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Hispanic link weekly report, January 27, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 27, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Colorado state Sen. Polly Baca announces her candidacy for the Second Congressional District seat held by Rep. Tim Wirth who has decided to run for the Senate seat Gary Hart has announced he will vacate for a second try for the presidency... Jos6 Nunez resigns his post as state chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly to accept an appointment by U.S. Labor Secretary Bill Brock as secretary's representative for Region 8. Nuftez is succeeded by Vice Chairman Robert Martinez ... Rudy Beserra, formerly Hispanic community liaison with the Republican National Committee, is named the RNC’s small business liaison... New York attorney Eva Guardarramas is nominated by President Reagan to serve on the federal Child Safety Partnership Committee.. . Peter Liacouras,
president of Temple Universitylfin Philadelphia is proposing that Spanish be made a requirement for graiJuatf^n^Dyn 98@fJhe proposal, which Liacouras calls “The best way to help create a generation with real understanding and shared values...needs approval from the faculty and board of trustees... Roberto Guajardo, 10, is among six young men and a woman chosen by Boy Scouts of America to present the organization’s 76th annual Report to the Nation during a week-long program in Washington, D.C., beginning Feb. 1... League of United Latin American Citizens’President Oscar Mora'n is joined in Atlanta by immediate past President Mario Obledo in celebrating the first federal holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Jan. 20 .. . The Associated Press names golfer Nancy L6pez its female athlete of the year... Tomas Galindo, founder of Austin, Texas’ largest tortilla factory and who reportedly fed Mexican Gen. Pancho Villa’s troops, dies there Jan. 14 at age 96...
(0) HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT (jjTZ^
Elections Hurt HispanicChancesfor Judgeships
Hispanic lawyers become state court judges in greater numbers when appointed by elected chief executives, rather than through partisan and non-partisan elections, a study released by a court reform organization revealed.
The study, “The Success of Women and Minorities in Achieving Judicial Office: The Selection Process,” by the Fund for Modern Courts in New York, found that 3.1 % or 52 of 1,685 state judges selected by executive appointment were Hispanic. The method is used in California, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey and New York.
Partisan and non-partisan elections gave states the lowest number of Hispanic judges
Avalos Work Removed
The American Civil Liberties Union in San Diego filed a suit in U.S. District Court there Jan. 10 asking that an artwork by a Hispanic artist be displayed for its originally permitted time following its premature removal from a federal courthouse.
David Avalos’ “painted wood construction” titled “San Diego Donkey Cart” consists of a wooden cart with a cardboard cut-out painting atop it that depicts an undocumented worker being searched by a border agent. It was commissioned by a local gallery for exhibition, with the General Services Administration granting Avalos a permit to display the work Jan. 4-17.
The work put in place in front of the courthouse Jan. 5, was ordered removed Jan. 6 by Judge Gordon Thompson Jr., who called it a security risk It is currently on display at Centro Cultural de la Raza. No court date has been set.
HOW HISPANICS REACH BENCH
Total Hisp. Hisp. %
No. No. of Total
Partisan Election 3,611 69 1.9%
Non-Part Election 3,933 5 0.1%
Judicial Election 351 2 0.6%
Appointment 1,685 52 3.1%
at 1.9% and 0.1%, respectively. Legislative elections (used in Rhode Island, South Carolina and Virginia) produced 0% Hispanic judges while judicial election (Illinois only) resulted
Racetrack Workers Back
The Committee on Chicano Rights in California has charged the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service with capitulation to racetrack executives there for granting temporary work visas to undocumented workers after conducting a series of raids on the tracks less than six months ago.
Attorneys for the Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association requested that the U.S. Labor Department certify the un-availibility of U.S. workers for the tracks after the raids The issuance of 363 visas for skilled and unskilled positions at three Southern California racetracks was announced Jan. 13. The visas are valid through Oct. 1 with the possibility for renewal, said the INS.
Harold Ezell, Western regional commissionerfor INS, said the service will continue to enforce immigration laws at the tracks.
in 0.6%. Eight states use partisan elections to select all of their judges and seven use them to choose some. Twelve states use non-partisan elections to elect all judges and six to choose some. (See chart.)
Hispanics were 1% (22) of judges chosen through merit selection, the method after executive appointment found to place more women and minorities on the bench. As a three-step process used to choose all judges in 12 states and some in 10, women and minorities were 17.1% of the 2,110 chosen by the procedure.
The study found 150 Hispanic state court judges(1.2%), including three on high courts (0.9%) and 10 on intermediate appellate courts (1.4%). It also found 24 H ispanic federal judges (3.1%).
Released last month, the two-year study covering all 50 states showed that as of Sept. 1, 1985, there were 12,093 full-time, law-trained judges on state courts and 753 federal judges. Women and minorities constituted 12.6% of state court judges and 17.4% of the federal judiciary.
Weekly Report obtained figures on two states which did not provide numbers on H ispanics for the study- Florida and Michigan. According to the 1985 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials by the National
continued on page 2
LATINO JUDGES IN KEY STATES
% Pop* %Judges
New Mexico 36.6 24.0
Texas 21.0 7.9
California 19.2 4.7
Arizona 16.2 4.2
Colorado 11.8 2.8
New York r 9.5 1.5
Florida 8.8~ 0.8**
New Jersey 6.7 0.3
Illinois 5.6 0.4
*- Population by 1980 Census ** - From 1985 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials by National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Source: Fund for Modern Courts Inc.
APPOINTMENTS OF HISPANIC JUDGES
All District Appeals Total % Hisp.
Appts. (Hisp.) (Hisp.) (Hisp.) Appts.
Johnson (’63-’68) 165 3 0 3 1.8%
Nixon (’68-’73) 228 2 0 2 0.9%
Ford (,74-,77) 65 1 0 1 1.5%
Carter (’77-’81) 258 14 2 16 6.2%
Reagan (’81 -’85) 167 7 1 8 4.8%
Source: Fund for Modern Courts Inc.


