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Hispanic link weekly report, January 13, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 13, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News Week
Felipe Garza Jr., an apparently healthy 15-year-old Patterson, Calif., schoolboy who told his mother shortly before Christmas that he knew he was going to die and wanted his heart given to his girlfriend who needed a heart transplant, dies Jan. 4 after a blood vessel bursts in his head. In a five-hour “miracle” operation the next day, Garza’s wishes are followed and his heart is transplanted to Donna Ashlock, 14, who had been on the verge of death from degeneration of the heart... Panama-born Laffit Pincay Jr. wins his fifth Eclipse Award Jan. 7 as thoroughbred racing’s top jockey for 1985. . . Jorge Vel&squez becomes the fourth jockey in throughbred racing history to amass more than $90 million in career purse earnings following a Jan. 4 victory at Aqueduct race course in New York. He joins Pincay,
Angel Cordero Jr. and Willie Shoemaker in reacmhliJ the ... New York City Personnel Department Director Juan Ortiz resigns his $92,000 a year post Jan. 6 following a recent reprimand for receiving birthday gifts of cash from subordinates... Manhattan, N.Y., Borough President David Dinkins names former Bronx Borough President Herman Badillo aide Sally Hernandez as his deputy... Father Fernando Villalobos, a crusader against gang warfare in California’s San Joaquin Valley who organized and led a convention of the state’s Latino laity last May in Fresno, dies at age 38 after suffering a heart attack while in surgery for a herniated spinal disc iff his native Costa Rica... Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the National Catholic Conference who suffered a heart attack Oct. 3, returns to work Jan. 6... Alfredo Montoya, executive director of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, enters the hospital for ear surgery...
vol 4 No. 2 (Q) h i mmmmmmmmQ) â„¢
SIN Stations to Appeal FCC License Denials
' Officials from seven U.S. television stations affiliated with the Spanish International Network (SIN) say they are confident of winning an appeal of a Federal Communications Commission ruling released Jan. 8 which denies license renewals of stations licensed to Spanish International Communications Corporation (SICC), as well as to Bahia de San Francisco Television Company and The Seven Hills Television Company.
The FCC ruling concluded that Reynold (Rene) Anselmo, president of the powerful Spanish-language network and one of the
Unions Must Translate
A U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeless handed down an apparent precedent-setting decision that calls for mandatory translations at union membership meetings for Spanishspeaking members.
A suit filed three years ago by three workers against the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union, Local 11, charged Spanish-speaking members were denied their full rights as members because the failure to provide translations precluded participation in union affairs. The union represents about 16,000 workers in the Los Angeles area, the majority of whom are Hispanic.
Judge Richard Gadbois ruled on Dec. 27 that beginning this month the local must provide translation of its monthly membership meetings and that it post a notice informing members of the change.
Chavez Protest Launched
United Farm Workers President C§sar Chavez, joined at a news conference in Sacramento by 25 Democratic state legislators, launched a new “Wrath of Grapes” campaign Jan. 7.
He called for a ban on five pesticides used on grapes and other farm products - captan, phosdrin, parathion, methl bromide and dinoseb - which he singled out as “most dangerous” to farm workers.
Ch4vez also announced his intention to restimulate his eight-month-old table grape boycott with millions of national mailers, bumper stickers, posters and buttons.
stations’ major stockholders, acts as a pawn of “alien ownership and control” in violation of Section 310 of the Federal Communications Act of 1934.
Stations’ attorney Norman Leventhal said that the judge’s decision does not have any precedent in court or in the commission’s prior cases. H e said that the stations’ owners will be meeting this week to consider an appeal.
The ruling is effective 50 days after its release unless an appeal is filed within 30 days.
FCC Administrative Law Judge John Conlin’s ruling could have the effect of closing down the stations. However, SIN officials dismissed such a possibility on the network’s Jan. 8 newscast.
They said the decision could be altered either by a successful appeal to the Commission or by a change in corporate structures.
Soliz Running for Council
Illinois State Rep. Juan Soliz(D-Chicago) announced his candidacy for a special aldermanic election for the 25th Ward Jan. 6. The ward is one of seven where special elections will be held March 18.
Seeking endorsements from Chicago Mayor Harold Washington and 10th Ward Alderman Edward Vrdolyak, political enemies, Soliz called on all Hispanic candidates in four wards- including one with the City Council’s lone Hispanic incumbent, Miguel Santiago - to form their own “power block.”
Hispanic victories in Santiago’s ward and the other three redrawn districts in which the percentage of Hispanic voters has increased due to a court order, could realign power in the City Council. Presently, 29 of 50 aldermen are faithful to Vrdolyak. (See Weekly Report Jan. 6.)
Soliz, 36, said he will also keep his name on the ballot for re-election to the state Legislature. If he wins on both tickets, Soliz said he will resign the state position.
There is an eight-day filing period, from Jan. 10-17.
During the appeal, which they said could take from seven to ten years, the stations would continue their normal operations.
SIN, with more than 300 broadcast and cable affiliates, now programs 24 hours a day and, according to Conlin, controlled approximately $98 million of the $118 million spent on Spanish television advertising and $3.5 million in program sales in 1984.
The SIN network is affected indirectly through the loss of the seven major stations’ revenue. The network itself does not fall under FCC regulations.
