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Hispanic link weekly report, January 20, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 20, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Jos6 ArmendSriz, a bilingual teacher in Chaparral, N.M., is among four teachers selected from a field of 140,000 as a finalist for the Teacher of the Year award sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers, Encyclopedia Britannica Inc. and Good Housekeeping. All finalists were previously named “Teacher of the Year'’ in their states. The winner will be announced in March . . .Golfer Nancy L6pez and jockey Angel Cordero Jr. are the two U.S. Hispanics among 100 persons invited to the Jan. 14 White House dinner for Ecuadoran President Le6n Febres-Cordera Lopez recently announced she will not play on the Ladies Professional Golf Association tour until July as she is expecting her second child in May.. .Arizona state
Sen. Luis Gonzales announces plans to run agajnstUv^. Rep. Morris Udall, the 25-year Democratic incumbent Gonzales,"also a Demdcrat, claims Udall has “lost touch with the community". .LOS Angeles School Board member Larry Gonzdlez says he'Wrll hot run fdr the seat vacated by Richard Alatbrre, who was elected to the Los Angeles City Council Dec. 10. Richard Polanco, a former Alatorre aide, was the first to announce for the seat.. .Former ABC 20/20 correspondent Geraldo Rivera is filling infor Larry King on his Larry King Live show broadcast over the Cable News Network. He Will continue for the vacationing King until Jan^ 24.. Franklin Ghang-Dfaz, the first Hispanic American astronaut; and six other crew members of space shuttle Columbia finally lift off Jan; 13 after a record seven delays due to bad weather and technical problems. . .

More Latinos Finishing H.S., in College-Census
A new U.S. Census Bureau report on educational attainment has divulged some possibly significant trends among Hispanics:
• Between 1972 and 1984, the proportion of H ispanics aged 18-24 who graduated from high school increased from 51.9% to 60.1%.
• Between 1973 and 1984, the proportion of Hispanic females enrolled in college increased 137%. Latinas now outnumber Latino collegians by 55.7% to 44.3%. In 1973, the males dominated, 57.6% to 42.4%.
• Of all Hispanics aged 3 to 34 years old enrolled in school in 1984, 55.6% were in elementary school, compared to 46.2% for blacks and 46.8% for whites.
• Hispanic high school graduates 18 to 24 years old who went to college (now 29.9%) peaked in 1976 at 35.8%.
The report, “School Enrollment - Social and Economic Characteristics of Students:
1984 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Ages 18-24 (in thousands)
High School Enrolled in Graduates College
No. % No. %
Hisp. 1,212 60.1 362 17.9
Black 2,885 74.7 786 20.4
White 19,373 83.0 6,256 28.0
Source: “School Enrollment- Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1984," U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.
Reagan Nominates Reich
Cuban American Otto J. Reich was nominated by President Reagan Jan. 15 as ambassador to Venezuela The nomination requires Senate confirmation.
Reich, 40, currently serves as the State Department’s coordinator of public diplomacy for Latin America and the Caribbean. White House intent to nominate him for the post was revealed last summer, but the action was snagged because press reports, which characterized Reich as a right-wing extremist preceded official notification to Venezuela.
Reich replaces George Landau, who left Venezuela last spring.
HISPANIC COLLEGE ENROLLMENT
Ages 14-34 (in thousands)
’73 *76 ’80 ’84
Male 167 223 222 232
Female 123 204 221 292
Source: “School Enrollment- Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1984," U.S Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
October 1984,” was released Jan. 9. It showed that Hispanics continue to lag behind whites and blacks in their high school completion rates.
Beginning in 1972, the first year such data was collected on Hispanics, the high school completion rate was 51.9%. The following 11 years, the figure fluctuated between 57.6% and 54.1%, with the largest jump occurring between 1983 and 1984 - 54.8% to 60.1 %.
Wendy Bruno of the education staff of the Census Bureau said the increase was not necessarily significant because of the small Hispanic sample size. A significant increase would be 6% or higher, Bruno said.
7.6% Work Disabilities
A new Census Bureau report shows that 7.6% of Hispanic males had a work disability in 1980 compared with 9.3% of white males and 12.4% of black males. Of those with a work disability, 3.6% of all Hispanics in the work force were prevented from doing any work at all, compared with 4% and 6.8% of white and black workers respectively.
In the female work force, 7.6% Latinas, 7.9% whites and 12.4% blacks had a work disability. Of those, 5% of all Latinas, 4.6% of all whites and 8% of all blacks in the work force were prevented from working.
The report “Selected Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability by States: 1980,” shows that 12 million or 8.9% of the work force 18 to 64 years old had a work disability and that 6.2 million could not do any work. Federal workers, according to the study, had a higher disability rate (9.7%) than workers in state and local governments(7.9%), private industry (6.9%) and self employment (8.8%).
The report counted 524,000 Hispanics 34 years and younger attending college in 1984, a jump from 290,000 in 1973. The gain was not dramatically disproportionate to Hispanic population growth in those years.
In 1984, as in years past, a lower percentage of Hispanics than blacks or whites attended college (see chart).
Hispanics who completed high school, however, were more likely to continue their formal education than were blacks. The 1984 figures showed that, among high school graduates, 29.9% of Hispanics, 27.2% of blacks and 33.7% of whites went on to college. Hispanics had an increase of 4.1 % from 1972 - the largest for all three groups.
_________________________continued on page 2
CHC Is Rated ‘Liberal’
Reps. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) were rated as the most liberal of the 11 voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in 1985 by Americans for Democratic Action, a Washington, D.C. -based lobbying organization.