Sin pelos en la lengua
YEAR OF THE LATINA? The year 1986 isn’t even a month old yet, and look whaf s happening already:
Golfer Nancy L6pez was named female athlete of the year by Associated Press, while not one Latino was even mentioned among 24 names in the AP vote for male athlete of the year. (The only Latino ever to win the award in 55 years was Lee Trevino, back in 1971.)
And Census figures reported in Weekly Report last week show that las latinas lead los latinos in college enrollment, 292,000 to 232,000. That’s 58% to 42%, reversing a 56% to 44% latino dominance just 11 years earlier.
Brains? Brawn? iQue paso, muchachos?
PULITZER SLIGHT: Columbia University, which dropped its summer program for minority journalists in 1974 because it had “served its mission,” has stuck us in the eye again.
In choosing 65 journalists as the jury for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize awards, it couldn’t find one single qualified Hispanic, male or female.
SUPER BOWL POSTSCRIPT: The year 1985 saw the San Francisco
49ers join the Miami Dolphins, the Dallas Cowboys and the Raiders and Rams of Los Angeles in offering National Football League play-by-play in Spanish for local aficionados Whether it improves sports-language or not remains a question.
'“La ala cerrada” is certainly an improvement over “the tight end.” But doesn’t“linebacker" sound less vulgar than “el apoyador?" The supporter?
ANOTHER LANGUAGE LESSON: Texas columnist Fernando Pih6n, doesn’t like the word “poverty.”
Poverty, he quotes a dictionary definition, means “the condition of ... not having the means by which to provide resources for daily living.” And in the possession of politicians and bureaucrats, “it has become a mere statistic... used to mislead and confuse.”
His recommendation: Replace it with “destitution - a word which evokes an image of a reality where the means of mere subsistence-such as food and shelter - are lacking.”
Wouldn’t it jar our conscience to hear President Reagan report that “some 1.8 million Americans escaped from destitution last year?” he asks.
- Kay Barbaro
More Hispanic Judges Appointed
QO/ft Tn/HhAwinn Tnharrn
continued from page 1
Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, Florida had five Hispanic state judges out of 575 elected in non-partisan elections and Michigan had one out of 575. These additions change the study finding of 0.1% Hispanics elected in non-partisan elections to 0.27%.
Robert M6ndez, president of the Hispanic National Bar Association, said the small number of Hispanics entering and completing law studies and those going on to pass bar examinations, coupled with a “lingering racism” that keeps voters from voting for a Hispanic sumamed candidate, make it difficult for Hispanics to win (and retain seats) in judicial elections.
Figures quoted in the report from a 1982 study by the American Bar Association! sSection on Legal Education and Admissions to the
Bar showed that Hispanics constituted only 2.5% and blacks4.5% of the 1981 law student population compared with 1.2% and 4% ten years earlier.
Other highlights of the Fund for Modern Courts report, which was compiled by its executive director, M.L Henry:
•There were 465 black state court judges (3.8%), nine on state high courts (2.7%), 33 (4.7%) on intermediate appellate courts and 53 federal judges.
• A sampling of judicial appointments by several governors showed former California Gov. Edmund Brown Jr. (1975-82) leading recent California, New Jersey and New York governors in H ispanics appointed at 62 (7.3%) of his 844 total. New Jersey Gov. Thomas Kean (1982-84) rated last with no Hispanics appointed. -Carlos Morales
9% Try Chewing Tobacco
Hispanic teenagers use smokeless tobacco half as much as whites but twice as much as blacks, preliminary findings by the National Institute on Drug Abuse show.
Statistics from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse released this month show that boys aged 12-17 used smokeless tobacco during the past year in the following percentages:
Blacks Hispanics Whites
4% 9% 20%
Use by girls of all groups was 2% or less. Frequent use - once or more a week -was less common among Latinos in that age group than Hispanic males between 18 and 39. The figures:
12-17 18-25 26-39 40-older
1% 5% 4% 0%
The NHSDA used Spanish as well as English forms and interviewers for the first time. Concluded in December, it sampled 4,564 persons, one-quarter of whom were Hispanic. Hispanics, it noted, live in large numbers in regions - the Southwest and South - where smokeless tobacco is used more heavily.
Colo. Hispanic Dropouts
Conflicting figures on the real dropout rate among Hispanic students and possible discrimination by the public school system will be the subjects of a series of hearings in four cities by the Colorado State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.
The fact-finding hearings started Jan. 10 in Denver and are scheduled to continue in February and March in the cities of Greeley, Pueblo, Durango and Grand Junction.
According to the Denver Public School System, the Hispanic dropout rate in 1984-85 was 14.7%, an increase of 2.2% from the previous year. But in testimony before the panel, Denver school board member Paul Sandoval said that the estimate “was a lie. It is my contention thatthe accurate percentage is more around the neighborhood of 50% to 60%.”
16% Enjoy Discretionary Income
Sixteen percent of Hispanic households in 1983 had incomes left over for spending and saving after maintaining a comfortable living standard, according to a report by the U.S. Census Bureau and the New York-based Conference Board.
The proportion of black households with discretionary income was also 16%, while that of whites was 33.7%.
Computed in 1984 dollars, discretionary income, as defined by the report, allows a household a 30% higher“spendable income” than the average for similar households.
The report is the second of its kind. The first one, which also showed Hispanic dis-
cretionary income at 16%, covered the year 1980.