Cities and channel numbers of the seven stations are: Los Angeles (Ch. 34), Miami (23), San Antonio (41), Paterson, N.J. (23), Hanford, Calif. (21), Phoenix (33) and San Francisco (14).
Conlirfs decision commented that the license
continued on page 2
UFW Raps Calif. ALRB
The United Farm Workers has charged that California Gov. George Deukmejian’s latest appointment to the state's sieminal Agricultural Labor Relations Board has completed the body's transformation into a futile agency.
Roberto Delacruz, political director for the UFW, called the Jan. 2 addition of Gregory Gonot to the five-member body, which was created by landmark 1975 legislation, “irrelevant.. because the ALRB is no longer a place farm workers can go to resolve their grievances.”
Gonot, 38, a lawyer who wrote many promanagement decisions as a senior aide to board member John McCarthy, replaced prolabor Jerome Waldie, whose term expired Dec. 31. Waldie’s departure leaves the board with three Deukmejian appointees.
When Deukmejian took office in November 1982, he made two changes that started the transformation, according to critics: cutting the board’s budget by a third and appointing David Stirling as the agency's general counsel
Under Stirling’s reign, the board has filed only 482 charges against employers in three years, compared to 1,188 the three preceding years. As of December 1983, there were 1,091 backlogged cases, compared to496 in December 1982.


Sin pelos en la lengua
GUERRA’S 1986 ALMANAC: It’s too late for New Veal's resolutions, and I would never adhere to them anyway.
Instead, I will share with you the prose of Jaime Guerra, veteran bilingual muckraker whose writing has seared newspapers throughout the Southwestern U.S. and Mexico.
Guerra, now a wire editor with the Houston Chronicle, is still far from happy with the condition of nuestro mundo. He offers:
WHAT I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IN 1986, BUT MOSTCERTAINLY WON’T:
A REVIVAL OF THE ‘DECADE OF THE HISPANIC’ MYTH: Who knows? Someone might take it seriously and - well, some Latino might just use the slogan on souvenirs and create a few jobs in the barrio. God knows, we need the ashtraya
THE PROBLEM OF DRUGS TREATED AT ITS SOURCE: Let’s quit blaming other nations for our vicea If we are such experts at exploiting the law of supply and demand, why do we act stupid on this crisis? As long as idiots are willing to pay dearly to destroy themselvea someone will gladly profit from it.
SOME SENSIBLE ACTION ON ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION: The -moment for this subject to be treated with logic is long overdue. The
immensity of the problem leaves no room for the hypocritical emotionalism with which it is being treated.
Congress votes a billion or two dollars for the Contras who are committed to democracy a la Yankee in Nicaragua The Contras pose no threat to the Sandinistaa but the expensive hotels in Miami would collapse if their leaders are forced to move their headquarters anywhere near the alleged “front.”
A FREE HANK WILLIAMS RECORDING OF‘MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS’ FOR EVERY CHURCH INVOLVED IN THE SANCTUARY MOVEMENT: That’s the song that says, “If you mind your own business, you’ll be busy all the time.” It ain’t gospel, but the advice will keep them from constantly breaking the law and creating hate for those they purport to help.
EQUITABLE TRADE WITH LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES: If we are all going to go on welfare and quit producing, we might as well buy from neighbors and quit making former enemies rich.
NAIVETE: So that I could believe that an executive from a bankrupt country with enough millions to buy a bankrupt U.S. newsservice is a wholesome copy of Benito Judrez.
Because of new UPI owner Mario Vdzquez Rana’s long and powerful connections with the government there - Guerra tells me-folks in Mexico have nicknamed that venerable wire service U-PRI-I.
- Kay Barbaro
SIN Stations to Appeal FCC Edict
continued from page 1
Special Election Called
California Gov. George Deukmejian has set April 8 and June 3 as primary and final election dates to fill the 55th state Assembly seat vacated by Richard Alatorre. Alatorre was elected to the Los Angeles City Council Dec. 10. The June date coincides with the regular state primary.
Alatorre aide Richard Polanco, who lost a 1982 Assembly race to Gloria Molina, has announced that he will seek the Democratic nomination. Los Angeles school board member Larry Gonzdlez has said that he is seriously considering it No Republican has yet announced.
Assembly terms expire Dec. 1. Therefore, any 55th District candidates must also enter the June state primary if they wish to compete for the 1987-88 term.
Deseg. Ordered Expedited
The San Jose, Calif., Unified School District must expedite desegregation efforts, but it is not required to employ busing, ruled a U.S. District Court judge.
After 14 years of legal maneuvering, Judge Robert Peckham accepted the school district’s plan for desegregation Dec. 31. Peckham, however, ordered a faster pace with 60% of the students to be in desegregated schools by the 1986-87 school year and 90% three years later.
A lawsuit on behalf of Hispanic students charging intentional segregation prompted the ruling. The school district submitted the plan Sept. 30,1985.
Hispanic parents charged that the plan posed an unfair burden on Hispanic students because it entailed closing schools with large Hispanic populations. San Jose High School, the oldest in the city with 65% Hispanic representation, is one of the schools slated for closing.