The voting record for the U.S. House and Senate members released Jan. 14 gave both Garcia and Roybal 95% ratings. All members of Congress were rated on 20 issues, including the federal budget, death penalty, abortion, star wars, immigration and aid to the Contras Overall, the House average was 45%, the Senate, 40%.
The other nine voting members of the caucus - Jaime Fuster(D-P.R.) and Ron de Lugo (D-Virgin Islands) do not vote in Congress - were rated: Henry Gonz&lez (D-Texas), 85%; Tony Coehlo (D-Calif.), 80%; Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), 80%; Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), 75%; Bill Richardson (D-N.M.), 70%; Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), 65%; E.“Kika” de la Garza (D-Texas), 60%; Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas), 60% and Manuel Lujan (D-N.M.), 15%. The caucus rated 71% overall in 1985, down from its 1984 rating of 75%. A rating of 70% or above is considered liberal by ADA.
In 1985 five senators and 20 representatives had 100% scores While none were Hispanic, Roybal receiyedLa 100% rating in 1984.
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JAN 2 11986:


Sin_pelos_en_la lengua
SWEET AND SOUR: Bracing against expected efforts to whisk the Simpson immigration bill (passed on the Senate side in September through the House of Representatives, the Wall Street Journal laid out its concern.
The bill, it editorialized recently, “contains an enforcement mechanism that requires job-providers to assume that Hispanic-looking job seekers are breaking the law until they provide documentation to prove otherwise. We continue to believe that it would be odious and embarrassing to see such a policy become law in the U.S.”
Nice But why the odious bold headline over it:
“Wetbacks as People.”
And won’t Asian Americans have the same problem? Maybe the Journafs planning a sequel, “Gooks as People.”
GAMES RICH PEOPLE PLAY: How do influential and influenceable folks in Washington get their jollies and red and green jelly beans at Yuletide?
At the Federal Communications Commission, they indulge in the year-end tradition of auctioning off (proceeds to United Way) lunch dates with key FCC staff and commissioners.
Jos A Luis Rodriguez, president of the New York-based Hispanic Information and Telecommunications Network (HITN), had tried in
the past - to no avail - to gain audience with Jim McKinney, the FCCs chief of mass media
Thanks to a HITN board member who bid$75, Rodriguez finally got his wish. Auction ground rules, however, call for no table talk with your FCC host on matters pending before the commission (HITN now has some).
But Rodriguez did have a good chance to air some general Hispanic concerns. And the meal was first-rate, he reports.
(On hearing of the custom, one well-placed lobbyist asked, “Can’t you just call up and in vite a commissioner to lunch?" No way, she was told. Not if you’re an unconnected minority.)
SECOND OPINION: When the New York Board of Education extended the contract of Chancellor Nathan Quiftones to June 1987 last month, it extolled him “for a succession of innovative new programs.”
The New York Times is less effusive. In a recent editorial, it grades Quiftones’ performance “adequate," at best Chastising both him and the board fortheir“unwillingness even to admit that the system is failing to meet the needs of half its constituents,” it labels career-man Quiftones “a creature of a lethargic bureaucracy, reacting to crises rather than forcefully seeking change.”
If only Anthony Alvarado had been as good out of school as he was in it...
- Kay Barbaro
Latino Jobless Still Double-Digit
The Hispanic unemployment rate decreased from November to December, with the national rate hitting its lowest point in more than five years, but Hispanics continued to have a double-digit jobless rate.
The U.S. Labor Departments Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 10.4% of the Hispanic population was out of work in December, a slight improvement over November’s 10.6%.
The Hispanic rate reached its lowest point
in February at 10.0% and its highest point in October at 11.1%.
The national rate was 6.9% for December, the first time since April 1980 that the unemployment dropped below 7%.
The Full Employment Action Council(FEAC), however, challenged the Labor Department’s figures. FEAC figures, unlike those put out by Labor, included discouraged and part-time workers. The FEAC’s “real rate” for Hispanic unemployment today is 18.2%.
HISPANIC AND NATIONAL JOBLESS RATES BY MONTH - 1985
J F M A M J J A S 0 N D
10.6 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.6 10.6 11.0 10.4 10.4 11.1 10.6 10.4
7.4 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.0 6.9
Hisp.
Natl,
Source: U.S. Department of Labor
Latinos on Farms Clustered in West
Hispanics living on farms in 1984 were concentrated in the West younger than other groups and experienced a higher unemployment rate than the rest of the farm population, a study by the Census Bureau showed.
The Jan. 10 report, “Farm Population of the United States 1984,” showed that 60% of the
178.000 Hispanics on farms lived in the West Hispanics constituted 3.1% (178,000) of the
5.754.000 total farm residents; blacks were 2.6% (148,000).
Farm residents are defined as persons living on rural farms, including non-agricultural workers and their dependents. The study noted that 58% of all farm residents in the West worked in agriculture compared to 55.5% in the Northeast, 52.7% in the Midwest and 43.8% in the South.
The unemployment rate for farm residents was lower than that of the nonfarm population - 3.0% versus 7.7%. However, the unemployment
rate of Hispanics was substantially higher (6.1 %) than the white rate (2.7%). Comparative figures for blacks were not available.
Hispanics had the lowest median age of all farm residents at 24, followed by blacks, 25.5, and whites, 36.
The Midwest had the largest share of farm residents (44.%), followed by the South (36%), the West (15%) and the Northeast (6%).
Mike Garcia Dies
Mike Garcia, one of four pitchers who helped the Cleveland Indians establish the major league record for victories in 1954, died Jan. 13.
Garcia, 62, spent 12 seasons with the I ndians and compiled a record of 142 wins and 96 losses. He contributed 19 wins with a league-best 2.54 earned run average the year the Indians set the American League record for victories - 111 games.
