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Hispanic link weekly report, February 24, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 24, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Mexican Sen. Maria del Carmen Mdrquez de Romero Aceves tells those gathered for a LULAC conference on immigration in San Antonio that “Mexico prefers to export goods rather than labor,” calling on the United States to assist Mexico in relieving economic pressures which spur undocumented immigration. . . Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste appoints Juan Andrade, executive director of the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, as chairman of the Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs for a three-year term... Richard Fajardo, with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles, will be lead attorney for the organization in the Los Angeles City Council redistricting suit filed Nov. 26 bytheU.S. Department of Justice. A motion filed by MALDEF
in January to intervene in the case to ensure L|nlifla/&prl$entation was approved by U.S. District Court Judge James Ideman Feb. 14... Juan Rosario, national executive director of Aj^HRtoa&c^^zation dedicated to furthering the education and leadership potential of Puerto Rican youth, greets visitors Feb. 14 to the organization’s new offices in Washington, D.C., following a change in headquarters location from New York... Actor Edward James Olmos announces a personal fund-raising drive to collect cash, canned goods and clothing to aid victims of last year's earthquakes in Mexico. Citing instances where aid has not reached the victims, Olmos says he will personally deliver his collections to needy groups... The Association of Hispanic Arts, a non-profit service organization in the Bronx headed by Jane Delgado, is among 13 winners of the New York State Governor's Arts Awards recently announced by Gov. Mario Cuomo to be presented in Albany March 4...
I!^^!^panic REPORT^ M,8M
Preparation Tied to Few Latinos in Med Schools
Medical school applications by mainland Puerto Ricans and Chicanos increased by 15% each between 1974 and 1983, but - a new study shows- those increases were not reflected in the schoofs first-year enrollments.
Puerto Rican enrollments grew from 0.6% to 0.7% during the period. For Chicanos, the increase was from 1.5% to 1.9%.
Blaming this disparity on inadequate academic preparation, the study reported that efforts to
Border Arrests Up 43%
U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions of undocumented immigrants along the Mexican border surged 43% in the first four months of fiscal year 1986 (October’86 through January ’86), Immigration and Naturalization Service officials reported at a Feb. 20 press conference in Washington, D.C.
They said that 406,054 arrests were made in that period, with a record 131,409 in January alone.
INS Commissioner Alan Nelson attributed the increase to economic conditions in Mexico as well as a one-third increase in Border Patrol agents in the area-2,629 now contrasted to 1,982 a year ago.
In the San Diego sector, which extends about 30 miles east from the ocean, a 48% increase in apprehensions of non-Mexican immigrants was also noted. The four-month figure for fiscal ’86 was 3,914, compared to 2,641 last fiscal year.
Photographer Wins Suit
A Hispanic journalist in California was awarded $204,000 by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury Feb. 18 for a beating he suffered by four deputies of the Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department seven years ago.
Roberto Rodriguez, who at the time was a photographer for Low Rider magazine, received 14 stitches and was hospitalized for two days because of the March 24, 1979, incident. While covering a film debut, Rodriguez was assaulted as he photographed the officers beating another person at the scene. The officers are still employed by the department.
Rodriguez, 31, is now editor of Caminos magazine.
increase the number of Hispanic and other minority students entering medical school were insufficient. Many more such programs must be implemented at the pre-college level,it said.
The study, by Educational Testing Services (ETS), in Princeton, N.J., found that the great majority of Hispanic and black students did not participate in specialized health education programs until they were in college although three-quarters of them decided on a medical career before or during high school.
The 2,700 study participants - 69% black, 31% Hispanic- were drawn from the pool of students who took the 1983 Medical College Admissions Test.
The three-part study released in December also found that, contrary to undergraduate enrollment (see Weekly Report Jan. 20), Hispano applicants outnumbered Hispanas 66% to 34%.
Equal percentages (49% each) of the 508
Hispanic and 1,065 black applicants to medical schools in 1983 were accepted,the study showed.
The study examined two areas: the demographic and educational characteristics of the students and the number participating in supplemental programs.
More than 50% of the Hispanic applicants were from Southwestern and Western states.
The majority (52%) of Hispanic students had attended high schools with 25% or less minority enrollment Thirty-four percent attended private high schools.
The study also revealed that, while in high school, few students participated in intervention programs designed specifically to improve the academic performance of those interested in medical professions. Less than 10% of Hispanic and black students were tutored in math or science, and only 8% felt the supplemental tutoring programs met the needs
continued on page 2
More Latinos Enroll in Seminaries
The number of Hispanics enrolled in seminary schools in the United States and Canada grew more than five-fold from 264 in 1972 to 1,454 in 1985, but Hispanics comprised only2.6% ofthe56,377 students enrolled in 1985.
Hispanic seminary enrollment has increased every year the data on Hispanics have been collected (beginning in 1972) except for 1984, when there was a 4.9% drop.
Hispanic and Pacific/Asian American enrollment witnessed the largest increase (both 142%) from 1977 to 1985; the latter group grew to 1,195. Enrollment of women for that period increased 74% to 14,572,
blacks, 73.1% to 1,314.
Hispanics experienced the largest increase in the percentage of overall enrollment, from 0.8% to 2.6%. Women, however, represented the biggest numerical jump, going from 3,358 in 1972 to 14,572 in 1985.
Despite the enrollment growth for the four groups, there was a slight decrease in overall seminary enrollment. The study attributed this to fewer post-secondary students studying the humanities.
“The quality of educational background which (Hispanics) bring has made entrance into the field of graduate theological education difficult,” the study noted.
HISPANIC STUDENT ENROLLMENT IN SEMINARY SCHOOLS*
’72 ’74 ’76 ’78 ’80 ’81 ’82 ’83 ’84 ’85
No. Hispanic
Students 264 448 541 681 894 955 1,180 1,381 1,314 1,454
% Of Total 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.8 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.3 2.6
* United States and Canada. Source: The Association of Theological Schools


Sin pelos en la lengua
COUNTING OUR BLESSINGS: Weekly Report prides itself on being the publication of record for U.S. Hispanics. We want our readers to be able to speak with authority whenever accosted for the latest figures on how many Hispanics drop out of high school, serve in Congress, have AIDS, prefer New Coke, have papers, and so on.
Here’s another one to commit to memory:
We Hispanics suffer less from headaches than do our white brothers and sisters.
