strong, service-oriented d epartment. $31,000-$33,000. Send resume and ferences to: Executive Director, American Society for Public Administration. 1120 G St. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20005 by Jan. 20. WRITER/EDITOR, D5-1 0829 Governinent of Th e Distri c t of Columbia Serves with the Publicati on and In fo rm ation Branch, a n d performs the following duties: INDIANA iJNIVERSITY, Bloominglon, is seeking a senior administrator to serve as Dean for Women's Affai r s beginning July 1 , 1986. The Dean for Women's Affairs is an advocate for women in matters of equity and reports directly to the President, the chief administrator of IUS. The appointment is 3 / 4 time, with 1 / 4 time teaching. Candidate must be eligible for tenure in an academi c discipline presently existing at Indiana University, Bloomington. QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Demonstrated com mitment to principles of equality i n the university with particular reference to women. 2.Demonstrated ability to relate to and work effectively with a wide ranye of persons: faculty , students, s taff , administrators, and the general public. 3 . Dm onstratedabilitytocreateandto implement innovative programs. 4 . Established re sea rch reputation. Salary commensurate with qualificati ons. INTERVIEWS WILL BEGIN MARCH 3. 1986. Applicants s hould send a letter o f app lication, v it a and three letters of recommendation to : Pro fessor Phyllis R Klotman. Chair. Search and Screen Committee for Dean for Women's Affairs, Memorial Hall East M27, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 4 7405. Assists in writing or editing budgetary report s and materia l s for publication ; assists in editing Di strict agency budget justifications in pre paration for their submissi o n to the Council, Congress and the President for review and approval; assists in preparing press releases, feature news articles and presentations about the budget process for use at community 1---------------..J meetinys. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES EXPERIENCE: Fi ve years experience in specialized wriling or editing articles. speeches. ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST. Washington, pamphlets, or news releases designed for D.C.based,willdofree-lanceworkatreasonable publication in such media as the daily or rates. Contact: Michael Antonio Cava (703) weekly press. general. scienlific, technical or 385, or Hispa ni c Link.(202) 234-0737. trade magazines. G L OMB, HANTEN & BACA LAW FIRM : 1m-HOW TO APPLY: All applicants must submit a completed SF-171 to: D.C. Office of Personnel, Servic ing Personnel Offi ce #4, EOM Personnel Unit, Room 218. 1350 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Washington, D.C. 20004. migrati o n civil litigation-commercial law employment law-federal agency practic.e. 1815 H St. NW. Suite 1000, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 466-2250. and to showcase Hispanic works. Calendar Lourdes Monzon (202) 296-0335 Mario Sanchez (305) 643-1660 Ext. 156 COMING SOON BILINGUAL EDUCATION San Francisco Jan . 15-18 The Califo rnia Association for Bilingu a l Education is spo n soring a confe renc e with workshop sessions including primary language education and the dropout rate. Mary Jew ( 415) 239 -02 95 CONGRESSMAN GONZALEZ TRIBUTE San Anto nio Jan. 18 New York Gov. Mario Cuomo w ill keynote a banquet in recognition of Rep. Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas), beginning his 25th year in Congress. Gail Beag l e (202) 225-3236 HISPANIC ENTREPRENEURS Washington. D.C. J an. 22 The 1st Genera l Assembly o f Hispanic Entrepreneurs by the l bero American Chamber of Comme rce will examine topics such as fina nce a n d obt a ining federal His pani c Link Weekl y R eport SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Angeles Jan. 30 The Per sonne l Man agement Association of Aztlan i s s ponsoring its 2nd annual dinner. Cec ilia Alatorre (213) 972-2168 ANPA MINORITIES TASK FORCE Reston , Va. Jan . 30 , 3 1 The American N ewspaper Publishers Association F o undation ' s Task For ce on Minorities iri the Newspaper Business will elect its leadership and discuss activ itie s f o r 1 986 . Nanc y Osborn (703) 648-1000 CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan . 30,31 Workshop t opics for CNPC's a nnual co nfer ence include m e dia coverage of ethnic events and ethni c ity and politics. Guarione Diaz (305) 642 3484 HISPANIC THEATERS CONFERENCE San Antonio Feb . 7-9 The Confe r encia Nacional de Teatros Hispanos. conducted b y several regional H ispanic theater g r oups, look s to establish a national theater c ir c uit JOURNALISM JOBS FAIR Los Angeles Feb . 7, 8 The California Chicano News Media Association is s ponsoring its 7th annual fair for Hispanics i nterest e d in media-related careers. Connie Rivera (213) 743-7158 SPOTLIGHT The Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters will hold rts a:mvention concuiTently with its parent organization. National R e ligious Broadcasters, Feb. 2-5 in Washington. D.C. Some of the a reas to be covered inc lude fund raising, management techniques , improving production and establishing broadcasting ministries. For further information call H.O. Espinoza at (512) 824 3322. Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community free of charge. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date . Please include name of event. date . location. contact person and phone number. Address items to : Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly R eport. 1420 N St. NW. Washington . D.C .. 20005 . 3