More Latinos Finish H.S.
continued from page 1
Although 18-to-24-year-old Hispanics increased their high school completion rate from 1972 to 1984, the expected parallel increase of Hispanic high school graduates enrolled in college did not occur.
The study also showed that Hispanic females represented a larger proportion of their ethnic/ racial group enrolled in college than their white or black counterparts. While Hispanic females aged 14 to34 comprised 55.7% of all Hispanics enrolled in college in 1984, black females were 52.1%; white females, 49.1%.
Cecilia Burciaga, associate dean for graduate studies at Stanford University, said the increase is a “hopeful sign.” A substantial number of these women are in their late 20s to early40s and have reentered the educational system, namely community colleges, suggested Burciaga
- Felix Perez
Arroyo Loses Board Race
Puerto Rican Evelyn Arroyo, a Hoboken, N.J., school board candidate who ran a newspaper ad of herself wearing a silk negligee, finished third out of five candidates in the Jan. 14 election for the nine-member board.
Printed in a Hoboken weekly newspaper, Arroyo’s ad caused a local controversy that was picked up by the national media.
Lourdes Arroyo, no relation and another candidate forthe two-yearterm seat, criticized the advertisement saying it was “sexist” and ’’degrading to the whole Puerto Rican community”.
They were the two Hispanics in the fiveway race. Evelyn Arroyo polled 407 votes and Lourdes Arroyo, 1,696 votes. Eugene Drayton won the seat with 1,933 votes.
I n another race for a one- year term seat, two Latinos, Felix Santiago and Linda Diaz-Murphy, finished 4th and 5th.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: The U.S. Census Bureau reports on the 1972-84 school enrollment of Hispanic, black and white students and their characteristics in “School Enrollment- Social and Economic Characteristics of Students October1984 (Advance Report),” Series-P-20, No. 404. Price not available at press time. Contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
WORK DISABILITY: The Census Bureau provides information on the number of persons with a work disability in “Selected Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability by State: 1980,” (GPO Stock No. 033-024-06366-2). Cost: $5. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
FARM POPULATION: The U.S. Census Bureau has published a report on farm residents, their income, geographical location, sex, age, race, national origin and other characteristics in“Farm Population of the United States 1984,” Series P-27, No. 58. Price not available at press time. Contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
1986 CALENDAR: The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs has printed a 1986 calendar that features a noted Hispanic in History each month. Price: $2.50. Also availablefrom the commission is a list of publications on different issues affecting the Ohio Hispanic community. Contact Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs, 65 South Front St., Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 466-8333.
NEW YORK INTERSHIPS: Recruitment is underway for two internship programs with the New York city government “Summer Management Intern Program” for New York City residents is a terv-week city government work training program for 40 college junior, senior and recently graduated students Deadline: Feb 1. The nine-month “Urban Fellows Program” offers 20 college and graduate students intensive instruction in city administration through seminars and practical experience Deadline Feb 15. Contact your school's financial aid officer or write to: Director, NYC Urban Fellows Program, 220 Church St., Rm., 338, New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 233-0489.
HISPANICS IN DENVER: The Latin American Research and Service Agency has published a 68-page report titled “A Demographic Profile of Denver’s Hispanic Population.” Price: $12. Order from: LARASA, 303 W. Colfax, Suite 825, Denver, Colo. 80204 (303) 623-1465.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D.C 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
MANAGING EDITOR
For national weekend newspaper magazine with 600,000 circulation. Candidates need strong writing - editing skills to generate, assign and edit general interest features and manage editorial staff. Working experience on West Coast or Southwest essential. Salary: negotiable. Contact Harry Caicedo (305) 442*2462.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
For non-profit, community based organization providing educational services to Hispanic immigrants and other minorities.
Responsibilities include program and personnel management administrative and fiscal oversight fund-raising, and community outreach.
Requires experience in administering educational programs for bicultural, bilingual populations, demonstrated managerial and fund-raising abilities, must be fully bilingual in Spanish and English. Salary $30,00 & benefits
Send resume, 2*3 page personal statement describing qualifications, and 5 references to:
Spanish Education - Development Center Search 1840 Kalorama Rd. NW Washington, D.C. 20009 By Jan. 31
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltr&n (213) 743*7158.
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR II for Public Relation*
The New Jersey Education Association seeks a candidate who shows familiarity with the operation or public schools and with the habits, attitudes of teachers and their representative organizations. Salary is $29,596 per year. Apply to: Edward J. Gallagher, Director, Communications Division, New Jersey Education Association, 180 West State St, P.O. Box 1211, Trenton, N.J. 08607 (609) 599-4561.
MANAGEMENT INTERNS Phoenix, Ariz.
Starting Salary $19,ZOO
The city seeks qualified persons who have completed, or will complete, a master's degree in public administration or a closely related field by June 1986 for its one-year Intern Program. Positions start July 1, 1986. All information and documents required for the application must be received by Jan. 31, 1986. Applications and further information can be obtained from Charles E Hill, management and budget director, 251 West Washington, Phoenix, Ariz. 85003 (602) 262-4805.
AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/ AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER.
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Mont-| gomery County, MeL, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC ENTREPRENEURS Washington, D.C. Jan. 22
The Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce will sponsor its 1 st Assembly for H ispanic Businessmen and Entrepreneurs from the Washington area, with Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez as guest speaker. Lourdes Monz6n (202).296-0335
HISPANIC FEDERAL EXECUTIVES Washington, D.C. Jan. 24
National Council of La Raza President RaCil Yzaguirre will be the guest speaker at a luncheon to install new officers of the Association of Hispanic Federal Executives.