The court will have jurisdiction over the 37-member district until it achieves desegregation. 2
refusal was a drastic solution and that an appeal is possible since the violations do not “go to the very heart” of the statute - to prevent foreign control during wartime. Contrary to newspapers and other media forms, radio and television stations must be owned and controlled by U.S. citizens, with no more than 20% foreign investment
The ruling claims that, based on a 1983 investigation by the FCCs Mass Media Bureau, Anselmo is an intermediary between the Mexican Azcarraga family and the stations, and that they would not have survived without the financial backing of the family.
Although the stations are at least 80%-owned by U.S. citizens, their relationship with SIN, which is owned 25% by Anselmo and 75% by Televisa, a media conglomerate property of the Azcarraga family, puts them under control of a foreign corporation, it charged.
According to Conlin, the grouping was the “brainchild” of the senior Emilio Azcarraga, founder and deceased father of the Mexico media empire’s present owner. Azcarraga, Conlin said, wanted to create an “open bordei” fortelevision programming between the United States and Mexico and an export market for Televisa, which is now the world’s largest producer of Spanish-language programs and part of the Azcarraga conglomerate which includes newspapers, radio stations, record companies and theaters.
From 1961 to 1972, Azcarraga formed seven U.S. TV stations and retai ned the 20% ownership
Latinos Lead Church Poll
Churchgoing was more prevalent among Latinos than non-Latinos in 1985, with 45% of them going tochuich or synagogue compared to 42% of blacks and whites, a year-end Gallup Poll showed.
Attendance has remained relatively constant since 1969, after a decline from a 49% level in 1955.
permitted by law. He made a series of loans to several U.S. citizens, among them Anselmo, as station stockholders without losing control of the operations, FCC claimed.
“This influence exists at various levels," the decision said. “It is reflected in the composition of the ownership and boards of directors of the licensed corporations, in the stations' management, in its programming and in the historical financial and personal ties between the (stations) and the Azcarraga family and its corporate interests.”
It cited an “abnormal relationship?’ between SIN and the stations that included a contract stipulation permitting the network to get a share of the advertising revenues that station personnel - not SIN - obtain from local ads. Aside from being a program production company, SIN acts as national advertising sales representative for the Spanish television companies.
- Dora Delgado
MALDEF in LA. Suit
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed Jan. 6 a motion to intervene in the Los Angeles City Council redistricting suit to ensure Latino representation in the legal proceedings.
The suit filed Nov. 26 by the U.S. Department of Justice, charges that the 15-member Councifs 1982 redistricting plan deliberately fragmented the city’s Hispanic population to minimize its voting strength.
MALDEF Counsel Linda Wong said that her organization also intends to challenge the Department’s interpretation of the Voting Rights Act of 1982. The Justice Department maintains that discrimination must be intentional in order to prove violation of the law. MALDEF contends that the adoption of the ’ intent* standard “could roll back successes achieved through the use of the ‘effects’ standard and hamper future efforts by minorities to challenge election plans.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
MANAGING EDITOR
For national weekend newspaper magazine with 600,000 circulation. Candidates need strong writing - editing skills to generate, assign and edit general interest features and manage editorial staff. Working experience on West Coast or Southwest essential. Salary, negotiable. Contact Harry Caicedo (305) 442-2462.
PRINCE GEORGESCOUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
REPORTER TO COVER Police and Transportation News. Minimum 4 years full-time radio broadcasting experience. Must have familiarity with Washington, D.C., area geography and working knowledge of public services agency communication systems, Law enforcement background an advantage. Drivers license with good record required Send spot news tape and resume to Holland Cooke at WTOP, 4646 40th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20016. EOE M/F.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND.
PUT A STAR IN YOUR FUTURE-----------------------
STARTING SALARIES: GS-5, $14,390 or GS-7, $17,824 (Depending upon Qualifications)
From Feb. 10 through Feb. 21, 1986, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written Examination for Deputy U.S. Marshal positions in the Federal government.
The United States Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest Federal law enforcement agency. Since 1789, U.S. Marshals have served the Executive and Judicial branches of government through a variety of vital law enforcement activities:
• Protection of judges, officials and witnesses
• Apprehension of fugitives • Execution of court orders
• Custody of prisoners • Custody of seized property SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUP - The Special Operations Group is a highly trained reaction force which provides Federal assistance in emergency situations of national significance. Membership is selective, part-time and voluntary. Deputies must be in superb physical condition and successfully complete the special operations training. LOCATION OF POSITIONS - Deputy U.S. Marshal positions are located in the 94 Judicial Districts of the U.S. Marshals Service, which cover the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. You must be available for initial assignment to any duty station; be prepared to travel frequently for extended periods of time; and be available for reassignment to other duty stations.
TO QUALIFY YOU MUST:
• Be a U.S. citizen
BE A DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL
• Possess a valid driver's license
• Establish an eligible rating on the written examination
• Have a bachelor's degree or 3 years of responsible experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Qualifying experience is administrative, professional, investigative, or other responsible work. There are additional education/experience requirements for the GS-7 grade level.)
• Be at least 21 years old
• Meet certain medical requirements and undergo a background and character investigation
AGE LIMITATION - Under Public Law 93-350, the maximum age for original entry into Deputy U.S. Marshal positions is the day immediately preceding one’s 35th birthday; however, this limitation may be waived in some cases.
