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Hispanic link weekly report, February 10, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 10, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. officials in Washington, D.C., have quietly convened a grand jury that for the past two months has been taking testimony on the yet unresolved kidnaping and murder of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena* the Los Angeles Times reported Feb. 1. Camarena’s body was discovered in Guadalajara, Mexico, March 5. Officials convened the grand jury, the Times says, after becoming frustrated with the slow pace of the Mexican inquiry... U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese nominates Gil Pom pa for another four-year term as assistant attorney general/director of the Justice Department's Community Relations Service. It requires Senate approval, which is expected... John Roy Castillo is named as the first Hispanic director of the Michigan Department of Civil
Rights. He has been with the department in various capacities since 1978... Noelia Fernandez is named special assistant to William Harris, director of the Office of Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Labor. She joined Labor in 1978 as an equal employment opportunity specialist with OCR... Raul Torres, a 1961 graduate of Edison High School in Philadelphia, becomes the first Hispanic named principal of a Philadelphia high school as he assumes the helm at Edison... Panamanian Roberto Durdn, on the comback trail again trying for an unprecedented fourth world title, scores a second-round knockout Jaa 31 in Panama against Colombian middleweight Manuel Zambrana Ip his first outing in 18 months, Dur&n, 34, weighed the most he ever has for a fight - 165 pounds. . . Luis Dlaz-Carlo, former contributing editor with La Luz magazine, one of the nation's first Latino magazines, and a New York financial consultant, dies Jan. 19 at age 56 of cancer of the pancreas...
Vol. 4 No.6

Feb. 10,1986
Chavez Resigns Post
Seven Latino Oscar Nominations
Chavez Resigns Post to Run for U.S. Senate
Linda Ch&vez, director of the White Housers office of public liaison, resigned her post Feb. 3 to run for the U.S. Senate seat of retiring Maryland Republican Charles Mathias
President Reagan wished her “all the best in your new endeavor^’ on her departure, but stopped short of endorsing her in the September primary.
“In your own calm, thoughtful and efficient way, you... provided us with a model of how government officials should work,” the President wrote her. “The members of the White House staff and the Cabinet will all miss you. I know I will.”
A native New Mexican, Chdvez, 38, was staff director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from November 1983 until she joined the White House in April 1985. At that time, she changed her party registration from Democrat to Republican.
Mathias* a liberal Republican, served eight years in the House and the past 18 in the Senate. Democrats hold a 3-1 registration edge in Maryland, however, and a conservative Republican - as Chavez is characterized-would be an underdog in the race to replace him.
Two businessmen and a state delegate have also announced for the Republican primary. The winner must face the victor in a Democratic primary battle which matches Gov. Harry H ughes against two well-supported members of Congress, Michael Barnes and Barbara Mikulski.
Gonzales Wins Pro Title
Paul Gonzales became the first 1984 Olympian to win a professional boxing title by defeating Alonzo Strongbow in a unanimous 12-round decision Feb. 2 in Los Angelea
The East Los Angeles youth earned $35,000 (among the largest paychecks ever earned in the United States by a flyweight), the North American Boxing Federation flyweight title and a 3-0 professional record.
Expressing a desire to win the world championship, Gonzales said he’ll take his time and fight “a couple more... before a title shot.”
Hispanic-themed films garnered a total of seven Oscar nominations announced Feb. 5 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.,
The drama Kiss of the Spider Woman, based on a novel by Miguel Puig, earned four Oscar mentions, including “best picture of the year.” The film tied for third place among this year's most nominated works.
The H.B. Filmes production, in association with Sugarloaf Films and Island Alive, was produced by David Weisman.
Also nominated for Kiss of the Spider Woman were H&ctor Babenco (best achievement in directing), William Hurt (best performance by an actor in a leading role), and Leonard Schrader(best (screenplay Ibased on material from another medium).
Argentina’s La estoria oficial - the only
Fifty-nine percent of 4.5 million Hispanic children under the age of 18 lived in homes that participated in federal cash and noncash assistance programs in 1984, a new U.S. Census Bureau report has found.
The programs ranged from Medicaid, Veterans Administration pensions and free or reduced-price school meals to public or subsidized housing rental and energy assistance.
By comparison, 68% of 9.5 million black children and 24.4% ot 49.3 million white children were living in households receiving such benefits.
The report, “Economic Characteristics of Households in the United States: Fourth Quarter 1984,” was issued Jan. 30. It said that in 1984 one in three children - 19.5 million - lived in households that received cash and/or noncash public assistance.
The percentage of Hispanic, black and white children in four major programs:
Hispanic Black White
Food stamps 25.3% 36.3% 9.7%
School meals 48.2% 51.7% 16.5%
Medicaid 23.3% 31.3% 8.6%
Cash assist. 22.6% 34.9% 9.0%
About 68% of families receiving these cash
movie in Spanish nominated in the “best foreign-language film of the year" category-won nominations for Luis Puenzo and Aida Bortnik for “best screenplay written directly for the screen.”
Produced by Historias CinematogrAficasZ Cinemania and Progress Communications and distributed by Aimi Pictures, La estoria oficial repeats last year's screenplay nomination of El norte.
Las Madras, a production of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo sponsored by Film Arts Foundation, won a “best achievement in documentary features^’ nomination for producers Susana Muftoz and Lourdes Portillo.
The Academy presents its Oscars March 24 in a ceremony to be broadcast live by ABC-TV.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
and noncash benefits were headed by a woman, with 24% Hispanic children living in such households, compared with 46% black children and 14% white children.
While the average monthly household income for families with Hispanic children was $1,637, the income for families with black and white children was $1,504 and $2,468 respectively.
Another report “Characteristics of Households and Persons Receiving Selected Noncash Benefits: 1984,” found that while 76.3% of white children were covered by private medical insurance, only half-48.7%- of Hispanic and black children were similarly covered.
Ariz. English Resolution
Arizona Hispanic Democrats have castigated that state’s Republican Party for passing a resolution Jaa 25 that called for the establishment of English as the state’s official language.
State Sen. Peter Rios (D) predicted the resolution would work to the detriment of the state GOP.
The resolution called for an end to bilingual ballots and limited funds for bilingual educatioa
C^rantj^* states have laws declaring EngTflh iii^their official language.
59% of Children Given Federal Aid
FEB 1 2 '986


Sin pelos en la lengua
I CALM ATE iCALMATEI Why is everybody shouting?