Gilbert Chavez (202) 447-7501
COMING SOON
SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS DINNER Los Angeles Jan. 30
The 2nd annual banquet by the Personnel Management Association of Aztl&n will award nine scholarships to students from PMAA chapters.
Cecilia Alatorre (213) 972-2168 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
MINORITIES IN THE MEDIA Reston, Va. Jan. 30,31
The American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation’s Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business will hold elections and discuss future activities Nancy Osborn (703) 648-1000
CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan. 30,31
National IMAGE President Annabelle Jaramillo will be a panelist at CNPCs 3rd annual conference dealing with subjects such as media coverage of ethnic events and ethnicity and politics Guarione Diaz (305) 642-3484
HISPANIC RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS Washington, D.C. Feb. 2-5 The National Hispanic Religious Broadcasters will convene at the National Religious Broadcasters conference to discuss improving management and production techniques and establishing ministries. H.O. Espinoza (512) 824-3322
MEDIA JOBS FAIR Los Angeles Feb. 7, 8
The 7th annual fair by the California Chicano News Media Association will bring together Hispanics and media representatives to discuss job opportunities along with workshops on job hunting.
Connie Rivera (213) 743-7158
HISPANIC THEATERS San Antonio Feb. 7-9
The Conferencia Nacional de Teatros Hispanos, conducted by several regional Hispanic theater groups, will examine improving management methods, showcasing Hispanic works and creating a national circuit
Mario SAnchez (305) 643-1660 Ext. 157
SPOTLIGHT
The National Center for Health Statistics of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will conduct workshops on the data tapes from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES). Scheduled for Feb. 3,4 in Houston and Feb. 6, 7 in Los Angeles, the files to be released include medical history and physicians? examinations from the Mexican American survey section. For further information, contact Sandra Smith at the Scientific and Technical Information Branch, National Center for Health Statistics, Room 1-57,3700 East-West Highway, Hyattsville, Md. (301) 436-8500.
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community free of charge. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name of event, date, location, contact person and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
3


Arts & Entertainment
HISPANIC ARTISTS ARE NOMINATED IN A variety Of Golden Globe and Grammy categories as Hollywood officially kicks off its award season this week
Nominees for this year's Grammy awards were announced Jan. 9 by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Hispanics are mentioned in eight categories outside the“Latin” three which are expected to raise less controversy than they did last year when no Chicanos were listed in the “Mexican American performance” nominations.
Singer Linda.Ronstadt is nominated in three non-Latin categories, including “pop vocal performance, female" for her album Lush Life The album on the Elektra label is also nominated in the “album package” and “instrumental arrangement accompanying vocals" category.
Other Latinos nominated are: Dave Valentin for his album Love Light in Flight in the “R&B instrumental performance (orchestra, group or soloist)” category; Cheech Marin for his Born in East LA hit in the “comedy recording” category; Pldcido Domingo and Pilar Lorengar for their album Zarzuela Arias and Duets in the “classical vocal soloist performance" category and Brazilian Tania Maria for her album Made in New York in the“jazz vocal solo performance, female” category.
The NARAS continues its three-year-old practice of awarding Grammys in three “Latin” music categories. Spanish singer Rocio
Durcal is mentioned in the “Mexican American performance” category for her Canta a Juan Gabriel album (with songs written by the Juarez-born Juan Gabriel). All other nominees in this category are either Mexican nationals or Mexican Americans: Maria de Lourdes (for Mujer importante); Santiago Jimenez Jr. (Santiago Strikes Again); Vicki Carr (Simplemente mujer); Los Humildes (13 Aniversano/13 Album/13 Exitos); and Juan Valentin (20 Exitos Romanticos con Juan Valentin).
Two men nominated last year in the “Latin pop performance” category were mentioned again this year, separately and together, in a total of three “pop” nominations. Jose Jose and Jose Feliciano share a nomination for their duet titled Porella In the same category, Jose Jose is listed for his album Reflections while Jos6 Feliciano is singled out for his Yo soy tuyo. Also nominated were Lani Hall (Es tacit amar) and Lucia Mendez (Solo una mujer).
Nominated in the “tropical Latin performance” category are: Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco (De nuevo); Mongo Santamaria (Free Spirit/Espiritu Libre); Tito Puente (Mambo Diablo); Ruben Blades (Mucho Mejor);Bonny Cepeda y Orquesta (Noche de discotheque) and Eddie Palmieri (Solito).
Meanwhile, actors Edward James Olmos and Raul Julia could take home Golden Globes this week when the Hollywood Foreign Press Association gives out its awards Jan. 24. The ceremony will be televised live for the first time in its history this year. The show is syndicated by independent stations across the country (check local listings).
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SIN APPEAL CONFIRMED: Stations of the SIN Television network will not be immediately affected by a recent ruling by a Federal Communications Commission judge saying that 13 SIN affiliates are illegally controlled by Mexican media magnate Emilio Azcarraga.
SIN officials confirmed last week that the Spanish International Communications Corporation, the Bahia de San Francisco Television Company and The Seven Hills Television Company will appeal the ruling, which denies license renewals for SIN network
affiliates owned by the three companies in New York Miami, San Antonio, Fresno, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Tucson. The ruling, handed down by FCCJudge John Conlin, will also affect the licensing of SICC-owned translator stations in Philadelphia, Bakersfield, Calif., and Hartford.
In a press statement released Jan. 13, SIN president Ren6 Anselmo said that the network will “take all the steps possible to preserve Spanish-language television for our viewers” The statement added that pending final determination on the appeal, which could take several months, the stations will continue to operate unaffected.
