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Hispanic link weekly report, February 3, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 3, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News
Judith Garcia, one of ten teacher finalists chosen for the space shuttle Challenger that tragically claimed the lives of its seven passengers Jan. 28, says her last words to teacher/passenger Sharon McAuliffe were"... you’re going to carry my spirit with you”... Victor Torres, a graduate geology student at the University of Michigan who in 1984 discovered the oldest fossil remains ever found in the United States of a primate that could be a distant ancestor of humans, has the new species named in his honor -Cantius torresi. Torres’ professor, Philip Gingerich, reports on the significance of the find in the Jan. 23-29 issue of the British scientific journal Nature. . . Manny Carillo, former special assistant to Assistant Secretary of Labor Frank Casillas until his departure in
June 1985, is named special assistant to Fred Romero, head of Labors Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Development. . . California state Assemblyman Charles C£hler6n^ntroduces a bill in the state Legislature that proposes establism®/©f^um to chronicle the contributions of Latin Americans to the heritage and culture of California and the nation... Lionel SpMnpresfideQtaof San Antonio -based Sosa & Associates, the nation*s5 fouhn tafgest Hispanic advertising agency in number of accounts, announces the opening of a Chicago office... New York Mayor Ed Koch appoints Michael Huerta as Commissioner of Ports and Terminals for the city. Huerta had been working as a consultant to the government and Chamber of Commerce of St. Kitts-Nevis in the West Indies... Alfred Villalobos, president of ARVCO, a consulting firm in San Diego, is elected chairman of the board of the Mexican and American Foundation in that city...
'^^Q)HISPAi4IC LINKWEEKLY^^^i^:
Five-Year Latino Growth-16% vs. 3% for Nation
Hispanic population on the U.S. mainland grew by 16% — compared to 3% growth in the total population — between 1980 and 1935, a new Census report has revealed. Hispanic numbers increased from 14.6 to 16.9 million.
With 3.3 million persons living in the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, there are presently 20.2 million Hispanics in the United States.
This equals 8.6% of the population.
The new Census figures, released Jan. 29, showed Hispanics making up 7.2% of the mainland population as of March 1985, contrasted to 6.4% in the 1980 Census. Its figures were obtained by direct interviews of a population sample and by updating 1980 Census age and sex data through recent estimates of Hispanic births and deaths,
Red Cross Fraud Alleged
Police in Ponce, Puerto Rico, arrested and charged 27 people Jan. 24 for misusing more than $40,000 given by the American Red Cross to the island following the flooding last October that claimed some 200 lives.
Julio Santiago, who distributed Red Cross vouchers in Santa Isabel, east of Ponce, was among those charged. All 27 suspects were from that area. They were charged with fraud and illegal appropriation.
immigration and changes in military personnel and institutionalized population.
Changes in population by national origin showed:
Numbers Percentage Mexicans +1,590,000 + 18.3%
Puerto Ricans + 557,000 + 27.7%
Cubans + 230,000 +28.5%
Other Spanish — 42,000 — 1.3%
The reduction in the count of “other Spanish” was attributed in part to sampling error and to more persons identifying themselves specifically as Mexicans, Puerto Ricans or Cubans in the 1985 survey, according to Art Cresce of the Census Bureau’s Spanish Statistics Branch.
Central and South Americans were not separated from “other Spanish” persons in the 1980 Census survey. A March 1982 Census survey recorded 1.5 million of them. The count
Latinos Lead Church Poll
Churchgoing was more prevalent among Latinosthat non-Latinos in 1985, with45% of them going to church or synagogue compared to 42% of blacks and whites, a year-end Gallup Poll showed.
Attendance has remained relatively constant since 1969,afteradeclinefrom a49% level in 1955. In 1985 there was a slight increase of two percent from 40% in 1984.
According to the poll, 53% of Catholics attend church compared with 42% of Protestants
increased by 13% to 1.7 million in the March 1985 Current Population Survey.
Other cited factors for the overall Hispanic population increase were intense Mexican and Cuban immigration and high fertility rates among U.S. Latinos.
In educational status, Hispanics 25 years or older continued to compare unfavorably with the rest of the population, the new survey showed. It reported that 86.5% of Hispanics had completed 5 years or more of school compared with 98% of non-Hispanics. While 47.9% of Hispanics were high school graduates* 75.5% of non-Hispanics had a high school degree, and 8.5% of Hispanics completed at least 4 years of college, compared with 20.1% for non-Hispanics.
Compared to 1980, there was a slight improvement in Hispanic educational attainment in 1985. In 1980, there were 84.5% Hispanics with 5 years or more of school, 44% high school graduates and 7.6% college graduates.
Among H ispanic groups in 1985, Mexicans had the lowest percentage of high school (41.9%) and college (5.5%) graduates, while Central and South Americans had the highest percentages (62.6% and 15.5%).
Annual family income lagged far behind the $26,951 for non-Hispanics in 1984. The Hispanic median income was $18,833 with Puerto
â–  -_______________________continued on page 2
INS Stages First Sting
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service officers in El Paso, Texas, lured 55 undocumented Mexican immigrants Jan. 18 to a “grand opening party*’ of a bogus automotive dealership. The INS sting operation, first in its history, promised prizes including a truck and a television set, and offered a free barbecue, popcorn and balloons.
Some 250 persons who purportedly had ignored deportation orders were sent letters inviting them to a “Ford-a-Rama Day” at a new “dealership” - a National Guard armory building - named Argim, migra spelled backwards. Migra is Spanish slang for Border Patrol.
Of the 55 who showed up, most were deported immediately.
HISPANICS LIVING ON THE UNITED STATES MAINLAND
March 1985 1980 Census
Origin Number Percent Number- Percent
Mexicali 10,269,000 60.6% 8,679,000 59.4%
Puerto Rican 2,562,000 15.1% 2,005,000 13.7%
Cuban 1,036,000 6.1% 806,000 5.5%
Central or South American Other Spanish 1.722.000 1.350.000 10.2% 8.0% '— >-3,114,000 21.3%
All Spanish Origin 16,940,000 100.0% 14,604,000 100.0%
Note: In the 1980 Census, “Other Spanish” included persons from Spain, the Spanish-speaking countries of Central or South America, and others who identified themselves as Latino, Spanish-American, Spanish, etc. In the March 1985 Current Population Survey, the“Central or South American” category is separated. Census Bureau did not include 3.3 million persons living in Puerto Rico.
Source: U.S Census Bureau -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart


Sin pelos en la lengua
QUIZ TIME: Are you a Hispanic expert? Since it’s still early in the year and not everyone’s fully awake, we’ll make this multiple choice:
1. What U.S. Hispanic group showed the greatest growth rate between 1980 and 1985? a) Cubans b) Mexicans c) Puerto Ricans
2. Which is the nation’s second-fastest-growing minority? a) Hispanics b) Asians c) Blacks
3. What famous American was born on Feb. 18? a) Luis Muftoz Marin b) George Washington c) Abraham Lincoln
4. Which U.S. Hispanic group has the most large families? a) Mexicans b) Cubans c) Puerto Ricans
5. How many Puerto Ricans live in the United States? a) 2.6 million b) 5.9 million c) 8.6 million
Some of the answers may not make sense to you, but here they are anyway:
1. If you read Page 1, you discovered that, according to the new Census survey, Cubans(28.5%) - followed by Puerto Ricans(27.7%) and then Mexicans (18.3%) - showed the greatest rate of increase between the’80 and '85 tallies. The Mariel exodus just missed the 1980 Census count
2. The second-fastest-growing minority is Hispanics. Asians passed us as the fastest in 1980.
3. Washington was born Feb. 11, but a calendar year reform in 1752 changed his birthday to Feb. 22 and this year we celebrate it on Feb. 17. Lincoln was born on Feb. 12. Luis Mufioz Marin, Puerto Rico’s first elected governor and architect of its miraculous post-World War II economic development was born Feb. 18,1898. He died April 30, 1980, at the age of 82. His birthday will be celebrated in many mainland Puerto Rican communities this month.
4. The Census says that 9.8% of U.S. Mexican families include seven or more persons; for Puerto Ricans, it’s 2.5%; Cubans, 0.9%.
5. In all of its reports on persons of Spanish origin in the United States, the Census Bureau obstinately refuses to include those in Puerto Rico, even though they are U.S. citizens and there’s a constant flow between the island and mainland.