TRAINING - All new Deputies are required to complete a six-month basic training program consisting of approximately 3 months at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center(FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia, and 3 months of on-the-job training. At the end of the 6 months, those individuals hired at GS-5 will be eligible for GS-7.
HOW TO APPLY: Contact your local Federal Job Information/Testing Center, listed under U.S. Government in metropolitan area telephone directories, beginning Feb. 10, 1986, for more information and an application for the test.
The United States Marshals Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer and i$ actively recruiting Women and Minority Applicants.
THE GOOD NEWS
BOOKLETS ON LATIN AMERICA: The League of United Latin American Citizens has published “The Future of Puerto Rico,” the first in a series of booklets on Latin American issues. The 24-page publication includes three arguments by prominent Puerto Ricans on political formulas for Puerto Rico: independence, commonwealth or statehood. Send self-addressed 7 1/2x10 1/2 envelope with a 39-cent stamp to: LULAC, 400 First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8516.
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT PAMPHLETS: The U.S. Small Business Administration has announced it will begin charging 25$ to 50$ each for its 138 pamphlets formerly offered free on subjects such as “The ABCs of Borrowing,” “Incorporating a Small Business,” and “Learning About Your Market” For more information, contact: Anita I rick, SBA, Washington, D.C. 20416 (202) 653-6822.
COLLEGE GUIDE: The College Board has published a guide to help college-bound students and their parents understand alternatives to meet college costa “The College Cost Book, 1985-86,” is available for $10.95 from: College Board Publications, Department E02, Box 886, New York, N.Y. 10101 (212)713-8175.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
FETAL ALCOHOL SYNDROME Washington, D.C. Jan. 13
The national Hispanic Coalition on Substance Abuse will cosponsor a semeinar on alcohol abuse among pregnant women.
Nancy Ramos (202) 673-7529
BILINGUAL EDUCATION
San Francisco Jan. 15-18
The 11 th annual conference by the California Association
for Bilingual Education will include topics such as
parental involvement and computer usage among
minority language children.
Mary Jew (415) 239-0295 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
GALLEGOS RECOGNITION DINNER Omaha, Neb. Jan. 16
Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Tony Gallegos will be honored at a banquet sponsored by the American Gl Forum.
Judy English (402) 331-0600
CONGRESSMAN GONZALEZ TRIBUTE San Antonio Jan. 18
New York Gov. Mario Cuomo will keynote this din ner marking the beginning of Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez’s (D-Texas) 25th year in Congress.
Gail Beagle (202) 225-3236
HISPANIC ENTREPRENEURS Washington, D.C. Jan. 22
The 1 st Assembly of Hispanic Entrepreneurs in the Washington metropolitan area by the I bero American Chamber of Commerce will cover subjects such as finance and obtaining government contracts Lourdes Monzdn (202) 296-0335.
COMING SOON
SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS DINNER
Los Angeles Jan. 30
Cecilia Alatorre (213) 972-2168
CAMINOS AWARDS DINNER
Los Angeles Feb. 1
Pauline Mdrquez (213) 222-1349
SPOTLIGHT
The American Association for Affirmative Action will hold its 12th annual conference March 12-16 in Atlanta. There will be panel discussions, lectures and role-playing exercises on topics ranging frorp whether the affirmative action officer is an advocate or adversary to effective hiring policies. For further information contact Judy Bumison or Dorothy Fropman at Bumison, Martello and Associates, 119 W. Hubbard St., Chicago, III. 60610 (312) 329-2512.
3


Arts & Entertainment
PICKS BY ENTERTAINMENT REPORTERS IN Hollywood and New York have begun the early year award season - with prominent participation by Hispanics among the nominated and nominators.
The Golden Globe awards, given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association kick off the season Jan. 24. Nominees for the awards were announced early this month by Jorge C&mara, president of the HFPA.
Two U.S. Hispanic actors are nominated for 1986 Golden Globes. Edward James Olmos is mentioned in the“best supporting actor in a television series, mini-series or movie” category, while Raul Juli& is listed in the“best actor in a film” race. Juli4 runs against William Hurt, his co-star in Kiss of the Spider Woman. The film, directed by Hector Babenco and based on the Manuel Puig novel, won a nomination in
the “best supporting actress’ category for Brazilian Sonia Braga.
One Spanish language film - the Argentine La historia oficial- won a nomination in the “best foreign film” category. Luis Puenzo’s movie is among several from Spanish-speaking countries submitted for consideration for a 1986 Oscar nomination in the “best foreign film” category. Also submitted were Mexico’s Frida, Peru’s The City and the Dogs Spain’s The Witching Hour and Venezuela’s Orians Entertainment reporters on the other coast- members of the New York-based Asociacidn de Cronistas da Espectaculos- have also recently announced nominees for its annual ACE honors. Scores of Hispanic performers- the majority from Puerto Rico, Spain, Argentina, the Dominican Republic and Venezuela- are nominated in dozens of television, nightclub, radio and theater categories.
The ACE hands out its awards March 15.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MAKING WAVES: Norma Niurka, entertainment editor with The Miami Herald, stirred a storm thats yet to subside with a Dec. 13 report on “Blacklisting: Miami Style.”
The article, run in both the Herald’s English and Spanish editions, detailed refusals by radio staions there to play popular but politically “hot” Hispanic recording artists.