According to a study by Louis Harris and Associates conducted for Nuprin, 71% of Hispanics suffered more than one headache in the previous 12 months, compared to 74% of whites.
So we don’t start feeling too superior, the release is quick to point out that college graduates get more headaches than do high school dropouts, 77% vs. 68%.
There it is, batos: If you don’t want a bunch of headaches in life, drop out.
COUNTING THE VOTES: The February edition of Hispanic Business
magazine offers this lead on a story about the recent special election in Los Angeles:
“Former California state Assemblyman Richard Alatorre won a stunning upset in a December election to become the first Hispanic to be seated on the powerful Los Angeles City Council in more than 20 years."
Upset? His opponents’stomachs, maybe. The only way Alatorre-who gained 60% of the vote in a field of seven candidates - could have lost the race was if he’d run against an incumbent named Ferdinand Marcos.
COUNTER-ATTACK? Another in my collection of strange news story leads is the one in Insight magazine (Dec. 16) on Texas Republican attorney general candidate Roy Barrera Jr. It offers:
“Roy Barrera Jr., one of the few Hispanic judges in Texas, does not seem to notice the irony as he stands in front of the Alamo.”
I promise to feel ironic the next time I visit the Alamo if all of our nation’s descendants of the Union Jack promise to do so when they visit Philadelphia’s Independence Hall.
I must be assimilating. I feel a headache coming on.
- Kay Barbaro
14 Latinos File for
Fourteen Hispanics have filed for candidacy in four of seven reapportioned wards in special Chicago aldermanic elections to be held March 28. In three wards, all the candidates are Hispanic and in the fourth, Hispanics are strong contenders.
On Dec. 30, a federal judge ordered that seven of the city’s 50 districts be redrawn in response to a voting rights suit filed on behalf of Hispanics and blacks challenging the redistricting plan drawn up by the City Council
Park Service Hiring Plan
Hispanic employment with the western region of the National Park Service will increase over the next five years following the Resolution of an administrative class action complaint brought by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
The settlement, announced Feb. 19 by MALDEF and the Service, follows a 1981 complaint by three Hispanics who applied for positions as equal employment opportunity officers with the San Francisco office and were turned down. The suit alleged discrimination in the recruitment, hiring, promotion and training of Hispanic applicants and employees.
The western region of the Service includes California, Arizona, Nevada, Hawaii and Guam.
The settlement calls for Hispanics to hold 5.3% of professional, 7.6% administrative, 11% technical and 28% blue collar positions in the region within five years.
H ispan ics were 5.1 % to 2,500 total western region employees in 1984.
Theresa Bustillos, MALDEF director of employment litigation who will monitor the settlement every year, called the agreement “significant in light of all the rhetoric and tenor of the Reagan administration” which opposes goals and timetables as solutions to discrimination cases.
Other elements of the affirmative action plan call for a Hispanic recruitment plan, improved career counseling for Hispanics and an assessment by the Service of where bilingual employees are needed.
Chicago Council
in 1981. The court-approved plan increased H ispanic majorities in three districts, decreasing Latinos slightly in the 31 st Ward, from 57% to 52%. The Council's lone Latino incumbent, Puerto Rican Miguei Santiago, represents the 31 st Ward.
Chicago Mayor Harold Washington stands to wrest control of the Council from 1'0th Ward Alderman and Cook County Democratic Chairman Edward Vrdolyak if four of the seven alderman in the new wards join his camp. Vrdolyak controlled those seven wards and 22 of the 43 other sSats.
Of the remaining three wards up for election, two are predominantly black. The other is split between blacks and whites, the latter historically voting in larger numbers.
The Hispanic candidates are:
Ward 22 (72% Latino): Deputy Water Commissioner Jesus Garcia is favored over businessmen Guadalupe Martinez and Fred Yaftez, and Du Besa Garcia, whose occupation is unknown.
Ward 25 (67% Latino): State Rep. Juan Soliz is the front-runner against Deputy Water Commissioner Juan Velasquez, Philip Coronado, an athletic director for a community center, and lawyer Virginia Martinez.
Ward 26 (58% Latino): Cook County Commissioner Manuel Torres is matched against Luis Gutierrez, assistant superintendent of the Dept of Streets and Sanitation, and Omar L6pez, assistant to the Chicago Park Superintendent.
Ward 31: Santiago is opposed by businessman Ben Rosado and former director of the Chicago office of the National Puerto Rican Forum Migdalia Collazo.
One of the Hispanic favorites, Jesus Garcia, is considered a Washington ally. Juan Soliz has not allied himself to either camp, while Miguel Santiago is pro-Vrdolyak. The 26th Ward election has no favorite, but all the Hispanic candidates work for the Washington administration.
If necessary, run-offs will be held April 29.
Latinos in Med Schools
continued from page 1
of students pursuing medical careers.
Comparing the colleges and universities attended by Hispanics and blacks, 7% of Hispanic medical school applicants matriculated in institutions where the average Scholastic Aptitude Test score- out of a possible 1,600 points - was 884 or lower (“low selectivity institutions^). However, 52% of the Hispanics attended “high selectivity institutions” -those where the average SAT score was 1020 or higher. ETS administers the SAT.
Although the participation rate for students in intervention programs increased in college, percentages for both groups were still low. Twenty-two percent of Hispanics enrolled in summer programs for pre-medical students, but the majority did so after their junior year in college.
-Felix Perez
Fuster Protests Cuts
Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster has asked the General Accounting Office to reconsider its proposal to slash $10.5 million in excise tax rebates to the island as part of the federal budget cuts that take effect March 1.
The GAO, prompted by the Gramm- Rudman-Hoilings Act, also recommended an additional $4.2 million from anticipated 1986 collections by the U.S. Customs Service on merchandise imported into Puerto Rico not be reverted to the island’s treasury.
The GAO recommended the cuts to President Reagan Jan. 21. The $10.5 million would come from excise tax rebates on island rum sold on the mainland. Puerto Rico received $368 million in rebates last year.
The cuts are part of the $11.7 billion in sequestrations mandated by the budget-\ balancing legislation.