At a Los Angeles press conference held Jan. 14, SICC stockholder Danny Villanueva said the corporation is considering options
ranging from “protracted litigation to an outright sale” Villanueva, who is president and general manager of Los Angeles SIN affiliate KMEX, said that SICC’s “most likely” option would be to restructure, following Conlin’s suggestions that the corporation do so.
Meanwhile, a Los Angeles federal judge said Jan. 13 that she is ready to issue a ruling on a lawsuit introduced by SICC minority stockholder Frank Fouce against SICC, SIN and Anselmo. Judge Mariana Pfaelzer said she expected the parties to reach an out-Of-court settlement before she handed down her ruling.
At press time, SICC officials and stockholders were scheduled to hold a summit meeting in New York to discuss possible options to restructuring the corporation.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 *N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
I USED TO BE A KWRA¥-A|AERICAN BUT MY m' 5MB X WAS •PURO MECCANO," OTHER PEOPLE SAID I WAS LATINO, SPANISH SPEAWN& OR SPANISH SORUMAETW THEN I BECAME A q\ICAN0>
AND THE GOVERNMENT BEGAN CALLING ME HISPANIC®
MY TRENDS CALLED ME MANY THINGS AND MY A SAID,
'YOU'RE JUST R.AIH IAZYJ

4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Sen. Gonza,les an ,nounces l?!ans t9' run Udall, the 25-year Dem0cratic incumbent. Gonzales, also a Derh6crat, claims Udall has "lost touch with ttre ' community''. : :Los 'Angeles School ' Board membePla' rry Gonzalez says freiwill 'flot fun for':the seat vacated by Richard :Alatorre, who was' elected• to the Los Angeles City Council Dec : 10: Richard Polanco,• a former' Aiatorre aide was the first to announce for the seat. .. GeraldoRivera is filling infor l..arry King on his Larry King Live show broadcast over•the Cable News Networl<. . He continue for the vacationing King until Jan , 24 ... Diaz, the first Hispanic American astronaut; •and . six other' crew members of space shuttle Columbia finally lift-'off Jan: 1'3 after a record seven delays due to bad weather and technical problems ... Jose Armendariz, a bilingual teacher in Chaparral, N.M., is among four teachers selected from a field of 140,000 as a finalist for the Teacher of the Year award sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers, Encyclopedia Britannica Inc. and Good Housekeeping. All finalists were previously named "Teacher of the Year'' in their states. The winner will be announced in March ... Golfer Nancy L6pez and joc;key Angel Cordero Jr. are the two U.S. Hispanics among 100 persons invited to the Jan . 14 White House dinner for Ecuadoran President Le6n Febres-Cordero. Lopez recently announced she will not play on the Ladies Professional Golf Association tour until July as she is expecting her second child in May ... Arizona state HISPANIC LINK WEE EPORT Jan.20,1986 More Latinos Finishing H.S., in CollegeCensus A new U.S. Census Bureau report on edu cational attainment has divulged some possibly significant trends among Hispanics: • Between 1972 and 1984, the proportion of Hispanics aged 18-24 who graduated from high school increased from 51. 9% to 60.1 % . • Between 1973 and 1984, the proportion of Hispanic females enrolled in college increased 137%. Latinas now outnumber Latino collegians by 55.7% to 44.3%. In 1973, the males domi nated, 57.6% to 42.4%. • Of all Hispanics aged 3 to 34 years old enrolled in school in 1984, 55.6% were in elementary school, compared to 46. 2% for blacks and 46.8% for whites. • Hispanic high school graduates 18 to 24 years old who went to college (now 29.9%) peaked in 1976 at 35. 8% . The report, "School Enrollment Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: Hisp. Black White 1984 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Ages 18-24 (in thousands) High School Enrolled in Graduates College No. % No. % 1,212 60.1 362 17.9 2,885 74. 7 786 20.4 19,373 83.0 6,256 28.0 Source: " School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1984," U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Reagan Nominates Reich Cuban American Otto J . Reich was nominated by President Reagan Jan. 15 as ambassador to Venezuela The nomination requires Senate confirmation. Reich, 40, currently serves as the State Departmenfs coordinator of public diplomacy for Latin America and the Caribbean. White House intent to nominate him f o r the post was revealed last summ. c r, but the action was snagged because press reports, which charac terized Reich as a right-wing ex tre mist, preceded off icial notification to Venezuela. Reich replaces George Landau, who le ft Venezuela last spring . HISPANIC COLLEGE ENROLLMENT Ages 14-34 (in thousands) Male Female '73 '76 167 223 123 204 '80 '84 222 232 221 292 Source: "School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of Students : October 1984," U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census October 1984," was released Jan . 9 . It showed that Hispanics continue to lag behind whites and blacks in their high school completion rates . Beginning in 1972, the first year such data was collected on Hispanics , the high school completion rate was 51 . 9%. The following 11 years , figure fluctuated between 57 . 6% and 54. 1 % , with the largest jump occurring between 1983 and 1984-54.8% t o 60.1 % . Wendy Bruno of the education staff of the Census Bureau said the increase was not necessarily significant because of the small Hispanic sample size. A significant increase would be 6% or higher, Bruno said. 7.60/o Work Disabilities A new Census Bureau report shows that 7.6% of Hispanic males had a work disability in 1980 compared with 9 . 3% of white males and 12.4% of b l ack males. Of those with a work disability, 3 . 6% of all Hispanics in the work force were prevented from doing any work at all , compared with 4% and 6 . 8% of white and black workers respectively. In the female work force, 7.6% Latinas, 7 . 9% whites and 12.4% blacks had a work disability. Of those , 5% of all Latinas, 4 . 6% of all whites and 8% of all blacks in the work force were prevented from working. The report "Selected Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability by States: 1980, " shows that 12 million or 8 . 