Wrote Niurka, in part:
“Cubans, Puerto Ricans and Dominicans vibrate to the Panamanian salsa of composer-singer Rub6n Blades; Spaniards and Argentinians rejoice in the lyrics of Argentinian singer-composer Alberto Cortes; most walk on air when the Bob Dylan of Catalonia, singer-composer Joan Manuel Serrat, interprets his Love Poem.
“But because of a vigorous underground campaign of censorship, the Spanish-language radio stations in Miami have banned these performers...
“(Other) ‘blacklist* names include Puerto Ricans Danny Rivera, Lucesita Benitez and Chucho Avellanet and Spaniards Victor Manuel and Ana Bel6n. Most sympathize with or
support the Cuban regime; others are proindependence Puerto Ricans or old anti-Franco Spanish activists .. ”
Even Julio Iglesias was on the “blacklist” for a couple of years in the ’70s for saying he wouldn’t mind singing in Cuba, Niurka wrote.
Her article offered such explanations by station executives as “We cannot row against the current. If the other stations decided to drop them, we did the same.” And “We think it’s healthy not to mix politics and show biz.” Some cited “bomb threats?’ as added incentives
Reaction to her article has included numerous talk shows picking up the debate (Niurka declines to appear on them) and one station’s offer to go to Puerto Ricoto interview Danny Rivera and then reconsider his inclusion on “blacklist”
Did the article stir up more flack than anything the nine-year Herald veteran wrote in the past?
“No,” she said.“Six years before Mariel, I visited Cuba with a group of writers and artists and wrote about that experience.”
Overall, she added, the “blacklist’ piece is having a positive effect One station even gave her its “ best reporter of the year” award last week
(Weekly Report readers who want a copy of the article may write and request one from
Norma Niurka, Entertainment Editor, Miami Herald, Herald Plaza, Miami, Florida 33101. Enclose self-addressed stamped envelope and indicate Spanish or English.)
POSTING THE TIMES: In a three-part series that started Jan. 7 headed “The Rich & Troubled Times,” The Washington Post looked at its up-the-coast rival, The New York Times. Included was this paragraph:
“Asked about the criticism that the paper avoids some areas of the city and some of the seamier local'issues, (editor Abe) Rosenthal said: ‘It seems to me we cover every bloody issue. Do we cover Hispanic news, lets say? Not well enough. But the reason we cover Hispanic news is not for Hispanic readers. Hispanic readers do not buy The New York Times to read about Hispanic news, nor will they ever.”
REAGAN MEETS WHOM? Mexican journalists are expressing displeasure with the poor play U.S. media gave the Reagan-de la Madrid meeting in Mexicali.
Particularly galling to them was The New York Times’ Page 2 story headed: “Reagan Sees Mexican Today”.
Asked one critic: “If he met with the Pope, would they write ‘Reagan Sees Catholic’?”
- Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420‘N’Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher HActor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, FAlix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 Issues) $86.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packetsatyournextconferenceorconvention. Fordetails, contact HActor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week A Angel Cordero Jr. and Willie Shoemaker in ... New York City Personnel Department Director Juan Ortiz resigns his $92,000 a year post Jan. 6 following a recent reprimand for receiving birthday gifts of cash from subordinates ... Manhattan, N.Y., Borough President David Dinkins names former Bronx Borough President Herman Badillo aide Sally Hernandez as his deputy ... Father Fernando Villalobos, a crusader against gang warfare in California's San Joaquin Valley who organized and led a convention of the state's Latino laity last May in Fresno, dies at age 38 afte, ( : suffering a heart attack while in surgery for a herniated spinal disc rri his native Costa Rica. . . Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the National Catholic Conference who suffered a heart attack Oct. 3, returns to work Jan. 6 ... Alfredo Montoya, executive director of the Labor Council for Latin American . Advancement, enters the hospital for ear surgery ... Felipe Garza Jr., an apparently healthy 15yearold Patterson , Calif., schoolboy who told his mother shortly before Christmas that he knew he was going to die and wanted his heart given to his girlfriend who needed a heart transplant, dies Jan. 4 after a blood vessel bursts in his head. In a five-hour"miracle" operation the next day, Garza's wishes are followed and his heart is transplanted to Donna Ashlock, 14, who had been on the verge of death from degeneration of the heart . . . Panama-born Laffit Pincay Jr. wins his fifth Eclipse Award Jan. 7 as thoroughbred racing's top jockey for 1985. . . Jorge Velasquez becomes the fourth jockey in throughbred racing history to amass more than $90 million in career purse earnings following a Jan. 4 victory at Aqueduct race course in New York. He joins Pincay, •'4""2ll HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 113• 1••• SIN Stations to Appeal FCC License Denials 1 Officials from seven U . S . television stations affiliated with the Spanish International Network (SIN) say they are confident of winning an appeal of a Federal Communications Com mission ruling released Jan. 8 which denies license renewals of stations licensed to Spanish International Communications Cor poration (SICC), as well as to Bahia de San Francisco Television Company and The Seven Hills Television Company. The FCC ruling concluded that Reynold (Rene) Anselmo, president of the powerful Spanish-language network and one of the Unions Must Translate A U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles , handed down an apparent precedent-setting decision that calls for mandatory translations at \.Inion membership meetings for Spanish speaking members. A suit filed three years ago by three workers against the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union, Local 11, charged Spanish-speaking members were denied their full rights as members because the failure to provide trans lations precluded participation in union affairs. The union. represE)nts about 16,000 workers in the Los Angeles area, the majority of whom are Hispanic . Judge Richard Gadbois ruled on Dec . 