There were 660,000 Hispanic households in 1983 with discretionary income, compared to 634,000 in 1980. These households created a market of $6 billion, $8.5 billion less than that of blacks. Hispanic households, however, had a higher average income per residence than blacks
Although Hispanics had the highest aftertaxes income ($34,879), their income before taxes was second to that of whites A spokesman for Census said the discrepancy was due to the composition of Hispanic families and different state taxes
HOUSEHOLDS WITH DISCRETIONARY INCOME
Households Average Income Discretionary Income
Number Proportion of Before After Aggregate Per
(thousands) households taxes taxes (billions) Average capita
Total 26,409 31.5 $46,764 $34,562 $277.9 $10,525 $3,713
Spanish origin 660 16.1 46,172 34,879 6.0 9,119 2,412
Black and other 1,712 16.0 44,301 33,049 14.6 8,555 2,479
White 24,697 33.7 46,935 34,667 263.3 10,661 3,819
Source: "A Marketer's Guide to Discretionary Income" U.S. Census Bureau and The Conference Board
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
SPANISH MEDIA - Master’s in Communications, fully bilingual, U.S. Spanish media experience. Newly relocated. Seeking permanent position in media or related field in Washington, D.C., area. Call Lucienne L6pez Loman (202) 362-4527 or Hispanic Link(202) 234-0280.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltr&n (213) 743*7158.
CITY MANAGER, Las Vegas, N.M. (pop 14,300); Salary negotiable $37*43,000& benefits, depending on qualifications. Eight persons holding position since ICMA(CM) recognition in 1959. Appointed by eight-member Council elected by district. $15 milllron budget; 175 employees, prefer MPA and five years experience in local government in full servicecity. Send resume to Carmen Gonzales, Personnel Office, P.O. Box 179, Las Vegas, N.M. 87701 by 3/7/86; telephone (505) 454-1401.
The City of Las Vegas is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKER $24,121 Ann. #66206CDHS
Position performs clinical mental health related social work in the Department of Human Services for Arlington County. Employee gathers and analyzes psycho-social data, assesses and diagnoses problems, develops and implements an ongoing treatment program, conducts therapy for a.variety of clients-and provides consultation as requested by the community.
Requires Bachelor’s degree supplemented by a Master's degree from an approved school of social work plus two years related experience in social work Preference may be given to applicants with experience in a mental health setting, experience working with abused children, experience with a variety of clients and clinical problems and/or the ability to be licensed. Official Arlington County application form required. Applications will be accepted no later than 5 p.m. on Feb. 6. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167, Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St, North Arlington, Va. 22201
EOE
CELL BIOLOGIST
The Department of Biology at the University of Utah seeks candidates for a tenure-track faculty appointment in plant or animal cell biology. The position is available for July 1986 but candidates interested in later starting dates are welcome to apply. The successful candidate will be expected to establish a vigorous research program and to contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching programs. We particularly desire a colleague who can establish mutually beneficial interactions with existing research groups. Several recent appointments and increasing cooperation with departments in the adjacent medical school offer the opportunity to participate in the continued development of an already strong program.
Interested persons should send a letter of application, curriculum vita, and three letters of recommendation or the names of three individuals willing to serve as references. The closing date for receipt of applications is May 1,1986. Address all materials to: Dr. Mario R. Capecchi, Dept, of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112.
The University of Utah isan Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer.
PUT A STAR IN YOUR FUTURE-BE A DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL
STARTING SALARIES: GS-5, $14,390 or GS-7, $17,824 (Depending upon Qualifications)
From Feb. 10 through Feb. 21, 1986, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written Examination for Deputy U.S. Marshal positions in the Federal government.
The United States Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest Federal law enforcement agency. Since 1789, U.S. Marshals have served the Executive and Judicial branches of government through a variety of vital law enforcement activities:
• Protection of judges, officials and witnesses
• Apprehension of fugitives • Execution of court orders
• Custody of prisoners • Custody of seized property SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUP- The Special Operations Group is a highly trained reaction force which provides Federal assistance in emergency situations of national significance. Membership is selective, part-time and voluntary. Deputies must be in superb physical condition and successfully complete the special operations training. LOCATION OF POSITIONS - Deputy U.S. Marshal positions are located in the 94 Judicial Districts of the U.S. Marshals Service, which cover the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. You must be available for initial assignment to any duty station; be prepared to travel frequently for extended periods of time; and be available for reassignment to other duty stations.
TO QUALIFY YOU MUST:
• Be a U.S. citizen
• Possess a valid driver's license
• Establish an eligible rating on the written examination
• Have a bachelor's degree or 3 years of responsible experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience Qualifying experience is administrative, professional, investigative, or other responsible work. There are additional education/experience requirements for the GS-7 grade level.)
• Be at least 21 years old
• Meet certain medical requirements and undergo a background and character investigation
AGE LIMITATION - Under Public Law 93-350, the maximum age for original entry into Deputy U.S. Marshal positions is the day immediately preceding one’s 35th birthday; however, this limitation may be waived in some cases.
TRAINING - All new Deputies are required to complete a six-month basic training program consisting of approximately 3 months at the Federal LawEnforcementTrainingCenter(FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia, and 3 months of on-the-job training. At the end of the 6 months, those individuals hired at GS-5 will be eligible for GS-7.
HOW TO APPLY: Contact your local Federal Job Information/Testing Center, listed under U.S. Government in metropolitan area telephone directories, beginning Feb. 10, 1986, for more information and an application for the test.
The United States Marshals Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is actively recruiting Women and Minority Applicants.
THE GOOD NEWS
SUBSTANCE ABUSE: The National Household Survey on Drug Abuse will begin issuing reports on substance abuse probably this summer. The survey, which included significant Hispanic samples, measured abuse of 11 drugs, including smokeless tobacco, inhalants, cocaine, heroin, cigarettes, marijuana and alcohol. For information, contact: Dr. Beatrice Rouse, project director, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, Division of Epidemiology and Statistical Analysis, NIDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, Md. 20857.
MINORITY JUDGES: A major new 69-page study on women and minority judges is available for $5 from the Fund for Modern Courts, 36 West 44th St., #310, New York, N.Y. 10036-8181.
DISCRETIONARY INCOME: A 51 -page report by the U.S. Census Bureau and The Conference Board, a business information service, lists households by size, age and region according to income available after paying taxes and living expenses. Cost free. Contact John Coder, Population Division, Rm. 2318, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C- 20233 (301) 763-5060.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS DINNER Los Angeles Jan. 30
The Personnel Management Association of Aztlan will sponsor its 2nd annual banquet where nine students from PMAA chapters will be awarded scholarships for outstanding leadership.
