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Hispanic link weekly report, February 17, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 17, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Auraria Library
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Malang The News This Week
New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya receives the “Saved by the Belt” award from the state Transportation Department Feb. 10 for avoiding serious injury by using a seat belt. Anaya suffered minor injuries while traveling in a state car Jan. 23 with his three children, who also received minor injuries. They were hit by anothercar cited for making an unsafe turn. A mandatory seat belt law for front seat riders went into effect in the state Jan. 1... The Patterson, Calif., City Council adopts a resolution renaming a park there the Felipe A. Garza Memorial Park after the 15-year-old boy whose dying wish was that his heart be given to his friend, Donna Ashlock, 14. . . Gladys Cabrera takes over as executive director of Para Los Ninos, a nonprofit social service agency in Los Angeles providing programs ranging from family crisis counseling to emergency food and shelter.
1-tB i b 1986
She will oversee a staff of 50 and an annual operating budget of $900,000... Maria Contreras-Sweet is named vice president of public affairs for the Seven-Up/RC Bottling Companies of Southern California. She becomes the first Hispanic vice president#in the company... 1985 Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck, owned by Cuban Dennis Diaz, is named 1985’s horse of the year by three racing organizations... Nicaraguan Alexis Arguello continues his bid to become the only boxer to win titles in four divisions by knocking out Billy Costello in Reno, Nev., Feb. 9 in the fourth round The junior welterweight bout was Arguello’s second knockout in as many fights since coming out of retirement in October. . . Miamian Mary Joe Fernandez, 14, wins her debut match as a professional tennis player beating Czechoslovakian Andrea Holikova in the first round of the $1.8 million Lipton International Players Championships in Boca Raton, Fla ...

Hispanic Leaders Denounce Reagan’s Budget
A Weekly Report survey of Hispanic leaders across the country finds them in general agreement that President Reagan’s 1987 budget proposal has a disproportionately negative impact on the nation’s 20 million Hispanics.
The proposal for fiscal year 1987, which begins Oct. 1, 1986, is the administration’s version of government spending as mandated by Gramm-Rudman-Hollings. The law, which requires the federal deficit to be eliminated by 1991 in yearly increments, sets a deficit ceiling of $144 billion for 1987. The president’s budget totals $944 billion, with a deficit of $143.6 billion.
In response to a suit filed by 12 congressmen a three-judge panel convened by Congress found the automatic-cut provision of the law unconstitutional on Feb. 7.
Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), one of the plaintiffs, said the ruling “puts the decision back in the hands of Congress, where it belongs.”
Immigration Bill Dead?
Budget constraints imposed by the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings bill could destroy any chance of passage for an immigration bill this session of Congress.
That is the opinion of legislative analyst Mario Moreno, associate counsel at the Washington office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Any comprehensive immigration legislation is estimated by congressional analysts to cost a minimum of $1 billion.
Even without the budget-balancing law, differences between the Senate and House versions, namely in the guestworker and amnesty provisions, would have to be reconciled before a bill comes up for a congressional conference committee vote, Moreno said.
The Senate immigration bill was passed September 1985. The House counterpart has yet to reach the Judiciary Committee.
Sizing up the chances for passage, Moreno commented: “It doesn’t appear likely, but we are ever vigilant.”
Social service program cuts and eliminations that will affect Hispanics occur primarily in five areas: bilingual education, the Small Business Administration, the Legal Services Corporation, Medicare and Medicaid.
EDUCATION
The president’s proposal calls for an increase in bilingual education funds from 1986 ($136.8 million to$142.9 million in 1987). When adjusted for a 4% inflation rate, the increase is roughly $1 million.
Calling the increase minimal, Jim Lyons, legislative counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education, said the administration has repeatedly opposed congressional recommendations for major bilingual education budget increases in the past. This time, he added, it did not take into account that limited* English-proficient student growth is 2 1/2 times faster than that of the general student population.
A component of bilingual education to be defunded is Bilingual Vocational Training. Lori Orum, education director at the National Council of La Raza(NCLR), called the elimination extremely detrimental because the program trains bilingual instructors and disseminates teaching materials for bilingual education programs. Its 1986 funding level is$3.5 million.
SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Hispanic entrepreneurs borrowed $151.4 million from the SBA during fiscal year 1985.
Latino Jobless Decrease
The civilian unemployment rate for Hispanics fell from 10.4% in December to 10.1% in January, while the overall unemployment rate fell to its lowest point in six years - 6.9% to 6.7% - according to the U.S. Labor Department
In comparison, the civilian unemployment rate for blacks declined from 14.9% to 14.4%; for whites, from 5.9% to 5.7%.
The average weekly earnings of Hispanic males- $299 - nearly matched those of black males- $307 - while the earnings for Latinas -$231 - lagged behind those for black women - $255. The average weekly earnings of white males and females were $424 and $287, respectively.
Reagan’s budget proposal slashes funding to the agency from its 1986 level of $885 million to $95.3 million in 1987. The administration’s proposal would eventually terminate the SBA’s lending activities and transfer its other functions to the Department of Commerce.
Sal G6mez, former executive director of the National Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and now president of the Boulder, Colo., consulting firm Span-Tech, said such a move “will take away an important option for Hispanics” because they have traditionally been considered high risks by banks. NHCC President Hect6r Barreto added that“a great number of successful Hispanic businesses today are around because of the SBA”
LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION
Reagan’s 1987 proposal calls for the abolition of LSC, which is funded at $292.3 million in 1986. Reagan suggested private attorneys donate 20 hours of legal service per year to indigents instead.
Sixteen percent of LSC cases nationally were filed by Hispanics.
Jos6 Padilla, executive director of the California Rural Legal Assistance Corporation, said this will lead clients to get legal services by telephone from non-Spanish-speaking lawyers.
CRLA’s clientele is 50% to 60% Hispanic, and three-quarters of its funding is from the federal budget.
MEDICARE
This health insurance, which is estimated to serve 31 million elderly and disabled persons*
continued on page 2
Latino Workers Up 1 %
Hispanics now comprise6.7% of the natiorfs labor force population, an increase of one full percent since 1980, the U.S. Department of Labor reports.
As of January, there were 7,787,000 Hispanics in the U.S. civilian work force of 116,786,000.
In 1980, there were 5,993,000 Hispanics among 104,450,000 total workers.


S/'n pe/os en la lengua
INCIDENTAL INTELLIGENCE: The first Burger King customer to spot HerbfHeribertql in the natiorfscapital was Roberto Hemdndez, a recent arrival from Puerto Rico. Hernandez, who’s now eligible for the $1 million drawing among all state winners, is using his initial $5,000 prize to bring his wife and children to join him on the mainland.