First political consultant Arnoldo Torres (where have I heard that name before?) rolls an exploding tamale in the direction of Dwight Ellis, the National Association of Broadcasters? vice president in charge of minorities (who apparently has yet to find a Hispanic aualified to work on his staff).
Representing Latinos in Public Broadcasting, Torres complains that - according to the preliminary agenda for the Feb. 11-12 Caucus of Minority Executives in Media convened by Ellis - the 66 presenters and reactors include only two Latinos.
In a nasty note cc’d to Sin Pelos, Torres reflects to his longtime* acquaintance: “I find you repeating the mistakes that you and black civil rights groups have worked to change. Do you now profess to believe in and practice the so- called colorblind society approach? You should know better...”
KING-SIZE REBUFF:Then Angelo Falcdn sends a controlled-rage letter to Martin Pasetta, who produced the Jan. 20 Tribute to Martin Luther King televised by NBC.
Falc6n, president of the New York-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, points out, in part:
“Although two of our community’s top performers, Rub6n Blades and Tito Puente, did perform live, they were not included in the television show. Some colleagues who attended the event at Radio City Music Hall expressed dismay at the manner in which hosts Bill Cosby and Harry Belafonte played with the pronunciation of Rub6n Blades' name.. .to get a laugh. This they found insulting to one of the foremost creative artists in our community in that it feeds into unfortunate stereotypes about Latinos, something Dr. King stood against...”
iESTO ES EL COLMO! (Loosely, it’s the last straw). Next, I’m looking at my incoming mail and an invitation to attend the 12th annual conference of the American Association for Affirmative Action March 12-16 in Atlanta.
In six columns of featured speakers and session leaders, I am able to identify two — just two — Hispanics.
LESSONS IN MANNERS: Since ifs not accomplishing anything else positive, maybe the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights should spend some of its$12.3 million annual budget to conduct sensitivity sessions for black and brown leadership. -Kay Birbaro
Colo. Latinos ‘Stable’
Hispanics in Colorado are a “very stable population?’ and implied immigration problems are untrue, a survey released there Jan. 29 by the Latin American Research and Service Agency revealed.
LARASA found that of 4,339 Hispanics it surveyed in the state, 67% reported they were born in Colorado. Less than 10% said they were bom outside of the United States. Only 6% said they were born in Mexico.
Colorado’s Hispanics-about51% of whom reside in the Denver area - increased from 13.4% to 18.8% of the state population between 1970 and 1980.
The state’s governor, Richard Lamm, has been an outspoken advocate for national immigration restrictions, claiming that as many as 12 million aliens live illegally in the United States. He has warned that Southwestern United States could become a “Hispanic Quebec.”
In releasing the report, LARASA Executive Director Audrey Alvarado called proposed immigration legislation “an insult to H ispanics.”
“Hispanics are already at risk in terms of employment,” she added.
Ninety-one percent of the state's Hispanics reported that they were U.S. citizens in the 1980 Census
Alatorre Wins Top
Richard Alatorre, recently elected member of the Los Angeles City Council and former California assemblyman, won the “Hispanic of the Year” award at Caminos magazine’s 6th annual banquet Approximately500 persons attended the event, celebrated at the Los Angeles Westin Bonaventure Hotel Feb. 1.
Winners in the other 13 categories were:
• Art Judy Baca, co-founder and artistic director of the Social and Public Arts Resource Center in Venice, Calif.
• Business: Hilda Altagracia-Smith, partner in Financial Independence Co., Los Angeles
• Community Development: Al Mejia, director of Urban Affairs of the aerospace company Rockwell International.
• Education: Dr. Tom Rivera, associate dean of students at California State University, San Bernardino, Calif.
• Entertainment Lupe Ontiveros, actress known for her roles in the movies “Zoot Suit,” “El norte" and “Goonies.”
• Labor Al Ybarra, president of Local 887 of the United Auto Workers in Los Angeles.
• Law: Antonia Hernandez, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
• Media Ray Gonzdlez, community affairs director and producer/host of Pacesetters and Gallery, KTLA-TV 5, Los Angeles.
• Music Los Lobos, the East LA. rock/Tex-Mex group.
Caminos Honor
• Science and Medicine: Castulo de ia Rocha, executive director of the Los Angeles- based Clinica Familiar del Barrio.
• Social Service: Armando Navarro, president of Congreso Para Pueblos Unidos, San Bernardino,
• Sports Jim Plunkett quarterback of the Los Angeles Raiders football team.
• Organization: The San Francisco-based Association of Mexican American Educators.
CHC Adds 14th Member
Rep. Vicente “Ben” Blaz, a Republican from Guam, has joined the Congressional Hispanic Caucus as its 14th full member.
A retired Marine Corps general, Blaz, 58, said Guam’s Spanish culture and folklore and the minority status of Guamanians in the United States make him share the same interests with other Caucus members.
The freshman congressman and Rep. Manuel Lujdn (New Mexico) are the Caucus? only Republican members. Blaz is vice chairman of the Republican Task Force on Insular Affairs, a member of the Republican Task Force on Indian Affairs and president of the Freshman Class of Republicans. Committee assignments include Armed Services, Interior and Insular Affairs and the Select Committee on Aging.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
PENNSYLVANIA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
Lancaster, Pa. Feb. 11
A meeting by Hispanic businessmen from the state will be held to establish their own chamber.
David Acosta (717) 569-6666
LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE Sacramento, Calif. Feb. 11,12 The Hispanic Caucus of the California Legislature will sponsor a conference for legislators and Hispanic leaders
Marfa Ochoa (916) 445-1670 2
NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Las Vegas, Nev. Feb 14
The chamber will have a luncheon to install its newly
elected officers
Otto M6rida (702) 385-7367
IMMIGRATION REFORM San Antonio Feb. 14
Henry Cisneros mayor of San Antonio, will deliver the opening remarks at a seminar sponsored by the League of United Latin American Citizens examining immigration from Mexico’s perspective.