) An attorney with GAO told Weekly Report a response is expected by the March 1 deadline. Carmen Votaw, FusteRsadministrative assistant, said the resident commissioner may file a suit if GAO does not reconsider.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
SEMINARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: The Association of Theological Schools will publish in March its “Fact Book” for 1985 listing seminary enrollment data for Hispanics, blacks, women and Pacific/Asian Americans. Price: $13. Contact ATS, 42 E. National Rd., P.O. Box 130, Vandalia, Ohio 45377 (513) 898-4654.
HISPANIC READERSHIP STUDY: The National Association of Hispanic Publications has issued its 43-page National Hispanic Readership Study of 1985 that profiles 1,757 readers of 37 Hispanic publications across the country. Copies are available by sending a self-addressed 9” by 12” manila envelope with 90$ affixed postage to: Pauline Marquez, NAHP, P.O. Box 54307, Los Angeles, Calif. 90054 (213) 222-1349.
MINORITY MEDICAL STUDENTS: The 135-page study,“Who Is Going to Medical School? A Look at the 1984-1985 Underrepresented Minority Medical School Applicant Pool,” examines the academic preparation and socioeconomic background of Hispanic and black medical school applicants. For a free copy, contact Gloria Cains, Educational Testing Services, 825 I St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 659-0616.
HISPANICS IN CHICAGO: The Chicago Reporter has issued a second edition of its 33-page book “Hispanics in Chicago.” Price: $9.95. Order from: The Chicago Reporter, 18 South Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60603 (312) 236-4830.
MINORITY BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES: The organizing committee of the 1987 Pan American Games is exhorting minority-owned businesses to identify themselves as possible vendors for the event. Write to: PAX/Indianapolis, Merchants Plaza, Suite 1144E, Indianapolis, Ind. 46204 (317) 267-2626.
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID: Congressman Esteban Torres will provide students with information on Pell Grants, Guaranteed Student Loans and other federal aid programs. Contact Rep. Esteban Torres, 1740 Longworth HOB, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-5256.
UN NUEVO DIA: The Catholic Conference of Illinois has produced a set of 13 fifteen-minute radio programs with inspirational themes in Spanish. Afnong the program titles: “Being Hispano,” “The Family,” “Dignity of Work,” “Alcoholism,” and “Church as a Community.” Send a $20 prepaid order to: Ethnic Communications Outlet, 5342 S. University Ave., Chicago, III. 60615 (312) 667-2626.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in youf search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
SIN Television Network seeks eager, out- rAuoAirN ®Tacc
going writer for public relations department campaign staff
Must be bilingual. Prefer public relations agency The Democratic National Committee (DNQ
and/or copywriting experience. Send resume will be hiring campaign staff in several states, to: MarietteArguimbau,SIN,460W.42ndSt.> Each staff member will be responsible for New York, N.Y. 10036. implementing a campaign program, which
may include:
• hiring and supervising a field staff
• coordinating canvassing program
• coordinating telephone bank program
• coordinating direct-mail program
• directing get-out-the-vote program Some campaign or political experience
required. Salary range $18 - 20,000.
APPLICANT MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. Apply to: The Democratic Party Election Force, Political Division, Democratic National Committee, 430 South Capitol St SE, Washington, D.C. 20003(202)863-8076. The DNC is an equal opportunity employer.
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST THE NATIONAL Economic Development & Law Center, a non-profit community and economic development support center, seeks full-time employee fully bilingual (English/ Spanish) to provide organizational development training and technical assistance to community* * based organizations (CBOs).
Applicant must have 3 years practical experience working with CBOs on general management and organizational issues including funding strategies; understanding the needs of minority, low income and refugee/immigrant
~ ______ communities Ability to write and communicate
TV NEWS production company and members clear,y. Extensive travel required Salary com-of HAMAS in Los Angeles need news footage mensurate with experience, from $30,000/yr. on significant national Hispanic news events p|US fringe benefits, since start of National Hispanic Heritage Submit resume postmarked on or before Week for immediate use. Will pay going rates April 1 to: Marsha Brown, NED&LC. 1950 Write or call Jos6 Luis Cedefto (213) 222- Addison St., Berkeley, Calif. 94704.
8370, ROD Enterprises P.O. Box 50472, NED&LC is an EOE/AA employer, M/F/H Pasadena, Calif. 91105. Deadline March 15. urged to apply.
STATE PARTY FUNDRAISERS
The Democratic National Committee (DNC) will be hiring fund-raising staff in several states beginning in April. Each fund-raising staff member will be responsible for implementing a fund-raising program, which may include:
• improving the quality of a direct-mail fund-raising program (list building)
• improving thequality of a phone-mail program (list building)
• planning and coordination of fundraising events
• development and improvement of membership program
• development of large-donor program
Fund-raising and political experience
very helpful. Salary range$18-$20,000.
APPLICANT MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. Apply to: The Democratic Party Election Fores Political Division, Democratic National Committes 430 South Capitol St SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 863-8076.
The DNC is an equal opportunity employer.
Cajendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC CAREER CONFERENCE Ontario, Calif. Feb. 26
The advisory committee to the LULAC National Educational Service Center in Pomona, Calif., is sponsoring the 5th annual statewide business career conference with workshops and interviews by participating corporations.
Steve Garcia (714) 623-0588
BILINGUAL EDUCATION Washington, D.C. Feb. 27
The Hispanic Bar Association of the District of Columbia will empanel experts in bilingual education, including Ram6n Santiago of the Georgetown Bilingual Education Service Center, to discuss current issues. Elaine Sierra (202) 225-6235
HISPANIC FAMILIES AND YOUTH Tucson, Ariz. Feb. 27, 28
The 3rd annual conference co-sponsored by the Congreso National de Asuntos Colegiales will examine chemical and substance abuse.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Mina King (202) 387-4035
NATIONAL HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Los Angeles Feb. 28
The 10th annual conference sponsored by the Mexican-American Opportunity Foundation will discuss opportunities for the professional woman and present its “Woman of the Year" award.
Mary Cordero (818) 289-2000 Ext. 11
CANDIDATE ENDORSEMENT CONVENTION San Antonio March 1
Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) will be the keynote speaker at the Mexican American Democrats of Texas convention to endorse candidates for the state Democratic primary.
Rosemary Salinas (512) 882-8284
PUBLIC RELATIONS CONFERENCE Los Angeles March 1
The Hispanic Public Relations Association will host a conference to discuss the relationship between marketing and public relations.