27 that beginning this .. month the local must provide translation of its monthly membership meetings and that it post a notice informing members of the change. Chavez Protest Launched United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez, joined at a news conference in Sacramento by 25 Democratic state legislators, launched a new "Wrath of Grapes" campaign Jan . 7. He called for a ban on five pesticides used on grapes and other farm products-captan, phosdrin, parathion, methl bromide and dinoseb -which he singled out as "most dangerous" to farm workers. Chavez also announced his intention to restimulate his eight-month-old table grape boycott with millions of national mailers, bumper stickers, posters and buttons. stations' major stockholders, acts as a pawn of "alien ownership and control" in violation of Section 310 of the Federal Communications Act of 1934. Stations' attorney Norman Leventhal said that the judge's decision does not have any precedent in court or in the commission ' s prior cases. He said that the stations' owners will be meeting this week to consider an appeal. The ruling is effective 50 days after its release unless an appeal is filed within 30 days. FCC Administrative Law Judge John Conlin's ruling could have the effect of closing down the stations. However, SIN officials dismissed such a possibility on the network's Jan. 8 newscast. They sa i d the decision could be altered either by a successful appeal to the Com mission or by a change in corporate structures. Soliz Running for Council Illinois State Rep . Juan Soliz (DChicago) announced his candidacy for a special aldermanic election for the 25th Ward Jan. 6 . The ward is one of seven where special elections will be held March 18. Seeking endorsements from Chicago Mayor Harold Washington and 1Oth Ward Alderman Edward Vrdolyak, political enemies, Soliz called on all Hispanic candidates in four wards-including one with the City council's lone Hispanic incumbent, Miguel Santiago to form their own "power block." Hispanic victories in Santiago's ward and the other three redrawn districts in which the percentage of Hispanic voters has increased due to a court order, could realign power in the City Council . Presently, 29 of 50 aldermen are faithful to Vrdolyak. (See Weekly Report Jan. 6.) Soliz, 36, said he will also keep his name on the ballot for re-election to the state Legislature. If he wins on both tickets, Soliz said he will resign the state position . There is an eight-day filing period, from Jan. 1 0. During the appeal, which they said could take from seven to ten years, the stations would continue their normal operations. SIN, with more than 300 broadcast and cable affiliates, now programs 24 hours a day and, according to Conlin, controlled approxi mately $98 million of the $118 million spent on Spanish television advertising and $3.5 million in program sales in .1984. The SIN network is affected indirectly through the loss of the seven major stations' revenue. The network itself does not fall under FCC regulations. Cities and channel numbers of the seven stations are: Los Angeles (Ch. 34), " Miami (23), San Antonio (41 ), Paterson, N.J . (23), Hanford, Calif . (21), Phoenix (33) and San Francisco (14) . Conlin's decision commented that the lic . ense continued on page 2 UFW Raps Calif. ALRB The United Farm Workers has charged that California Gov. George Deukmejian's latest appointment to the state's seminal Agricultural Labor Relations Board has completed the body's transformation into a futile agency. Roberto Delacruz, political director for the UFW, called the Jan. 2 addition of Gregory Gonot to the five-member body, which was created by landmark 1975 legislation, "irrelevant .. because the ALRB is no longer a place farm workers can go to resolve their grievances." Gonot, 38, a lawyer who wrote many pro management decisions as a senioraide to board member John McCarthy, replaced pro labor Jerome Waldie, whose term expired Dec . 31. Waldie's departure leaves the board with three Deukrnejian appointees. When Deukmejian took office in November 1982, he made two changes that started the transformation, according to critics: cutting the board's budget by a third al')d appointing David Stirling as the agency's general counsel. Under Stirling's reign, the has filed only 482 charges against employers in three years, compared to 1,188 the three preceding years. As of December 1983, there were 1,091 backlogged cases, compared to496 in December 1982.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengual immensity of the problem leaves no room for the hypocritical emotionalism with which it is bemg treated. Congress votes a billion or two dollars for the Contras who are committed to democracy a Ia Yankee in Nicaragua. The Contras pose no threat to the Sandinistas, but the expensive hotels in Miami would collapse if their leaders are forced to move their headquarters anywhere near the alleged "front." GUERRA'S 1986 ALMANAC: lfs too late for New Year's resolutions, and I would never adhere to them anyway . Instead, I will share with you the prose of Jaime Guerra, veteran bilingual muckraker whose writing has seared newspapers throughout the Southwestern U.S. and Mexico. Guerra, now a wire editor with the Houston Chronicle, is still far from happy with the condition of nuestro mundo. He offers: WHAT I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IN 1986, BUTMOSTCERTAINLY WON'T: A REVIVAL OF THE 'DECADE OF THE HISPANIC' MYTH: Who knows? Someone might take it seriously and well , some Latino might just use the slogan on souvenirs and create a few jobs in the barrio . God knows, we need the ashtrays. A FREE HANK WILLIAMS RECORDING OF'MINDYOUROWN BUSINESS' FOR EVERY CHURCH INVOLVED IN THE SANCTUARY MOVEMENT: Thafs the song that says, "If you mind your own business, you'll be busy all the time . " It ain't gospel, but the advice will keep them from constantly breaking the law and creating hate for those they purport to help . EQUITABLE TRADE WITH LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES: If we are all going to go on welfare and quit producing, we might as well buy from