Who says that all gringos look alike?
COINCIDENTAL INTELLIGENCE: The day this month when our national Sunday supplement, Vista, came out with a cover piece on the world’s most beautiful roommates, Miss Universe Deborah Carthy-Deu, la puertorriqueha, and Miss USA Laura Martinez Herring, la chicana, Hispanic Link News Sevice was syndicating a column by critic/playwright Achy Obejas, una cubana, attacking Latina beauty contests as the bane of the barrio.
Obejas unloaded: “We know we’ve got a lot of pretty faces. Even the white racists don’t deny us our hot tamales. Ask Rita Moreno. But we stand to strut the other stuff: the strengths, talents and heart of the young women- and men- who make up the Latino community..
INCIDENTAL CONFUSION: How does the Chicano flyweight who just won the North American Boxing Federation title spell his name? During his Olympic victories in ’84, most media used Paul Gonzdlez, with a “z”. When Paul won his pro title last month, The Los Angeles Times and Hispanic Link used an “s” - Gonzales. The New York Times and some others went with a “z”.
But most confused must be Caminos magazine. In a full-page promotion for its “Hispanic of the Year” banquet, it announced the appearance of last year's winner PAUL GONZALEZ in big bold letters next to a photograph of the young idol wearing his custom boxing shorts with the equally bold lettering G-O-N-Z-A-L-E-Sacross the belt.
COINCIDENTALCONFUSION: As the old Spanish saying warns, "Ague/ que al cielo escupe a su cara le cae.” He who spits up to the sky, will get it on his face.
Weekly Report reader Frank G6mez, ever a stickler, reminds us that we’re not perfect, either. Last week we italicized the word tamale- something we do with all Spanish words. In correct Spanish, Gomez reminds us, the word is still tamal.
-Kay Barbaro
Religion Rated Important
Hispanic Catholics? strict support for traditional beliefs tends to decline with acculturation, education and higher income, a recent nationwide survey of 1,010 Hispanic Catholics revealed
The study, “The Hispanic Catholic in the United States,” released Feb 7 by the Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center for Hispanics, showed 83% of respondents ranked religion as very important in their lives That priority was more prevalent among first-generation Hispanics. Beliefs, as in the saints’ interceding power or in Jesus’ divinement, declined with increased education, income and acculturation.
Differing from other ethnic groups, Hispanic Catholics cling to folk practices such as giving and asking for parental blessings, having home altars, praying to saints, using holy water in the home and making religious deals with God, the study found.
Hispanic Catholics were unaware of recent institutional trends. More than half never heard of the Second Vatican Council orthe American bishops? pastoral letter on war and peace. Three out of four did not know of “liberation theology,” the Latin-American movement that combines faith with the achievement of social and political goals.
The survey found eight out of 10 Hispanic Catholics had been approached for conversion by other religions, with a majority perceiving them favorably.
L.A. Repeals Sanctuary
The Los Angeles City Council voted 11-1 Feb. 7 to repeal a resolution that declared the city a sanctuary for political refugees.
The council was reacting to residents who felt the measure would encourage undocumented immigration. It had adopted the sanctuary measure last November, 8-6.
With its latest vote, the council reaffirmed the policy of providing city services for persons without questioning theirstatus. A policy not to ask a person’s status when an application is made for food stamps, enroll children in schools or seek health services has been in effect in Los Angeles since 1973.
Minorities Paddled More
Students? racial and economic status tend to influence the amount of corporal punishment used in public schools, a survey of Florida’s Dade County schools found. Blacks were paddled at a higher rate - more than their percentage in the student body -followed by Hispanics and whites.
Of 314 students who were paddled from September to January, 31 % were H ispanic, 60% were black and 7% were white. Hispanics constitute 44% of the student population, blacks 32% and whites 25%.
The study, started after a parent’s complaint, was revealed Feb. 5 during a county school board meeting. The parent complained that his son was unjustly paddled for being late for school when the lateness was due to problems in starting his car.
Deputy Superintendent Joe Fernandez said school principals were often responding to parental requests that favor paddling over out-of-school suspensions.
Janet McAliley, school board member, said that the practice was found consistently in schools in poor neighborhoods with high enrollments of Hispanics and blacks.
30% Denied Citizenship
Nearly 30% of persons applying for citizenship in the first half of 1985 failed to obtain it, a report released Feb. 12 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials showed.
The report, “The Long Grey Welcome,” was prepared for NALEO by immigration specialist David North. It noted that while the Immigration and Naturalization Service’s figure of 2.8% being denied citizenship for the same period is accurate, the number is actually greater when persons who were not formally denied citizenship are included. Such persons are usually lacking information or turn in incomplete applications
A spokesperson for INS in Washington, D.C., questioned the report’s figures(obtained from INSs Management Information System) but said the latest figures (1983) showed 3,160 applications were denied of 187,719 filed (1.7%).
Leaders Attack’87 Budget
continued from page 1
is scheduled to be cut from $86.6 billion in 1986 to $82.2 billion in 1987. Those covered will pay a 15% higher yearly premium as well as a $25 higherdeductible($75to$100). Also, rather than paying for 25% of Part B of the plan (predominantly doctors? services as opposed to hospital services), recipients would pay 35%.
Maria Sotomayor, chair of the National Hispanic Council on Aging, said that poor Hispanic elderly may have to tap into their already-limited food dollars for basic medical care.
Figures on the number of Hispanics on Medicare are not isolated by the government, but Sotomayor said Hispanic elderly do not use existing services to the degree that they should. The cuts and fee increases will cause Hispanics to visit doctors less frequently, she said.
MEDICAID
The major health care program for indigents under 65 years old, Medicaid has a 1986 budget of $24.6 billion. The president’s budget will cut it by $1.1 billion in 1987, $2.5 billion in 1988 and $3.3 billion in 1989.
Jane Delgado, executive director of the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizations, said that because Medicaid does not keep data on Hispanics, it would be difficult to determine the exact effect of the cuts. Hispanics tend not to have medical insurance so “reductions in coverage would affect Hispanics more because they represent a larger proportion of poor people,” she said.
Many analysts felt that the federal panel’s rejection of across-the-board budget cuts (expected to be ruled on by the U.S. Supreme Court in early summer) gives the president a better negotiating position because he will not have to worry about automatic sequestrations, said Charles Kamasaki, legislative analyst for NCLR.