Esther Renteria (213) 726-7690
COMING SOON
1 ST NATIONAL CONFERENCE
National Center on Missing and Exploited Children
Chicago March 2-5
Jan Stanton (217) 782-6429
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE Hispanic Institute for Research and Development of Bergen County, N.J.'
West New York, N.J. March 4 Miriam Cuervo (201) 447-9477
VOTING RIGHTS HEARINGS U.S. Civil Rights Commission Washington, D.C. March 5-7 Gail Gerebenics (202) 376-8368
HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE American Association for Higher Education Hispanic Caucus
Washington, D.C. March 12-15 Laura Rend6n (202) 254-6050
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC ELDERLY: The National Council on Aging will co-sponsor a symposium March 21-23 in San Francisco dealing with issues impacting the Hispanic elderly community such as gerontology, community development, data gathering and communications For further information contact Rebeca Gilad at NHCA, 2713 Ontario Rd. N.W., Suite 200, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 265-1288.
3


Arts & Entertainment
THIS WEEKS CEREMONYTO HONOR LAST year's top achievements in the recording industry will reportedly make special mention of the CantarG, cantaras Latin American aid song, although that song is not nominated in any of the three “Latin” music Grammy categories.
The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences hands out its gramophone-shaped trophies Feb. 25 at a Los Angeles ceremony that will be telecast live by CBS. According to an article published in the Feb. 28 issue of Bam, a California music magazine, “the awards show will honor all the ‘Aid’ projects.”
Cantare, cantaras, a song released last summer by the non-profit Hermanos foundation, qualified fora 1986 Grammy nomination as a recording that hit the market during the eligibility year Oct. 1,1984 through Sept. 30, 1985. While five out of the 56 performers who contributed to the Hermanos recording are nominated individually in the three “Latin” categories, the song itself was not nominated.
“What they will probably do,” Hermanos Executive Director Luis Medina told Weekly Report, “is something similar to what was done at the American Music Awards.” A last month’s ceremony, in a segment
honoring all “aid” projects, a clip from CantarS, cantaras was shown.
NARAS President C. Michael Greene said he received a letter from Medina protesting the exclusion of Cantare, cantaras in this year's Grammy proceedings. In his letter, Medina requested that NARAS give Cantare, cantaras, special consideration outside of the three “Latin” categories. No reply to Medina’s letter had been received at press time.
A total of 15 Latin recording acts are nominated this year in the “best Latin pop,” “best tropical Latin,” and “best Mexican/American” performance categories. Five other Latino acts are nominated for a total of seven non-Latin categories. (See Jan. 20 Weekly Report.)
At this year’s ceremony a special non-competitive Lifetime Achievement Award will be given by the Academy’s National Trustees to Andres Segovia for “creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recordings.” The Spanish guitarist is a 1958 Grammy winner.
In a related recording industry item, the Clasica Moderns label releases this week a new album by its Latin rock group Zerimar. The disc, Ritmo Peligroso, will be launched at a Feb. 27 nightclub engagement in North Hollywood, Calif.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
READERSHIP SURVEY: Hispanic print media have always come in last in the competition for national advertising dollars.
Last year, for example, Spanish-language television and radio earned about $40 million each from national ads, while Hispanic publications picked up somewhere between $8 and $10 million, according to Kirk Whisler, publisher of Caminos magazine and president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications.
About 85% of ad revenue for Latino print media comes from local advertisers, he says.
The problem, as Whisler sees it, is one of image. Studies, commissioned mainly by Spanish broadcast media, have given the impression that Hispanics don’t read.
To dispel that notion, last summer NAHP conducted a survey of 1,757 readers of 37 Hispanic publications, hoping to prove that national advertisers were missing a bloc of
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants^ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
people with lots of money to spend.
Now the results are in. They were released Feb. 18 in Los Angeles.
Here are some of the key findings:
• Survey respondents favored reading over other forms of media. They spent 45% of their weekly media time reading, compared to 29% watching TV and 26% listening to radio.
• Their mean household income was higher than that of the overall Hispanic population -$22,100 annually vs. $18,400.
• They owned credit cards at or above the national average. Fifty-three percent held a Visa or MasterCard.
• Some of their planned major purchases for 1986 were: automobiles (41 %), furniture (30%), appliances (28%), video cassette recorders (25%), television sets (20%) and home computers (13%).
The survey also provided detailed information
on the participants’ reading preferences, consumer habits, political tendencies, age, education and other characteristics Participating publications were mostly Spanish-language or bilingual weekly newspapers.
Whisler is currently circulating the 43-page report among national advertising agencies to give them “a realistic picture of the Hispanic readers" To gain a larger share of the national ad dollar, the 75-member NAHP has picked up Bntrada of New York to serve as its ad representative.
In 1985, there were approximately 500 Hispanic newspapers magazines and journals in the United States.
With NAHPs new initiatives, Whisler hopes to increase Hispanic print media’s national ad revenues by 50% this year- an ambitious projection but, he insists “peanuts” compared to what Hispanic radio and television are getting.
AWARDS: Yolanda Alvarado, Lansing, Mich., State Journal reporter, won the 1986 Guild Service Award from the International Organization of Newspaper Unions for her work in revitalizing the local newspaper guild. . . Nancy Montoya and KGUN-TV, Tucson, won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University broadcast journalism award for outstanding reporting at its 14th annual presentation in New York this month. _ Dora Delgado
Valenzuela Paid Most
Fernando Valenzuela, 25, the five-year veteran left-hander with the Los Angeles Dodgers became the highest-paid pitcher in major league history Feb. 15, signing a three-year contract worth $5.5 million.
The Sonora, Mexico, native also became the first pitcher to sign a contract that pays over $2 million for one year (’86 - $1.6 million; ’87 - $1.85 million; ’88 - $2.05 million). Valenzuela’s contract surpasses the $1.8 million-a-year contract signed by Rick Sutcliffe of the Chicago Cubs last year.
