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Hispanic link weekly report, March 3, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 3, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
United Farm Workers President C6sar Chdvez unveils a new campaign to counter growers’ advertising which portrays fresh grapes as a natural snack Feb. 26 at the Maryland State House in Annapolis. Ch&vez also testifies on a resolution to endorse the boycott by the Maryland General Assembly.. . Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n serves as honorary chairman at a celebration in New York March 6 marking the 26th anniversary of the Puerto Rican Family Institute, a non-profit service agency “working to preserve and strengthen Puerto Rican and other Hispanic families in New York and Puerto Rico” ... A federal grand jury in San Juan, P.R., finds former police undercover agent Aleiandro Gonz&lez Malav6 not guilty by a 9 to 3 vote on a kidnaping charge related to the 1978
Cerro Maravilla case. Malave and two reputed terrclls&bomi’ifaiideered a taxi to the Ponce summit where the sabotage of a commercial television relay tower resulted in the deaths pi jW® twojrrfjQg^rs of the Armed Revolutionary Movement... SanfaTei N.lOl., Banquest-First National Bank sues former governor and current President of University of New Mexico Board of Regents Jerry Apodaca and his family claiming overdue debts of almost $100,000. Apodaca defaulted in January on a $609,000 loan for a health spa.. Nelson Grillo and Daniel Flores are sworn in as the first Latino Inspectors with the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department following promotions from field captains... Former assistant state director of the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service in Sacramento, Calif., Charles Martinez, is named VETS director... The California Senate Rules Committee names Gilbert Contreras, a San Diego businessman and developer, to the California Costal Commission...
HISPANIC LINI^WEEKLY^REPORT
Latino Fortune500 Corporate Council Launched
A network of Hispanic executives representing Fortune 500 companies was formally launched Feb 26 in Arlington, Va, with a declared goal to “encourage corporations into developing partnerships with Hispanics at all levels within the corporate hierarchy.”
The National Hispanic Corporate Council, which began forming in July 1985 and includes 12 Hispanics from major corporations, will be based in Phoenix, Ariz., and headed by Olga
NHCC Founding Board
Olga Aros (Pres.), Gannett Co., Inc.
Charles Barajas (1 st VP), Southland Corp. Rita Di Martino (2nd VP), AT&T Charles Shoumaker (financial officer), Circle K. Corp.
Patricia Asip (operations officer), J.C. Penney
Jesse Aguirre, Anheuser-Busch Cos. Richard Amundsen, Coca-Cola USA Jaime Ramirez, The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States.
Jose Ruano, Miller Brewing Co.
David Rubio, McDonald's Corp.
Alex Vdsquez, Allstate Insurance Co. Albert Zapanta, Atlantic-Richfield Co.
First Colombian LULAC
Oscar Mor4n, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, inaugurated LULACs first Colombian American council in Miami Feb. 8.
“We are becoming what our founding fathers intended to form, that is: a group of united Latin American citizens, as our name says,” Mor£n told Weekly Report.
The organization is “about 67% Mexican American,” according to Moran, but it has approximately six East Coast councils that are Puerto Rican and Cuban American run. “We are seeing more Ecuadorans, Dominicans and Bolivians entering the organization as well,” he added.
Presided over by businessman Fernando Cerrato, the new council will try to bring national attention to the concerns of U.S. Colombians, Mor&n said.
Aros, regional marketing manager with USA TODAY and liaison with the Hispanic community for the Gannett Co. Inc.
The council, Aros said, will provide information to corporations to enable them to make more decisions and commitments and broaden their involvement with Hispanics That involvement has been limited to philanthropy, affirmative action and high-visibility community relations, she noted, adding that it needs to be broadened to include investments, finance, sales* marketing and procurement.
“We want to provide corporations with information and data that is reliable,” Aros explained. “We will offer approaches and techniques that have worked with the Hispanic community to enable corporations to balance their business responsibilities with social responsibilities across the board.”
The council is presently relying on volunteers for staff. It has no funding support for staff as
Eight Challenge Polanco
Richard Polanco, erstwhile aide to former California Assemblyman Richard Alatorre, is being challenged for that state’s vacated 55th Assembly District seat by bond agent Mike Hernandez. Seven other candidates met the Feb 24 filing deadline.