Richard Sayre (202) 628-8516
CORPORATE ACHIEVERS BANQUET New York Feb. 15
The Corporate Achievers Scholarship Banquet, cosponsored by Noticias del Mundo, will award five scholarships to Hispanic business students
Rufina Alvarez (212) 431-5844
COMING SOON
MINORITY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS Washington, D.C. Feb. 20, 21 Catherine Seller (202) 676-6300
COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL ASSOCIATION Washington, D.C. Feb. 17-19 Sandy Shapiro (202) 462-1038
HISPANIC CAREER CONFERENCE
Ontario, Calif. Feb. 26
Cynthia Martinez (714) 623-0588
HISPANIC FAMIUES AND YOUTH CONFERENCE Tucson, Ariz. Feb. 27, 28 Mina King (202) 387-4035
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ES7) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
NATIONAL opportunities for entry level positions as Contract Specialist with the Federal Government. Application forms are available Feb. 3-28. Forms may be obtained from OPM federal job information centers nearest you.
Corporation for Public Broadcasting has acontinuing need for Radio Program Managers, Classical Music Announcers, Broadcast Engineers and Technicians nationwide. Send resume to: CPB, Human Resources Development, 1111 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
MALDEF OPENINGS
National civil rights organization seeks TWO attorneys in Chicago. The ASSOCIATE COUNSEL manages office and supervises litigation. 5 years litigation and civil rights law experience, management experience. Resume with references to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014.
The STAFF ATTORNEY litigates in four areas. Licensed attorney, civil rights law experience, bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. For BOTH positions, resume with references to Ray Romero, MALDEF, 343 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 60604. Deadline for BOTH positions Feb. 21.
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON issues a weekly bulletin on employment opportunities. Contact: Staff, Employment Office, 1320 NE Campus Parkway, Seattle, Wash. 98195.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Cali (202) 635-LAND.
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT $25,317 -$33,862 Ann. #14116ADMF
Professional senior level position in the comptroller’s office in the department of management and finance. Develops and maintains accounting policies and procedures and performs technical accounting work in the areas of: iPayroll tax reporting, utilities, proprietary operations, data processing, capital projects, lease financing, general accounts payable, etc.
Requires bachelor’s degree in related area plus two years experience in professional accounting. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in one or more of the following areas: auditing, accounting, financial experience with local government, use of automated accounting and financial management systems, CPA, or master's degree in accounting or business administration.
Official Arlington County application form required. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167. All applications must be received in the Personnel Dept by 5 p.m. on Feb. 21. Arlington County Personnel Dept, 2100 North 14th St, Arlington, Va 22201.
EOE
AMERICAN RED CROSS CORPORATE INITIATIVE ASSOCIATE to directthe Hispanic Initiative withiwthe American Red Cross under supervision of Special Assistant to the President for EEO. Work with other national headquarters units to develop programs, products and services for Hispanic consumption and to promote increased Hispanic involvement in Red Cross. Develop an approved 2 - and 3 - year business plan, evaluation plan and public relations/marketing plan. Identify supplementary funding sources for Hispanic Initiative and actively pursue donors Serve as liaison with national Hispanic agencies. Provide consultation in development Red Cross training course materials, print and A-V. Requirements: Bachelor’s degree. Knowledge of and sensitivity to the culture of Hispanic population. Demonstrated experience in management and administration. Proven experience and excellence in working with groups, with top-level volunteers Excellent written and oral communication skills needed Ability to make effective presentations before groups Ability to plan and organize. One year renewable contract, 2-year maximum. Salary range $27,500- $42,500. No telephone inquiries Send resume and letter by Feb. 27 to Nicolas Nicosia, Personnel Administration, American Red Cross, 18th and D Sts NW, Washington, D.C. 20006.
EOE/AA
PUT A STAR IN YOUR FUTURE-----------------------
STARTING SALARIES: GS-5, $14,390 or GS-7, $17,824 (Depending upon Qualifications)
From Feb. 10 through Feb. 21, 1986, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written Examination for Deputy U.S. Marshal positions in the Federal government.
The United States Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest Federal law enforcement agency. Since 1789, U.S. Marshals have served the, Executive and Judicial branches of government through a variety of vital law enforcement activities:
• Protection of judges, officials and witnesses
• Apprehension of fugitives • Execution of court orders
• Custody of prisoners • Custody of seized property SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUP - The Special Operations Group is a highly trained reaction force which provides Federal assistance in emergency situations of national significance. Membership is selective, part-time and voluntary. Deputies must be in superb physical condition and successfully complete the special operations training. LOCATION OF POSITIONS - Deputy U.S. Marshal positions are located in the 94 Judicial Districts of the U.S. Marshals Service, which cover the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. You must be available for initial assignment to any duty station; be prepared to travel frequently for extended periods of time; and be available for reassignment to other duty stations.
TO QUALIFY YOU MUST:
• Be a U.S. citizen
BE A DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL
• Possess a valid driver's license
• Establish an eligible rating on the written examination
‘ • Have a bachelor's deg reeor3 years of responsible experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience Qualifying experience is administrative, professional, investigative, or other responsible work. There are additional education/experience requirements for the GS-7 grade level.)
• Be at least 21 years old
• Meet certain medical requirements and undergo a background and character investigation
AGE LIMITATION - Under Public Law 93-350, the maximum age for original entry into Deputy U.S. Marshal positions is the day immediately preceding one’s 35th birthday, however, this limitation may be waived in some cases.
TRAINING - All new Deputies are required to complete a six-month basic training program consisting of approximately 3 months at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center(FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia, and 3 months of on-the-job training. At the end of the 6 months, those individuals hired at GS-5 will be eligible for GS-7.
HOW TO APPLY: Contact your local Federal Job Information/Testing Center, listed under U.S. Government in metropolitan area telephone directories, beginning Feb. 10, 1986, for more information and an application for the test
The United States Marshals Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is actively recruiting Women and Minority Applicants.
THE GOOD NEWS
PARTICIPATION IN BENEFIT PROGRAMS: Two U.S. Bureau of the Census reports examine the characteristics and participation rates of Hispanic, black and white households in private and federal assistance programs. For copies of “Characteristics of Households and Persons Receiving Selected Noncash Benefits: 1984,” Series P-60, No. 150 (Price $5.50) and “Economic Characteristics of Households in the United States: Fourth Quarter 1984,” Series P-70, No. 6 (Price not available at press time), order from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
WOMEN’S FELLOWSHIP: The Women’s Research & Education Institute of the Congressional Caucus of Women’s Issues is offering 11 fellowships to work as a legislative aide on policy issues affecting women. Awarding an $8,000 tax-free stipend, the fellowships run from Sept 1 to April 30. Deadline: Feb. 19. Request applications from: Women’s Research and Education Institute, 204 Fourth St SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-1010.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
TEXAS MEDIA: A Gannett Foundation-funded study, “Media in Ethnic Context-Communication and Language inTexas^’(see Media Report) is available for$25 from Dr. Pamela Shoemaker, Department of Journalism, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471-7708.