An immensely popular figure with Los Angeled large Hispanic community, Valenzuela’s record in the majors is 78 wins 57 losses.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week in January to intervene in the case to ensure L jfa re entation was approved by U.S. District Court Judge James Ide man Feb. 14 ... Juan Rosario, national executive dir _ ector of 0@8@z_ation dedicated to furthering the educatton and reliderStuJ5" potential of Puerto Rican youth, greets visitors Feb. 14 to the organization's new offices in Washington, D.C., following a change in headquarters location from New York. . . Actor Edward James Olmos announces a personal fund-raising drive to collect cash, canned goods and clothing to aid victims of last year's earthquakes in Mexico. Citing instances where aid has not reached the victims, Olmos says he will personally deliver his collections to needy groups ... The Association of Hispanic Arts, a non-profit service organization in the Bronx headed by Jane Delgado, is among 13 winners of the New York State Governor's Arts Awards recently announced by Gov. Mario Cuomo to be presented in Albany March 4 ... Mexican Sen . Marla del Carmen Marquez de Romero Aceves tells those gathered for a LULAC conference on immigration in San Antonio that "Mexico prefers to export goods rather than labor," calling on the United States to assist Mexico in relieving economic pressures which spur undocumented immigration. . . Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste appoints Juan Andrade, executive director of the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, as chairman of the Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs for a three-year term ... Richard Fajardo, with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles , will be lead attorney for the organization in the Los Angeles City Council redistricting suit filed Nov . 26 by the U . S . Department of Justice. A motion filed by MALDEF ••'•••ll HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT , .... 24,1988 Preparation Tied to Few Latinos in Med Schools Medical school applications by mainland Puerto Ricans and Chicanos increased by 15% each between 197 4 and 1983, but-a new study shows-those increases were not reflected in the schoofs first-year enrollments. Puerto Rican enrollments grew from 0.5% to 0.7% during the period. For Chicanos, the increase was from 1 . 5% to 1 .9%. Blaming this disparity on inadequate academic preparation, the study reported that efforts to Border Arrests Up 430/o U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions of un documented immigrants along the Mexican border surged 43% in the first four months of fiscal year 1986 (0ctober'85 through January ' 86), Immigration and Naturalization Service officials reported at a Feb . 20 press conference in Washington, D .C. They said that 406,054 arrests were made in that !riod, with a record 131,409 in January alone. INS Commissioner Alan Nelson attributed the increase to economic conditions in Mexico as well as a one-third increase in Border Patrol agents in the area-2,629 now contrasted to 1,982 a year ago. In the San Diego sector, which extends about 30 miles east from the ocean, a 48% increase in apprehensions of non-Mexican immigrants was also noted. The four-month figure for fiscal '86 was 3,914, compared to 2,641 last fiscal year. Photographer Wins Suit A Hispanic journalist in California was awarded $204,000 by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury Feb. 18 for a beating he suffered by four deputies of the Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department seven years ago . Roberto Rodriguez, who at the time was a photographer for Low Rider magazine, received 14 stitches and was hospitalized for two days because of the March 24, 1979, incident While covering a film debut, Rodriguez was assaulted as he photographed the officers beating another person at the scene. The officers are still employed by the department Rodriguez, 31, is now editor of Caminos magazine . increase the number of Hispanic and other minority students entering medical school were insufficient. Many more such programs must be implemented at the pre-college level,it said. The study , by Educational Testing Services (ETS), in Princeton, N . J., found that the great majority of H i spanic and black students did not participate in specialized health education programs until they were in college although three-quarters of them decided on a medical career before or during high school. The 2 ,700 study participants-69% black, 31% Hispanic-were drawn from the pool of students who took the 1983 Medical College Admissions Test. The three--part study released in December also found that, contrary to undergraduate enrollment (see Weekly Report Jan 20), Hispano applicants outnumbered Hispanas 66% to 34%. Equal percentages (49% each) of the 508 Hispanic and 1 ,065 black applicants to medical schools in 1983 were accepted,the study showed. The study examined two areas: the demo graphic and educatio nal characteristics of the students and the number participating in supplemental programs. More than 50% of the Hispanic applicants were from Southwestern and Western states. The majority (52%) of Hispanic students had attended high schools with 25% or less minority enrollment Thirty-four percent attended private high schools. The study also revealed that, while in high school , few students participated in intervention programs designed specifically to improve the academic performance of those interested in medical professions . Less than 1 0% of Hispanic and black students were tutored in math or science, and only 8% felt the SUI>' plemental tutoring programs met the needs continued on page 2 More Latinos Enroll in Seminaries The number of Hispanics enrolled in seminary schools in the United States and Canada grew more than five-fold from 264 in 1972 to 1,454 in 1985, but Hispanics comprised only 2.6% of the 56,377 students enrolled in 1985. Hispanic seminary enrollment has increased every year the data on Hispanics have been collected (beginning in 1972) except for 1984, when there was a 4.9% drop. Hispanic and Pacific/Asian American enrollment witnessed the largest increase (both 142%) from 1977 to 1985; the latter group grew to 1, 195. Enrollment of women for that period increased 74% to 14,572 , blacks, 73.1% to 1 ,314. Hispanics experienced the largest increase in the percentage of overall enrollment, from 0.8% to 2 . 6%. Women, however, re presented the biggest numerical jump, going from 3,358 in 1972 to 14,572 in 1985. Despite the enrollment growth for the four groups, there was a slight decrease in overall seminary enrollment. The study at tributed this to fewer post-secondary students studying the humanities. "The quality of educational background which(Hispanics) bring has made entrance into the field of graduate theological education difficult," the study noted . HISPANIC STUDENT ENROLLMENT IN SEMINARY SCHOOLS* '72 '74 '76 '78 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 No. Hispanic Students 264 448 541 681 894 955 1,180 1,381 1,314 1,454 %of Total 0 . 8 1.2 1.3 1 . 5 1 . 8 1.9 2.2 2 . 5 2.3 2.6 • United States and Canada . Source : The Association of Theological Schools