Cecilia Alatorre (213) 972-2168
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan. 30,31
Guillermo Martinez, editorial board member of the Miami Herald, will be a panelist at CNPCs 3rd annual conference titled “Ethnic Relations in the Cuban Community.’’
Guarion& Diaz (305) 642-3484
MINORITIES IN THE MEDIA Reston, Va. Jan. 30,31
The Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business of the American Newspaper Publishers
Association will hold elections and plan its 1986 agenda.
Nancy Osborn (703) 648-1000
HISPANIC RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS Washington, D.C. Feb. 1-5 The group will convene concurrently with its parent organization, National Religious Broadcasters, to discuss establishing broadcast ministries, improving production and management techniques.
H.O. Espinoza (512) 824-3322
3


Arts & Entertainment
THE RECENT PERFORMANCE BY A HEAVY metal band in Puerto Rico prompted an announcement by an island group that certain rock songs instill “distorted” ideas in the minds of youth.
Alerta Joven, the island group, said in a recent press conference that many songs by heavy metal bands carry “subliminal messages” that promote youth rebellion. The group asked for parental cooperation in understanding the content of rock lyrics and “rejecting (those songs) that are detrimental to their personalities.”
The announcement by Alerta Joven was made only days before the Jan. 12 scheduled performance by rock group Kiss in Puerto Rico.
In other music news, a trio of U S. recording companies have joined forces in a lawsuit attempting to stop the importation of albums that are also produced in the United States.
The three companies- Ariola/RCA International, A&M Records and CBS- are suing the Los Angeles-based Crystal Promotions for allegedly distributing and selling Spanish-language records manufactured outside of the United States before their U.S. distributors release them here.
PROPOSALS TO DESIGN, DEVELOP AND DELIVER high-quality training for public radio professionals will be accepted through this week by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
The GPB’s department of human resources and development will accept proposals through Jan. 30 for training in news reporting and production, music recording, audio research, intermediate production, engineering and programming music. Training areas were chosen in consultation with public radio organizations throughout the country.
ONE LINERS: The current edition of the Mira! art tour closes Jan. 27 its New York showing at Museo del Barrio; from there the show will travel to Chicago and five other U.S. cities... The Visions of Para los Ninos, a multi-media show about Chicano children’s views of their heritage, continues at the Los Angeles Children’s Museum through Jan. 29. . . An exhibit of photographs by the recently^deceased Mexican writer Juan Rulfo opens in February in the German city of Treveris... Spanish singer Raphael has taken a one-year lease of Richard Nixon’s house in Miami... New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya has praised the NBC television series Miami Vice for showing children the “harmful consequences of using drugs... ”
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
FCC APPOINTMENT: Announcement of President Reagan’s nominee to fill the Federal Communications Commission seat vacated by Henry Rivera, a New Mexico Democrat, last year, is expected very soon Prime candidate for the spot on the five-member body is fellow New Mexican Patricia Diaz Dennis, a member of the National Labor Relations Board since May 1983.
CISNEROS SYNDICATED: San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros^ views on urban, border and Latin American issues are now carried by some 20 U.S. dailies, mostly in the Southwest.
The Los Angeles Times Syndicate, which handles 85 features, launched his every-other-week, op-ed column Nov. 18. Among subscribers- The Los Angeles Times, Sacramento Bee, Arizona Republic, Houston Chronicle, and, in Spanish, Miami’s Diario de las Americas and New York’s El Diario/La Prensa.
MEDIA GROUPS UNITE: For the first time,
HISPANIC LINK IVVEEKLYREPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
the California Chicano News Media Association, Asian American Journalists Association and Black Journalists Association of Southern California are joining forces at a dinner meeting Jan. 30. If s being hosted by KABC-TV, Hollywood.
Keynoting are University of Southern California journalism professor Felix Gutierrez and Clint Wilson, co-authors of “Minorities in the Media.”
POST JOINS EFFORT: The Washington Post has joined the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., in planning and conducting an essay contest geared to developing Latino talent among high school students in the Greater Washington area.
As sponsor, the Post will stage a banquet to honor the winners of three English-language and three Spanish-language awards, which total $900. The area’s Spanish-language tabloid, Latino, is also participating.
The Hispanic News Media Association is also working with the Washington, D.C., ABC-TV affiliate, WJLA-TV, in developing a pilot for a newsmakers program featuring Hispanic journalists.
AWARDS: Editors of U.S., French and British editions of Elle magazine named fashion designer Carolina Herrera as one of the world’s two most elegant women... GalaVision won a 1985 Award for Cable Excellence (ACE) for the eight-episode serial recounting the life of the Carmelite nun, Teresa de Jesus, Santa Teresa .. SIN Television Network’s Miami affiliate WLTV came in third among all stations, behind the ABC and CBS affiliates, in capturing 18 trophies at the Ninth Annual Florida Emmy Awards...
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Ernie Sotomayor, assistant state editor with the Dallas Times-H era Id, has been promoted to associate editor... Minerva P6rez,. formerly with Dallas^ KRLD-TV, joined KPNX-TV in Phoenix as reporter and weekend anchor with the NBC affiliate... Roxanna Brightwell, long-time public relations director for SIN in New York, has moved over to its marketing staff as a national account executive... Melita Garza joined the National Association of Hispanic Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) in Washington, D.C., as press contact and editor of its national
newsletter... .. _ . .