9% of the work f orce 18 to 64 years old had a work disability and that 6 . 2 million could not do any work. Fede ral workers, according to the study , had a higher disability rate (9.7%) than workers in state and loca l governments(? .9% ) , private industry (6.9%) and self employmen t (8 .8%). The report counted 524,000 Hispanics 34 years and younger attending college in 1984, a jump from 290,000 in 1973. The gain was not dramatically disproportionate to Hispanic population growth in those years. In 1984, as in years past, a lower percentage of Hispanics than blacks or whites attended college (see chart). Hispanics who completed high school, however, were more likely to continue their formal education than were blacks. The 1984 figures showed that, among high school graduates, 29 . 9% of Hispanics, 27.2% of blacks and 33. 7% of whites went on to college. Hispanics had an increase of4.1% from 1972 the largest for all three groups. continued on page 2 CHC Is Rated 'Liberal' Reps. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) were rated as the most liberal of the 11 voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in 1985 by Americans for Democratic Action, a Wash ington, D .C. -based lobbying organization. The voting record for the U.S. House and Senate members released Jan. 14 gave both Garcia and Roybal 95% ratings. All members of Congress were rated on 20 issues, including the federal budget, death penalty, abortion, star wars, immigration and aid to the Contras. Overall, the House average was 45%, the Senate, 40%. The other nine voting members of the caucus-Jaime Fuster(D-P.R.) and Rohde Lugo(D-Virgin Islands) do not vote in Congress were rated : Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas), 85%; Tony Coehlo (D-Calif .), 80%; Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), 80%; Esteban Torres(D Calif .), 75% ; Bill Richardson (D-N.M.), 70%; Albert Bustamante ( D-Texas), 65%; E." Kika" de Ia Garza (D Texas), 60%; Solomon Ortiz (D Texas), 60% and Manuel Lujan (D-N.M.), 15%. The caucus rated 71% overall in 1985, down from its 1984 rating of 75%. A rating of 70% or above is considered liberal by ADA. In 1985 five senators and 20 representatives had 1 00% scores. While none were Hispanic, Roybal rating in 1984. JAN 2 i '1986,

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,Sin _ pelos en Ia lengua the past-to no avail -to gain audience with Jim McKinney, the FCC's chief of mass media SWEET AND SOUR: . Bracing against expected efforts to whisk Simpson immigration bill (passed on the Senate side in through the House of Representatives, the Wall Street Journal laid out its concern. Thanks to a HITN board member who bid $75, Rodriguez finally got his wish. Auction ground rules, however, call for no table talk with your FCC host on matters pending before the commission(HITN now has some). The it editorialized recently, "contains an enforcement mechanism that requires job-providers to assume that Hispanic-looking job seekers are breaking the law until they provide documentation to prove otherwise. We continue to believe that it would be odious and embarrassing to see such a policy become law in the U .S." But Rodriguez did have a good chance to air some general Hispanic concerns. And the meal was first-rate, he reports. (On hearing of the custom, one well-placed lobbyist asked, "Can't you just call up and invite a commissioner to lunch?" No way, she was told. Not if you're an unconnected minority.) Nice. But why the odious bold headline over it: SECOND OPINION: When the New York Board of Education extended the contract of Chancellor Nathan Quil'lones to June 1987 last month, it extolled him "for a succession of innovative new programs." "Wetback& as People." And won't Asian Americans have the same problem? Maybe the Journars planning a sequel, "Gooka as People." GAMES RICH PEOPLE PLAY: How do influential and influenceable folks in Washington get their jollies and red and green jelly beans at Yuletide? At the Federal Communications Commission, they indulge in the year-end tradition of auctioning oft (procseds to United Way) lunch dates with key FCC staff and commissioners. The New York Times is less effusive. In a recent editorial, it grades Quinones' performance "adequate," at best. Chastising both him and the board for their" unwillingness even to admit that the system is failing to meet the needs of half its constituents," it labels career-man Quinones "a creature of a lethargic bureaucracy, reacting to crises rather than forcefully seeking change." Joa6 Luis Rodriguez, president of the New York-based Hispanic Information and Telecommunications Network (HITN), had tried in If only Anthony Alvarado had been as good out of school as he was in it. .. Latino Jobless Still Double-Digit The Hispanic unemployment rate decreased from November to December, with the national rate hitting its lowest point in more than five years, but Hispanics continued to have a . double-digit jobless rate. The U.S . Labor Departmenfs Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 1 0.4% of the Hispanic population was out of work in December, a slight improvement over November's 10.6% . The Hispanic rate reached its lowest point in February at 10.0% and its highest point in October at 11 . 1 %. The national rate was 6.9% for December, the first time since April 1980 that the unemployment dropped below 7%. The Full Employment Action Councii(FEAC), however, challenged the Labor Departmenfs figures. FEAC figures, unlike those put out by Labor, induded discouraged and part time workers . The FEAC's " real rate" for Hispanic unemployment today is 18.2%. HISPANIC AND NATIONAL JOBLESS RATES BY MONTH1985 Hisp. Nat I, J 10. 6 7 . 4 F 10.0 7.3 M 10.3 7.3 Source : U.S Department of Labor A 10.4 7 . 3 M 10.6 7.3 J 10 . 6 7.3 J 11.0 7 . 3 A 10.4 7 . 1 S 0 N D 10 . 4 11. 1 10.6 10.4 7.1 7.1 7 . 0 6 . 9 Latinos on Farms Clustered in West Hispanics living on farms in 1984 were concentrated in the West, younger than other groups and experienced a higher unem ployment rate than the rest of the farm popu la ti on, a study by the Census Bureau showed. The Jan . 