EDITING PROGRAM: Twelve professional fellowships for an editing skills training program are being offered by the Institute for Journalism Education. The program, running from June8 to Aug. 1 at the University of Arizona’s Journalism Department, gives preference to minority reporters or editors with at least one year of experience on a daily newspaper or other media Applications, which should be postmarked by March 1, can be obtained from: The Editing Program for Minority Journalists, Journalism Dept, Franklin Building, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 85721 (602)621-5777.
CORPORATE GIVING GUIDE: “Profiles of Effective Corporate Giving Programs” is a 14-page booklet which summarizes a study of 48 corporate-giving programs across the nation and the methods they use Copies are available by sending $2 to: Independent Sector, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-8100.
3


Arts & Entertainment
A LETTER OF PROTEST HAS BEEN DELIVERED to the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences by the non-profit group that released last year's child relief song Cantare, cantaras over the omission of Hermanos’ song in this year's list of Grammy nominees.
The letter to NARAS, sent by Hermanos President Luis Medina, had not received a reply at press time.
“We know that (NARAS) does not manipulate the nominations,” Medina told Weekly Report, “but every year since the establishment of the new Latin music categories it has done a less than efficientiobi”
According to Medina, NARAS should have nominated Cantare, cantaras outside of the three “ Latin” music categories established in 1982 to avoid competition among Hermanos performers. Outoffour performers nominated in the“best Latin pop performance'’ category, three appear on the CantarG, cantaras track. Other Hermanos contributors are nominated in the other two “Latin” categories.
NARAS will hand out its Grammys Feb. 26 in a ceremony that will be carried live by CBS.
A SEARCH FOR THREE NEW HISPANIC PLAYS by a Southern California company continues for the next two months, while Latinos coast-to-coast continue making theater news.
The Orange County South Coast Repertory’s search for scripts by established and developing Hispanic playwrights, through April 1,
will culminate with stage readings of the selected works in a workshop scheduled for July.
According to Jos6 Cruz Gonzdlez, a National Endowment for the Arts fellow at SCR, entries will be accepted from any Hispanic American playwright Selection will be based upon excellence and potential of the script.
Two other Southern California theater events this week involve well-known Hispanic stage artists. I Don't Have to Show You No Stinking Badges, a new play by Luis Valdez, opened in Los Angeles Fetx 6 after two weeks of previews at the new LA Theater Center. Across town in Hollywood, Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh opens Feb. 12. Last year's New York revival of the play reunited its original star Jason Robards with then-retired director Josri Quintero.
Back in New York, Times reviewer D.J.R. Bruckner writes about Juan Rodriguez’s performance in The Duel on stage at La Mama:
“... Mr. Rodriguez makes himself in both of his roles so vulnerable that his moments of strength... surprised one into remembering that he is a large and powerful man.”
Rodriguez is a member of Jordcirkus - an international, multilingual collective based in Stockholm.
ONE LINERS: Poet Sonia Sdnchez reads from her work Feb. 10 at
the Library of Congress’ Coolidge Auditorium in Washington, D.C_
.Poncho Sanchez and Johnny Martinez perform together Jan. 13 at j>ugar Daddy’s in Montebello, Calif....
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
The favorite electronic news medium for whites and blacks was also radio. The groups tuned in to it an average of 41 /2 days a week versus 3 1 /2 to TV news.
OFFICIAL ENGLISH: The Phil Donohue Show took another look at the “official English” issue in a program taped for its 200-plus markets Feb. 7. Viewing dates vary.
Taking opposing sides were U.S. Rep Norman Shumway (D-Calif.), author of the English-only constitutional amendment, and former LULAC Executive Director Arnoldo Torres, now a political consultant.
HISPANIC FOOTAGE SOUGHT: Steve Rodriguez’s ROD Enterprises is looking for footage on significant U.S. Hispanic news events which have occurred since the inauguration of Hispanic Heritage Week in 1968. He can be reached c/o ROD, P.O. BOX 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 50472 (213) 222-8370.
- Felix Perez
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc,
1420‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. -20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, FAlix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
Noportionot Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $86.
Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. Fordetails, contact HActor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
A Valentine’s Day Sentiment from Jose Antonio Burciaga
A MACHO IS STRONG,, LUPE/
HELP ME WITH
/TSclothes,
IS/JUAN.
A MACHO PROTECTS HIS FAMILIAR
A MACHO HAS COURAGE/
I COUIDNT .-^.SURVIVE P\ WITHOUT
iy°u-
yvNCHO IS NOBLE.'
WHATEVER YOU SKi^ORMON!
PUT THE 'CLOTHES HERE.
Itorda# fib'Hispawc L»JC
Media Report
TEXAS MEDIA HABITS: Seventy-seven percent of Texas? Hispanics do not read Spanish-language newspapers or magazines, but nearly half- 48% - feel that it is important to have a daily Spanish newspaper to read.
Thats one of many findings of a University of Texas (Austin) survey released recently.
It found that the importance of Spanish-language newspapers to readers increased with age, but decreased with education (until college level, when it crept up again) and income. Hispanics who had only a grade-school education felt most strongly about having a Spanish-language newspaper to read.
The study compared media usage patterns among 308 Hispanics, 117 blacks arid 739
whites.
It found that Hispanics read a daily newspaper an average of 3.4 times a week compared to 3.7 for blacks and 4.3 for whites, and were much less likely to be magazine readers. They subscribed to or read .76 magazines regularly, compared to .96 for blacks and 1.24 for whites.
Hispanics found radio a more popular medium that television. Just 6% viewed Spanish-language television stations only; 24% listened to Spanish-language radio stations only. (Fifty-five percent of the surveyed Latinos said they were bilingual; 21% spoke English only, 24% Spanish only.)
The survey’s other findings on Hispanics’ media usage:
• Twenty-one percent preferred their TV news in Spanish.