Kamasaki commented on the budget “Overall, we would characterize it as a disaster, inequitable and not realistic.”
2
- Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
CITIZENSHIP REPORT: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials commissioned a report, “The Long Grey Welcome,” which claims that the number of persons denied citizenship by the Immigration and Naturalization Service is actually greater than what INS reports. For a copy (Cost: $10; 106 pgs.), contact: NALEO, 420 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
HISPANIC CATHOLICS: The Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center for Hispanics has released a socio-culfural and religious profile of U.S. Hispanic Catholics. For a copy of “The Hispanic Catholic in the United States.” (Price: $12 plus 75 cents for postage and handling) write to: The Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center for Hispanics, 1011 First Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022 (212) 751-7045.
FI NANCIAL AID VIDEOTAPES: The College Board has two videotapes that provide basic information on the financial aid application process. The introductory" Paying for College” (purchase price: $40) and “Completing the FAR (purchase price: $35) are available in VHS, 3/4 inch and Beta formats. Either may be rented for $25. “Payingfor College” also comes in slide cassette ($30) and filmstrip cassette ($27). Send check to: College Board Film Library, c/o RHR Filmedia Inc., 49 West 37th St., New York, N.Y. 10018 (212) 575-0501. )1.
YOUNG PEOPLE GUIDE: A free booklet, written by young people, offers names and addresses of community services in the New York area, often provided free and without parental involvement, in such areas as birth control, sexual assault, substance abuse and homelessness. English or Spanish versions available by sending self-addressed, 39-cent postage envelope to: Help Yourself, Community Council'of Greater New York, 275 Seventh Ave., New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 741-8844.
PENSION AND FAMILY INCOME: The Census Bureau reports on pension income and the participation rate of Hispanics and other ethnic groups in assistance programs in “Economic Characteristics of Households in the United States: Third Quarter 1984,” Series P-70, No.5. Price: $3.75. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
JOBS IN LATIN AMERICA: The Intergovernmental Committee for Migration is offering free listings of jobs available in Latin American countries. There are 181 employment opportunities in such fields as engineering, business, health, agriculture and education. Write to: Intergovernmental Committee for Migration, Latin,American Return of Talent Program, 529 National Press Building, Suite 440, 14th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 662-7099.
WRITING CONTEST: The Mexican American Studies and Research Center at the University of Arizona is sponsoring its Second Annual National Chicano Short Story Contest, which is open to Chicanos and Mexicans residing in the United States. Awards of $350, $200 and $100 will be given to winners in the Spanish and English categories. Deadline: Aug. 1. For more information, contact: Ignacio Garcia, Mexican American Studies and Research Center,209 Modern Language Building, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 85721 (602)621-5121.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals: Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington. D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234*0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
MALDEF OPENINGS The STAFF ATTORNEY litigates in four areas. Licensed attorney, civil rights law experience, bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. For BOTH positions, resume with references to Ray Romero, MALDEF, 343 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 60604. Deadline for BOTH positions Feb. 21.
National civil rights organization seeks TWO attorneys in Chicago. The ASSOCIATE COUNSEL manages office and supervises litigation. 5 years litigation and civil rights law experience, management experience. Resume with references to Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014.
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Ann. #14116ADMF $25,317 -$33,862
Professional senior level position in the comptroller’s office in the department of management and finance. Develops and maintains accounting policies and procedures and performs technical accounting work in the areas of: Payroll tax reporting, utilities, proprietary operations, data processing, capital projects, lease financing, general accounts payable, etc.
Requires bachelor's degree in related area plus two years experience in professional accounting. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in one or more of the following areas: auditing, accounting, financial experience with local government use of automated accounting and financial management systems, CPA or master's degree in accounting or business administration.
Official Arlington County application form required. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167. All applications must be received in the Personnel Dept by 5 p.m. on Feb: 21. Arlington County Personnel Dept, 2100 North 14th St, Arlington, Va 22201.
EOE
AMERICAN RED CROSS
CORPORATE INITIATIVE ASSOCIATE to direct the Hispanic Initiative within the American Red Cross Under supervision of Special Assistant to the President for EEO. Work with other national headquarters units to develop programs, products and services for Hispanic consumption and to promote increased Hispanic involvement in Red Cross. Develop an approved 2 - and 3 - year business plan, evaluation plan and public relations/marketing plan. Identify supplementary funding sources for Hispanic Initiative and actively pursue donors Serve as liaison with national Hispanic agencies Provide consultation in development, Red Cross training course materials, print and A-V. Requirements- Bachelor's degree. Knowledge of and sensitivity to the culture of Hispanic population Demonstrated experience in management and administration. Proven experience and excellence in working with groups with top-level volunteers Excellent written and oral communication skills needed. Ability to make effective presentations before groups Ability to plan and organize. One year renewable contract, 2-year maximum. Salary range $27,500 - $42,500. No telephone inquiries Send resume and letter by Feb. 27 to Nicolas Nicosia, Personnel Administration, American Red Cross, 18th and D Sts NW, Washington, D.C. 20006.
EOE/AA
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT $14,000 -$16,000 per year. Experience in word processor alpha-micro preferred. Minimum of two years administrative secretarial experience; ability to proofread and edit work; type 65 to 70 words per minute and bilingual and biliterate (Spanish/English) required. Send resume to: Charles Kamasaki, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St NW. Washington. D.C. 20001.
ACCOUNTANTS/AUDITORS Opportunities nationally for entry level positions (GS 5*9 with potential to GS 12) in the federal government. Application forms may be obtained from an OPM federal job information center near you.
CONSULTANT Management consulting firm seeks New York City-based specialist with hands-on experience in assisting small businesses prepare loan and bond applications. Responsibilities include advisory services to N.Y./N.J. minority businesses and U.S. Department of Transportation grantees Salary range 28-32K. Please send resume to: Camellia Bloch, Kendall Square Associates P.O. Box 277, Cambridge, Mass. 02141.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL
ASSOCIATION
Washington, D.C. Feb. 17-19
Linda Chavez, former director of the White House
Public Liaison Office, will speak at a seminar on
comparable worth, affirmative action and immigration.
Sandy Shapiro (202) 462-1038
LULAC WEEK Feb. 17-21
The League of United Latin American Citizens will Hispanic Link Weekly Report
sponsor events throughout the nation commemorating the contributions of H ispanics to areas such as civil rights, education and immigration.
Eduardo Pefta (202) 371-1555
TRANSPORTATION CONTRACTS FOR HISPANICS Miami Feb. 19, 20
The Washington Consulting Group will conduct a conference to provide information on how to attain federal transportation contracts.