So it says 2.6 million, ignoring the 3.3 million on the island. “We only cover persons living in the 50 states, whether they are tourists or illegal aliens,” Bureau Deputy Director Louis Kincannon told Weekly Report’s Dora Delgado.
U.S. Rep Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.), whochairsthe House Subcommittee On Census and Population, says island Puerto Ricans - as well as poeple living on other U.S. “properties” such as the Virgin islands and Guam - should be included “simply because they’re U.S. citizens.”
But so far, the bureaucrats don’t pay any attention to what the chairman says.
- Kay Barbaro
Few Lawyers in Firms
Hispanic representation in the nation’s largest law firms remained negligible in 1985, according to a National Law Journal survey.
The survey of 246 of the nation’s top 250 firms revealed that the number of Hispanic lawyers in the£e firms grew only one-tenth of a percent, from 0.65% in 1984 to 0.79%, in 1985. Therewere334 Hispanics in the firms surveyed, compared to 620 blacks and 375 Asian Americana
A large majority of the Hispanics were associates rather than partners; 26% were practicing in the 25 top firms.
The 1985 survey was the Journal’s most extensive to date. It included nearly 7% of the nation’s 600,000 lawyers.
Central Am. Scholarships
A total of 154 undergraduate students from Central America arrived in Miami Jan. 13 under a new federal scholarship program that will pay for the completion of their bachelors degrees as an indirect way to counteract Soviet influence in the region.
Sponsored by the United States Information Agency, the Central American Program for Undergraduate Scholarship is an outgrowth of 1984 recommendations by the Presidential Commission on Central America headed by Henry Kissinger. Its purpose is to compete with the Soviet Union in attracting Third World students to their educational systems.
Of the 154 students, 6 are from Nicaragua, 23 from El Salvador, 30 from Honduras, 26 from Guatemala, 24 from Costa Rica, 25 from Panama and 20 from Belize. The students come from predominantly poor rural areas and might have otherwise gone to the Soviet Union or other communist countries to complete their education, according to government officials.
The students will attend colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Vermont and Wisconsin.
2
Fewer Latinos on Boards
The number of Hispanics serving on public school boards declined in 1985, according to a survey by the American School Board Journal and Virginia Tech University.
In its January issue, the Journal projected that Hispanic school board membership nationally dropped from 1.5% in 1984 to 1.2% last year.
A total of 1,468 members representing more than 9% of the nation's school boards participated in the survey.
Largest Hispanic decrease was found in the National School Boards Association’s 12-state Southern region, which includes Florida and Texas. There it fell from 4.3% to 2.2%.
The only one of its five regions to reflect an increase was the nine-state Pacific region, which went from 2.6% to 3.7%.
Other regions with declines were the Western (Rocky Mountain states), from 2.4% to 1.8%, and Central, 0.8% to 0.5%. No Hispanic school board members were identified in either the'84 or’85 survey samples from the Northeast region.
In the survey, board members in each region also identified 19 areas of concern. Tops among them were lack of financial support, declining enrollment and lack of parental interest Not one mentioned districts? ability to serve non-English-speaking or limited-English-speaking students as a concern.
Chi. Cops Lose Appeal
The U.S. Supreme Court let stand Jan. 13a ruling against a group of Chicago Hispanic and white police sergeants who had charged that the city’s test for promotion to lieutenant was unrelated to the job.
The suit, originally filed in 1977, alleged that the sergeants’ rights were being violated because their opportunity for advancement was based on an unfair exam.
Hispanics Grow by 16%
continued from page 1
Ricans having the lowest ($12,371) and Cubans being the most affluent ($22,587). In 1979, the Hispanic median family income was $14,612, compared with $20,223 for non-Hispanics.
I n 1985, the unemployment rate was substantially higher for Hispanics (11.3%) than for non-Hispanics (7.4%), with Puerto Ricans having the highest rate (14.3%) and Cubans the lowest (6.8%). In 1979, there was a 8.9% Hispanic and a 6.4% non-Hispanic unemployment rate.
In 1984, 25.2% Hispanics lived in poverty compared with 10.7% non-Hispanics. Again, Puerto Rican families were the most affected, with 41.9% living in poverty,followed by 24.1% Mexicans, 23.6% Central and South Americans, 15.2% persons of other Spanish origin and 12.9% Cubans. In 1979, 21.3% Hispanics lived below poverty level, compared with 8.9% of nOn-Hispanics.
Other survey findings:
•The Hispanic population was somewhat older in 1985. Median age rose to 25 years from 23.2 years in 1980. For non-Hispanics, it rose from 308 in 1980 to 31.9 in 1985. Puerto Ricans and Mexicans were the youngest of all (24.3 and 23.3), while Cubans were the oldest (39.1).
• Hispanic families were larger (mean of 3.88 persons) than non-Hispanic families (3.18). Cuban families were smallest in size (3.13) while Mexican families were the largest (4.15).
•Twenty-three percent of Hispanic families were headed by a woman, compared to 15.7% of non-Hispanic families. Forty-fOur percent of the Puerto Rican families were headed by a woman, 21.9% of Central and South Americans, 18.6% of Mexicans and 16% of Cubans.
“Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1985" is the advance summary of a more detailed report expected to be issued within two months.
- Dora Delgado Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1985
(Advance Report)
Table 5. Selected Social Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Spanish Origin, by Type of Origin: March 1985
(For the United States)
Characteristic Spanish origin Not of Spanish origin1
Total population Total Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban Central or South American Other Spani sh
AGE
Total.•••••••••••••••(thousands).• 234,066 16,940 10,269 2,562 1,036 1,722 1,350 217,126
Percent •••••• 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Under 5 years••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 7.7 10.7 11.7 10.6 5.4 9.5 8.3 7.4
5 to 17 years 19.0 25.3 27.4 26.5 14.4 21.6 19.4 18.6
18 to 64 years 61.8 59.2 56.8 60.3 65.7 65.5 63.7 61.9
65 years and over ••••• ••••••• 11.5 4.8 4.2 2.7 14.5 3.3 8.5 12.0
Median age. •••••••••• (years)• • 31.4 25.0 23.3 24.3 39.1 27.1 29.6 31.9
SEX
Percent. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Male. 48.5 49.8 51.1 46.8 48.7 47.9 49.1 48.4
Female.••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••• 51.5 50.2 48.9 53.2 51.3 52.1 50.9 51.6
MARITAL STATUS
Total, 15 years and over(thous.)•• 182,316 11,776 6,814 1,774 867 1,280 1,040 170,540
Percent •••••• 100,0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Single (never married) 26.2 31.2 31.0 37.5 19.7 32.7 29.9 25.8
Married. ...•••• 59.2 57.9 59.6 50.1 63.1 58.4 55.2 59.3
Widowed •••••••••• 7.4 4.7 4.0 4.2 8.8 3.8 7.5 7.6
Divorced. ..•••• 7.2 6.2 5.4 8.2 8.4 5.1 7.4 7.2
EDUCATION
Total, 25 years and over(thous.)•• 143,524 8,455 4,755 1,241 721 951 787 135,070
Percent completed—
Less than 5 years of school 2.7 13.5 17.1 12.8 7.4 7.2 6.0 2.0
4 years of high school or more.••••••• 73.9 47.9 41.9 46.3 51.1 62.6 66.1 75.5
4 years of college or more.••••••••••' 19.4 8.5 5.5 7.0 13.7 15.5 15.3 20.1
Median school years completed.•••••••••• 12.6 11.5 10.2 11.2 12.0 12.4 12.4 12.7
TYPE OF FAMILY
All families..••••••••••(thous.)•• 62,706 3,939 2,251 621 318 406 343 58,767
Percent •••••• 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Married-couple families. ••••••••• 80.3 71.7 75.7 52.0 78.3 73.4 72.9 80.9
Female householder, no husband present.• 16.2 23.0 18.6 44.0 16.0 21.9 21.3 15.7
Male householder, no wife present 3.6 5.3 5.8 4.0 5.7 4.7 5.5 3.4
SIZE OF FAMILY
Percent. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Two persons•••• 40.4 24.4 20.9 24.4 43.1 21.9 33.2 41.5
Three persons 23.6 24.1 22.0 27.1 25.2 29.6 24.5 23.6