• Forty percent allotted half or more of their radio-listening time to Spanish stations.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week Rights. He has been with the department in various capacities since 1978 ... Noelia FernAndez is named special assistant to William Harris, director of the Office of Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Labor. She joined Labor in 1978 as an equal employment opportunity specialist with OCR. .. Raul Torres, a 1961 graduate of Edison High School in Philadelphia, becomes the first Hispanic named principal of a Philadelphia high school as he assumes the helm at Edison ... Panamanian Roberto Durin, on the com back trail again trying for an unprecedented fourth world title, scores a second-round knockout Jan 31 in Panama against Colombian middleweight Manuel Zambrano. In his first outing in 18 months, Duran, 34, weighed the most he ever has for a fight -165 pounds. . . Luis DlazCarlo, former contributing editor with La Luz magazine, one of the nation's first U.S. officials in Wash i ngton, D .C., have quietly con v ened a grand jury that for the past two months has been taking testimony on the yet unresolved kidnaping and murder of U.S. Drug Enforcement Adm;nistration agent Enrique Camarena, the Los Angeles Times reported Feb. 1 . Camarena's body was discovered in Guadalajara, Mexico, March 5. Officials convened the grand jury, the Times says, after becoming frustrated with the slow pace of the Mexican inquiry ... U .S. Attorney General Edwin Meese nominates Gil Pompa for another four-year term as assistant attorney general/director of the Justice Departmenfs Community Relations Service . It requires Senate approval, which is expected . . . John Roy Castillo is named as the first Hispanic director of the Michigan Department of Civil . Latino magazines, and a New York financial consultant, dies Jan. 19 at age 56 of cancer of the pancreas ... Vol. 4 No.6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY R Chavez Resigns Post to Run for U.S. Senate Linda Chavez, director of the White House's office of public liaison, resigned her post Feb. 3 to run for the U.S. Senate seat of retiring Maryland Republican Charles Mathias. President Reagan wished her "all the best in your new endeavors " on her departure, but stopped short of endorsing her in the September primary . "In your own calm, thoughtful and efficient way, you . . . provided us with a model of how government officials should work," the Pre sident wrote her. "The members of the White House staff and the Cabinet will all miss you. I know I will." A native New Mexican , Chavez, 38, was staff director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from November 1983 until she joined the White House in April 1985. At that time, she changed her party registration from Democrat to Republican . Mathias, a liberal Republican, served eight years in the House and the past 18 in the Senate. Democrats hold a 3 registration edge in Maryland, however, and a conservative Republican-as Chavez is characte rized would be an underdog in the race to replace him. Two businessmen and a state delegate have also announced for the Republican primary. The winner must face the victor in a Democratic primary battle which matches Gov. Harry Hughes against two well-supported members of Congress, Michael Barnes and Barbara Mikulski. Gonzales Wins Pro Title Paul Gonzales became the first 1984 Olympian to win a professional boxing title by defeating Alonzo Strongbow in a unanimous 12-round decision Feb. 2 in Los Angeles. The East Los Angeles youth earned $35,000 (among the largest paychecks ever earned in the United States by a flyweight), the North American Boxing Federation flyweight title , and a 3 professional record. Expressing a desire to win the world champi onship, Gonzales said he'll take his time and fight "a couple more ... before a title shot." Seven Latino Oscar Nominations Hispanic-themed films garnered a total of seven Oscar nominations announced Feb. 5 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences., The drama Kiss of t he Spider Woman, based on a novel by Miguel Puig, earned four Oscar mentions, including "best picture of the year . " The film tied for third place among this year's most nominated works. The H. B. Filmesproduction, in association with Sugarloaf Films and Island Al ive, was produced by David Weisman . . Also nominated for Kiss of the Spider Woman were Hector Babenco (best achievement in directing), William Hurt(best performance by an actor in a leading role), and Leonard Schrader(best\screenplay l based on material from another medium) . Argentina's La astoria oficial -the only . movie in Spanish nominated in the "bes t . foreign-language film of the year" category won nominations for Luis Puenzo and A id a Bartnik for "best screenplay written directl y for the screen." Produced by Historias Cinematograficas/ Cinemania and Progress Communications and distributed by Almi Pictures, La estoria oficial repeats last year's screenplay nomination of El norte. Las Madres, a production of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo sponsored by Film Arts Foun dation, won a "best achievement in documenta ry features" nomination for producers Susana Mui'loz and Lourdes Portillo. The Academy presents its Oscars March 24 in a ceremony to be broadcast live by ABC TV. '-Antonio Me)lasR entas 59/o of Children Given Federal Aid Fifty-nine percent of 4 . 5 million Hispanic children under the age of 18 li ved in homes that participated in federal cash and noncash assistance programs in 1984, a new U.S. Census Bureau report has found . The programs ranged from Medicaid, Veterans Administra t ion pensions and free or reduced p.rice school meals to public or subsidized housing rental and energy assistance. By comparison, 68% of 9.5 million black children and 24.4% or 49. 3 million white children were living in households receiving such benefits. The report, "Economic Characteristics of Households in the United States: Fourth Quarter 1 984, " was issued Jan. 30. It said that in 1984 one in three children 19.5 million lived in households that received cash and/or noncash public ass i stance. The percentage of Hispanic, black and white chUdren in four major programs: Food stamps School meals Medicaid Cash assist. Hispanic Black 25.3% 36.3% 48.2% 51. 7% 23.3% 31.3% 22.6% 34.9% White 9.7% 16 . 5% 8 . 6% 9 . 0% About 68% of families receiving these cash and o noncash benefits were headed by a woman, with 24% Hispanic children living in such households, compared with 46% black children and 14% white children . While the average monthly household income for families with Hispanic children was $1,637, the income for families with black and white children was $1 ,504 and $2,468 respectivel y . Another report, " Characteristics of Households and Persons Receiving Selected Noncash Benefits: 1984," found that while 76.3% of white children were covered by private medical insurance, only half48.7%-of Hispanic and black children were similarly covered. Ariz. English Resolution Arizona Hispanic Democrats have castigated that state's Republican Party for passing a resolution Jan 25 that called for the establish ment of English as the state's official language . State Sen. Peter Rlos (D) predicted the resolution would work to the detriment of the state GOP . The resolution called for an end to bilingual ballots and limited funds for bilingual education states have laws deelaring official language. FEB 1 2 ' 1 986