Clara Engel (602) 268-5803
SENOR INTERNACIONAL AWARDS Laredo, Texas Feb. 20
LULAC Council No. 12 will present awards to John Gavin, U.S. ambassador to Mexico, and Miguel Velasco, executive vice president of Televisa. Joseph Howard (512) 722-9187
MINORITY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS Washington, D.C. Feb. 20, 21 The 16th annual symposium by the Conference of Minority Public Administrators will examine topics such as affirmative action, and comparable worth. Catherine Seller (202) 676-6300
SPOTLIGHT
CARLOS VAZQUEZ MEMORIAL BENEFIT: A benefit in honor of V&zquez, 25, former student body president at California State University, youth gang counselor and musician, will be held in Los Angeles on Feb. 22. Proceeds will go toward the education of Vazquez’ six-month-old daughter. Donations may be sent to Carlos V&zquez Memorial Fund, P.O. Box 7023, Alhambra, Calif. 91802-9998, or call Jos6 Figueroa at (213) 224-3347. I
3


Arts & Entertainment
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LATIN AMERICAN cinema and literature was the topic of discussion at a seminar held as part of the third Miami Film Festival which ended Feb. 16.
Three Latin American writers whose work has been translated to the silver screen participated in the seminar Peru’s Mario Vargas Llosa, Cuba's Guillermo Cabrera Infante and Argentina’s Manuel Puig (whose novel Kiss of the Spider Woman served as basis for the film nominated this year for a “best picture” Oscar).
A total of 30 films from 12 countries - including Spain, Argentina, Mexico and Brazil - were screened at the 10-day festival. A world premiere was among the Spanish entries- Emilio Martinez Lazaro’s Lulu by Night
Another Latin American novelist, Mexico’s Carlos Fuentes, is among this year's three finalists fpr the Ritz Paris Hemingway literary award. Fuentes is nominated for the $50,000 prize, the world’s biggest, for his best-selling new book, Gringo Viejo, based on the life of U.S. writer Ambrose Bierce.
The award, named for the hotel in France where Ernest Hemingway lived, was first given last year. The winner, Mario Vargas Llosa, won
for his novel La guerra del fin del mundo.
AN EXHIBIT THIS WEEK AT A MUSEUM in Mexico City marks the return to Mexico of centuries-old murals removed from Aztec temples.
The murals, originally painted in subterranean buildings at the Aztec site of Teotihuacan, were mysteriously removed in 1960. Sixteen years later the murals resurfaced, but they were willed by San Francisco architect Harold Wagner to the city’s De Young Memorial Museum.
The museum agreed to return the murals to Mexico, where they will be exhibited beginning Feb. 19 at the capital’s Museo Nacional de Antropologia.
ONE LINERS: Richard Zaldivar has been elected to a three-year term on the national board of directors of the Screen Extras Guild in Hollywood... H6ctor Galan is among winners in the 1986 American Film Institute’s Independent Filmmaker Program. He will receive complete funding for a documentary on the King Ranch, the largest ranch in Texas... Sergio Gonzdlez, a 13-year-old born in Gainesville, Fla, replaces Menudo’s Roy Rosello who retired last month for health reasons.. And a $5,000 reward is being offered for the safe return of a rare tiger-shaped B.C. Rich guitar stolen last month from Renegade guitarist Kenny Mdrquez...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NAHJ ELECTIONS: Chicago Tribune reporter Manuel Galvan heads a card of eight candidates to be offered to the National Association of Hispanic Journalists membership in April.
The slate was finalized in San Francisco Feb. 8 at the NAHJ board's last meeting prior to the April 23-27 National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami, where the ballots are counted.
Others on the official card are Julio Moran,reporter, Los Angeles Times, first vice president; Maria Elena Salinas, anchor, KM EX-TV Hollywood, second vice president; Elaine Rivera, reporter, Washington Times, secretary; Jesus Rangel, reporter, New York Times, treasurer; and three at-large nominees: Evelyn HernAndez, reporter, Miami Herald; Antonio Espinal, city editor, Noticias del Mundo, New York; and Mario Villafuerte of the Austin American-
Statesman, who could become the first news photographer to serve on the board.
Other NAHJ members may gain the ballot by submitting petitions signed by 13 voting members by March 12. Eight regional representatives will also be elected later in the year.
This year three key founding members of NAHJ - President Guillermo Martinez, editorial board member of the Miami Herald; charter President (current treasurer) Gerald Garcia, editor/publisher of the Tucson Citizen; and at-large delegate Maggie Rivas, business writer with the Dallas Morning News - are retiring from elective office.
At the San Francisco meeting, the board also agreed to send a’trio of representatives to meet with representatives from the California Chicano News Media Association in mid-March to discuss NAHJ’s plan to stage the '87 national media conference in Los Angeles. Some CCNMA board members had expressed concern that the NAHJ-sponsored event would lure away their funding sources.
ENFOQUE NACIONAL Changes in financing National Public Radio services to member stations appeared likely last month to force the abandonment or switch to English of NPR’s Enfoque Nacional, which presently is broadcast by 51 of its stations.
The threat caused Latinos In Public Telecommunications, based in Florida, to hire consultant Arnoldo Torres to represent their interests.
Torres and NPR Vice President for Progamming Joe Gwathmey have since agreed in principle on some actions which would insure continuation of Enfoque Nacional broadcasts in Spanish and develop new opportunities for both English and bilingual programming geared to the Latino community.
One Key element the development of a Latino Consortium-type body similar to the one engaged by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. A meeting involving representatives from NPR, CPB and Torres is set for Feb. 26.
- Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 * N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen*Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias* Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) S96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) S26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. Fordetails, contact HActor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234*0737.
Then -Entonces...
Now -Ahora...
ATENOSN GRINGO
For4^G9 & <£»3L?3ia'ar
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SI Lihtteiat at Naaieaf WEEKLY PAYMENTS IN GOLD TO DYNAMITERS • MACHINE GUNNERS « RAILROADERS EiliMMMi Till! la Jurat, Mask*
« January ||/| •
VIVA VILLA! VIVA RevolucWn!
ILL A
jOn gringo
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wonald Reagan
"El Liberator of Central America”
WEEKLY PAYMENTS IN GOLD TO DYNAMITERS • MACHINE GUNNERS • RAILROADERS Enlistments taken by CIA in Washingotn, D.C.
1986
Viva la contra-revolucion!