- Charlie Ericksen
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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.<" HR/CR Making The News This Week Colorado state Sen. Polly Baca announces her candidacy for the Second Congressional District seat held by Rep . Tim Wirth who has decided to run for the Senate seat Gary Hart has announced he will vacate for a second try for the presidency . .. Jose Nu iiez resigns his post as state chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly to accept an appointment by U .S. Labor Secretary Bill Brock as secretary's representative for Region 8. Nunez is succeeded by Vice Chairman Robert Martinez ... Rudy Beserra, formerly Hispanic community liaison with the Republican National Committee, is named the RNC's small business liaison ... New York attorney Eva Guardarramas is nominated by President Reagan to serve on the federal Child Safety Partnership Committee. . . Peter Liacouras, i'f president of Temple Universitjin that Spanish be made a requirement for proposal, which Liacouras calls "The best way to help create a generation with real understanding and shared values . . . ," needs approval from the faculty and board of trustees. .. Roberto Guajardo, 1 0, is among six young men and a woman chosen by Boy Scouts of America to present the organization's 76th annual Report to the Nation during a week long program in Washington, D.C., beginning Feb. 1. . . League of United Latin American Citizens' President Oscar Moran is joined in Atlanta by immediate past President Mario Obledo in celebrating the first federal holiday honoring Dr . Martin Luther King Jr. Jan. 20 ... The Associated Press names golfer. Nancy L6pez its female athlete of the year ... Tomas Galindo, founder. of Austin, Texas' largest tortilla factory and who reportedly fed Mexican Gen. Pancho Villa's troops, dies there Jan . 14 at age 96 ... Voi .• No.•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Jan.27,1986 Elections Hurt HispanicChancesforJudgeships Hispanic lawyers become state court judges in greater numbers when appointed by elected chief executives, rather than through partisan and norrpartisan elections, a study released by a court reform organization revealed. The study, "The Success of Women and Minorities in Achieving Judicial Office: The Selection Process," by the Fund for Modern Courts in New York, found that 3.1% or 52 of 1,685 state judges selected by executive appointment were Hispanic. The method is used in California, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey and New York. Partisan and norrpartisan elections gave states the lowest number of Hispanic judges HOW HISPANICS REACH BENCH Partisan Election Non-Part. Election Judicial Election Appointment Total No. 3,611 3,933 351 1,685 Hisp. No. 69 5 2 52 Hisp.% of Total 1.9% 0.1 o/o 0.6% 3.1 o/o at 1.9% and 0.1 %, respectively. Legislative elections(used in Rhode Island, South Carolina and Virginia) produced 0% Hispanic judges while judicial election (Illinois only) resulted APPOINTMENTS OF HISPANIC JUDGES All District Appeals Total % Hisp. Appts. (Hisp.) (Hisp.) (Hisp.) Appts. Johnson ('63'68) 165 3 Nixon ('68'73) 228 2 Ford ('74'77) 65 1 Carter ('77-'81) 258 14 Reagan ('81'85) 167 Source: Fund for Modern Courts Inc. Avalos Work Removed The American Civil Liberties Union in San Diego filed a suit in U.S. District Court there Jan . 10 asking that an artwork by a Hispanic artist be displayed for its originally permitted time following its premature removal from a federal courthouse. David Avalos' "painted wood construction" titled "San Diego Donkey Carf' consists of a wooden cart with a cardboard cut out painting atop it that depicts an undocumented worker being searched by a border agent. It was commissioned by a local gallery for exhibition, with the General Services Administration granting Avalos a permit to display the work Jan. 4-17. The work, put in place in front of the courthouse Jan. 5, was ordered removed Jan. 6 by Judge Gordon Thorn pson Jr. , who called it a security risk It is currently on display at Centro Cultural de Ia Raza No court date has been set. 7 0 3 1.8% 0 2 0.9% 0 1 1 .5% 2 16 6.2% 1 8 4.8% Racetrack Workers Back The Committee on Chicano Rights in California has charged the U.S. Immigration and Natu ralization Service with capitulation to racetrack executives there for granting temporary work visas to undocumented workers after conducting a series of raids on the tracks less than six months ago. Attorneys for the Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association requested that the U.S. Labor Department certify the un availibility of U.S. workers for the tracks after the raids. The issuance of 363 visas for skilled and unskilled positions at three Southern California racetracks was announced Jan. 13. The visas are valid through Oct. 1 with the possibility for renewal, said the INS. Harold Western regional commissioner for INS, said the service will continue to enforce immigration laws at the tracks. in 0 . 6% . Eight states use partisan elections to select all of their judges and seven use them to choose some. Twelve states use norrpartisan elections to elect all judges and six to choose some. (See chart. ) Hispanics were 1% (22) of judges chosen through merit selection, the method after executive appointment found to place more women and minorities on the bench . As a three-step process used to choose all judges in 12 states and some in 1 0, women and minorities were 17.1% of the 2,110 chosen by the procedure . The study found 150 Hispanic state court judges (1.2%), including three on high courts (0 .9%) and 10 on intermediate appellate courts ( 1.4%). It also found 24 Hispanic federal judges (3.1%). Released last month, the two-year study covering all 50 states showed that as of Sept. 1, 1985, there were 12,093 full-time, law trained judges on state courts and 753 federal . judges. Women and minorities constituted 12 . 6% of state court judges and 17.4% of the federal judiciary. Weekly Report obtained figures on two states which did not provide numbers on Hispanics fort he study-Florida and Michigan. According to the 1985 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials by the National continued on page 2 LATINO JUDGES IN KEY STATES %Pop.* %Judges New Mexico 36.6 24.0 Texas 21.0 7.9 California 19.2 4.7 Arizona 16.2 4.2 Colorado 11.8 2.8 New York -9.5 1.5 Florida 8."8" 0.8** New Jersey 6.7 0.3 Illinois 5.6 0 . 4 * Population by 1980 Census • • From 1985 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials by National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Source : Fund for Modern Courts Inc.