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Arts & Entertainment recordings. Domingo's recording of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Requiem also placed 5th among top compact disc classical recordings. Latinos had three of the top 50 jazz albumsLinda Ronstadfs Lush Life (ranked 28th), Tania Maria's Made in New York (29th) , and Dave Valentin's Jungle Garden (45th) . Brazilian Tania Maria was named among the top 25 jazz album artists. END-OF-THE-YEAR TRADE PUBLICATIONS and national media organizations selected Hispanic entertainers in their "best" lists for 1985. Actors Raul Julia and William Hurt shared the"best actor" award by the National Film Review Board for their performances in Kiss of the Spider Woman-a film based on the novel by Argentine writer Manuel Puig. Hurt was also named "best actor" by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, while the Argent ine film The Official Story shared "best foreign film" with Japan's Ran. a , "year review" article published in music trad e magazine Cashbox's Dec. 28 issue, Peter Holden listed Los Lobos among "artists normally championed as underdogs (who) have been embraced by the music industry at large. " The magazine named Linda Ronstadt one of the year's top five female adult/contemporary recording artists, while Sheila E in Romance 1600 was listed among the 50 top black contemporary albums. In pop music categories, a single album by a Latino act made the year's top 100. L os Lobos' How Will the Wolf Survive ranked 94th. Ronstadt, Sheila E and Julio Iglesias made the top 100 album artists list; Sheila E was also included among top pop singles female artists (ranked 17th) and top pop album female artists (10th) along with Suzanne Vega (19th) . Julio Iglesias came in at No. 25 among the top album male artists, and Sidewalk Talk, a recordi ng by Jellybean Benitez, placed as the 20th top dance club play aibum or single. Billboard's year-end charts are compiled based on the magazine's weekly charts during the November 1984 through November 1985 period. No Latin music charts were published this year due to a new ranking format implemented by the magazine in July. Billboard, another entertainment trade magazine, published its " year-end' charts in its Dec. 28 issue. The magazine named Placido Domingo as 1985's top classical artist. Three of his albums were ranked 3rd, 12th and 23rd among the year's top 25 classical Two U.S. Hispanic recordings were listed among the top 10 songs of 1985 in a list compiled by Latin American entertainment correspondents for United Press International. The Hermanos recording of Cantare, cantaras placed 7th, followed by Miami Sound Machine's Congaartists from Spain and throughout the continent placed in all of the slots. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report I ADVERTISING CONTRACTS: La Verdad ) and La Naci6n, described by The Miami: Herald as two of Miamrsshrillestanti-Castro tabloids, will share in $250,000 city legal advertising revenues in 1986. New Mayor Xavier Suarez, a frequent past target of La Verdad (along with ex-Mayor! Maurice Ferre), told the Herald that the awards to the Spanish-language weeklies were. "patronage" and that he opposes the L a Verdad contract. because of the ''vulgar language" it uses. Neither paper applied for the advertising rights, but were selected by a 4-1 City Com mission vote over Patria, which had received $9,000 in city ad revenues last year and had applied again. Commissioners Joe Carollo led the "pro" voters; Suarez cast the lone "no" vote. Other publications sharing in the revenues will be The Miami Herald, the Miami Times, the Miami Review and Diario las Americas. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado. Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Me)las-Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96 . ."Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. 4 CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details. contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. EXCELLENCE AWARD: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists inaugu rates its$1 ,000 journalism excellence award in 1986. The prize, honoring octogenarian international columnist Guillermo Martinez-Marquez, will be presented at the NAHJ-sponsored National Hispanic Media Conference, set for Miami April23-26. Cuba-born Martinez-Marquez now writes out of Miami. The award will be presented for the best news story or series-print, radio or television in 1985 by a U.S . Hispanic journalist. Sutr mission deadline is Feb . 15. For details, contact Frank Newton, NAHJ , National Press Building, Suite 634,529 14th St NW, Washington , D . C . 20045 (202) 783-6228. COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE: The school of Communications at Washington, D.C.'s, Howard University will conduct its 15th annual Communications Conference Feb. 1316, measuring "Communications: A Key to Economic and Political Change." For information, contact its coordinator, . Oscar Gandy, School of Communications, Howard University , Washington, D.C. 20059 (202) 636-7 491. MEXICO'S QUAKES: National Public Radio will air the Jose McMurray half-hour bilingual documentary "Mexi co: The Earth quake" on Feb. 28. Part of NPR's Latino series , it examines how the city is coping after t he two September jolts which killed 7 ,000 people. " The Mexican people lost lives and theX lost homes, but they never lost their spirit,' reflects McMurray. ROLODEX ROULETTE: Rick Lozano, sportscaster for KMOL-TV in San Antonio , moves to Los Angeles' KABC-TV in February ... Linda Rios Brooks is promoted from vice president of San Antonio's KENsTV to pre sident and general manager ... Lee Llambelis joins the office of New York Mayor Ed Koch as press aide ... Former Southern California journalist Chuck HalloranLos Angeles Times, Orange Country Register has joined San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and the In stitute for American Studies there to help re search and write on South Texas' long term economic growth policies ... Charlie Ericksen ABOUT THE ARTIST Esteban E. Torres, first elected to Congress on Nov. 2, 1982, serves in the U.S. House of Re presentatives for California's 34th District He is also a gifted artist In fact, he studied to become a commercial artist when he entered East Los Angeles Community College in the late 1950s. He went on to gain a bachelor's degree from California State University, Los Angeles, and study economics at the University of Maryland and international labor at American University in Wash ington, D. C . This drawing was made for his campaign contributors. Hispanic Link Weekly Report