21.1 23.7 22.6 28.8 18.6 24.9 25.4 21.0
Five persons 9.4 14.0 15.7 12.7 9.1 13.8 9.9 9.1
3.5 7.0 9.0 4.5 2.8 5.9 3.5 3.2
Seven or more persons••••••••••••••••«•• 2.0 6.7 9.8 2.5 0.9 4.2 2.9 1.6
Mean number of persons.••••••••••••••••• 3.23 3.88 4.15 3.62 3.13 3.74 3.41 3.18
1 Includes persons who did not know or did not report on origin. - U.& Bureau of tho Census chart
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


, Table 6. Selected Economic Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Spanish Origin, by Type of Origin: March 1985
(For the United States)
Characteristic Spanish origin Not of Spanish origin1
Total population Total Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban Central or South American Other Spanish
LABOR FORCE STATUS
Total, 16 years and over (thous.).. 178,587 11,466 6,625 1,721 851 1,248 1,021 167,121
In civilian labor force. 114,256 7,362 4,427 882 557 853 643 106,894
Percent in civilian labor force. 64.0 64.2 66.8 51.2 65.5 68.3 63.0 64.0
Percent unemployed. 7.6 11.3 11.9 14.3 6.8 11.0 7.1 7.4
Males, 16 years and over ..(thous.).. 85,132 5,643 3,402 754 413 587 486 79,489
In civilian labor force 63,365 4,427 2,773 504 308 483 358 58,938
Percent in civilian labor force 74.4 78.5 81.5 66.9 74.6 82.3 73.7 74.1
Percent unemployed...... 7.8 11.8 12.5 15.0 6.9 9.3 8.9 7.5
Females, 16 years and over (thous.).. 93,455 5,823 3,223 967 438 661 534 87,632
In civilian labor force • •••• 50,891 2,935 1,654 378 249 370 284 47,956
Percent in civilian labor force.•••••••• 54.5 50.4 51.3 39.0 56.9 55.9 53.2 54.7
Percent unemployed. •••••••••• 7.4 10.5 10.9 13.3 6.6 13.2 4.9 7.2
OCCUPATION
Employed males, 16 years
and over........ ...(thous.).. 58,430 3,906 2,426 429 287 438 326 54,524
Percent •••••• 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Managerial and professional specialty 25.2 11.6 8.6 12.5 19.1 15.7 20.5 26.2
Technical, sales, and administrative support. 19.8 14.6 12.3 21.6 16.9 16.9 18.3 20.2
Service occupations•••••••• 9.9 14.9 14.1 19.9 9.7 18.7 13.7 9.5
Farming, forestry, and fishing. • •••• 4.3 6.0 8.7 0.8 0.6 2.0 2.6 4.2
Precision production, craft, and repair...••• 20.3 23.3 24.8 17.4 27.8 19.9 20.3 20.1
Operators, fabricators, and laborers 20.5 29.6 31.6 27.8 25.9 26.9 24.6 19.8
Employed females, 16 years
and over. (thous.) • • 47,120 2,625 1,474 327 233 321 270 44,495
Percent. ••••»•« 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Managerial and professional specialty.••••••• 23.7 12.6 11.2 14.3 14.1 13.4 15.9 24.4
Technical, sales, and administrative support. 45.7 42.7 43.5 42.1 42.4 36.4 46.9 45.9
Service occupations 18.1 22.3 22.4 22.8 16.0 26.0 22.0 17.9
Farming, forestry, and fishing. •»••••• 1.0 1.3 2.1 0,6 - 0.6 - 1.0
Precision production, craft, and repair 2.3 3.5 3.8 2.2 5.1 2.8 2.7 2.3
Operators, fabricators, and laborers. 9.1 17.7 17.1 17.9 22.5 20.9 12.5 8.6
FAMILY INCOME IN 1984
Median income. ••...••••• (dollars).. 26,433 18,833 19,184 12,371 22,587 19,785 23,470 26,951
BELOW POVERTY LEVEL IN 1984
Families .... (thous.).. 7,277 991 541 260 41 96 52 6,286
Percent below poverty level2......... 11.6 25.2 24.1 41.9 12.9 23.6 15.2 10.7
Family householder—
65 years old and over:
Number 713 58 33 3 14 3 6 655
Percent * 7.3 19.4 19.2 (B) (B) (B) (B) 6.9
Not a high school graduate:3
Number 3,229 633 367 163 25 54 24 2,596
Percent •••••• 20.6 32.5 29.8 52.6 17.0 36.2 22.0 18.9
Female, husband absent:
Number • • 3,498 483 183 203 22 42 33 3,014
Percent •.. . • 34.5 53.4 43.8 74.4 (B) 47.2 (B) 32.7
Unrelated Individuals:
Number. 6,609 545 297 138 29 49 31 6,065
Percent .»••• 21.8 36.8 39.0 49.1 31.2 29.2 17.4 21.1
B Base less than 75,000. - U.S. Bureau of the Census chart
- Represents zero or rounds to zero.
* Includes persons who did not know or did not report on origin. 2 Percent of all families of specified origin, householder 25 years old and over.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
1985 HISPANIC POPULATION SURVEY: A U.S. Bureau of the Census report released Jan. 29 provides new data on Hispanic population, age, sex, education, employment, income and other characteristics. The six-page “Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1985, Advance Report,” P-20, No. 403, Stock no. 003-001-90802-6, is available for$1 each prepaid from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
HISPAN ICS ON SCHOOL BOARDS: The January issue of American School Board Journal reports on the findings of a nationwide survey on school boards’ ethnic and racial composition in different regions of the United States. For a free copy, contact: American School Board Journal, 1680 Duke St., Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 838-6722.
HISPANICS IN LAW FIRMS: The results from a nationwide survey on the number of H ispanics in top law firms appear in an article titled “Little Room at the Top for Blacks, Hispanics.” Cost: $2.00. Specify the Dec. 23,1985 issue. Contact The National Law Journal, 111 8th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10011 (212) 741-8300.
CONGRESSIONAL RATING: Americans for Democratic Action rated all members of Congress on 20 issues that they voted on in 1985. (See Jan. 20 Weekly Report.) Copies of the 14-page report are $5. Contact: ADA, 1411 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005(202) 638-6447.
UNITED WAY INTERNSHIPS: United Way of America is recruiting college graduates and professionals with less than two years experience for its management training program in fund raising and fund distribution. Ten interns will be selected in June for one-year placements in United Way organizations. Salary: $18,000. Deadline: Feb. 21. Contact Debbie Walls Foster, Special Personnel Programs, United Way of America, 701 North Fairfax St., Alexandria, Va 22314 (703) 836-7100.
AWARD-WINNING FILM: “Esperanza/’an award-winning film by Latina producer Sylvia Morales, relates the story of a boy and a girl who attempt to find their father in Northern California after their mother is deported. Rental price:$100. Contact: Sylvia Morales, Latino Consortium, KCET-7V, 4401 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90027.
URBAN AND RURAL POPULATION: A report from the Census Bureau analyzes trends in population growth in metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas. Copies of “Patterns of Metropolitan Area and County Population Growth: 1980-1984,” Series P-25, No. 976, are available by sending $2.75 to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
PUBLICITY & ADVERTISING Lehman Center for the Performing Arts, New York, seeks individual to take charge of publicity & advertising. Responsible for all press relations and publicity, including writing of press releases, program editing, advertising layout and coordinating of public relations events. Strong organizational, writing and editing skills BA degree plus3 years experience in performing arts promotion. Position available immediately. Salary range to $22,000, commensurate with experience. Excellent fringe benefits Send resume to Managing Director, Lehman Center for the Performing Arts Bronx, New York 10468.
PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKER $24,121 Ann. #66206CDHS Position performs clinical mental health related social work in the Department of Human Services for Arlington County. Employee
OPPORTUNITY FOR ORGANIZATIONS: Key leaders of your organization - officers, board members and chapter presidents-may be able to receive Hispanic Link Weekly Report every week through a “networking” agreement developed by you, Hispanic Link and a sponsoring corporation.
Hispanic Link, offering a special discount rate, joined in its first such agreement recently with National Image and the Adolph Coors Company of Golden, Colo., which agreed to underwrite 70 full-year subscriptions for Image leadership coast-to-coast Now Image leaders have the latest available information - from the nation’s Hispanic “publication of record” - at their fingertips each week.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report plans to pursue additional “networking” proposals with Hispanic organizations and interested corporations.
If you would like more information on developing such agreements, please contact me. Thanks.