neighbors and quit making former enemies rich. THE PROBLEM OF DRUGS TREATED AT ITS SOURCE: Lefs quit blaming other nations for our vices. If we are such experts at exploiting the law of supply and demand, why do we act stupid on this crisis? As long as idiots are willing to pay dearly to destroy themselves, someone will gladly profit from it. NAIVETE: So that I could believe that an executive from a bankrupt country with enough millions to buy a bankrupt U.S. news service is a wholesome copy of Benito Juarez . Because of new UPI owner Mario Vazquez Raiia's long and powerful connections with the government there-Guerra tells mefolks in Mexico have nicknamed that venerable wire service U-PRI-1. Kay Barbaro SOME SENSIBLE ACTION ON ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION: The -moment for this subject to be treated with logic is long overdue. The Special Election Called Sl N Stations to Appeal FCC Edict California Gov. George Deukmejian has set April 8 and June 3 as primary and final election dates to fill the 55th state Assembly seat vacated by Richard Alatorre . Alatorre was elected to the Los Angeles City Council Dec. 10. The June date coincides with the regular state primary. Alatorre aide Richard Polanco, who lost a 1982 Assembly race to Gloria Molina, has announced that he will seek the Democratic nomination . Los Angeles school board member Larry Gonzalez has said that he is seriously considering it No Republican has yet announced. Assembly terms expire Dec. 1. Therefore, any 55th District candidates must also enter the June state primary if they wish to compete for the 1987-88 term. Deseg. Ordered Expedited The San Jose, Calif., Unified School District must expedite desegregation efforts, but it is not required to employ busing, ruled a U.S. District Court judge. After 14 years of legal maneuvering, Judge Robert Peckham accepted the school districfs plan for desegregation Dec . 31. Peckham, however, ordered a faster pace with 60% of the students to be in desegregated schools by the 1986-87 school year and 90% three years later. A lawsuit on behalf of Hispanic students charging intentional segregation prompted the ruling. The school district submitted the plan Sept. 30, 1 985. Hispanic parents charged that the plan posed an unfair burden on Hispanic students because it entailed closing schools with large Hispanic populations. San Jose High School, the oldest in the city with 65% Hispanic representation, is one of the schools slated for closing. The court will have jurisdiction over the 37-member district until it achieves desegregation. 2 continued from page 1 refusal was a drastic s9lution and that an appeal is possible since the violations do not "go to the very hearf' of the statute to prevent foreign control during war time. Con trary to newspapers and other media forms, radio and television stations must be owned and controlled by U . S . citizens, with no more than 20% foreign investment. The ruling claims that, based on a 1983 investigation by the FCC's Mass Media Bureau, Anselmo is an intermediary between the Mexican Azcarraga family and the stations, and that they would not have survived without the financial backing of the family. Although the stations are at least 80% owned by U.S. citizens, their relationship with SIN, which is owned 25% by Anselmo and 75% by Televisa, a media conglomerate pro perty of the Azcarraga family, puts them under control of a foreign corporation, it charged. According to Conlin, the grouping was the "brainchild" of the senior Emilio Azcarraga, founder and deceased father of the Mexico media empire's present owner. Azcarraga, Conlin said, wanted to create an "open border'' for television programming between the United States and Mexico and an export market for Televisa, which is now the world's largest producer of Spanish-language programs and part of the Azcarraga conglomerate which includes newspapers, radio stations, record companies and theaters. From 1961 to 1972, Azcarraga formed seven U.S. Tv stations and retained the 20% ownership Latinos Lead Church Poll Churchgoing was more prevalent among Latinos than non-Latinos in 1985, with 45% ofthem going to church or synagogue compared to 42% of blacks and whites, a year-end Gallup Poll showed. Attendance has remained relatively constant since 1969, after a decline from a49% level in 1955. permitted by law . He made a series of loans to several U.S. citizens, among them Anselmo, as station stockholders without losing control of the operations, FCC claimed. "This influence exists at various levels," the decision said "It is reflected in the composition of the ownership and boards of directors of the licensed corporations, in the stations' management, in its programming and in the historical financial and personal ties between the(stations) and theAzcarraga family and its corporate interests." It cited an "abnormal relationship" between Sl N and the stations that included a contract stipulation permitting the network to get a share of the advertising revenues that station personnel-not SINobtain from local ads. Aside from being a program production come pany, SIN acts as national advertising sales representative for the Spanish television companies . Dora Delgado ' MAL:.DEF in LA. suit The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed Jan. 6 a motion to intervene in the Los Angeles City Council redistricting suit to ensure Latino representation in the legal proceedings . The suit, filed Nov. 26 by the U.S. Department of Justice, charges that the 15-member Councirs 1982 redistricting plan deliberately fragmented the city's Hispanic population to minimize its voting strength. MALDEF Counsel Linda Wong said that her organization also intends to challenge the Departmenfs interpretation of the Voting Rights Act of 1982. The Justice Department maintains that discrimination must be intentional in order to prove violation of the law. MALDEF contends that the adoption of the 'intenf standard "could roll back successes achieved through the use of the 'effects' standard and hamper future efforts by minorities to challenge election plans." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Lmk help you i n your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 2340737. Ad copy received by 5 p . m .