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua YEAR OF THE LATINA? The year 1986 isn ' t even a month old yet, and look what's happening already: 49ers join the Miami Dolphins , the Dallas Cowboys and the Raiders and Rams of Los Angeles in offering National Football League play by-play in Spanish for local aficionados Whether it improves sports-language or not remains a question. Golfer Nancy L6pez was named female athlete of the year by Associated Press, while not one Latino was even mentioned among 24 names in the AP vo t e for male athlete of the year. (The only Lati no ever to win the award in 55 years was Lee Trevlflo, back in 1971.) ""La ala cerrada " is certainly an improvement over "the tight end . " But doesn 't" linebacker " sound less vulgar than "el apoyador? " The supporter? And Census figures reported in Weekly Report last week show that las latinas lead los Iatinos in college enrollment , 292,000 to 232,000. That's 58% to42%, reversing a 56% to44% Iatino dominance just11 years earlier. ANOTHER LANGUAGE LESSON: Texas columnist Fernando Pifl6n, doesn't like the word " poverty . " Brains? Brawn? i,Que pas6 , muchachos? Poverty, he quotes a dictionary definition , means "the condition of . . . not having the means by which to provide resources for daily living . " And in the possession of politicians and bureaucrats , " it has become a mere statistic . . . used to mislead and confuse . " PULITZER SLIGHT : Columbia University, which dropped its summe r program for minority journalists in 1974 because it had "served its mission , " has stuck us in the eye again . His recommendation: Replace i t with "destitution-a word which evokes an image of a reality where the means of mere subsistencesuch as food and shelterare lacking." In choosing 65 journalists as the jury for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize awa r ds, i t couldn' t find one single qualified Hispanic, male or female. S UPER BOWL POSTSCRiPT: The year 1985 saw the San Francisco Wouldn ' t it jar our conscience to hear P r esident Reagan report that "some 1 . 8 million Americans escaped from destitution last year? " he asks . More Hispanic Judges Appointed continued f rom page 1 Assoc i ation of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, Flor i da had five Hispanic state judges out of 5 7 5 elected in non-partisan elections and Michigan had one out of 575. These additions change the study find i ng of 0 .1% Hispanics elected in non-partisan elections to 0 . 27%. R o bert Mendez, president of the Hispanic Nat i onal Bar Association, said the small number of Hispanics entering and completing law studies and those going on to pass bar exami nat i ons, coupled with a "lingering racism " that keeps voters from voting for a Hispanic surna m ed candidate, make it difficult for Hispanics to w in (and re t ain seats) in judicial elections. Figures quoted in the report from a 1982 study by the American Bar Association's Section on Lega l Education and Admissions to the Bar showed that Hispanics constituted only 2.5% and blacks 4 .5% of the 1981 law student population compared with 1 . 2 % and 4 % ten years earlier . Other highlights of the Fund for Modern Court_s report , which was compiled by its executive director, M .L. Henry: eThere were 465 black state court judges (3 .8%), nine on state h i gh courts (2.7%), 33 (4.7%) on intermediate appellate courts and 53 federal judges. eA sampling of judicial appointments by several governors showed former California Gov . Edmund Brown Jr. (1975-82) leading recent California, New Jersey and New York governors in Hispanics appointed at 62 (7 .3%) of his 844 totaL New Gov. Thomas Kean (1982-84) rated last with no Hispanics appointed. -Car(os Morales 160/o Enjoy Discretionary Income Si x teen percent of Hispanic households in 1983 had incomes left over for spending a n d saving after maintaining a comfortable living s t andard, accord i ng to a report by the U . S . Census Bureau and the New York based Conference Board. The proportion of black households w ith discre tionary income was also 16% , while that o f whites was 33. 7% . Computed in 1984 dollars , discretionary income, as defined by the report , allows a household a 30% higher " spendable income " than the average for similar households. The report is the second of its kind. The f irst one, which also showed Hispanic discretionary income at 16%, covered the year 1980. There we r e 660,000 Hispanic households in 1983 with discre t ionary income , compared to 634,000 in 1 980. These households created a market of $6 billion , $8. 5 billion less than that of blacks. Hispanic households, however, had a higher average income per residence than blacks. Although Hispanics had the highest after taxes income ($34 , 879), their income before taxes was second to that of whites. A spokesman for Census said the discrepancy was due to the composition of Hispanic families and different state taxes . HOUS(;.I;iOLDS WITH DISCRETIONARY INCOME .......... Households Average Income Discretionary Income Number Proportion of Before After Aggregate Per (thousands) households taxes taxes (billions) Average capita Total 26,409 31. 5 $46,764 $34,562 $277. 9 $10,525 $3,713 Spanish origin 660 16. 1 46,172 34,879 6.0 9 ,119 2,412 Black and other 1 ,712 16. 0 44,301 33,049 14. 6 8,555 2,479 White 24,697 33. 7 46,935 34,667 263. 3 10,661 3,819 Source: " A Marketer's Guide to Discretionary Income, " U.S. Census Bureau and The Conference Board . 2 Kay Barbaro 90/o Try Chewing Tobacco Hispanic teenagers use smokeless tobacco half as much as whites but twice as much as blacks , preliminary findings by the National Institute on Drug Abuse show. Statist i cs from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse released this month show that boys aged 12-17 used smokeless tobacco during the past year in the follow ing percentages : Blacks Hispanics Whites 4% 9% 20% Use by g i rls of all groups was 2% or less . Frequent use once or more a weekwas less common among Latinos in that age group than Hispanic males between 18 and 39. The figures: 12-17 18-25 26-39 4D-older 1 % 5% 4% 0% The NHSDA used Spanish as well as English forms and interviewers for the first time. Concluded in December, it sampled 4,564 persons , one-quarter of whom were Hispanic. Hispanics, it noted, live in large numbers in regions-the Southwest and South-where tobacco is used more heavily . Colo. Hispanic Dropouts Conflicting figures on the real dropout rate among Hispanic students and possible dis crimination by the public school system will be the sub j ects of a series of hearings in four c i ties by the Colorado State Advisory Comm i ttee to the U . S . Commission on Civil Rights. The fact-finding hearings started Jan. 10 in Denver and are scheduled to continue in February and March in the cities of Greeley, Pueblo, Durango and Grand Junction. According to the Denver Public School System, the Hispanic dropout rate in 1984-85 was 14. 7% , an increase of 2 .2% from the previous year . But in testimony before the panel , Denver school board member Paul Sandoval said that the estimate "was a lie . It is my contention that the accurate percentage is more around the neighborhood of 50% to 60%." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS L e t H is p anic Link help you in your sea rch for ex e c utive s a nd professionals . Mail or ph o ne your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Wa s hington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (EST) Tue sday will be carried in Weekly Report s mailed Frid ay of the same week. Ad rates: 75 c ent s per w ord. Display rates: $35 per column in c h . PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SPANISH MEDIAMaster's in Communi cations, fully bilingual, U.S . Spanish media experience. Newly relocated. Seeking per manent position in media or related field in W as hington, D .C., area. Call Lucienne L6pez Loman (202) 362-4527 or Hispanic Link(202) 234-0280. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltran (2 1 3) 7 43-7158. CITY MANAGER, Las Vegas, N .M. (pop. 1 4,300) ; Salary negotiable$37-43,000& oenefits, depending on qualifications. Eight persons holding position since ICMA (CM) recognition in 1959. Appointed by eight member Council elected by district. $15 milllion budget; 175 employees . Prefer MPA and five years experience in local government in full service city . Send resume to Carmen Gonzales , Personnel Office, P . O . Bo x 179, Las Vegas, N . M . 87701 by 3/7/86; telephone (505) 454-1 401. The City of Las Vegas is an Equal Opportunity Employer . PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKER $24, 121 Ann . #66206CDHS Position performs clinical mental health related social work in the Department of Human Services for Arlington County . Employee gathers and analyzes psycho-social data, assesses and diagnoses problems, develops and implements an ongoing treatment program, conducts therapy fora. variety of clients. and provides consultation as requested by the community. Requires Bachelo(s degree supplemented by a Maste(s degree from an approved school of soc i al work plus two years related experience in social work. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in a mental health setting, experience working with abused children , experience with a variety of clients and clinical problems and/or the ability to be licensed Official Arlington County application form required. Applications will be accepted no later than 5 p.m. on Feb . 6 . To request applica tion material, please call (703) 5582167 , Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St. , North Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE CELL BIOLOGIST The Department of Biology at the University of Utah seeks candidates for a tenure-track faculty appointment in plant or animal cell biology. The position is available for July 1 986 but candidates interested in later starting dates are welcome to apply. The successful candidate will be expected to establish a v igorous research program and to contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching pro grams. We particularly desire a colleague who can establish mutually beneficial interactions with existing research groups. Several recent appointments and increasing cooperation with departments in the adjacent medical school offer the opportunity to participate in the continued development of an already strong program . interested persons should send a letter of application, curriculum vita , and three letters of recommendation or the names of three individuals willing to serve as references. The c losing date for receipt of applications is May 1 , 1986. Address all materials to: Dr. Mario R. Capecchi, Dept. of Biology, University of Utah , Salt Lake City , Utah 841 12. The University of Utah is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. PUT A STAR IN YOUR FUTURE--BE A DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL STARTING SALARIES : G8-5 , $14,390 or G8-7, $17,824 (Depending upon Qualifications) From Feb . 10 through Feb . 21, 1986, the U .S. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written Examination for Deputy U.S. Marshal positions in the Federal government. The United States Marshals Service is the nation' s oldest Federal law enforcement agency . Since 1789, U . S . Marshals have served the E xec utive and Judicial branches of government through a variety of vital law enforcement activities : • Protection of judges, officials and witnesses • Apprehension of fugitives e Execution of court orders • Custody of prisoners • Custody of seized property SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUPThe Special Operations Group is a highly trained reaction force which provides Federal assistance in emergency situations of national significance . Membership is selective , part-time and voluntary . Deputies must be in superb physical condition and successfully complete the special operations training . LOCATION OF POSITIONS Deputy U . S . Marshal positions are located in the 94 Judicial Districts of the U . S . Marshals Service , which cover the 50 states, Puerto Rico , and the Virgin Islands . You must be available for initial assignment to any duty station ; be prepared to travel frequently for extended periods of time; and be available for reassignment to other duty stations. TO QUALIFY YOU MUST: • Be a U . S . citizen THE GOOD NEWS SUBSTANCE ABUSE: The National Household Survey on Drug Abuse will begin issuing reports on substance abuse probably this summer. The survey , which included significant Hispanic samples, measured abuse of 11 drugs, including smokeless tobacco , inhalants, cocaine, heroin , cigarettes, marijuana and alcohol. For information, contact: Dr. Beatrice Rouse, project director, National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, Division of Epidemiology and Statist i cal Analysis , NIDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, Md. 20857. • Possess a valid drive(s license • Establish an eligible rating on the written examination • Have a bachelor's degree or3 years of responsible experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience . Qualifying experience is administrative , professional , investigative , or other responsible work. There are additional education/experience requirements for the G8-7 grade level.) • Be at least 21 years old • Meet certain medical requirements and undergo a background and character investigation AGE LIMITATIONUnder Public Law 93-350, the maximum age for original entry into Deputy U.S. Marshal positions is the day immediately preceding one's 35th birthday ; however, this limitation may be waived in some cases . TRAINING-All new Deputies are required to complete a six-month basic trainin\1 program consisting of approximately 3 months at the Federal Law EnforcementTraining Center(FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia, and 3 months of on the-job training . At the end of the 6 111onths, those individuals hired at GS-5 will be eligible for GS 7. HOW TO APPLY: Contact your local Federal Job Information/Testing Center, listed under U.S. Government in metropolitan area telephone directories, beginning Feb . 10, 1986, for more information and an application for the test. The United States Marshals Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is actively recruiting Women and Minority Applicants. MINORITY JUDGES: A major new 69-page study on women and minority judges is ava i lable for $5 from the Fund for Modern Courts, 36 West 44th St., #310,New York, N . Y . 