HActor Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher
gathers and analyzes psycho-social data, assesses and diagnoses problems, develops and implements an ongoing treatment program, conducts therapy for a variety of clients and provides consultation as requested by the community.
Requires Bachelors degree supplemented by a Master's degree from an approved school of social work plus two years related experience in social work. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in a mental health setting, experience working with abused children, experience with a variety of clients and clinical problems and/or the ability to be licensed Official Arlington County application form required Applications wi{{ be accepted no later than 5 p.m. on Fed 6. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167, Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St, North Arlington, Va 22201 EOE
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC HEALTH STATISTICS Houston Feb. 3,4 Los Angeles Feb. 6, 7
The data tapes on Mexican Americans from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) will be made public, with technical workshops on topics ranging from medical history to dental examination.
Sandra Smith (301) 436-8500
MIGRATION CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Feb. 5,6 Rep. Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) will be a panelist at a conference sponsored by the Center for I mmigration Policy and Refugee Assistance at Georgetown University.
Mary Larkin (202) 625-3545 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
HISPANIC THEATERS CONFERENCE San Antonio Feb. 7-9
Theater groups from around the nation will convene for the first Conferencia National de Teatros Hlspanos to discuss improving administrative techniques and creating a national Hispanic theater circuit Mario Sanchez (305) 643-1660 Ext. 157
SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Angeles Feb. 8
The Mexican American Alumni Association of the University of Southern California will hold its 12th annual fund-raising scholarship dinner and dance. Raul Vargas (213) 743-5280
COMING SOON
NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Las Vegas Feb. 14
Otto M6rida (702) 385-7367
CORPORATE ACHIEVERS SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISER
New York Feb. 15
Rufina Alvarez (212) 431 -5844
IMMIGRATION REFORM CONFERENCE
San Antonio Feb. 14
Richard Sayre (202) 628-8516
COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL ASSN. Washington, D.C. Feb. 17-19 Sandy Shapiro (202) 462-1038
SPOTLIGHT
Federico Peha, mayor of Denver, will address the 16th annual symposium of the Conference of Minority Public Administrators(COM PA) in Washington, D.C., Feb. 20, 21. Titled “Enhancing the Roles and Responsibilities of Minority Public Administrators,” the event will examine topics such as comparable worth, affirmative action and minority contracting. For further information contact Norton Bonaparte at the Institute for Governmental Service, 2101 Woods Hall, College Park Md. 20742 (301) 454-2507.
5


Arts & Entertainment
A SPANISH-LANGUAGE FILM, RECENT WINNER of a Golden Globe award, could be among Oscar nominees announced by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences this week.
Argentina’s La historia oficial- one among 30 official entries in the “foreign film” Oscar race - won a Golden Globe Jan. 24. The award, given by international journalist members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, traditionally predicts the choices for Academy Award nominations. Norma Aleandro, one of the film’s stars, won a 1985 New York Film Critics Circle Award for “best actress” on Jan. 26. Golden Globes are given annually in film and television categories. Among this year's honorees, actor Edward James Olmos picked up a Globe in the “best supporting actor" category for his performance on NBC’s Miami Vice. Olmos, who is a past nominee for a stage Tony, won an Emmy last year in a similar category.
Two actors nominated for“best actor" in film could appear among Oscar nominees to be announced Feb. 5- in separate categories Both William Hurt and Raul Julia were nominated by the HFPA for their roles in Kiss of the Spider Woman. But studio ads, taken in film trade
magazines to attract attention of Academy voters, suggest the nomination of both actors as follows: Hurt in the “best actor” category and Puerto Rican Julid in the “best supporting actor" slot.
Kiss of the Spider Woman, a film based on a novel by Argentine Manuel Puig and directed by compatriot Hector Babenco, won a Golden Globe nomination for“supporting actress” Sonia Braga. Neither Hurt, Juli& or Braga won HFPA nods. In an unprecedented move, however, the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures awarded Jan. 27 both Hurt and Julia its best actor award- the first time it has done so in its 77-year history.
Meanwhile, another Oscar hopeful Spanish-language film, Mexico’s Frida is being submitted to international film festivals in Berlin, Tokyo, Rotterdam, Oxford and Melbourne.
“Never before had a Mexican film accumulated so much international interest,” wrote Mexico City’s Excelsior newspaper about the film, which has already screened in Venice, Rio de Janeiro, Montreal, Huelva and Biarritz. It was also a prize winner at a recent festival in Havana.
Frida Mexico’s official Oscar entry, has not yet been screened commercially in Mexico which may disqualify it this year from Oscar consideration, according to Academy rules.
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
RECRUITING TIME: February once again is the month for recruiters from broadcast and print media to acquaint themselves with Hispanic talent at West and East Coast job conferences.
The California Chicano News Media Association stages its seventh annual Journalism Opportunities Conference for Minorities at the U niversity of Southern California in Los Angeles Feb. 7-8.
Last year it attracted 55 media organization representatives, who interviewed some 400 beginning and/or restless journalists.
In. Washington, D.C., Howard University’s School of Communications hosts its 15th annual Communications Conference Feb. 13-16. It combines recruiting sessions with numerous seminars and workshops, including one on “Hispanics and Blacks: Collision or Coalition,” coordinated by International Business Communications’ Frank G6mez.
On Long Island, Newsday held its third annual jobs conference Jan. 24,25.
PLUMA DE ORO: The nation’s first major literary competition for writers in Spanish will begin this year, with Oct. 12-Columbus Day-established as deadline for manuscript submissions.
The Pluma de Oro competition, housed at the University of Miami and initially funded for three years oy American Express, will offer minimum $2,000 awards in novel, short story, drama, poetry and essay categories and $500 prizes to student competitors in similar categories.
It will be open to anyone studying or working in the United States, according to Ambler Moss, dean of the university’s North-South Center.
The competition was announced at a Jan. 22 luncheon in Washington, D.C., with Mexico's Carlos Fuentes providing the introductory address.
POLITICAL JOURNAL With a helping boost from the Ford Foundation, the long-awaited Journal of H ispanic Politics is off the pressea
Vol. I, No. 1 includes articles on economic policy by Jose Llanes and Marta Tienda, one on social policy by Henry Ramos and Marlene Moralea and a political piece by Richard Santillan.
It will be published annually by the Hispanic Student Caucus of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.
Annual subscription ratea $10 students, $15 individuals/non-profita $20 corporationa and $100 for reprint righta For information, contact Ramos at The Ford Foundation, 320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 573-4763.