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Arts & Entertainment the " best supporting actress' category for Brazilian Sonia Braga . PICKS BY ENTERTAINMENT REPORTERS IN Hollywood and New York have begun the early year award season with prominent participation by Hispanics among the nominated and nominators . The Golden Globe awards, given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association kick off the season Jan . 24. Nominees for the awards were announced early this month by Jorge Camara, president of the HFPA. One Spanish language filmthe Argentine La historia oficial-won a nomination in the"best foreign film" category. Luis Puenzo's movie is among several from Spanish-speaking countries submitted for consideration for a 1986 Oscar nomination in the " best foreign film" category. Also submitted were Mexico's Frida, Peru's The City and the Dogs, Spain's The Witching Hour and Venezuela's Oriana Two U . S . Hispanic actors are nominated for 1986 Golden Globes. Edward James Olmos is mentioned in the "best supporting actor in a television series, mini-series or movie" category, while Raul Julia is listed in the"best actor in a film" race . Julia runs against William Hurt, his co-star in Kiss of the Spider Woman. The film , directed by Hector Babenco and based on the Manuel Puig novel, won a nomination in Entertainment reporters on the other coast-members of the New York-based Asociacion de Cronistas de Espectaculos-have also recently announced nominees for its annual ACE honors . Scores of Hispanic performers-the majority from Puerto Rico, Spain, Argentina, the Dominican Republic and Venezuela-are nominated in dozens of television , nightclub, radio and theater categories . The ACE hands out its awards March 15. support the Cuban regime ; others are proR e P 0 rt I independence Puerto Ricans or old antiFranco Spanish activists ... " -----------------Even Julio Iglesias was on the " blacklist'' Media MAKING WAVES: Norma Niurka, enter tainment editor with The Miami Herald, stirred a storm that's yet to subside with a Dec . 13 report on "Blacklisting: Miami Style." The article, run in both the Herald's English and Spanish editions, detailed refusals by radio staions there to play popular but politically "hot'' Hispanic recording artists. Wrote Niurka, in part: . "Cubans, Puerto Ricans and Dominicans vibrate to the Panamanian salsa of composer singer Ruben Blades; Spaniards and Argen tinians rejoice in the lyrics of Argentinian singer-composer Alberto Cortes; most wall< on air when the Bob Dylan of Catalon .ia, Joan Manuel Serrat, his Love Poem . "But because of a vigorous underground campaign of censorship, the Spanish-language radio stations in Miami have banned these performers. . . "(Other) 'blacklist' names include Puerto Ricans Danny Rivera , Lucesita Ben.itez and Chucho Avellanet and Spaniards Victor Manuel and Ana Belen. Most sympathize with or 4 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publ i cation of Hispanic Link.News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-Q737 Publis . her. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting : Dora Delgado , Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants ' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector (202) 234-0737 . for a couple of years in the '70s for saying he wouldn't mind singing in Cuba, Niurka wrote . Her article offered such explanations by station executives as "We cannot row against the current. If the other stations decided to drop them , we did the same." And "We think it's healthy not to mix politics and show biz:" Some cited "bomb threats" as added incentives. Reaction to her article included numerous talk shows picking up the debate (Niurka declines to appear on them) and one station's offer to go to Puerto Rico;to interview Danny Rivera and then reconsitter his inclusion on "blacklist." Did the article stir up more flack than anyth ing the nine-year Herald veteran wrote in the past? "No," she said. '"Six years before Mariel, I visited Cuba with a group of writers and artists and wrote about that experience. " Overall, she added, the "blacklist'' piece is having a positive effect. One station even gave her its" best reporter of the year" award last week. (Weekly Report readers who want a copy of the article may write and request one from -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Norma Niurka, Entertainment Editor, Miami Herald, Herald Plaza , Miami, Florida 33101 . Enclose self-addressed stamped envelope and indicate Spanish or English.) POSTING THE TIMES: In a three-part series that started Jan. 7 headed "The Rich & Troubled Times," The Washington Post looked at its up-the-coast rival, The New York Times. Included was this paragraph : "Asked about the criticism that the paper avoids some areas of the c ity and some of the seamier local'issues, (editor Abe) Rosenthal said: 'It seems to me we cover every bloody issue. Do we cover Hispanic news, let's say? Not well enough . But the reason we cover Hispanic news is not for Hispanic readers. His panic readers do not buy The New York Times to read about Hispanic news, nor will they ever . " REAGAN MEETS WHOM? Mexican journalists are expressing displeasure with the poor play U.S. media gave the Ia Madrid meeting in Mex i cali . Particularly galling to them was The New York Times' Page 2 story headed: "Reagan Sees Mexican Today " . Asked one critic : " If he met w i th the Pope, would they write ' Reagan Sees Catholic ' ? " Charlie Ericksen 'tL M6)(1c;o D. F. sl DE LA MAPRID SE COFi GRINGO, Hispanic Link Weekly Report