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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HR/CR Making The News This Week r-tB 1 cs 198_6 She will oversee a staff of 50 and an annual operat1ng budget of $900,000. . . Marla Contreras-Sweet is named vice president of public affairs for the Seven-Up/RC Bottling Companies of Southern California. She becomes the first Hispanic vice president .. in the company ... 1985 Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck, owned by Cuban Dennis Dlaz, is named 1985's horse ofthe year by three racing organizations ... Nicaraguan Alexis Arguello continues his bid to become the only boxer to win titles in four divisions by knocking out Billy Costello in Reno, Nev., Feb. 9 in the fourth round. The junior welterweight bout was Arguello's second knockout in as many fights since coming out of retirement in October ... Miamian Mary Joe Fernandez, 14, wins her debut match as a professional tennis player beating Czechoslovakian Andrea Hollkova in the first round of the . $1.8 million Lipton International Players Championships in Boca Raton, Fla ... New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya receives the "Saved by the Self' award from the state Transportation Department Feb. 1 0 for avoiding serious injury by using a seat belt. Anaya suffered minor injuries while traveling in a state car Jan. 23 with his three children, who also received minor injuries. They were hit by another car cited for making an unsafe turn. A mandatory seat belt law for front seat riders went into effect in the state Jan. 1 ... The Patterson, Calif., City Council adopts a resolution renaming a park there the Felipe A. Garza Memorial Park after the 15-yearold boy whose dying wish was that his heart be given to his friend, Donna Ashlock, 14. . . Gladys Cabrera takes over as executive director of Para Los N;;ios, a non profit social service agency in Los Angeles providing programs ranging from family crisis counseling to emergency food and shelter. V•'-•No.Til HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Feb.17, 1988 Hispanic Leaders Denounce Reagan's Budget A Weekly Report survey of Hispanic leaders across the country finds them in general agreement that President Reagan's 1987 proposal has a disproportionately negative impact on the nation's 20 million Hispanics. The proposal for fiscal year 1987, which begins Oct. 1, 1986, is the administration ' s version of government spending as mandated by Gramm-Rudman-Hollings. The law, which requires the federal deficit to be eliminated by 1991 in yearly increments, sets a deficit ceiling of$144 billion for 1987. The presidenfs budget totals $944 billion, with a deficit of $143.6 billion. In response to a suit filed by 12 congressmen a three-judge panel convened by Congress found the automatic-cut provision of the law unconstitutional on Feb. 7. Rep. Albert Bustamante (DTexas), one of the plaintiffs, said the ruling "puts the decision back in the hands of Congress, where it belongs . " Immigration Bill Dead? Budget constraints imposed by the Gramm Rudman-Hollings bill could destroy any chance of passage for an immigration bill this session of Congress. That is the opinion of l . egislative analyst Mario Moreno, associate counsel at the Washington office of fhe Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Any comprehensive immigration legislation is estimated by congressional analysts to cost a minimum of $1 billion. Even without the budget-balancing law, differences between the Senate and House versions, namely in the guestworker and amnesty provisions, would have to be rec onciled before a bill comes up for a con gressional conference committee vote, Moreno said. The Senate immigration bill was passed September 1985. The House counterpart has yet to reach the Judiciary Committee. Sizing up the chances for passage, Moreno commented: "It doesn't appear likely, but we are ever vigilant." Social service program cuts and elim i nations that will affect Hispanics occur primarily in five areas: bilingual education, the Small Business Administration, the Legal Services Corporation, Medicare and Medicaid. EDUCATION The presidenf s proposal calls for an increase in bilingual education funds from 1986 ($136.8 million to$142.9 million in 1987) . When adjusted for a 4% inflation rate, the increase is roughly $1 million. Calling the increase minimal, Jim Lyons, legislative counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education, said the administration has repeatedly opposed congressional re commendations for major bilingual education budget increases in the past. This time, he added, it did not take into account that limited English-proficient student growth is 2 1/2 times faster than that of the general student population. A component of bilingual education to be defunded is Bilingual Vocational Training. Lori Orum, education director at the National Council of La Raza(NCLR), called the elimination detrimental because the program trains bilingual instructors and disseminates teaching materials for bilingual education programs. Its 1986 funding level is$3.5 million . SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hispanic entrepreneurs borrowed $151.4 million from the SBA during fiscal year 1985. Latino Jobless Decrease The civilian unemployment rate for Hispanics fell from 1 0 . 4% in December to 10.1% in January, while the overall unemployment rate fell to its lowest point in six years-6.9% to 6.7%-according to the U.S. Labor Department In comparison, the civilian unemployment rate for blacks declined from 14.9% to 14.4%; for whites, from 5.9% to 5.7%. The average weekly earnings of Hispanic males$299nearly matched those of black males-$307-while the earnings for Latinas -$231 -lagged behind those for black women -$255. The average weekly earnings of white males and females were $424 and $287, respectively. Reagan's budget proposal slashes funding to the agency from its 1986 level of $885 million to$95.3 million in 1987. Theadminis tration's proposal would eventually terminate the SBA's lending activities and transfer its other functions to the Department of Commerce. Sal G6mez, former executive director of the National Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and now president of the Boulder, Colo., consulting firm Span-Tech, said such a move "will take away an important option fer His panics" because they have traditionally been considered high risks by banks. NHCC President Hect6rBarreto added that"a great number of successful Hispanic businesses today are around because of the SBA." LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION Reagan's 1987 proposal calls for the abolition of LSC, which is funded at $292. 3 million in 1986. Reagan suggested private attorneys donate 20 hours of legal service per year to indigents instead. Sixteen percent of LSC cases nationally were filed by Hispanics. Jose Padilla, executive director of the Cali fornia Rural Legal Assistance Corporation, said this will lead clients to get legal services by telephone from non-Spanish-speaking lawyers. GALA's clientele is 50% to 60% Hispanic, and three-quarters of its funding is from the federal budget. MEDICARE This health insurance, which is estimated to serve 31 mi Ilion elderly and disabled persons, continued on page 2 Latino Workers Up 1 Ofo Hispanics now comprise 6.7% ofthe nation's labor force population, an increase of one full percent since 1980, the U.S. Department of Labor reports. As of January, there were 7,787,000 His panics in the U.S. civilian work force of 116,786,000 . In 1980, there were 5,993,000 Hispanics among 1 04,450,000 total workers.