LATINO SOUNDS: Another publication, with works by 25 Detroit writers and artists-Latino and Native American- made its debut, too, aided by a grant from The Michigan Council for the Arta
Detroit La Onda Latina en Poesia/Latin Sounds in Poetry is an 80-page bilingual anthology celebrating “nuestra tierra" It costs $6, with checks payable to Detroit Latin Sounda c/o Casa de Unidad, 1920 Scotten, Detroit, Mich. 48209. - Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234*0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Judith Garcia, one of ten teacher finalists chosen for the space shuttle Challenger that tragically claimed the lives of its seven passengers Jan. 28, says her last words to teacher/passenger Sharon McAuliffe were" ... you're going to carry my spirit with you" ... VIctor Torres, a graduate geology student at the University of Michigan who in 1984 discovered the oldest fossil remains ever found in the United States of a primate that could be a distant ancestor of humans, has the new species named in his honor Cantius torresi. Torres' professor, Philip Gingerich, reports on the significance of the find in the Jan. 23 issue of the British scientific journal Nature. . . Manny Carillo, former special assistant to Assistant Secretary of Labor Frank Casillas until his departure in June 1985, is special assistant to Fred Romero, head of Labor's Office of Planning and Policy Development. .. California state As$emblyman Charles Ct.lstftr6n a in the state Legisl;:tture that proposes to chromcle the contributions of Latin Americans to the heritage and culture of California and the nation . . . Lionel San based Sosa & Associates, the natloh'SJ foutt'h 't'Mg'est H1spamc advertising agency in number of accounts, announces the opening of a Chicago office ... New York Mayor Ed Koch appoints Mic!lael Huerta as Commissioner of Ports and Terminals for the city. Huerta had been working as a consultant to the governmentand Chamber of Commerce of St. Kitts-Nevis in the West Indies ... Alfred Villalobos, president of ARVCO, a consulting firm in San Diego, is elected chairman of the board of the Mexican and American Foundat. ion in that city ... Vol. 4 No.5 HISPANIC LINK WEE Feb.3,1986 FiveYear Latino Growth-160/o vs. 3/o for Nation Hispanic population on the U.S. mainland grew by 16% --compared to 3% growth in the total population -between 1980 and 1985, a new Census report has revealed. Hispanic numbers increased from 14.6 to 16. 9 million. With 3.3 million persons living in the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, there are presently 20.2 million Hispanics in the United States. This equals 8 .6% of the population . The new Census figures, released Jan. 29, showed Hispanics making up 7.2% of the mainland population as of March 1985, contrasted to 6.4% in the 1980 Census. Its figures were obtained by direct interviews of a population sample and by updating 1980 Census age and sex data through recent estimates of Hispanic births and deaths, immigration and changes in military personnel and institutionalized population. Changes in population by national origin showed: Numbers Percentage Mexicans + 1 ,590,000 + 18.3% Puerto Ricans + 557,000 + 27.7% Cubans + 230,000 + 28.5% Other Spanish 42,000 1.3% The reduction in the count of "other Spanish" was attributed in part to sampling error and to more persons identifying themselves specifically as Mexicans, Puerto Ricans or Cubans in the 1985 survey, according to Art Cresce of the Census Bureau's Spanish Statistics Branch. Central and South Americans were not separated from "other Spanish" persons in the 1980 Census survey. A March 1982 Census survey recorded 1 . 5 million of them. The count HISPANICS LIVING ON THE UNITED STATES MAINLAND March 1980 Census Origin Number Perc:;ent NumberPercent Mexican 10,269,000 60.6% 8,679,000 59.4% Puerto Rican 2,562,000 15.1% 2,005,000 13.7% Cuban 1,036,000 6.1% 806,000 5.5o/o Central or South American 1,722,000 1 0 2 % :=:::::=3 114 000 21.3% Other Spanish 1,350,000 8.0% ' ' All Spanish Origin 16,940,000 100.0% 14,604,000 100.0% Note: In the 1980 Census, "Other Spanish" inCluded persons from Spain, the Spanishspeaking countries of Central or South America, and others who identified themselves as Latino, SpanishAmerican, Spanish, etc. In the March 1985 Current Population Survey, the"Central or South American" category is separated. Census Bureau did not include 3.3 million persons living in Puerto Rico. Source: US Census Bureau -Hispanic Link Weekly Report <;hart Red Cross Fraud Alleged Police in Ponce, Puerto Rico, arrested and charged 27 people Jan. 24 for misusing more than $40,000 given by the American Red Cross to the island following the flooding last October that claimed some 200 lives. Julio Santiago, who C:istributed Red Cross vouchers in Santa Isabel, east of Ponce, was among those charged. All 27 suspects were from that area . They were charged with fraud and illegal appropriation. Latinos Lead Church Poll Churchgoing was more prevalent among Latinos that non Latinos in 1985, with45% of them going to church or synagogue compared to 42% of blacks and whites, a year-end Gallup Poll showed . Attendance has remained relatively constant since 1969,afteradeclinefrom a49% level in 1955. In 1985 there was a slight increase of two percent from 40% in 1984. According to the poll, 53% of Catholics attend church compared with 42% of Protestants. increased by 13% to 1.7 million in the March 1985 Current Population Survey. Other cited factors for the overall Hispanic population increase were intense Mexican and Cuban immigration and high fertility rates among U.S. Latinos. In educational status, Hispanics 25 years or older continued to compare unfavorably with the rest of the populatior., the new survey showed. It reported that 86.5% of Hispanics had completed 5 years or more of school compared with 98% of While 47.9% of Hispanics were high school graduates, 75.5% of had a high school degree, and 8.5% of Hispanics completed at least 4 years of college, compared with 20.1% for Compared to 1980, there was a slight im provement in Hispanic educational attainment in 1985 . In 1980, there were 84.5% Hispanics with 5 years or more of school, 44% high school graduates and 7.6% college graduates. Among His panic groups in 1985, Mexicans had the lowest percentage of high school (41.9%) and college (5.5%) graduates, while Central and South Americans had the highest percentages (62.6% and 1 5.5% ). Annual family income lagged far behind the $26,951 for in 1984. The Hispanic median income was $18,833 with Puerto continued on page 2 INS Stages First Sting U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service officers in El Paso, Texas, lured 55 undocu mented Mexican immigrants Jan. 18 to a "grand opening party" of a bogus automotive dealership. The INS sting operation, first in its history, promised prizes including a truck and a television set, and offered a free barbecue, popcorn and balloons. Some 250 persons who purportedly had ignored deportation orders were sent letters inviting them to a "Ford-aRama Day" at a new "dealership"a National Guard armory buildingnamed Argim, migra spelled back wards. Migra is Spanish slang for Border Patrol. Of the 55 who showed up, most were deported immediately.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua 3. Washington was born Feb. 11, butacalendaryearreform in 1752 changed his birthday to Feb. 22 and this year we celebrate it on Feb . 17. Lincoln was born on Feb. 12. Luis Mui'\oz Marin, Puerto Rico 's first elected governor and architect of its miraculous post-World War II economic development, was born Feb. 18, 1898. He died April30, 1980, at the age of 82. His birthday will be celebrated in many mainland Puerto Rican communities this month . QUIZ TIME: Are you a Hispanic experf? Since ifs still early in the year and not everyone's fully awake, we'll make this multiple choice: 1. What U.S. Hispanic group showed the . greatest growth rate between 1 980 and 1985? a) Cubans b) Mexicans c) Puerto Ricans 2. Which is the nation's second-fastest-growing minority'? a) Hispanics b) Asians c) Blacks 3. What famous American was born on Feb. 18? a) Luis Mul'loz Marin b) George Washington c) Abraham Lincoln 4. The Census says that 9.8% of U.S. Mexican families include seven or more persons; for Puerto Ricans, ifs 2.5%; Cubans, 0.9%. 4. Which U.S. Hispanic group has the most large families? a) Mexicans b) Cubans c) Puerto Ricans 5. In all of its reports on persons of Spanish origin in the United States, the Census Bureau obstinately refuses to include those in Puerto Rico, even though they are U.S. citizens and there's a constant flow between the island and mainland. 5. How many Puerto Ricans live in the United States? a) 2.6 million b) 5 . 9 million c) 8.6 million Some of the answers may not make sense to you, but I:! ere they are anyway: So it says 2.6 million, ignoring the 3.3 million on the island. "We only cover persons living in the 50 states, whether they are tourists or illegal aliens," Bureau Deputy Director Louis Kincannon told Weekly Reporfs Dora Delgado. 