The seat was held by Alatorre for 13 years until his election to the Los Angeles City Council last December. The winner will hold the seat for the remainder of Alatorre’s term, which expires this year.
Although considered by many to be the frontrunner, Polanco faces in Hernandez an opponent who has received important endorsements and has proven, fund-raising capability. U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Assemblywoman Gloria Molina (D-Los Angeles) have publicly endorsed Hernandez.
Polanco has received the public endorsement of Alatorre, state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) and Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley.
The special primary election will be held April 8. The only other Hispanic candidate among the remaining seven is retired Los Angeles county employee Gonzalo Molina
A June runoff will be held if no one receives a majority of the vote.
yet, although it will be seeking it. Corporations pay $500 yearly membership dues.
A major concern voiced by Hispanics across the country, Aros said, is that they lack information on how to gain access to corporate America and often do not know whom to contact within corporations The council, she added, will attempt to fill those voids Tonv Bonilla, Corpus Christi attorney who chairs the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, is one of several Hispanic organizational leaders who expressed strong support for such a group.
Bonilla, recent past president of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), pointed out that the founding member-corpo-
continued on page 2
Campbells, FLOC Sign
A union of predominantly Hispanic farm workers, their employers and the Campbell Soup Co. signed the country’s first three-party labor contract Feb. 19. It ended a seven-year boycott against the food processor.
Negotiated over a five-month period, the agreement calls for wage increases and improved housing, working and health care conditions for about 600 workers in 16 tomato farms in Ohio and 12 cucumber farms in Michigan.
The workers* unionized under the Toledo-based Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) in Ohio, pushed Campbell’s entry into the negotiations with a boycott started in 1979 against the company and its lending institutions.
A three-year agreement with tomato pickers increases wages - previously in a $2.95 to $3.35 scale - to $4.50 an hour. Pay scales for cucumber pickers are still being worked out.
FLOC leaders said they are going to use the farm labor contract, the first outside of California, to unionize workers in farms contracted by other food processing companies. Workers from 71 cucumber farms contracted by Campbell will hold elections in the summer to decide if they want to be represented by the union.


Sin pelos en la lengua
WHERE-OH-WHERE? It might be an overstatement to call it a purge. Maybe U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett just can’t find any Hispanic educators who meet his personal standards.
But where-oh-where have all of the Latinos gone in the one federal department which once considered them such critical assets?
In the Carter years, there were half a dozen Latinos serving at the supergrade Senior Executive Service level in the department.
Today there are none.
In the Carter years, there were 11 at the top regular civil service (GS-15) level spread throughout the department.
Today there are four. Two are in bilingual education and another one is in limbo.
The department’s Office of Civil Rights used to have three Hispanic regional directors. Among OCR’s 200 employees today, our sources can’t think of more than one Hispanic at any level.
The Office of Hispanic Concerns has been emptied.
And the department's migrant education division - which serves a 75% Hispanic clientele (and from Day One had a Hispanic director) -
is about to get its first non-Latino chief now that Vidal Rivera has been cast aside.
AND WHERE ELSE? In New York City more than a dozen Puerto Rican organizations joined to stage a press conference on the steps of City Hall Feb. 26 protesting Mayor Ed Koch’s“failure to appoint a Latino to the Board of Education and his public statements implying that there are no Latinos qualified to sit on this body.”
The nation’s largest public school district is one-third Latino.
In the last couple of months, Koch named two non-minority males to serve as his representatives on the seven-member board.
AND ELSEWHERE: Miami is still rebounding from the Marine Stadium appearance of Phil Donahue, where he staged his nationally televised shouting match on “official English’ before 4,000 spectator-participants last month.
“People went crazy,” state Rep. Arnhilda Gonzalez Quevedo described it
Arnoldo Torres, who absorbed many of the anti-bilingualism proponents’ barbs as a participant, had the prize reaction.
Torres, the former LULAC executive director now working as an independent consultant, assessed it: “I enjoy this audience. It’s a solid, vicious audience.” -Kay B&rbaro
PACs Woo Caucus, Too
Six of the 11 voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus- all expected to seek re-election this year - received more than 40% of theircampaign contributions from Political Action Committees in 1985, a Feb. 14 report by Common Cause showed.
Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) received the largest amount of PAC money - $162,865 or 45% of his total contributions. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas) received no PAC money in 1985. He had $34,700 in campaign contributions.
The report on 399 representatives expected to seek re-election was taken from Federal Election Commission figures. It found that Hispanic congressmen spent an average of $51,604 in 1985 compared to $64,852 spent by non-Hispanics.
PAC contributions to the other nine in 1985 were: E,“Kika” de la Garza(D-Texas) $71,850 ($96,810 total contributions); Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) $45,187 ($71,091); Manuel Lujan (R-N.M.) $38,200 ($82,448); Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) $33,250 ($151,768); Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas) $30,300 ($85,631); Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) $29,250 ($119,745); Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) $23,950 ($79,607); Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) $14,950 ($22,170); Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) $3,550 ($24,327).
Hispanic Fortune 500 is Launched
continued from page 1 rations of the council have served as major voices for the H ispanic community within the corporate world for many years But, he added, the number of Hispanics in decision-making positions in major U.S. corporations is still so small that “it’s a national disgrace.”
' While companies such as Southland, Miller
Latino Prison AIDS High
Hispanics represent 48% of the AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) cases in the New York state adult penal system despite comprising just 14% of the nation’s AIDS cases overall, according to preliminary findings of a study to be released later this month.
Titled “AIDS in Correctional Facilities: Issues and Options," the study finds that 75% of state and 72% of county/city AIDS cases in such institutions are concentrated in Mid-Atlantic states (New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). Ninety-five percent of the cases in the New York correctional system are intravenous drug abusers as opposed to.the other high-risk group - homosexuals.
The monograph attributes the anomalous high incidence among Hispanic convicts to their over-representation among intravenous abusers.
Correctional AIDS cases numbered 765.
Billions Spent on Cars and Trucks
Hispanics spent $1.9 billion on 1984 cars and trucks in 19 markets containing 60% of the Latino population, a study commissioned by the SIN Television Network revealed.
An independent projection by SIN found that overall, Hispanics could have spent $3.1 billion on 1984 vehicles. SIN projected the number of vehicles sold to Hispanics in the survey’s markets-166,839 - and the average
Broadcasters Elect Reyes
Jose Reyes was elected president of the Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters Feb 4 at the group's annual convention in Washington, D.C. HNRBhas50members.
unit price - $11,000 - to the total Hispanic population.
Amanda Eastman, a spokeperson for SIN, said that the study's findings disputed the perception that Hispanics do not buy expensive cars. Of 1,064 BMWs sold in the Miami region, she said that 15.9% or 170 were bought by Hispanics; of 1,164 Mercedes Benz cars, 11.3% or 132 were bought by Hispanics
The study, conducted by R.L. Polk& Co. and released last month, was done by comparing state lists of new vehicle registrants with lists of persons of Spanish surname. It included 19 cities in the states of Florida, Texas, Illinois, Arizona and California
and Coca-Cola were cited by Bonilla as examples of those working positively with the Hispanic community, most others have poor records, he said.
“Johnson & Johnson,” he cited, “sells baby foods and diapers. With Hispanics having such a high birthrate and their putting all of those diapers on little brown butts, you’d think they would put a brown butt on their board.”
Angel L6pez, immediate past chairman of SER-Jobs for Progress, said he sees the formation of the council as an essential step to help Hispanics gain access to corporate America. L6pez, an executive with Sears, noted that while SER received contributions from 60 Fortune 500 companies, “440 is a long way to go. Twelve of 500 is even further.”
At its first board meeting of the year, also held Feb. 26, the NHCC board decided that each member would be responsible initially for contacting 24 additional Fortune 500 companies to encourage their participation. The council hopes to reach a membership of 75 by mid-July. _ Carlos Morales
Latinos Lack FIU Posts
Hispanics and other minorities are underrepresented in administrative and faculty positions at Miami's Florida International University due to discriminatory hiring and promotion procedures, a special commission report showed.
The six-member Commission on Minority Participation found that despite “moderate” increases in minority representation, Hispanics, blacks and women are predominantly found in the “lower echelons” of the university administration.