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Sin pelos en lengua magazine offers this lead on a story about the recent special election irr Los Angeles: "Former California state Assemblyman Richard Alatorre won a stunning upset in a December election to become the first Hispanic to be seated on the powerful los Angeles City Council in more than 20 years." COUNTING OUR BLESSINGS: Weekly Report prides itself on being the publication of record for U.S. Hispanics. We want our readers to be able to speak with authority whenever accosted for the latest figures on how many Hispanics drop out of high school, serve in Congress, have AIDS , prefer New Coke, have papers, and so on. Upset? His opponents' stomachs, maybe . The only way Alatorrewho gained 60% of the vote in a field of seven candidatescould have lost the race was if he'd run against an incumbent named Ferdinand Marcos. Here's another one to commit to memory: We Hispanics suffer less from headaches than do our white brothers and sisters. COUNTER-ATTACK? Another in my collection of strange news story leads is the one in Insight magazine (Dec . 16) on Texas Republican attorney general candidate Roy Barrera Jr. It offers: According to a study by louis Harris and Associates conducted for Nuprin, 71% of Hispanics suffered more than one headache in the previous 12 months, compared to 74% of whites. "Roy Barrera Jr., one of the few Hispanic judges in Texas, does not seem to notice the irony as he stands in front of the Alamo. " So we don't start feeling too superior, the release is quick to point out that college graduates get more headaches than do high school dropouts, 77% vs. 68%. I promise to feel ironic the next time I visit the Alamo if all of our nation's descendants of the Union Jack promise to do so when they visit-Philadelphia's Independence Hall. There it is, batos: If you don't want a bunch of headaches in life, drop out. I must be assimilating. I feel a headache coming on . COUNTING THE VOTES: The February edition of Hispanic Business Kay Barbaro 14 Latinos File for Chicago Council Latinos in Med Schools continued from page 1 Fourteen Hispanics have filed for candidacy in four of seven reapportioned wards in special Chicago aldermanic elections to be held March 28. In three wards, all the candidates are Hispanic and in the fourth, Hispanics are strong contenders. On Dec. 30, a federal judge ordered that seven of the city's 50 districts be redrawn in response to a voting rights suit filed on be half of Hispanics and blacks challenging there districting plan drawn up by the City Council Park Service Hiring Plan Hispanic employment with the western region of the National Park Service will increase over the next five years following the resolution of an administrative class action complaint brought by the Mexican American legal Defense and Educational Fund. . The settlement, announced Feb. 19 by MALO EF and the Service, follows a 1 981 complaint by three Hispanics who applied for positions as equal employment opportunity officers with the San Francisco office and were turned down. The suit alleged discrimi nation in the recruitment, hiring , promotion and training of Hispanic applicants and employees. The western region of the Service includes California, Arizona, Nevada, Hawaii and Guam. The settlement calls for Hispanics to hold 5.3% of professional, 7.6% administrative, 11% technical and 28% blue collar positions in the region within five years. Hispanics were 5.1% to 2,500 total western region employees in 1984. Theresa Bustillos, MALDEF director of employment litigation who will monitor the settlement every year, called the agreement "significant in light of all the rhetoric and tenor of the Reagan administration" which opposes goals and timetables as solutions to discrimination cases. Other elements of the affirmative action plan call for a Hispanic recruitment plan, improved career counseling for Hispanics and an assessment by the Service of where bilingual employees are needed. 2 in 1981. The court-approved plan increased Hispanic majorities in three districts, decreasing Latinos slightly in the 31st Ward, from 57% to 52%. The Councirs lone Latino incumbent , Puerto Rican Miguel Santiago, represents the 31st Ward. Chicago Mayor Harold Washington stands to wrest control of the Council from 1'0th Ward Alderman and Cook County Democratic Chairman Edward Vrdolyak if four of the seven alderman in the new wards join his camp. Vrdolyak controlled those seven wards and 22 of the 43 other seats. Of the remaining three wards up for election, two are predominantly black. The other is split between blacks and whites, the latter historically voting in larger numbers. The Hispanic candidates are: Ward 22 (72% Latino): Deputy Water Commissioner Jesus Garcia is favored over businessmen Guadalupe Martinez and Fred Yanez, and Du Besa Garcia, whose occupation is unknown. Ward 25 (67% Latino): State Rep. Juan Soliz is the front-runner against Deputy Water Commissioner Juan Velasquez, Philip Coronado, an athletic director for a community center, and lawyer Virginia Martinez . Ward 26 (58% Latino): Cook County Com missioner Manuel Torres is matched against . luis Gutierrez, assistant superintendent of the Dept. of Streets and Sanitation, and Omar L6pez, assistant to the Chicago Park Super intendent. Ward 31: Santiago is opposed by business man Ben Rosado and former director of the Chicago office of the National Puerto Rican of students pursuing medical careers. Comparing the colleges and universities attended by Hispanics and blacks, 7% of Hispanic medical school applicants matriculated in institutions where the average Scholastic Aptitude Test score-out of a possible 1,600 points-was 884 or lower ("low selectivity institutions''). However, 52% of the Hispanics attended "high selectivity institutions " those where the SAT score was 1020 or higher. ETS administers the SAT . Although the participation rate for students in intervention programs increased in college, percentages for both groups were still low . Twenty-two percent of Hispanics enrolled in summer programs for pre-medical students, but the majority did so after their junior year in college . -Felix Perez Fuster Protests Cuts Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster has asked the General Accounting Office to reconsider its proposal to slash $10.5 million in excise tax rebates to the island as part of the federal budget cuts that take effect March 1 . The GAO, prompted by the Gramm-Rudman Hollings Act, also recommended an additional $4.2 million from anticipated 1986 collections by the U.S. Customs Service on merchandise imported into Puerto Rico not be reverted to the island's treasury. The GAO recommended the cuts to President Reagan Jan. 21. The $10.5 million would come from excise tax rebates on island rum sold on the mainland. Puerto Rico received $368 million in rebates last year . The cuts are part of the $11.7 billion in Forum Migdali . a Col.lazo. . • • sequestrations mandated by the budget . One the Htspamc !avontes, Jesus balancing legislation. IS constder .ed a ally. Juan So_llz ) An attorney with GAO told Weekly Report not to etther camp, whtle a response is expected by the March 1 Mtguel San_t1ago IS pro-Vrdo.lyak. The 26th deadline. Carmen Votaw, Fuster's adminisWard electton has no favonte, but all the trative assistant said the resident comca.ndidates work for the Washington missioner may tile a suit if GAO does not admmtstratton . reconsider If necessary, run-offs will be held April 29. ...._ ____ Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS SEMINARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: The Association of Theological Schools will publish in March its "Fact Book" for 1985 listing seminary enrollment data for Hispanics, blacks, women and Pacific/ Asian Americans. Price : $13. Contact: ATS , 42 E. National Rd., P.O. Box 130, Vandalia , Ohio 453,77 (513) 898-4654. HISPANIC READERSHIP STUDY: The National Association of Hispanic Publications has issued its 43-page National Hispanic Readership Study of 1985 that profiles 1,757 readers of 37 Hispanic publications across the country. Copies are available by sending a self-addressed 9" by 12" manila envelope with 90 affixed postage to: Pauline Marquez, NAHP, P .O. Box 54307, Los Angeles, Calif . 