1. If you read 1, you discovered that, according to the new Census survey, Cubans followed by Puerto Ricans (27 .7%) and then Mexicans (18.3%)-showed the greatest rate of increase between the '80 and '85 tallies. The Mariel exodus just missed the U.S. Rep. RobertGarcla(D-N.Y.), who chairs the House Subcommittee on Census and Population, says island Puerto Ricans-as well as poeple living on other U .S. "properties" such as the Virgin Islands and Guamshould be included "simply because they're U.S. citizens." 1980 Census count. •e 2. The second-fastest-growing minority is Hispanics. Asians passed us as the fastest in 1980. But so far, the bureaucrats don't pay any attention to what the chairman says. Few Lawyers in Firms Hispanic representation in the nation's largest law firms remained negligible in 1985, according to a National Law Journal survey. The survey of 246 of ttie nation's top 250 firms revealed that the number of Hispanic lawyers in these firms grew only one-tenth of a percent, from 0.65% in .1984 to 0.79%, in 1985. There were 334 Hispanics in thElfirms surveyed, compared to 620 blacks and 375 Asian Americans. A large majority of the Hispanics were associates rather than partners; 26% were practicing in the 25 top firms. The 1985 survey was the Journal's most extensive to date. It included nearly 7% of the nation's 600,000 lawyers . Central Am. Scholarships A total of 154 undergraduate students from Central America arrived in Miami Jan. 13 under a new federal scholarship program that will pay for the completion of their bachelor's degrees as an indirect way to counteract Soviet influence in the region. Sponsored by the United States Information Agency, the Central American Program for Undergraduate Scholarship is an outgrowth of 1984 recommendations by the Presidential Commission on Central America headed by Henry Kissinger . Its purpose is to comp-ete with the Soviet Union in attracting Third World students to their educational systems. Of the 154 students, 6 are from Nicaragua, 23 from El Salvador, 30 from Honduras, 26 from Guatemala, 24 from Costa Rica, 25 from Panama and 20 from Belize. The students come from predominantly poor rural areas and might have otherwise gone to the Soviet Union or other communist countries to complete their education, according to government officials . The students will attend colleges and uni versities in Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Oregon; Pennsylvania, Texas, Vermont and Wisconsin. 2 Fewer Latinos on Boards The number of Hispanics serving on public school boards declined in 1985, according to a survey by the American School Board Journal and Virginia Tech University. In its January issue, the Journal projected that Hispanic school board membership nationally dropped from 1.5% in 1984 to 1.2% last year . A total of 1 ,468 members representing more than 9% of the nation's school boards participated in the survey. Largest Hispanic decrease was found in the National School Boards Association's 12-state Southern region, which Includes Florida and Texas. There it fell from 4.3% to 2.2%. The only one of its five regions to reflect an increase was the nine-state Pacific region, which went from 2.6% to 3.7% . Other regions with declines were the Western . ( Rocky Mountain states), from 2.4% to 1 .8%, and Central, 0.8% to 0.5%. No Hispanic school board members were identified in either the '84 or'85 survey samples from the Northeast region. In the survey, board members in each region also identified 1 9 areas of concern. Tops among them were lack of financial support, declining enrollment and lack of parental interest Not one mentioned districts' ability to serve non-English-speaking or limited-English-speaking students as a concern. Chi. Cops Lose Appeal The i.J.S. Supreme Court let stand Jan. 13 a ruling against a group of Chicago Hispanic and white police sergeants who had charged that the city's test for promotion to lieutenant was unrelated to the job. The suit, originally filed in 1917, alleged that the sergeants' rights were being violated because their opportunity for advancement was based on an unfair exam. Kay Barbaro Hispanics Grow by 16/o continued from page 1 Ricans having the lowest($12,371) and Cubans being the most affluent ($22,587) . In 1979, the Hispanic median family income was $14,612, compared with $20,223 for non-Hispanics . In 1985, the unemployment rate was substantially higher for Hispanics (11.3%) than for non--Hispanics (7.4%), with Puerto Ricans having the highest rate (14 .3%) and Cubans the lowest (6.8%) . In 1979, there was a 8.9% Hispanic and a 6.4% non--Hispanic unem ployment rate. In 1984, 25.2% Hispanics lived in poverty compared with 10.7% nonHispanics. Again, Puerto Rican families were the most affected, with 41.9% living in poverty, followed by 24 .1% Mexicans, 23.6% Central and South Americans, 15 .2% persons of other Spanish origin and 12.9% Cubans. In 1979, 21.3% Hispanics lived below poverty level, compared with 8 .9% of non-Hispanics. Other survey findings: eThe Hispanic popohHion was somewhat older in 1985. Median age rose to 25 years from 23.2 years in 1980. For nonHispanics, it rose from 30.6 in 1980 to 31.9 in 1985. Puerto Ricans and Mexicans were the youngest of all (24.3 and 23.3), while Cubans were the oldest (39.1 ) . • Hispanic families were larger (mean of 3.88 persons) than non-Hispanic families (3.18). Cuban families were smallest in size (3.13) while Mexican families were the largest (4.15). eTwenty-three percent of Hispanic families were headed by a woman, compared to 1 5.7% of non-Hispanic families. Forty-four percent of the Puerto Rican families were headed by a woman, 21 .9% of Central and South Americans, 18.6% of Mexicans and 16% of Cubans . "Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1985" is the advance summary of a more detailed report expected to be issued within two months. Dora Delgado Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: (Advance Report) March 1985 Table 5. Selected Social Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Spanish Origin, by Type of Origin: March 1985 (For the United States) Spanish origin Characteristic Central Not of Total Puerto or South Other Spanish population Total Mexican Rican Cuban American Spanish origin1 AGE Total, ••••••••••••••• (thousands),, 234,066 16,940 10,269 2,562 1,036 1, 722 1,350 217,126 Percent ..•.•.••.•••••.........•. 100,0 100.0 100,0 100,0 100.0 100,0 100.0 100,0 Under 5 years ••..••.•.•...•...•••••..... 7.7 10.7 11.7 10.6 5.4 9.5 8.3 7.4 5 to 17 years .•..•.....•.••...•.••••..•. 19,0 25,3 27.4 26. 5 14.4 21.6 19.4 18,6 18 to 64 years., ••• , •••••••••••••••••••• 61.8 59.2 56.8 60.3 65.7 65.5 63,7 61.9 65 years and over •...........•.......... 11.5 4.8 4.2 2.7 14.5 3,3 8.5 12,0 Median age, •••••••••••••••••••• (years),. 31.4 25,0 23.3 24.3 39.1 27,1 29.6 31.9 SEX Percent •••• •••••••••••••••••.••• 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100 , 0 100,0 100,0 100.0 Male, ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• , ••••• 48.5 49.8 51.1 46.8 48.7 47.9 49.1 48.4 Fenale ..•....••..•.......•.............. 51,5 50.2 48,9 53.2 51.3 52.1 50.9 51.6 MARITAL STATUS Total, 15 years and over(thous.),. 182,316 11,776 6,814 1, 774 867 1, 280 1,040 170,540 Percent •••••.••••••••••••••••••• 100,0 100.0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100.0 Single (never married) •••••••••••••••••• 26.2 31.2 31.0 37.5 19.7 32.7 29.9 25.8 Married ••.••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••• 59.2 57.9 59.6 50.1 63,1 58.4 55.2 59.3 Widowed, •••• , ••••••• , ••••••••••••••••••• 7.4 4.7 4.0 4.2 8,8 3.8 7.5 7,6 Divorced ••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••.• 7.2 6,2 5.4 8,2 8.4 5.1 7.4 7.2 EDUCATION Total, 25 years and over(thous,) •• 143,524 8,455 4,755 1,241 721 951 787 135,070 Percent completed--Less than 5 years of school ..•..••.•.. 2,7 13,5 17,1 12,8 7.4 7.2 6,0 2.0 4 years of high school or more •••••••• 73,9 47.9 41.9 46.3 51,1 62,6 66,1 75,5 4 years of college or more •••••••••••• 19.4 8,5 s.s 7,0 13.7 15,5 15,3 20,1 Median school years completed,, ••••• , •• , 12.6 11,5 10,2 11.2 12.0 12,4 12.4 12,7 TYPE OF FAMILY All families •••••••••••• (thous.) •• 62,706 3,939 2, 251 621 318 406 343 58,767 Percent ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 100,0 100,0 100 , 0 100,0 100.0 100,0 100,0 100,0 Married-couple families .••••..••••••.••. 80,3 71.7 75,7 52.0 78.3 73.4 72.9 80,9 Female householder, no husband present.,, 16,2 23,0 18.6 44.0 16.0 21.9 21.3 15.7 Male householder, no wife present ••••••• 3,6 5,3 5.8 4.0 5,7 4.7 5.5 3.4 SIZE OF FAMILY Percent ••.•.••••••••...•••••••.. 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 100,0 Two persons ••.•..•.....•••.••.•........• 40.4 24.4 20,9 24.4 43.1 21,9 33.2 41.5 Three persons ••...•.•.•.•..••••.•.••.•.. 23.6 24.1 22.0 27,1 25.2 29.6 24.5 -23.6 Four persons .•••.•..••••••..•••••..•••.. 21,1 23.7 22.6 28, 8 18.6 24.9 1 25.4 21.0 F'i ve persons .••.•....•.••.••••••..•.•.•. 9.4 14,0 15.7 12, 7 9,1 13.8 9.9 9.1 Six persons ..•.•••.•••••.•.••.•••••.•.•• 3,5 7,0 9,0 4.5 2.8 5.9 3,5 3.2 Seven or more persons •••.•••.•.••••.•••• 2.0 6.7 9,8 2.5 0,9 4.2 2.9 1,6 Mean number of persons ••••.•.•••.••.•••. 3.23 3,88 4 .15 3,62 3,13 3.74 3;41 3,18 !Includes persons who did not know or did not report on origin, U.S. BUI'MU oUhe Cen-chert Hispanic Link Weekly Report ' 3