The Feb. 13 report presented to state universities Chancellor Charles Reed noted a drop in Hispanic faculty from 12.1 % in 1980 to 11.7% in 1985. Conversely, Hispanic representation in service and maintenance positions grew from 39.2% in 1980 to 54.5% in 1985.
Hispanics are 43% of undergraduate students at the university, 26% of graduate students.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
i
FORTUN E 500‘- For information on corporate memberships to the new National Hispanic Corporate Council (NHCC), contact Charles Barajas, Southland Corp., 2828 N. Haskell Ave., Box 719, Dallas, Texas 75221 (214) 828-7011, or Olga Aros, USA TODAY, 411 N. Roosevelt Ave., Chandler, Ariz. 85224 (602) 961-6015.
AIDS IN U.S. PRISONS: The National Institute of Justice will publish a report in early April examining the incidence of AIDS in U.S. correctional institutions. For a free copy write to NIJ, 1600 Research Ave., Rockville, Md. 20850 (301) 251-5500. (Specify inventory no. DD100126.)
HISPANICS AT FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY: A member of the Commission on Minority Participation that examined Hispanic and minority faculty and administration employment will provide copies of the report on a cost basis. Contact: Dr. Willie Williams, Dept, of Mathematical Sciences* Florida International University, Tamiami Campus, Miami, Fla 33199 (305) 554-2029.
HISPAN 1C CAR MARKET: The SIN-TV network issued a report on the numbers and percentages of 1984 cars and trucks sold to Hispanics“hTT9 markets. For a free copy, write to: SIN, 460 West 42nd St., New York. N.Y. 10036 (212) 502-1300.
PAC CONTRIBUTIONS: A 33-page report examines the amount of monies given by Political Action Committees to members of Congress seeking re-election in 1986. Figures for H ispanic congressmen included in the appendix. For free copies write to: Common Cause, Press Office, 2030 M St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20036 (202) 833-1200.
ART CONTEST: A contest of paintings, engravings, drawings and collages is open to Puerto Rican high school students in the 50 states and Puerto Rico. Deadline for works, which should not exceed 30 X 30 inches in size, is May 14. Send entries to: Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster, 1428 Longworth HOB, Washington, D.C. 20515(202)225-2615.
FINANCIAL AID: New booklets to help students finance their education are available in the areas of allied, health, business, education, engineering, law, mass communications, medicine and science. Each of eight 50 to 60-page brochures offer information on employment outlook, minority employment and available financial aid. Price: $3 per booklet; $20 for set of eight; $35 for two sets; $1.75 each in orders of 100 or more. Orderfrom: Garrett Park Press, Garrett Park, Md. 20896 (301) 946-2553.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
INPATIENT TEAM LEADER Grand Rapids, Michigan This is a professional position responsible for the coordination of services to Community Mental Health clients in the Kent Oaks Psychiatric Unit of Kent Community Hospital Salary $25,459-$33,654. Qualifications: Ph.D. in psychology and possession of Limited License from State of Michigan. One year's experience post graduate (master’s degree or highei) within a residential multi-disciplinary treatment team All applications for county employment must be made on a county application form Contact Kent County Personnel Department County Administration :
Bldg., Room 205, 300 Monroe NW, Grand Rapids, Mich. 49503 (616) 774-3513.
SIN Television Network seeks eager, outgoing writer for public relations department.
Must be bilinguaL Prefer public relations agency anchor copywriting experience. Send resume to: MarietteArguimbau, SIN,460 W.42ndSt.,
New York, N.Y. 10036.
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
THE NATIONAL Economic Development i & Law Center, a non-profit community and j economic development support center, seeks j full-time employee fully bilingual (English/
Spanish) to provide organizational development training and technical assistance to community-based organizations (CBOs).
Applicant must have 3 years practical experience working with CBOs on general management and organizational issues including funding strategies; understanding the needs of minority, low income and refugee/immigrant communities. Ability to write and communicate M
clearly. Extensive travel required Salary com- ™ NEWS production company and members mensurate with experience, from $30,000/yr. °f HAMAS in Los Angeles need news footage plus fringe benefits. on significant national Hispanic news events
Submit resume postmarked on or before since start of National Hispanic Heritage April 1 to: Marsha Brown, NED&LC, 1950 Week for immediate use. Will pay going rates. Addison St., Berkeley, Calif. 94704. Write or call Jos6 Luis Cedefto (213) 222-
NED&LC is an EOE/AA employer, M/F/H 8370, ROD Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, urged to apply. , Pasadena, Calif. 91105. Deadline March 15.