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua INCIDENTAL CONFUSION: How does the Chicano flyweight who just won the North American Boxing Federation title spell his name? During his Olympic victories in '84, most media used Paul Gonzalez, with a "z". When Paul won his pro title last month , The Los Angeles Times and Hispanic Link used an "s"-Gonzales . The New York Times and some others went with a "z". INCIDENTAL INTELLIGENCE: The first Burger King customer to spot Herb(HeribertoJ in the nation's capital was Roberto Hernandez, a recent arrival from Puerto Rico. Hernandez, who's now eligible for the S1 million drawing among all state winners, is using his initial $5,000 prize to bring his wife and children to join him on the mainland. Who says that all gringos look alike? . , COINCIDENTAL INTELLIGENCE: The day this month when our national Sunday supplement, Vista, came out with a cover piece on the world's most beautiful roommates, Miss Universe Deborah But most confused must be Caminos magazine. In a full-page promotion for its "Hispanic of the Year" banquet, it announced the appearance of last year's winner PAUL GONZALEZ in big bold letters next to a photograph of the young idol wearing his custom boxing shorts with the equally bold lettering G-Q-N-Z-A-L-E-Sacross the belt. . Carthy-Deu, /a puertorriquefla, and Miss USA Laura Martinez Herring, /a chicana, Hispanic Link News Sevice was syndicating a column by critic/playwright Achy Obejas, una cubana, attacking Latina beauty contests as the bane of the barrio. COINCIDENTAL CONFUSION: As the old Spanish saying warns , "Aquel que a/ cielo escupe a su cara le cae." He who spits up to the sky, will get it on his face . Obejas unloaded: "We know we've got a lot of pretty faces. Even the white racists don't deny us our hot tamales. Ask Rita Moreno . But we stand to strut the other stuff: the strengths, talents and heart of the young women-and men-who make up the Latino community ... " Weekly Report reader Frank G6mez, ever a stickler, reminds us that we're not perfect, either. Last week we italicized the word tamale-something we do with all Spanish words. In correct Spanish , Gomez reminds us , the word is still tarnal . Religion Rated Important Hispanic Catholics strict support for traditional beliefs tends to decline with acculturation, education and higher income, a recent nation wide survey of1 ,01 0 Hispanic Catholics revealed The study, ."The Hispanic Catholic in the United States," released Feb. 7 by the Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center for Hispanics, showed 8 , 3% of respondents ranked religion as very important in their lives. That priority was more prevalent among first-generation Hispanics . Beliefs, as in the saints' interceding power or in Jesus' divinement, declined with increased education, income and acculturation. Differing from other ethnic groups, Hispanic Catholics cling to folk practices such as giving and asking for parental blessings, having home altars, praying to saints, using holy water in "the home and making religious deals with God, the study'found. Hispanic Catholics were unaware of recent institutional trends . More than half never heard ofthe Second Vatican Council or the American bishops' pastoral letter on war and peace . Three out of four did not know of"liberation theology," the Latin-American movement that combines faith with the achievement of social and political goals. The survey found eight out of 10 Hispanic Catholics had been approached for con/ersion by othe.r religions ; with a majority perceiving them favorably. 2 L.A. Sanctuary The Los Angeles City Council voted 11-1 Feb . 7 to repeal a resolution that declared the city a sanctuary for political refugees. The council was reacting to residents who felt . the measure would encourage undocumented immigration. It had adopted the sanctuary measure last November, 8-6 . With its latest vote, the council reaffirmed the policy .of providing city services for persons without questioning their status. A policy not to ask a person's status when an application is made for food stamps , enroll children in schools or seek health services has been in effect in Los Angeles since 1973. Minorities Paddled More Students' racial and economic status tend to influence the amount of corporal punish ment used in public schools, a survey of Florida's Dade County schools found. Blacks were paddled at a higher rate-more than their percentage in the student body followed by Hispanics and whites. Of 314 students who were paddled from September to January, 31% were Hispanic, 60% were black and 7% were white. Hispanics constitute 44% of the student population, blacks 32% and whites 25%. The study, started after a parenf s complaint, was revealed Feb . 5 during a county school board meeting . The parent complained that his son was unjustly paddled for being late for school when the lateness was due to problems in starting his car. Deputy Superintendent Joe Fernandez said school principals were often responding to parental requests that favor paddling over out-of-school suspensions. Janet McAiiley, school board member, said that the practice was found consistently in schools in poor neighborhoods w i th high enrollments of Hispanics and blacks. 300/o Denied Citizenship Nearly 30% of persons applying for citizenship in the first half of 1985 failed to obtain it, a report released Feb . 1 2 by the National As sociation of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials showed . The report, "The Long Grey Welcome," was prepared for NALEO by immigration specialist David North. It noted that while the Immigration and Naturalization Service's figure of 2.8% being denied citizenship for th . e same period i s accurate, the number is actually greater when persons who were not formally denied citizenship are included. Such persons are usually lacking information or turn in incomplete applications. A spokesperson for INS in Washington , D . C., questioned the reporfs figures(obtained from INS's Management Information System) but said the latest figures ( 1983) showed 3,160 applications were denied of 187,719 filed (1. 7%). -Kay Barbaro Leaders Attack '87 Budget continued from page 1 is scheduled to be cut from $86. 6 billion in 1986 to$82.2 billion in 1987. Those covered wiU pay a 15% higher yearly premium as well as a $25 higherdeductible($75 to$1 00). Also, rather than paying for 25% of Part B of the plan (predominantly doctors' services as opposed to hospital services) , recipients would pay 35%. Maria Sotomayor , chair of the National Hispanic Council on Aging, said that poo r Hispanic elderly may have to tap into their already-limited food dollars for basic medical care. Figures on the number of Hispanics on Medicare are not isolated by the government, but Sotomayor said Hispanic elderly do not use existing services to the degree that they should. The cuts and fee increases will cause His panics to v i sit doctors less frequently, she said. MEDICAID The major health care program for indigents under 65 years old, Medicaid has a 1986 budget of $24.6 billion . The presidenfs budget will cut it by $1 .1 billion in 1987, $2.5 billion in 1988 and $3.3 billion in 1989. Jane Delgado, executive director of the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizations, said that because Medicaid does not keep data on Hispanics, it would be difficult to determine the exact effect of the cuts. Hispanics tend not to have medical insurance so"reductions in coverage would affect Hispanics more because they represent a larger proportion of poor people," she said. Many analysts felt that the federal panel's rejection of across-the-board budget cuts (expected to be ruled on by the U.S . Supreme Court in early summer) gives the president a better negotiating position because he will not have to worry about automatic sequestrations, said Charles Kamasaki, legislative analyst for NCLR. Kamasaki commented on the budget " Overall , we would characterize it as a disaster, inequitable and not realistic." Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS CITIZENSHIP REPORT: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials commissioned a report, "The Long Grey Welcome," which claims that the number of persons denied citizenship by the Immigration and Naturalization Service is actually greater than what INS reports. For a copy(Cost: $1 0; 106 pgs.), contact: NALEO, 420 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. HISPANIC CATHOLICS: The Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center for Hispanics has released a socio-cultural and religious profile of U.S. H;spanic Catholics. For a copy of "The Hispani c Catholic in the United States." (Price: $12 plus 75 cents for postage and handling) write to: The Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center for Hispanics, 1011 First Ave., New York, N.Y . 10022 (212) 751-7045. Fl NANCIAL AID VIDEOTAPES: The College Board has two video tapes that provide basic information on the financial aid application process. The introductory"Paying for College" (purchase price: $40) and"Completing the FAP' (purchase price : $35) are available in VHS, 3/4 inch and Beta formats. Either may be rented for$25. "Paying for College" also comes in slide cassette ($30) and filmstrip cassette ($27). Send check to: College Board Film Library, c/o RH R Filmedia Inc . , 49 West 37th St., New York, N . Y . 10018 (212) 575-0501. >1. YOUNG PEOPLE GUIDE: A free booklet, written by young people, offers names and addresses of community services in the New York area, often provided free and without parental involvement, in such areas as birth sexual assault, substance abuse and homelessness. English or Spanish versions available by sending self-addressed, 39-cent. postage envelope to: Help Yourself, Community Council of Greater New York, 275 Seventh Ave . , New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 741-8844. PENSION AND FAMILY INCOME: The Census Bureau reports on pension income and the participation rate of Hispanics and other ethnic groups in assistance programs in "Economic Characteristics of Households in the United States: Third Quarter 1984," Series P70, No.5. Price: $3.75. Contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. JOBS IN LATIN AMERICA: The Intergovernmental Committee for Migration is offering free listings of jobs available in Latin American countries. There are 181 employment opportunities in such fields as engineering, business, health, agriculture and education . Write to: Intergovernmental Committee for Migration, Latin . American Return of Talent Program, 529 National Press Building, Suite 440, 14th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 662-7099. WRITING CONTEST: The Mexican American Studies and Research Center at the University of Arizona is sponsoring its Second Annual National Chicano Short Story Contest, which is open to Chicanos and Mexicans residing in the United States. Awards of $350, $200 and $100 will be given to winners in the Spanish and English categories. Deadline: Aug. 1. For more information, contact: Ignacio Garcia, Mexican American Studies and Research Center, 209 Modern Language Building, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 85721. (602) 621-5121. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link. t 420 N St. NW. Washington. D .C. 20005. Phone (202) 2340737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESn Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 ,>er column inch. MALDEF OPENINGS The STAFF ATTORNEY litigates in four areas. Licensed attorney, civil rights law e x perience, bilingual (English/Spanish) pre ferred. For BOTH positions, resume with re ferences to Ray Romero, MALDEF. 343 S. Dearborn St. , Chicago, IlL 60604. Deadline for BOTH positions Feb. 21. National civil rights organization seeks TWO attorneys in Chicago. The ASSOCIATE COUNSEL manages office and supervises litigation. 5 years litigation and civil rights law experience, management experience. Resume with references toMs A Hernandez. MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014. SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Ann. #14116ADMF $25,31 7 $33,862 Professional senior level position in the comptroller's office in the department of management and finance. Develops and maintains accounting policies and procedures and performs technical ac counting work in the areas of: Payroll tax reporting, utilities, proprietary operations, data processing, capital projects, lease financing, general accounts payable, etc. Requires bachelor's degree in related area plus two years experience in pro fessional accounting. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in one or more oft he following areas: auditing, accounting, financial experience with local use of automated accounting and financial management systems, CPA, or maste(s degree in accounting or business administration. Official Arlington County application form required. To request application material, please call (703) 558. All applications must be received in the Per sonnel Dept by 5 p.rn on Feb. 21. Artington County Personnel Dept, 2100 North 14th St., Arlington, Va 22201 . EOE AMERICAN RED CROSS CORPORATE INITIATIVE ASSOCIATE to direct the Hispanic lnitiativewithintheAmerican Red Cross under supervision of Special A&sis tant to the President for EEO. Work with other national headquarters units to develop programs, products and services for Hispanic consumption and to promote increased His panic involvement in Red Cross. Develop an approved 2 and 3 year business plan, evaluation plan and public relations/marketing plan . Identify supplementary funding sources for Hispanic Initiative and actively pursue donors. Serve as liaison with national Hispanic agencies. Provide consultation in development, Red Cross training course materials, print and AV . Requirements: Bachelor's degree. Knowledge of and sensitivity to the culture of Hispanic population. Demonstrated experience in management and administration. Proven experience and excellence in working with groups, with top-level volunteers Excellent written and oral communication skills needed Ability to make effective presentations before groups. Ability to plan and organize . . One year renewable contract, 2year maximum. Salary range $27,500-$42,500 . No telephone inquiries Send resume and tetter by Feb. 27 to N icolas Nicosia, Personnel Administration, American Red Cross, 18th and D Sts NW, Washington, D .C. 20006. EOE/AA ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT$14,000 $16,000peryear. Experienceinwordprocessor alpha--micro preferred Minimum of two years administrative $ecretarial experience; ability to proofread and edit work; type 65 to 70 words per minute and bilingual and biliterate (Spanish/English) required. Send resume to: Charles Kamasaki, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001. ACCOUNTANTS/ AUDITORS Opportunities nationally for entry level positions (GS 5 with potential toGS 12) in the federal govern ment Application forms may be obtained from an OPM federal job information center near you . CONSULTANT Management consulting firm seeks New York Citybased specialist with handson experience in assisting small businesses prepare loan and applications. Responsibilities include advisory services to N.Y./N.J. minority businesses and U.S.'Depa rtment o!Trans portation grantees Salary range 28 K Please send resume to: Camellia Bloch, Kendall Square Associates, P.O. Box 277, Cambridge, Mass. 02141. MINORITY PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS Washington, D . C . Feb . 