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, Table 6. Selected Economic Characteristics of All Persons and Persons of Spanish Origin, by Type of Origin: March 1985 (For the United States) Spanish origin Characteristic Central Not of Puerto or South Other Spanish Total population Total Mexican Rican Cuban American Spanish origin1 LABOR FORCE STATUS Total, 16 years and over,,,,,(thous, ) •• In civilian labor force,,, ••••••••••••••••••• Percent in civilian labor force .•••••••• Percent unemployed,,, , ••••••••••••••••••••• Males, 16 years and over ••••••• (thoua,) •• In civilian labor force, ••••••••••••••••••••• Percent in civilian labor force •••••• : • • Percent unemployed ••••••••••••••••••••••••• Females, 16 years and over,,,,,(thous,)., In civilian labor force,.,, •••••••••••••••••• Percent in civilian labor force .••••••• • Percent unemployed,,,, ••••••••••••••••••••• OCCUPATION Employed males, 16 years and over •••••••••••••••••••• (thous,),, Percent•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Managerial and professional specialty •••••••• Technical, sales, and administrative support. Service occupations •••••••••••••••••••••••••• Farming, forestry, and fishing, •••••••••••••• Precision production, croft, and repair •••••• Operators, fabricators, and laborers ••••••••• Employed females, 16 years and over,,, ••••••••••••••••• (thous,) •• Percent •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Managerial and professional specialty, •••••• • Technical, sales, and administrative support. Service occupations •••••••••••••••••••••••••• Farming, forestry, and fishing ••••••••••••••• Precision production, craft, and repair,,,,,, Operators, fabricators, and laborers ••••••••• FAMILY INCOME IN 1984 Median income,,, •••••••••••••••••• (dollars),, BELOW POVERTY LEVEL IN 1984 Families ••••••••••••••••••••• (thous,),, Percent below poverty level2 ,,, •••••• householder--65 years old and over: Number •.••.. ....•...•••.•..•.••....•••.•• Percent ••..• . •..•••...•• . •••..•..•••••.• • Not a high school graduate:3 Number •.....••..••..•...•••....•••...••. . Percent .•.••••••••••••••..••••••.•••••••• Female, husband absent: Number • •.•••••••••.•••.•••••••.•.••••.•• . Percent •.••••..••.••••..• •••.••••..• . . . • Unrelated Individuals: Number •••.••••••••• • ••.••••.•••.•••••••.. Percent •••.• , •••• ,., ••• ,, •••• , • • ,, •• ,, •• , B Base less than 75,000. -Represents zero or rounds to zero. 178,587 114,256 64.0 7,6 85,132 63, 365 74.4 7,8 93,455 50,891 54.5 7,4 58,430 100,0 25.2 19,8 9.9 4.3 20.3 20,5 47,120 100,0 23,7 45.7 18,1 1,0 2.3 9,1 26,433 7. 277 11,6 713 7.3 3,229 20.6 3 , 498 34.5 6,609 21.8 11,466 7,362 64.2 11.3 5,643 4,427 78, 5 11.8 5,823 2, 935 50,4 10.5 3, 906 100.0 11,6 14,6 14,9 6,0 23.3 29.6 2,625 100,0 12.6 42.7 22.3 1.3 3.5 17,7 18,833 991 25,2 58 19.4 633 32.5 483 53.4 545 36 . 8 lJncludes persons who did not know or did not report on origin. 2percent of all families of specified origin. 3Householder 25 years old and over. 4 6,625 4,427 66;8 11.9 3 , 402 2, 773 81,5 12.5 3,223 1,654 51.3 10.9 2,426 100,0 8,6 12,3 14.1 8,7 24.8 31,6 1 , 474 100,0 11,2 43.5 22.4 2.1 3,8 17.1 19,184 541 24.1 33 19.2 367 29. 8 183 43 . 8 297 39 .o 1,721 882 51.2 14.3 754 504 66.9 15.0 967 378 39.0 13.3 429 100.0 12.5 21,6 19.9 0.8 17.4 27,8 327 100.0 14,3 42.1 22.8 0,6 2.2 17.9 12 , 371 260 41,9 3 (B) 163 52. 6 203 74. 4 138 49.1 851 557 65.5 6.8 413 308 74.6 6,9 438 249 56,9 6,6 287 100,0 19,1 16.9 9.7 0.6 27,8 25.9 233 100.0 14,1 42.4 16,0 5,1 22,5 22,587 41 12.9 14 (B) 25 17.0 22 (B) 29 31.2 1,248 853 68.3 11,0 587 483 82.3 9.3 661 370 55.9 13,2 438 100,0 15,7 16.9 18,7 2.0 19.9 26.9 321 100,0 13.4 36.4 26.0 0.6 2.8 20, 9 19,785 96 23.6 3 (B) 54 36.2 42 47.2 49 29.2 1,021 643 63. 0 7 , 1 486 358 73,7 8,9 534 284 53.2 4.9 326 100,0 20.5 18 . 3 13,7 2.6 20.3 24.6 270 100.0 15.9 46.9 22.0 2.7 12.5 23,470 52 15.2 6 (B) 24 22.0 33 (B) 31 17.4 167,121 106 , 894 64, 0 7.4 79,489 58,938 74.1 7.5 87.632 47,956 54.7 7. 2 54,524 100.0 26.2 20.2 9.5 4.2 20.1 19.8 44,495 100.0 24.4 45.9 17.9 1.0 2.3 8,6 26. 951 6,286 10,7 655 6.9 2. 596 18.9 3,014 32.7 6,065 21.1 U.S. Bureau of the Cenaua chart Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS 1985 HISPANIC POPULATION SURVEY: A U.S. Bureau of the Census report released Jan . 29 provides new data on Hispanic population, age, sex, education, employment, income and other characteristics. The six-page "Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1985, Advance Report," P-20, No . 403, Stock no . 003001, is available for $1 each prepaid from: Super intendant of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783. HISPANICS ON SCHOOL BOARDS: The January issue of American School Board Journal reports on the findings of a nationwide survey on school boards ' ethnic and racial composition in different regions of the United States . For a free copy, contact: American School Board Journal, 1680 Duke St., Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 838 6722. . HISPANICS IN LAW FIRMS: The results from a . nationwide survey on the number of Hispanics i n top law firms appear in an article titled "Little Room at the Top for Blacks, Hispanics." Cost: $2 .00. Specify the Dec. 23, 1985 issue. Contact: The National Law Journal, 111 8th Ave., New York, N.Y. 1 0011 (212) 7 41. CONGRESSIONAL RATING: Americans for Democratic Action rated all members of Congress on 20 issues that ttiey voted on i n 1985. (See Jan. 20 Weekly Report . ) Copies of the 14-page report are $5. Contact: ADA, 1411 K St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 638. UNITED WAY INTERNSHIPS: United Way of America is recruit i ng college graduates and professionals with less than two years experience for its management training program in fund rai sing and fund d i str i bution . Ten interns will be selected in June for one-year placements in United Way organizations . Salary: $18,000. Deadline : Feb . 21. Contact: Debbie Walls Foster, Special Personnel Programs, United Way of America, 701 North Fairfax St., Alexandria , Va. 22314 (703) 836. AWARD-WINNING FILM: " Esperanza, " an award-winning film by Lat i na producer Sylvia Morales , relates the story of a boy and a girl who attempt to find the i r father in Northern California after their mother is deported . Rental pr i ce:$1 00. contact: Sylvia Morales , Latino Consortium, KCET TV, 4401 Sunset Blvd , Los Angeles, Calif. 90027. URBAN AND RURAL POPULATION: A report from the Census Bureau analyzes trends in population growth in metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas . Copies of " Patterns of Metropolitan Area and County Population Growth : 1980, " Series P-25 , No. 976, a r e available by sending $2 .75 t : x Superintendent of Documents , U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington , D . C . 20402 (202) 783 3238. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and profesSionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. PUBLICITY & ADVERTISING Lehman Center for the Perform i ng Arts, New York. s e eks individual to t ake charge of publ i c ity & advertising . Responsible for all press relat i ons and publicity , includ ing wr i ting of press releases, program advertising iayou \ and coordinating of public relations events. Strong organ i zational , writing and edijingskills. BAdegree plus3 years experience in performing arts promotion. Position available immediately . Salary range to $22.000, com mensurate w i th experience . Excellent fringe benefits. Send resume to Managing Director. Lehman Center for the Performing Arts, Bronx. New York 10468. PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKER $2(121 Ann . ;o66206CDHS Position performs clinical mental health related social work in the Department of Human Services for Ar1ington County . Employee gathers and analyzes psycho-social data. assesses and diagnoses problems. develope and i mplements an ongoing treatment program. conducts therapy for a variety of clients and provides consultat i on as requested by the community . Requires Bachelofs degree supplemented by a Mastefs degree from an approved school of social worl< plus two years related experience in social work. Preference may be given to app l icants with exper i ence in a mental health setting, experience working with abused children , experience with a variety of clients and clinical problems and/or the ability to be licensed Official Ar1ington County application form required . Applications will be accepted no later than 5 P.m. on To request applicat ion material, please call (703) 558 2167 . Ar1ington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St. North A r lington, Va 22201 EOE OPPORTUNITY FOR ORGANIZATIONS: Key leaders of your organization-officers , board members and chapter presidentsmay be able to receive His panic Link Weekly Report every week through a "networking'' agreement developed by you , Hispanic Link and a sponsoring corporation. Hispanic Link, offering a special discount rate, joined . in its first such agreement recently with Nat i onal Image and the Adolph Coors Company of Golden, Colo. , which agreed to underwrite 70 full-year subscriptions for Image leadership coast-to-coast Now Image leaders have the latest available information-from the nation's Hispanic "publication of record''-at their fingertips each week. Hispanic Link Weekly Report plans to pursue additional " net working " proposals with Hispanic organizat i ons and interested corporations. If you would like more information on developing such agreements, please contact me. Thanks . Hector Erlcksen-Mendoza Publisher Calendar HISPANIC THEATERS CONFERENCE San Antonio Feb. 7-9 New York Feb. 15 Rufina Alvarez (212) 431 THIS WEEK HISPANIC HEALTH STATISTICS Houston Feb . 