10 report, "Farm Population of the United States 1984," showed that 60% of the 178,000 Hispanics on farms lived in the West. His panics constituted 3 .1% (178 ,000) of the 5,754,00 0 total farm residents; blacks were 2 . 6% (148,000). F arm residents are defined as persons living on rural farms, including non-agricultural workers and their dependents. The study noted that 58% of all farm residents in the West worked in agriculture compared to 55.5% in the Northeast, 52.7% in the Midwest and 43.8 % in the South. T he unempioyment rate for farm residents was lower than of the nonfarm population 3.0% versus 7 .71>. However, the unemployment 2 rate of Hispanics was substantially higher (6.1 %) than the white rate (2.7%). Comparative figures for blacks were not available . Hispanics had the lowest median age of all farm residents at 24, followed by blacks , 25 . 5 , and whites, 36. The Midwest had the largest share of farm residents (44 .%), followed by the South (36%), the West (15%) and the Northeast (6%). Mike Garcia Dies Mike Garcia, one of four pitchers who helped the Cleveland Indians establish the major league record for victories in 1954, died Jan . 13. Garcia, 62 , spent 12 seasons with the Indians and compiled a record of 142 wins and 96 losses. He contributed 19 wins with a league best 2 .54 earned run average the year the Indians set the American League record for victories-111 games. Kay Barbaro More Latinos Finish H.S. continued from page 1 Although 18-to-24-year-old Hispanics in creased their high school completion rate from 1972 to 1984, the expected parallel increase of Hispanic high school graduates enrolled in college did not occur. The study also showed that Hispanic females represented a larger proportion of their ethnic/ racial group enrolled in college than their white or black counterparts. While Hispanic females aged 14 to34 comprised55. 7% of all Hispanics enrolled in college in 1984, black females were 52.1%; white females, 49.1%. Cecilia Burciaga, associate dean for graduate studies at Stanford University, said the increase is a " hopeful sign." A substantial number of these women are in their late 20s to early40s and have reentered the educational system , namely community colleges, suggested Burciaga Felix Perez Arroyo Loses Board Race Puerto Rican Evelyn Arroyo , a Hoboken, N . J . , school board candidate who ran a newspaper ad of herself wearing a silk negligee, f i nished t hird out of five candidates in the Jan. 14 election for the ninemember board . Printed in a Hoboken weekly newspaper , Arroyo's ad caused a local controversy that was picked up by the national media. Lourdes Arroyo, no relation ana another candidate for the twO'year ter m seat, criticized the advertisement saying it was "sexisf' and "degrad i ng to the whole Puerto Rican community''. They were t he two His panics in the fiveway race . Evelyn Arroyo polled 407 votes and Lourdes Arroyo, 1 ,696 votes . Eugene Drayton won the seat with 1 ,933 votes . In another race for a one-year term seat, two Latinos , Felix Santiago and Linda Diaz Murphy, finished 4th and 5th. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: The U . S . Census Bureau reports on the 1972 school enrollment of Hispanic, black and white students and their characteristics in "School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1984 (Advance Report)," Serie&P.20, No. 404. Price not available at press time. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S . Printing Office, Washington, D.C . 20402 (202) 783-3238. WORK DISABILITY: The Census Bureau provides information on the number of persons with a work disability in "Selected Characteristics of Persons with a Work Disability by State: 1980," (GPO Stock No. 033-024-06366). Cost: $5. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402 (202) 783-3238. FARM POPULATION: The U.S . Census Bureau has published a report on farm residents, their income, geographical location, sex, age, race, national origin and other characteristics in" Farm Population of the United States 1984," Series P-27, No. 58. Price not available at press time. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Printing Office, Washington, D.C . 20402 (202) 783-3238. 1986 CALENDAR: The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking -Affairs has printed a 1986 calendar that features a noted Hispanic in History each month. Price: $2. 50. Also available from the commission is a list of publications on different issues affecting the Ohio Hispanic community. Contact: Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs, 65 South Front St. , Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 466. NEW YORK INTERSHIPS: Recruitment is underway for two internship programs with the New York city government. "Summer Management Intern Program" for New York City residents is a ten week city government work training program for 40 college junior, senior and recently graduated students Deadline: Feb. 1. The "Urban Fellows Program" offers 20 college and graduate students intensive instruction in city administration through seminars and practical experience Deadline: Feb. 15. Contact your schoors financial aid officer or write to: Director, NYC Urban Fellows Program, 220 Church St., Rm., .338, New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) HISPANICS IN DENVER: The Latin American Research and Service Agency has published a 68-page report titled" A Demographic Profile of Hispanic Population." Price: $12. Order from:LARASA, 303 W. Colfax, Suite 825, Denver, Colo. 80204 (303) 623-1465. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D . C 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p . m . ps on the data tapes from the Hispanic Health Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES). Scheduled for Feb. 3, 4 in Houston and Feb. 6 , 7 in Los Angeles, the files to be released include medical history and physicians' examinations from the Mexican American survey section. For further information, contact Sandra Smith at the Scientific and Teehnicallnformation Branch, National Center for Health Statistics, Room 1, 3700 East West Highway , Hyattsville , Md. (301) 436. Calendar will announce events of interest to the national His panic community free of charge . Items should be received two before publication date . Please include r.ame of event, date, location, contact person and phone number . Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 0737 . 3