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Sin pelos en .Ia lengua Falc6n, president of the New York-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, points out, in part: "Although two of our community's top performers, Ruben Blades and Tito Puente, did perform live, they were not included in the television show. Some colleagues who attended the event at Radio City Music Hall expressed dismay at the manner in which hosts Bill Cosby and Harry Belafonte played with the pronunciation of Ruben Blades' name ... to get a laugh. This they found insulting to one of the foremost creative artists in our community in that it feeds into unfortunate stereotypes about Latinos, something Dr. King stood against ... " iCALMATEliCALMATEI Why is everybody shouting? . First, political consultant Arnoldo Torres(where have 1 heard that name before?) rolls an exploding tamale in the direction of Dwight Ellis, the National Association of Broadcasters' vice president in charge of minorities (who apparently has yet to find a Hispanic aualified to work on his staff). Representing Latinos in Public Broadcasting, Torres complains that according to the preliminary agenda for the Feb. 11-12 Caucus of Minority Executives in Media convened by Ellisthe 66 presenters and reactors include only two Latinos. In a nasty note cc'd to Sin Pelos, Torres reflects to his longtime• acquaintance: "I find you repeating the mistakes that you and black civil rights groups have worked to change. Do you now profess to believe in and practice the socalled colorblind sciciety approach? You should know better ... " iESTO ES EL COLMO! (Loosely, ifs the last straw). Next, I'm looking at my incoming mail and an invitation to attend the 12th annual conference of the American Association for Affirmative Action March 12-16 in Atlanta. In six columns of featured speakers and session leaders, I am able to identify two-just two-Hispanics. KING-SIZE REBUFF:Then Angelo Falcon sends a rage letter to Martin Pasetta, who produced the Jan . 20 Tribute to Martin Luther King televised by NBC. LESSONS IN MANNERS: Since ifs not accomplishing anything else positive, maybe the U.S . Commission on Civil Rights should spend some of its $12. 3 million annual budget to conduct sensitivity sessions for black and brown leadership. -Kay Barbaro Colo. Latinos 'Stable' Hispanics in Colorado are a "very stable population" and implied immigration problems are untrue, a survey released there Jan. 29 by the Latin American Research and Service Agency revealed. LARASA found that of 4,339 Hispanics it surveyed in the state, 67% reported they were born in Colorado. Less than 10% said they were born outside of the United States. Only 6% said they were born in Mexico. Coloradd s Hispanicsabout 51% of whom reside in the Denver area-increased from 13.4% to 18.8% of the state population between 1970 and 1980. The state's governor, Richard Lamm, has . been an outspoken advocate for national immigration r es t rictions, claiming that as many as 12 million aliens live illegally in the United States. He has warned that South western United States could become a "Hispanic Quebec." In releasing the report, LARASA Executive Director Audrey Alvarado called proposed immigration legislation ... an insult to Hispanics." ; "Hispanics are already at risk in terms of employment," she added. Ninety-one percent of the state's His panics reported that they were U.S. citizens iri the 1980 Census . Calendar THIS WEEK PENNSYLVANIA HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Lancaster, Pa Feb. 11 A meeting by H ispanic businessmen from the state will be held to establish their own chamber. David Acosta (717) 569 LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE Sacramento, Calif . Feb . 11, 12 The Hispanic Caucus of the California Legislature will sponsor a conference for legislators and His panic leaders. Marra Ochoa (916) 445 2 Alatorre Wins Top Caminos Honor Richard Alatorre , recently-elected member of the Los Angeles City Council and former California assemblyman, won the "Hispanic of the Year" award at Caminos magazine's 6th annual banquet Approximately 500 persons attended the event, celebrated at the Los Angeles Westin Bonaventure Hotel Feb. 1. Winners in the other 13 categories were: e Art : Judy Baca, C(}"founder and artistic director of the Social and Public Arts Resource Center in Venice, Calif. e Business : Hilda AltagraciaSmith, partner in Financ"ial Independence Co., Los Angeles. • Community Development: AI Mejia , director of Urban Affairs of the aerospace company Rockwell International. e Education : Dr. Tom Rivera, associate dean of students at California State University, San Bernardino, Calif. e Entertainment Lupe Ontiveros, actress known for her roles in the movies "Zoot Suit," "EI norte" and "Goonies. " e Labor: AI Ybarra, president of Local887 of the United Auto Workers in Los Angeles. e Law: Antonia Hernandez, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund . e Media: Ray Gonzalez, community affairs director and producer/host of Pacesetters and Gallery, KTLA TV 5 , Los Angeles. e Music: Los Lobos, the East L.A. rock/TexMex group. NEVADA LATIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Las Vegas, Nev. Feb . 14 The chamber will have a luncheon to install its newly elected officers. Otto Merida (702) 385 7367 IMMIGRATION REFORM San Antonio Feb . 14 Henry Cisneros, mayor of San Antonio, will deliver the opening remarks at a seminar sponsored by the League of United Latin American Citizens examining immigration from Mexico's perspective. Richard Sayre (202) 628-8516 CORPORATE ACHIEVERS BANQUET New York Feb . 15 The Corporate Achievers Scholarship Banquet, C(}" sponsored by Noticias del Mundo, will award five scholarships to Hispanic business students. e Science and Medicine: Castulo de ia Rocha, executive director of the Los Angeles-based Clinica Familiar del Barrio. e Social Service : Armando Navarro , president of Congreso Para Pueblos Unidos, San Bernardino, e Sports: Jim Plunkett, quarterback of the Los Angeles Raiders football team . e Organization: The San Francisc(}"based As sociation of Mexican American Educators. CHCAdds14th Member Rep . Vicente "Ben" Blaz, a Republican from Guam, has joined the Congressional Hispanic Caucus as its 14th full member. A retired Marine Corps general, Blaz, 58, said Guam's Spanish culture and folklore and the minority status of Guamanians in the United States make him share the same interests with other Caucus members . The freshman congressman and Rep . Manuel Lujan (New Mexico) are the Caucus' only Republican members. Blaz is vice chairman of the Republican Task Force on Insular Affairs, a member of the Republican Task Force on Indian Affairs and president of the Freshman Class of Republicans. Com mittee assignments include Armed Services, Interior and Insular Affairs and the Select Committee on Aging. Rufina Alvarez (212) 431 COMING SOON MINORITY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS Washington, D.C. Feb . 20, 21 Catherine Seller (202) 676 COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL ASSOCIATION Washington, D.C. Feb . 