90054 (213) 222-1349. MINORITY MEDICAL STUDENTS: The 135-page study, "Who Is Going to Medical School? A Look at the 1984-1985 Underrepresented M i n o r ity Medical School Applicant Pool," examines the academic preparation and socioeconomic background of Hispanic and black medica l school applicants . For a free copy, contact Gloria Cains, Educationa l Testing Services, 825 I St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20006 (202) 659-0616. HISPANICS IN CHICAGO: The Chicago Reporter has issued a second edition of its 33-page book "Hispanics in Chicago." Price: $9.95. Order from : The Chicago Reporter, 18 South Michigan Ave . , Chicago, Ill. 60603 (312) 236-4830. MINORITY BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES: The organizing committee of the 1987 Pan American Games is exhorting minority-owned businesses to identify themselves as possible vendors fo r the event. Write to: PAX/Indianapolis, Merchants Plaza, Suite 1144E, Indiana polis , Ind . 46204 (317) 267-2626. STUDENT FINANCIAL AID: Congressman Esteban Torres will provide students with information on Pell Grants, Guaranteed Student Loans and other federal aid programs. Contact: Rep . Esteban Torres, 1740 Longworth HOB, U . S . House of Representatives , Washington , D.C. 20515 (202) 225-5256. UN NUEVO DIA: The Catholic Conference of Illinois has produced a set of 13 fifteen-minute radio programs with inspirational themes in Spanisl1 . the program titles: "Being Hispano, " "The Family," "Dignity of Work, " "Alcoholism," and "Church as a Community." Send a $20 prepaid order to: Ethnic Communications Outlet, 5342 S. Univ ersity Ave., Chicago, Ill . 60615 (312) 667-2626. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in yout search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N .W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p . m . (El) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates : 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch . SIN Television Network seeks eager, oul going writer for public relations department. Must be bilingual Prefer public relations agency and/or copywriting e x perience. Send resum e lo: Marietle Arguimbau. Sl N. 460 W . 42 nd St. , N e w York. N.Y. 10036. STATE PARTY FUNDRAISERS The D e mocra t i c National Commitlee (DNC) will b e hiring fund-raising staff in seve ral states beginning in April. Each fund-raising staff member will be r esponsible for implementing a fund-raising prog ram, w h ic h may include: e improving the quality of a direct mail fund-rais in g p rog ram ( list building) • improving the qual i ty of a phonemail program (list building) e planning and coordination of f und r aising events • development and improvemen t of m embership program • development of large-donor program Fund-ra isi ng and political e xperience veryhelpful. Salaryrange$18-$20.000. APPLICANT MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. Apply to: The Democrati c P a rty Election Force, Polit ica l Division , Democratic National Committee, 430 South Capitol St. SE. Washington. D.C. 20003 (202) 863. The DNC is an equal opportunity employer . lV NEWS production company and members of HAMAS in Los Angeles need news footage on significant national Hispanic news events since start of National Hispanic Heritage W eek for immediate use . Will pay rates . Write o r call Jose Luis (213) 222 8370, ROD Enterpris es, P .O. Box 50472, P asadena, Calif . 911 05. Deadlin e March 15. CAMPAIGN STAFF T he D emocratic National Committee (DNC) will be hiring campaign staff in several states. Each staff member will be responsible for impl e me nting a campaign program, which may include: • hiring and supervisin g a field staff e coordinating canvassing prog r a m • coordinating telephone bank program • coordinating direct m a il program • directing getoutthe-vote program Some campaign or poli tical experience required. Salary range $18-2 0 ,000. APPLICANT MUST BE WILLING TO RE LOCATE. Apply to: The Democratic Party Election Force, Pol itical Division, Democratic National Committee. 430 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C . 20003(20 2)8638076. The DNC is an equal opportunity employer. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST THE NATIONAL Economic Development & Law Center, a non-profit community and economic development support center, seeks fuiHime employee fully bilingual (English/ Spanish) to provide organizational development training and t echnica l assistance to community base d organizations (CBOs). Ap plicant must hav e 3 years practical ex perience working with CBOs on general management and organizational issues including funding strategies; understanding the needs of minority. low income and refugee/immigrant cOmmunities. Ability to write and communicate c l early. E xte n sive trav e l required Salary com mensurate with experience. from $30,000/yr. plus fri ng e benefits. Submit resume postmarked on or before Aoril 1 to: Marsha Brown . NED&LC . 1950 Addison St. , Berkeley. Calif. 94 704. NED&LC is a;:; EOE/AA employer, M/F/H urged t o apply. Calendar Mina King (202) 387-4035 Chicago March 2 -5 THIS WEEK HISPANIC CAREER CONFERENCE Ontario, Calif. Feb . 26 The advisory committee to the LULAC National Educati onal Service Center in Pomona , Calif . , is sponsor ing the 5th annual statewide business career confere nce with workshops and interviews by paling corporations. Steve Garcia (714) 623-0588 BILINGUAL EDUCATION Washington, D.C. Feb . 27 The Hispanic Bar Assoc i ation of the District of Colum bia will empanel experts in bilingual education , inclu ding Ram6n Santiago of the Georgetown Bilingual Education Service Center, to discuss current issues . Elaine Sierra (202) 225-6235 HISPANIC FAMILIES AND YOUTH Tucson, Ariz. Feb . 27, 28 The 3rd annual conference co-sponsored by the Cong reso Nacional de Asuntos Colegiales will examine c hemical and substance abuse . Hispa ni c Link Weekly Report NATIONAL HISPANIC WOMEN'S CONFERENCE Los Angeles Feb . 28 The 1Oth annual conference sponsored by the Mexican-American Opportunity Foundation will discuss opportunities for the professional woman and present its " Woman of the Yea(' award . Mary Cordero (818) 289-2000 E xt. 11 CANDIDATE ENDORSEMENT CONVENTION San Antonio March 1 Sen . Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) will be the keynote speaker at t he Mexican American Democrats of Texas convention to endorse candidates for the state Democratic primary . Rosemary Salinas (512) 882-8284 PUBLIC RELATIONS CONFERENCE Los Angeles March 1 The Hispanic Public Relations Association will host a conference to discuss the relationship between marketing and public relations . Esther Renteria (213) 726-7690 COMING SOON 1ST NATIONAL CONFERENCE National Center on Missing and E xploited Children Jan Stanton (217) 782-6429 ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE Hispanic Institute for Research and Development of Bergen County, N.J. ' West New York, N.J. March 4 Miriam Cuervo (201) 447-9477 VOTING RIGHTS HEARINGS U . S . Civil Rights Commission Washington , D . C . March 5 7 Gail Gerebenics (202) 376-8368 . HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE Americ an Association for Higher Education Hispanic Caucus Washington , D.C. March 12-15 Laura Rend6n (202) 254-6050 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC ELDERLY : The National Council on Aging will co-sponsor a symposium March 21-23 in San F rancisco dealing w ith issues impacting the Hispanic elderly community such as gerontology, community development, data gathering and com munications. For further information contact Rebeca Gilad at NHCA , 2713 Ontario Rd. N . W . , Suite 200, Wa s hington, D . C . 20009 (202) 265 -1288. 3