20, 21 Calendar THIS WEEK sponsor events throughoutthe nation commemorating the contributions of His panics to areas such as civil rights, education and immigration. Eduardo Peiia (202) 371-1555 TRANSPORTATION CONTRAClS FOR HISPANICS Miami Feb . 19, 20 The 16th annual symposium by the Conference of Minority Public Administrators will examine topics such as affirmative action, and comparable worth. Catherine Seller (202) 676-6300 COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL ASSOCIATION Washington, D.C. Feb . 17-19 Linda Chavez, former direr.tor of the White House Public Liaison Office, will speak at a seminar on comparable worth, affirmative action and immigration. Sandy Shapiro (202) 462-1038 LULAC WEEK Feb . 17-21 The League of Latin American Citizens will Hispanic Link Weekly Report The Washington Consulting Group will conduct a conference to provide information on how to attain federal transportation contracts . . Clara Engel (602) 268-5803 SENOR INTERNACIONALAWARDS Laredo, Texas Feb. 20 LULAC Council No . 12 will present awards to John Gavin, U.S. ambassador to Mexico, and Miguel executive vice president of Televisa. Joseph Howard (512) 722-9187 SPOTLIGHT CARLOS VAZQUEZ MEMORIAL BENEFIT: A benefit in honorofVazquez, 25, former student body president at California State University, youth gang counselor and musician, will be held in Los Angeles on Feb. 22 . Proceeds will go toward the education of Vazquez' six-month-old daughter. Donations may be sent to Carlos Vazquez Memorial Fund, Box 7023, Alhambra, Calif. 91802-9998, or call Jose Figueroa at (213) 224-3347. 3

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Arts & Entertainment for his novel La guerra del fin del mundo. AN EXHIBIT THIS WEEK AT A MUSEUM in Mexico City marks the return to Mexico of centurie&-old murals removed from Aztec temples. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LATIN AMERICAN cinema and literature was the topic of discussion at a seminar held as part of the third Miami Film Festival which ended Feb. 16. Three Latin American writers whose work has been translated to the silver screen participated in the seminar: Peru's Mario Vargas Llosa, Cuba's Guillermo Cabrera Infante and Argentina's Manuel Puig (whose novel Kiss of the Spider Woman served as basis for the film nominated this year for a "best picture" Oscat). The murals, originally painted in subterranean buildings at the Aztec site of Teotihuacan, were mysteriously removed in 1960. Sixteen years later the murals resurfaced, but they were willed by San Francisco architect Harold Wagner to the city's De Young Memorial Museum. The museum agreed to return the murals to Mexico, where they will be exhibited beginning Feb. 19 at the capital's Museo Nacional de Antropologia A total of 30 films from 12 countries-including Spain, Argentina, Mexico and Brazil-were screened at the 1 Oday festival. A world premiere was among the Spanish entriesEmilio Martinez Lazaro's Lulu by Night ONE LINERS: Richard Zaldivar has been elected to a three-year term on the national board of directors of the Screen Extras Guild in Hollywood ... Hector Galan is among winners in the 1986 American Film Institute's Independent Filmmaker Program. He will receive complete funding for a documentary on the King Ranch, the largest ranch in Texas ... Sergio Gonzalez, a 13-yearold born in Gainesville, Fla, replaces Menudo's Roy Rosello who retired last month for health reasons ... And a $5,000 reward is being offered for the safe return of a rare tiger-shaped B.C. Rich guitar stolen last month from Renegade guitarist Kenny Marquez ... Another Latin American novelist, Mexico's Carlos Fuentes, is among this year's three finalists for the Ritz Paris Hemingway literary award. Fuentes is nominated for the $50,000 prize, the world's biggest, for his best-selling new book, Gringo Viejo, based on the life of U.S. writer Ambrose Bierce . The award, named for the hotel in France where ErnestHemingway lived, was first given last year. The winner, Mario Vargas Llosa, won Media Report NAHJ ELECTIONS: Chicago Tribune report er Manuel Galvan heads a card of eight dates to be offered to the National Association of Hispanic Journalists membership in April. The slate was finalized in San Francisco Feb. 8 at the NAHJ boarcfs last meeting prior to the April23 National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami, where the ballots are counted. Others on the official card are Julio Moran, re porter, Los Angeles Times, first vice president; Maria Elena Salinas, anchor, KMEXlV Hollywood, second vice president; Elaine Rivera, reporter, Washington Times, secretary; Jesus Rangel, reporter, New York Times, treasurer; and three at-large nominees: Evelyn Hernandez, reporter, Miami Herald; Antonio Espinal, city, editor, Noticias del Mundo, New York; and Mario Villafuerte of the Austin American 4 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234..0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez. Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-RentaS, No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $98. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $28. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details. contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. Statesman, who could become the first news photographer to serve on the board. Other NAHJ members may gain the ballot by submitting petitions signed by 13 voting members by March 12 . Eight regional rep resentatives will also be elected later in the year. This year three key founding members of NAHJ President Guillermo Martinez, editorial board member of the Miami Herald; charter President (current treasurer) Gerald Garcia, editor/publisher of the Tucson Citizen; and at-large delegate Maggie Rivas, business writer with the Dallas Morning News-are retiring from elective office. At the San Francisco meeting, the board also agreed to send a trio of representatives to meet with representatives from the Cali fornia Chicano News Media Association in mid-March to discuss NAHJ's plan to stage the '87 national media conference in Los Angeles. Some CCNMA board members had expressed concern that the NAHJ-sponsored event would lure away their funding sources. WEEILY PAYMENTS IN GOLD TO DYNAMITERS t MACHINE GUNNElS t IRAILlOADEJIS l•li•• .. ac• Tah• .. , .. ,.., lfeaico --. 1111. VIVA VILLA! VIVA Revolucion! -Antonio Mejias-Rentas ENFOQUE NACIONAL: Changes in financing National Public Radio services to member stations appeared likely last month to force the abandonment or switch to English of NPR's Enfoque Nacional, which presently is broadcast by 51 of its stations. The threat caused Latinos In Public Tele communications, based in Florida, to hire consultant Arnoldo Torres to represent their interests . Torres and NPR VICe President for Progamming J . oe Gwathmey have since agreed in principle on some actions which would insure continuation of Enfoque Nacional broadcasts in Spanish and develop new opportunities for both English and bilingual programming geared to the Latino community. One Key element: the development of a Latino Consortium-type body similar to the one engaged by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. A meeting invelving repre sentatives from NPR, CPB and Torres is set for Feb. 26. Charlie Ericksen "EI Liberator of Central America" WEEkLY PAYMENTS IN GOLD TO DYNAIIITEIS t MACHINE GUNNElS t IAILIOADU:S Enlistments taken by CIA in Washingotn, D.C. 1986 Viva Ia contra-revolucidn! Hispanic Link Weekly Report