17 Sandy Shapiro (202) 462 038 HISPANIC CAREER CONFERENCE Ontario, Calif . Feb. 26 Cynthia Martinez (714) 623-0588 HISPANIC FAMILIES AND YOUTH CONFERENCE Tucson, Ariz. Feb. 27, 28 Mina King (202) 387 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Unk, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p .m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Aa rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch. NATIONAL opportunities for entry level positions as Contract Specialist with the Federal Government. Application forms are available Feb. 3 28. Forms may be obtained from OPM federal job information centers nearest you . Corporation for Public Broadcasting has a continuing need for. Radio Program Managers, Classical Music Announcers, Broadcast Eng• neer.s and Technicians nationwide. Send resume to: CPB , Human Resources Development, i 111 16th St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20036. MALDEF OPENINGS National civil rights organization seeks TWO attorneys in Chicago. The ASSOCIATE COUNSEL manages office and supervises litigation. 5 years litigation and civil rights law experience, management experience. Resume with references to Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF , 634 S. Spring St. 11 th Floor, Los Angeles , Calif. 90014. The STAFF ATTORNEY litigates in fou r areas. Licensed attorney, civil rights law experience, bilingual (English/Spanish) pre ferred . For BOTH positions, resume with re ferences to Ray Romero, MALDEF, 343 S . Dearborn St., Chicago, Ill. 60604. Deadline for BOTH positions Feb. 21. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON issues a weekly bulletin on employment opportunities. Contact: Staff, Employment Office, 1320 NE Campus Parkway, Seattle, Wash . 98195. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D . C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND. SENIOR ACCOUNTANT $25,317 $33,862 Ann #14116ADMF Professional senior level position in the comptrolle(s office in the department of management and finance. Develops and maintains accounting policies and procedures and performs technical ac counting work in ltle areasot Payroll tax reporting, utilities, proprietary operations. data processing , capital projects. lease financing, general accounts payable, etc. Requires bachelo( s degree in related area plus two years experience in prcr fessional accounting. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in one or more ofthe following areas: auditing, accounting, financial experience with local gcvernment' use of automated accounting . and financial management systems, CPA, ormaste(sdegreeinaccountingurbusiness administration. Official Arlington County application form required . To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167. All applications must be received in the Per sonnel Dept by 5 p.m on Feb . 21. Arlington County Per.sonnel Dept, 2100 North 14th St, Arlington , Va 22201. EOE AMERICAN RED CROSS CORPORATE INITIATIVE ASSOCIATE to direct the HispaniclnitiativewithilttheAmerican Red Cross under supervision of Special Assos tant to the President for EEO. Work with other national headquarters units to develop programs. products and services for Hispanic consumption and to promote increased Hi& panic involvement in Red Cross. Develop an approved 2 and 3 year business plan, evaluation plan and public relations/marketing plan. Identify supplementary funding sources for Hispanic Initiative and actively pursue donors. Serve as liaison with national Hispanic agencies. Provide consultation in development, Red Cross training course materials, print and A-V. Requirements: Bachelo(s degree. Knowledge of and sensitivity to the culture of Hispanic population Demonstrated experience in management and administration. Proven experience and excellence in working with groups, with top-level volunteers. Excellent written and oral communication skills needed. Ability to make effective presentations before groups. Ability to plan and organize. One year renewable contract, 2-year maximum . Salary range$27 ,500-$42,500. No telephon e inquiries. Send resume and letter by Feb. 27 to Nicolas Nicosia, Personnel Administration, American Red Cross, 18th and D Sts. NW, Washington, D .C. 20006. EOE!AA PUT A STAR IN YOUR FUTURE--BE A DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL STARTING SALARIES: G5-5, $14,390 or G5-7, $17,824 (Depending upon Qualifications) From Feb. 10 through Feb. 21, 1986, the U .S. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written Examination for Deputy U .S. Marshal positions in the Federal govern merit. The United States Marshals Service is the nation's oldest Federal law enforcement agency. Since 1 789, U.S. Marshals have served the, Executive and Judicial branches of government through a variety of vital law enforcement activities: • Protection of judges, officials and witnesses e Apprehension of fugitives • Execution of court orders e Custody of prisoners • Custody of seized property SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUPThe Special Operations Group is a highly trained reaction force which provides Federal assistance in emergency situations of national significance . Membership is selective, part-time and voluntary. Deputies must be in superb physical condition and successfully complete the special operations training . LOCATION OF POSITIONSDeputy U.S. Marshal positions are located in the 94 Judicial Districts of the U .S. Marshals Service, which cover the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. You must be available for initial assignment to any duty station ; be prepared to travel frequently for extended periods of time; and be available for reassignment to other duty stations. TO QUALIFY YOU MUST: e Be a U.S. citizen THE GOOD NEWS PARTICIPATION IN BENEFIT PROGRAMS: Two U.S. Bureau of the Census reports examine the characteristics and participation rates of Hispanic, black and white households in private and federal assistance programs. For copies of "Characteristics of Households and Persons Receiving Selected Noncash Benefits : 1984," Series P-60, No. 150 (Price $5.50) and "Economic Characteristics of Households in the United States: Fourth Quarter 1984," Series P70, No . 6 (Price not available at press time), order from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP: The Women's Research & Education Institute of the Congressional Caucus of Women's Issues is offering 11 fellowships to work as a legislative aide on policy issues affecting women . Awarding an $8,000 tax-free stipend, the fellowships run from Sept. 1 to April 30. Deadline: Feb. 19. Request applications from: Women's Research and Education Institute, 204 Fourth St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-1010. Hispanic Link Weekly Report • Possess a valid driver's license • Establish an eligible rating on the written exa . m.ination e Have a bachelor's degree or3 years of responsible experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Qualifying experience is administrative, professional, investigative, or other responsible work. There are additional education/experience requirements for the Gs-7 grade level.) e Be at least 21 years old e Meet certain medical requirements and undergo a background and character investigation AGE LIMITATIONUnder Public Law 93-350, the maximum age for original entry into Deputy U.S. Marshal positions is the day immediately preceding one's 35th birthday; however, this limitation may be waivec.' in some cases. TRAINING-All new Deputies are required to complete a six-month basic training program consisting of approximately 3 months at lhe Federal Law Enforcement Training Center(FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia,and 3 months of on-the-job training. At the end of the 6 months, those individuals hired at GS-5 will be eligible for G5-7. HOW TO APPLY : Contact your local Federal Job lnlormation/Testing