NEW YORK STATE Department of Transportation
THE NEW YORK STATE Department of Transportation is presently preparing a list of consultants who possess management administrative and advisory capabilities to receive RFPs for administration of a D/WBE supportive services program. The RFP will describe the specific objectives of the program. Briefly, these objectives include:
1. Review and coordinate with existing D/WBE associations with the goal of maximizing their effectiveness in advising constituents of business opportunities with NYSDOT;
2. Prepare a guidebook for distribution to D/WBEs addressing NYSDOT procedures and opportunities, financing, bonding and insurance, marketing and estimating, record keeping and management;
3. Design and administer a construction management training program for the principles of D/WBE firms involved in transportation related construction;
4. Coordinate with the supportive services consultants currently under contract with NYSDOT who provide individualized assistance to NYSDOT certified D/WBEs.
The RFP will further detail these objectives and describe the criteria by which proposals will be evaluated. Letters of interest must be submitted by March 14 and addressed as follows: Supportive Services Manager, NYSDOT 7 TAAPO, 1220 Washington, Ave., Albany, N.Y. 12232.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE West New York, N.J. March 4 The Hispanic Institute for Research and Development of Bergen County, N.J., will co-sponsor the conference covering government financing, exporting and opportunities abroad.
Miriam Cuervo (201) 447-9477
MINORITY WOMEN AND DISCRIMINATION Los Angeles March 7
Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Grace Montahez Davis will keynote the 2nd conference by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations titled "Race and Sex Discrimination in the Labor Market Minority Women at Work”
Reva Trevifto (213) 974-7626
TEJANO MUSIC AWARDS San Antonio March 9 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Laura Martfnez-Herring, Miss USA, will preside over the 6th annual ceremony to recognize Hispanic vocalists, songwriters and musicians in that state. Rudy Trevifto (512) 223-4721
NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES
Washington, D.C. March 8-11 President Henry Cisneros presides over NLCs annual legislative session, which includes regular meetings of its Hispanic caucus.
Ruth Santana (202) 626-3115
COMING SOON
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AWARD DINNER National Puerto Rican Forum New York March 11 Marta Garda (212) 685-2311
HISPANIC BUSINESS MARKET
New York Chamber of Commerce and Industry
New York March 12
Herminia Ramos-Donovan (212) 561-2023 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HISPANIC
CULTURE
Interdisciplinary Centerfor North-American Research,
University of Paris
Paris March 12-14
Juan Novoa (512) 736-7526
YOUNG REPUBLICAN LEADERSHIPCONFERENCE Young Republican National Federation Washington, D.C. March 13-16 Oscar Guarderas (202) 543-1771
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
American Association for Affirmative Action
Atlanta March 12-16
Judy Burnison (312) 329-2512
NATIONALCHICANOSTUDENT CONFERENCE Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan Berkeley, Calif. March 15 Gisela Macedo (415) 642-6673
GRAPE BOYCOTT FUND-RAISER United Farm Workers New York March 21 Ed Sanchez (212) 642-6673
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Arts & Entertainment
FOUR LATINOS WALKED AWAY WITH Grammys at the Feb. 25 awards ceremony in Los Angeles, with one of the three “Latin" music categories going to a non-Hispanic singer.
Linda Ronstadt was the only Hispanic performer honored by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences outside of the “Latin” categories. Ronstadt1 s album Lush Life won Grammys in two categories: “Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal” (by Nelson Riddle) and “Best Album Package” (by art directors Kosh and Ron Larson).
Ronstadt was also nominated in the “Best Pop Vocal Performance - Female” category. That award went to Whitney Houston.
Only one of the three “Latin” categories was presented in the live telecast carried by CBS. “Best Mexican American Performance” Grammy went to Vikki Carr for her Simplemente mujer album. The “Best Tropical Latin Performance” award was shared by Tito Puente and his Latin Ensemble (for their Mambo Diablo album) with Eddie Palmieri (Solito).