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Arts & Entertainment Durcal is mentioned in the "Mexican American performance" category for her Cant a a Juan Gabriel album (with songs written by the Juarez born Juan Gabriel) . All other nominees in this category are either 'Mexican nationals or Mexican Americans: Maria de Lou rdes (for Mujer importante) ; Santiago Jimenez Jr. (Santiago Strikes Again); Vicki Carr (Simplemente mujer) ; Los Humildes (13 Aniversario/13 Album/13 Exitos) ; and Juan Valentin (20 Exitos Romanticos con Juan Valentin). . HISPANIC ARTISTS ARE NOMINATED IN A variety of Golden Globe and Grammy categories as Hollywood officially kicks off its award season this week. Nominees for this years Grammy awards were announced Jan. 9 by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. H i spanics mentioned in eight categories outside the " Latin " three which are expected to raise less controversy than they did last year when no Chicanos were listed in the "Mexican American nominations. Two men nominated last year in the "Latin pop performance" category were mentioned again this year, separately and together, in a total of three "pop" nominations . Jose Jose and 'Jose Feliciano share a nomination for their duet titled Porella In the same category, Jose Jose is listed for his album Reflections while Jose Feliciano is singled out for his Yo soy tuyo . Also nominated were Lani Hall (Es facil amar) and Lucia Mendez (Solo una mujer). Singer Linda. Ronstadt is nominated in thre. e non-Latin categories, including "pop vocal performance, female" for her album Lush Life. The album on the Eiektra label is also nominated in the "album package" and "instrumental arrangement accompanying vocals" category. Nominated in the "tropical Latin performance" category are : Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco (De nuevo) ; Mongo Santamaria (Free Spirit/Espiritu Libre); lito Puente (Mambo Diablo) ; Ruben Blades (Mucho Mejor) ;Bonny Cepeda y Orquesta (Noche de discotheque) and Eddie Palmieri (So/ito) . Other Latinos nominated are : Dave Valentin for his album Love Light in Flight in the "R&B instrumental performance (orchestra , group or soloist)" category; Cheech Marin for his Born in East LA hit in the "comedy recording" category; Placido Domingo and Pilar Lorengar for their album Zarzuela Arias and Duets in the "classical vocal soloist performance" category and Brazilian Tania Maria for her album Made in New York in the "jazz vocal solo performance, female" category. Meanwhile, actors Edward James Olmos and Raul Julia could take home Golden Globes this week when the Hollywood Foreign Press Association giyes out its awards Jan. 24. The ceremony w i ll be televised live for the first time in its history this year . The show is syndicated by independent stations across the country(check local The NARAS continues its three-year-old practice of awarding Grammys in three "Latin" music categories. Spanish singer Rocio listings). -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report SIN APPEAL CONFIRMED: Stations of the SIN Television network will not be im mediately affected by a recent ruling by a FederaiCommunicationsCommissionjudge saying that 13 Sl N affiliates are illegally con trolled by Mex ican media magnate Emilio Azcarraga . . SIN officia l s confirmed last week that t he Spanish International Communication s Corpor a tion, the Bahia de Sa n Francisco T e levi s i o n Company a nd The Seven Hills Television Company w ill appeal the ruling , wh i ch denies license renewals for SIN network HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nation a l publicati on o f H ispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N W Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-o737 4 Publisher. Hec t o r E ric kse nMendoza Editor. C arlos M o r al e s Report ing: Dora D elgado, F e l ix P e rez, Char li e Ericksen , An tonio Mejias-Re n tas. No port i o n of Hispanic Link Weekl y R eport may be reprod u ced o r broadcast in a n y form w ithou t adva n ce p e rm iss i on Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATO RS: Include t h e latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekl y Report in participants' packets at your next conference o r conventio n . For details. c ontact Hector Er i ckse">-Me n doza (202) 234. affiliates owned by the three companies in New York, Miami , San Antonio, Fresno, L0s Angeles, San Francisco and Tucson. The ruling, handeddown by FCCIJudge John Conlin, will also affect the licensing of SICC-owned trans lator stations in Philadelphia, Bakersfield, Calif., and Hartford . In a press statement released Jan. 13, SIN president Rene Anselmo said that the network will "take all the steps possible t o preserve Spanish-language tefevision for our viewers. " The statement added that pending f inal de termination on the appeal , which could take several mon ths, the stations w ill contin ue to o perate unaffec t ed. At a Los Angeles press con ference held J an . 1 4, SICC stockh older Danny V i llanueva said the c orpo r ation is consid e ring options ranging from" protracted litigation to an outright sale." Villanueva , who is president and general manager of Los Angeles SIN affiliate KMEX, said that SICC's "most likely" option woul<;l be to restructure, following Conlin ' s suggestions that the corporation do so . Meanwhile , a Los Angeles federal judge said Jan . 13 that she is ready to issue a ruling on a lawsuit introduced by SICC minority stockholder Frank Fouce against SICC , SIN and Anselmo . Judge Mariana Pfaelzer said she expected the parties to reach an out-of-court settlement before she handed down her ruling . At press time , SICC officials and stockholders were scheduled t o hold a summit meeting in New York to discuss possible options to restructuri ng the corporation. -Antonio Mejias Ren ta s 1 U S E D 10 Bt A B U T M Y 1 '\PURO MEJ\CANO/ OTHER PEOPLE SAID I WAS LATINO, SPAN\$\\ SPEAKING-OR SPAN \S\\ I 'B'ECAME f\ 1. f\ND GOVERNMENT CALLING ME MY CALLID ME MANY 1HIN&S AND MY fl...'Vt\ SAID, "YOO'RE uUS1 Hi s pani c Lin k W eekly Report