Center, listed under U.S. Government in metropolitan area telephone directories, beginning Feb. 10, 1986, for more information and an application for the test. The United States Marshals Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is actively recruiting Women and Minority Applicants. TEXAS MEDIA: A Gannett Foundation-funded study, "Media in Ethnic Context-Communication and Language in Texas" (see Media Report) is available for$25 from Dr. Pamela Shoemaker, Department of Journalism, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471 7708. EDITING PROGRAM: Twelve professional fellowships for an editing skills training program are being offered by the Institute for Journalism Education. The program, running from JuneS to Aug. 1 at the University of Arizona's Journalism Department, gives preference to minority reporters or editors with at least one year of experience on a daily newspaper or other media Applications, which should be postmarked by March 1, can be obtained from: The Editing Program for Minority Journalists, Journalism Dept., Franklin Building, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz . 85721 (602) 621. CORPORA _TE GIVING GUIDE: "Profiles of Effective Corporate Giving Programs" is a 14-page booklet which summarizes a study of 48 corporate-giving programs across the nation and the -methods they use. Copies are available by sending $2 to: Independent Sector, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223. 3

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Arts & Entertainment will culminate with stage readings of the selected works in a workshop scheduled for July. A LETIER OF PROTEST HAS BEEN DELIVERED to the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences by the non-profit group that released last year's child relief song Can tare, cantaras over the omission of Hermanos' song in this year's list of Grammynominees. According to Jose Cruz Gonzalez, a National Endowment for the Arts fellow at SCR, entries will be accepted from any Hispanic American playwright. Selection will be based upon excellence and potential of the script. Two other Southern California theater events this week involve well-known Hispanic stage artists. I Don't Have to Show You No Stinking Badges, a new play by Luis Valdez, opened in Los Angeles Feb. 6 after two weeks of previews at the new LA Theater Center. Across town in HollYwood, Eugene O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh opens Feb. 12. Last year's New York revival of the play reunited its original star Jason Robards with then-retired director Jose Quintero . The letter to NARAS, sent by Hermanos President Luis Medina, had not received a reply at press time. "We know that (NARAS) does not manipulate the nominations," Medina told Weekly Report, "but every year since the establishment of the Latin categories it has done a less than Accordmg to Medma, NARAS should have nominated Cantare, cantaras outside of the three" Latin" music categories established in 1982 to avoid competition among Hermanos performers. Out of four performers nominated in the "best Latin pop performance" category, three appear on the Cantare, cantaras track. Other Hermanos contributors are nominated in the other two "Latin" categories. Back in New York, Times reviewer D.J.R. Bruckner writes about Juan Rodriguets performance in The Duel on stage at La Mama: NARAS will hand out its Grammys Feb. 26 in a ceremony that will : be carried live by CBS. " ... Mr. Rodriguez makes himself in both of his roles so vulnerable that his mo ' ments of strength ... surprised one into remembering that he is a large and powerful man." Rodriguez is a member of Jordcirkus-an international, multi lingual collective based in Stockholm. A SEARCH FOR THREE NEW HISPANIC PLAYS by a Southern California company continues for the next two months, while Latinos continue making theater news . ONE LINERS: Poet Sonia Sanchez reads from her work Feb . 10 at the Library of Congress' Coolidge Auditorium in Washington, D.C .... . Poncho Sanchez and Johnny Martinez perform together Jan. 13 at The Orange County South Coast Repertory's search for scripts by established and developing Hispanic playwrights, through April 1, Sugar Daddy's in Montebello, Calif .... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report TEXAS MEDIA HABITS: Seventy-seven percent of Texas' Hispanics do not read Spanish language newspapers or magazines, but nearly half48%feel that it is important to have a daily Spanish newspaper to read. Thafs one of many findings of a University of Texas (Austin) survey released recently. It found that the importance of Spanish language newspapers to readers increased with age, but decreased with education (until college level, when it crept up again) and income. Hispanics who had only a grade school education felt most strongly about having a Spanish-language newspaper to read. The study compared media usage patterns among 308 Hispanics, 117 blacks and 739 4 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPQRT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc, 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. -20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado , Felix Perez. Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejia& Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or-broadcast in any form without advance permission .Annu•l •ubacrlptlon 152 luue•l see . Trl•l •ub•crlptlon (1 3 l .. u••l S28. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' pecketsat your next conference or convention. For details. contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. whites. It found that Hispanics read a daily newspaper an average of 3.4 times a week, compared to 3.7 for blacks and 4.3 for whites, and were much less likely to be magazine readers. They subscribed to or read .76 magazines regularly, compared to .96 for blacks and 1 .2.4 for whites. Hispanics found radio a more popular medium that television. Just 6% viewed Spanish language television stations only; 24% listened to Spanish-language radio stations only . (Fifty five percent of the surveyed Latinos said they were bilingual; 21% spoke English only; 24% Spanish only.) The survey's other findings on Hispanics' media usage: • Twenty-one percent preferred their TV news in Spanish. • Forty percent allotted half or more of their time to Spanish stations. fhe favorite electronic news medium for whites and blacks was also radio . The groups tuned in to it an average of 4 1/2 days a week, versus 3 1 /2 to TV news. OFFICIAL ENGLISH: The Phil Donohue Show took another look at the" official English" issue in a program taped for its 200-plus markets Feb. 7. Viewing dates vary. Taking opposing sides were U.S. Rep. Norman Shumway (DCalif.), author of the English only constitutional amendment, and former LULAC Executive Director Arnoldo Torres, now a political consultant. HISPANIC FOOTAGE SOUGHT: Steve Rodriguets ROD Enterprises is looking for footage on significant U.S. Hispanic news events which have occurred since the inaugu ration of Hispanic Heritage Week in 1968. He can be reached c/o ROD, P.O. BOX 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 50472 (213) 222. Felix Perez A Valentine's Day Sentiment from Jose Antonio Burciaga A MACHO IS STRONG, LUPE! HELP ME WITH A MACHO PROTECTS HIS THE UOTHES, JUAN. WATCH YOUR 1\")lEP, ')1/Mj A MALHO HAS COURAGE! 1 COULDN'T SURVIVE WITHOUT YOU. IS NOBLE! . WHATEVER YO\l ii\Y,CORAZON.' PUT THE CLOTHt:S ( HERE. Hispanic Link Weekly Report