10036-8181 . DISCRETIONARY I NCO ME: A 51page report by the U.S. Census Bureau and The Conference Board, a business information service lists households by size, age and region according to available after paying taxes and living expenses. Cost: free. Contact: John Coder, Population Division, Am. 2318, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D .C. 20233 (301) 763. Calendar CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan . 30, 31 Association will hold elections and plan its 1986 agenda . THIS WEEK SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS DINNER Los Angeles Jan . 30 The Personnel Management Association of Aztlan will sponsor its 2nd annual banquet where nine students from PMAA chapters will be awarded arships for outstanding leaqership . Cecilia Alatorre (213) 972-2168 Hispani c Link Weekly Report Guillermo Martinez , editorial board member of the Miami Herald, will be a panelist at CNPC's 3rd annual conference titled " Ethnic Relations in the Cuban Commun ity. " Guarione Diaz (305) 642-3484 MINORITIES IN THE MEDIA Reston , Va. Jan. 30, 31 The Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business of the American Newspaper Publishers Nancy Osborn (703) 648-1000 HISPANIC RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS Washington, D.C. Feb . 1-5 The group will convene concurrently with its parent organization, National Religious Broadcasters, to discuss establishing broadcast ministries, improving production and management techniques. H.O. Espinoza (512) 824-3322 3

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Arts & Entertainment PROPOSALS TO DESIGN, DEVELOP AND DELIVER high-quality training for public radio professionals will be accepted through this week by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. THE RECENT PERFORMANCE BY A HEAVY metal band in Puerto Rico prompted an announcement by an island group that certain rock songs instill "distorted' ideas in the minds of youth. Alerta Joven, the island group, said in a recent press conference that many songs by heavy metal bands .carry"subliminal messages" that promote youth rebellion . The group asked for parental cooperation in understanding the content of rock lyrics and "rejecting (those songs) that are detrimental to their personalities." The CPS ' s department of human resources an _ d development will accept proposals through Jan. 3 _ 0 for training in news reporting and production, music recording, audio research, intermediate production, engineering and programming music . Training areas were chosen in consultation with public radio organizations throughout the country. The announcement by Alert a Joven was made only days before the Jan. 12 scheduled performance by rock group Kiss in Puerto Rico. ONE LINERS: The current edition of the Mira! art tour closes Jan. 27 its New York showing ' at Museo del Barrio; from there the show will travel to Chicago and five other U.S. cities ... The Visions of Para los Ninos, a multi-media show about Chicano children's views of their heritage, continues at the Los Angeles Children's Museum through Jan . 29 . . . An exhibit of photographs by the recently-deceased Mexican writer Juan Rulfo opens in February in the German city of Treveris ... Spanish singer Raphael has taken a one-year lease of Richard Nixon's house in Miami. .. New Mexico Gov . Toney Anaya has praised the NBC television series Miami Vice for showing children the "harmful consequences of using drugs ... " In other music news, a trio of U . S . recording companies have joined forces in a lawsuit attempting to stop the importation of albums that are also produced in the United States. The three companiesArlola/RCA International, A&M Records and CBS-are suing the Los Angeles-based Crystal Promotions for allegedly distributing and selling Spanish-language records manufactured outside of the United States before their U .S. distributors release them here. Media Report FCC APPOINTMENT: Announcement of President Reagan ' s nominee to fill the Federal Communications Commission seat vacated by Henry Rivera, a New Mexico Democrat, last year, is expected very soon Prime candidate fort he spot on the five-member body is fellow New Mexican Patricia Diaz Dennis, a member of the National Labor Relations Board since May 1983. CISNEROS SYNDICATED: San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros' views on urban, border and Latin American issues are now carried by some 20 U . S . dailies, mostly in the Southwest. The Los Angeles Times Syndicate, which handles 85 features, launched his every other-week, column Nov . 18. Among subscribers: The Los Angeles Times, Sacra mento Bee, Arizona Republic, Houston Chronicle, and, in Spanish, Miami's Diario de las Americas and New York's El Diario/La Prensa. 4 MEDIA GROUPS UNITE: For the first time, HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' .pecketsat your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234. the California Chicano News Media Associ ation, Asian American Journalists Association and BlackJoumallstsAssoclatlon ofSouthem California are joining forces at a dinner meeting Jan. 30. lfs being hosted by KABC TV, Hollywood . Keynoting are University of Southern Califor nia journalism professor Felix Gutierrez and Clint Wilson, co-authors of "Minorities in the Media." POST JOINS EFFORT: The Washington Post has joined the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., in planning and conducting an essay contest geared to developing Latino talent among high school students in the Greater Washington area. As sponsor, the Post \)/ill stage a banquet to honor the winners of three English-language and three Spanish-language awards, which total $900. The area's Spanis h-language tabloid, Latino, is also participating. The Hispanic News Media Association is also working with the Washington, D .C., ABC TV affiliate, WJLA-TV, in developing a pilot for a newsmakers program featuring Hispanic journalists. 'WOUl-D you LIKE ouR. lECftVE MODEL( .... ELECTED JuPG-ES AR LATINOS -Antonio Mejias-Rentas AWARDS: Editors of U.S., French and British editions of Elle magazine named fashion designer Carolina Herrera as one of the worlds two most elegant women... Gala VIsion won a 1985 Award for Cable Excellence (ACE) for the eight-episode serial recounting the life of the Carmelite nun, Teresa de Jesus, Santa Teresa . . SIN Television Network's Miami affiliate WL TV came in third among all stations, behind the ABC and CBS affiliates, in capturing 18 trophies at the Ninth Annual Florida Em my Awards ... ROLODEX ROULETTE: Ernie Sotomayor, assistant state editor with the Dallas TimesHerald, has been promoted to associate editor . .. Minerva Perez, . formerly with Dallas' KRLD-TV, joined KPNX-TV in Phoenix as reporter and weekend anchor with the NBC affiliate ... Roxanna Brightwell, long-time public relations director for SIN in New York, has moved over to its marketing staff as a national account executive . .. Melita Garza joined the National Association of Hispanic Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) in Washington, D . C . , as press contact and editor of its national newsletter ... Charlie Ericksen OR OVR. APPOIWTIVE MoDeL-? Hispanic Link Weekly Report