3 , 4 Los Angeles Feb . 6 , 7 The data tapes on Mexican Americans from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) w ill be made public, withtechnicalworkshops on t opics ranging from medical history to dental examination . Sandra Smith (301) 436 MIGRATION CONFERENCE Washington, D . C . Feb . 5 , 6 Rep . Bill Richardson (D-N . M . ) will be a panelist at a conference sponsored by the Center for Immigration Policy and Refugee Assistance at Georgetown Uni versity . Mary Larkin (202) 625 H is panic Link Weekly Report Theater groups from around the nation will convene for the first Conferencia Nacional-de Teatros Hispanos to discuss improving administrative techniques and creating a national Hispanic theater circuit. Mario Sanchez (305) 643 Ext. 157 SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Los Angeles Feb . 8 The Mexican American Alumni Association of the University of Southern California will ho l d its 12th annual fund-raising scholarship dinner and dance. Raul Vargas (213) 743 COMING SOON NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Las Vegas Feb . 14 Otto Mer i da (702) 385-7367 CORPORATE; ACHIEVERS SCHOLARSHIP FUND RAISER IMMIGRATION REFORM CONFERENCE San Antonio Feb . 14 Richard Sayre (202) 628 COUEGE AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNELASSN. Washington , D . C . Feb .17 Sandy Shapiro (202) 462 038 SPOTLIGHT Federico Pella, mayor of Denver , will address the 16th annual symposium of the Conference of Minority PublicAdministrators(COMPA) i n Washington , D .C., Feb. 20, 21. Titled "Enhancing the Roles andRe-. sponsibilit i es of Minority Public Administrators," the event will examine topics such as comparable worth, affirmative action and minority contracting. For further information contact Norton Bonaparte at the Institute for Governmental Service, 21 01 Woods Hall , College Park, Md . 20742 (301) 454. 5

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Arts & Entertainment magazines to attract attention of Academy voters, suggest the nomination of both actors as follows: Hurt in the "best actor'' category and Puerto Rican Julia in the "best supporting actor'' slot. A SPANISH-LANGUAGE FILM, RECENT WINNER of a Golden Globe award, could be among Oscar nominees announced by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences this week. Kiss of the Spider Woman, a film based on a novel by Argentine Manuel Puig and directed by compatriot Hector Babenco, won a Golden Globe nomination for"supporting actress'' Sonia Braga . Neither Hurt, Julia or Braga won HFPA nods. In an unprecedented move , however, the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures awarded Jan. 27 both Hurt and Julia its best actor award-the first time it has done so in its 77-year history . Argentina' s La historia oficial-one among 30 official entries in the "foreign film" Oscar race-won a Golden Globe Jan. 24. The award , given by international journalist members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, traditionally predicts the choices for Academy Award nominations. Norma Aleandro, one of the film's stars, won a 1985 New York Film Critics Circle Award for "best actress" on Jan. 26. Golden Globes are given annually in film and television categories. Among this year's honorees, actor Edward James Olmos picked up a Globe in the "best supporting actor' ' category for his performance on NBC's Miami Vice. Olmos, who is a past nominee for a stage Tony, won an Em my last year in a similar category. Meanwhile, another Oscar hopeful Spanish-language film, Mexico ' s Frida, is being submitted to international film festivals in Berlin , Tokyo, Rotterdam, Oxford and Melbourne. Two actors nominated for" best actor'' in film could appear among Oscar nominees to be announced Feb . 5-in separate categories. Both William Hurt and Raul Julia were nominated by the HFPA for their roles in Kiss of the Spider Woman. But studio ads, taken in film trade "Never before had a Mexican film accumulated so much i nternational interest," wrote Mexico City's Excelsior newspaper about the film, which has already screened in Venice, Rio de Janeiro, Montreal, Huelva and Biarritz. It was also a prize winner at a recent festival in Havana . Frida, Mexico's official Oscar entry, has not yet been screened commercially in Mexico which may disqualify it this year from Oscar consideration, according to Academy rules . Media Report RECRUITING TIME: February once again is the month for recruiters from broadcast and print media to acquaint themselves with Hispanic talent at West and East Coast job conferences. The California Chicano News Media Association stages its seventh annual Journal ism Opportunities Conference for Minorities at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles Feb . 7-8 . Last year it attracted 55 media organization representatives , who interviewed some 400 beginning and /or restless journalists . In _ Washington, D.C. , Howard University's School of Communications hosts its 15th annual Communications Conference Feb . 13 16. It combines recruiting sessions with numerous seminars and workshops , including one on "Hispanics and Blacks : Collision or Coalition," coordinated by International Busi ness Communications' Frank Gomez. 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publi ca tion of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 • N' Street N W Washington, D . C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. He ctor E r icksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Feli x Perez . Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of Hispan ic Link W e ekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permi ss io n Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : In c lude the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention . For details. contact Hector Erickse,...Mendoza (202) 2340737. On Long Island , Newsday held its third annual jobs conference Jan . 24, 25. PLUMA DE ORO: The nation's first major literary competition for writers in Spanish will begin this year, with Oct. 12Columbus Day established as deadline for manuscript sub missions . The Pluma de Oro competition, housed at the University of Miami and initially funded for three years oy American Express, will offer minimum $2,000 awards in novel, short story , drama , poetry and essay categories and $500 prizes to student competitors in similar categories . It will be open to anyone studying or working in the United States , according to Ambler Moss , dean of the university's North-South Center. Thecompetition was announced at a Jan . 22 luncheon in Washington, D . C . , with Mexico's Carlos Fuentes providing the introductory address . POLITICAL JOURNAL; With a helping boost from the Ford Foundation , the long-awaited Journal of Hispanic Politics is off the presses. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Vol. I, No. 1 includes articles on economic policy by Jose Llanes and Marta Tienda, one on social policy by Henry Ramos and Marlene . Morales, and a political piece by Richard Santillan. It will be published annually by the Hispanic Student Caucus of the John F . Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University . Annual subscription rates : $10 students, $15 individuals/non-profits, $20 corporations , and $100 for reprint rights . For information , contact Ramos at The Ford Foundation , 320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y . 10017 (212) 573-4763. LATINO SOUNDS: Another publication, with works by 25 Detroit writers and artists Latino and Native American-made its debut, too , aided by a grant from The Michigan Council for the Arts. Detroit La Onda Latina en Poesia/Latin Sounds in Poetry is an 80-page bilingual anthology celebrating " nuestra tierra " It costs $6 , with checks payable to Detroit Latin Sounds, c/o Casa de Unidad, 1920 Scotten, Detroit, Mich . 48209. Charlie Ericksen cout--IT I NGRooM '' L:.s BUREAU oF THE C EN.SU5 Hispanic Link Weekly Report