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Arts & Entertainment honoring all "aid" projects, a clip from Can tare, cantaras was shown. NARAS President C. Michael Greene said he received a letterfrom Medina protesting the exclusion of Cantare, cantaras in this year's Grammy proceedings. In his letter, Medina requested that NARAS give Cantare , cantaras , special consideration outside of the three "Latin" categories. No reply to Medina's letter had been received at press time. THIS WEEK'S CEREMONY TO HONOR the recording industry will reportedly make special mention of the Cant are, cantaras Latin American aid song, although that song is not nominated in any of the three" Latin" music Gram my categories. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences hands out its gramophone-shaped trophies Feb. 25 at a Los Angeles ceremony that will be telecast live by CBS. According to an article published in the Feb . 28 issue of Bam, a California music magazine, "the awards show will honor all the 'Aid' projects." A total of 15 Latin recording acts are nominated this year in the "best Latin pop," "best tropical Latin," and" best Mexican/ American" performance categories. Five other Latino acts are nominated for a total of seven non-Latin categories. (See Jan . 20 Weekly Report.) Cantare, cantaras. a song released last summer by the non-profit Hermanos foundation, qualified for a 1986 Gram my nomination as a recording that hit the market during the eligibility year Oct. 1, 1984 through Sept. 30, 1985. While five out of the 56 performers who contributed to the Hermanos recording are nominated individually in the three "Latin" categories, the song itself was not nominated. At this ceremony a special non-competitive Lifetime Achievement Award will be given by the Academy's National Trustees to Andres Segovia tor"creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recordings." The Spanish guitarist is a 1958 Grammy winner. In a related recording industry item, the Clasica Moderns label releases this week a new album by its Latin rock group Zerimar. The disc, Ritmo Peligroso, will be launched at a Feb. 27 nightclub engagement in North Hollywood, Calif . "What they will probably do, " Hermanos Executive Director Luis Medina told Weekly Report, "is something similar to what was done at the American Music Awards." A last month's ceremony, in a segment Media Report READE RSHIP SURVEY: Hispanic print media have always come in last in the com petition for national advertising dollars . Last year, tor example, Spanish-language television and radio earned about$40 million each from national ads, while Hispanic publi cations picked up somewhere between $8 and $10 million, according to Kirk Whisler, publisher of Caminos magazine and president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications. About 85% of ad revenlle for Latino print media comes from local advertisers, he says . The problem , as Whisler sees it, is one of image. S t udies , commissioned mainly by Spanish broadcast media, have given the impression that Hispanics don't read. To dispel that notion, last summer NAHP conducted a survey of 1,757 readers of 37 Hispanic publications, hoping to prove that national advertisers were missing a bloc of 4 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street N W Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-o737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Report i ng : Dora Delgado, Felix Perez . Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejia&-Rentas . \ No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets a t your nex1 conference or convention . For details, contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. people with lots of money to spend. Now the results are in. They were released Feb. 18 in Los Angeles. Here are some of the key findings : • Survey respondents favored reading over other forms of media . They spent 45% of their weekly media time reading, compared to 29% watching TV and 26% listening to radio. e Their mean household income was higher than that of the overall Hispanic population$22,1 00 annually vs. $18,400. • They owned credit cards at or above the national average. Fifty-three percent held a Visa or MasterCard. • Some of their planned major purchases tor 1986 were: automobiles (41 %), furniture (30%), appliances(28%), videocassette recorders (25%), television sets (20%) and home computers (13%). The survey also provided detailed information -Antonio Mejias-Rentas on the participants' reading preferences, con sumer habits, political tendencies, age , edu cation and other characteristics. Participating publications were mostly Spanish-language or bilingual weekly newspapers. Whisler is currently circulating the 43-page report among national advertising agencies to give them"a realistic picture of the Hispanic readers." To gain a larger share of the national ad dollar, the 75-member NAHP has picked up Entrada of New York to serve as its ad representative. In 1985, there were approximately 500 Hispanic newspapers, magazines and journals in the United States . With NAHPs new initiatives, Whisler hopes to increase Hispanic print media's national ad revenues by 50% this year-an ambitious projection but, he insists, "peanuts" compared to what Hispanic radio and television are getting. AWARDS: Yolanda Alvarado, Lansing, Mich. , State Journal reporter, won the 1986 Guild Service Award from the International Organi zation of Newspaper Unions for her work in revitalizing the local newspaper guild ... Nancy Montoya and KGUN-TV, Tucson, won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University broa<} cast journalism award for outstanding reporting at its 14th annual presentation in New York this month. Dora Delgado Valenzuela Paid Most Fernando Valenzuela, 25, the five-year veteran left-hander with the Los Angeles Dodgers, became the highest-paid pitcher in major league history Feb. 15, signing a three-year contract worth $5.5 million. The Sonora, Mexico, native also became the first pitcher to sign a contract that pays over $2 million for one year ('86 $1.6 million; '87 -$1.85 million; '88 $2.05 million). Valenzuela's contract surpasses the $1.8 million-a-year contract signed by Rick Sutcliffe of the Chicago Cubs last year. An immensely popular figure with Los Angeles' large Hispanic community, Valenzuela's record in the majors is 78 wins, 57 losses. Hispanic Link Weekly Report