At the live ceremony, singer Rub6n Blades and A&M Records owner Herb Alpert came out to read the third “Latin” winner. Honored for “Best Latin Pop Performance” was Alperfs wife, Lani Hall, for her
single Es facil amar.
Nominated Latinos in other categories were Dave Valentin for “Best R&B Instrumental Performance” (won by Ernie Watts); Tania Maria for“Best Jazz Solo Performance- Female” (Cleo Lane); Cheech Marin for “Best Comedy Recording (Whoopi Goldberg); and Placido Domingo and Pilar Lorengar for “Best Classical Soloist Performance? (John Aler).
THE NATION’S TWO FILM AND TELEVISION ACTORS’ unions will join forces this week at a conference to discuss the industry’s portrayal and employment of Hispanics and other minorities.
Equal employment opportunity committee chairs from the various branches of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists are expected to participate in the conference to be held March 7-9 in Los Angeles.
Both SAG and AFTRA have language in their contracts calling for producers to accurately “depict the American scene” by employing actors from Asian Pacific, black Latino and Native American groups.
According to Rodney Mitchell, SAG’s affirmative action administrator, Hispanics in the industry have “suffered from historic underemployment and stereotypecasting.”
Mitchell told Weekly Report that this week’s conference could propose issues to be brought up for negotiation this summer when union contracts expire.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HOW TO HIRE: The half-million-dollar, five-year commitment by the American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation to integrate all departments of the nation’s daily press is showing tangible progress this month.
The foundation, which announced the project in November, has recruited a full-time director, Terri Dickerson-Jones, who was a program manager for a Washington, D.C. -based women’s foundation.
Its planned 40-plus-page publication, “Recruiting and Retaining Newspaper Minority Employees: How To Do It,” is due off the presses by the end of the month.
The manual for newspaper executives will be distributed to ANPA members. It is also available to other interested parties for $5. Request it from the ANPA Foundation, Box 17407, Washington Dulles International Airport,
Washington, D.C. 20041.
The body’s Task Force on Minorities in the Media held its second annual meeting Jan. 30, 31 at a Dulles Airport hotel. Some 50 representatives of national newspaper organizations - advertising, circulation, editorial, promotion, carriers, eta - participated. Covering Latino interests were representatives from the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C.
Frank Quine, director of the American Press Institute, announced plans to hold a seminar on minority hiring May 18,19 in Reston, Va. It will include senior executives from some of the nation’s largest dailies.
HAPPY BIRTHDAYS: It’s anniversary time for some major Hispanic media:
El Miami Herald will celebrate its 10th anniversary with a record-sized edition and press run on Sunday, March 26. It plans to print an extra 100,000 copies, including a special section offering a 10-year retrospective
on Latin Miami.
El Herald started with a daily circulation of 18,700. Now if s 76,000.
It was 10 years ago also that Fresno’s KSJV radio bilingiie became a gleam in its founders’ collective eye. It’s planning a 10th anniversary celebration for J uly 4, the date in 1980 it finally went on the air.
Preceding it were other California bilingual stations KBBF of Santa Rosa (1973) and KUBO of Salinas (1979).
KSJVs Noticiero Latino, the daily Spanish-language news service now offered nationally within the public broadcasting system, celebrated its first anniversary March 1.
Last month, San Diego’s bilingual weekly, La Prensa San Diego, had its 10th birthday party.
And this month, Oklahoma City’s La Voz newspaper, published sporadically since 1976 by the Oklahoma Hispanic Cultural Center, locks into a monthly bilingual format.
- Charlie Ericksen and Carlos Morales
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher HSctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, FSIIx Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced , or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact HSctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
HLNS/Hector Ericksen-Mendoza
NATIONAL HISPANIC CORPORATE COUNCIL: Seated members, left to right are: Rita Di Martino, Charles Barajas, Olga Aros, Charles Shoumaker and Patricia Asip. Standing, left to right Jaime Ramirez, Alex Vdsquez, Jesse Aguirre, Albert Zapanta, Richard Amundsen, Jose Ruano and David Rubio.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Cerro Maravilla case. Malave and two reputed terr J 1 a dee red a taxi to the Ponce summit where the sabotage of a commercial television relay tower resulted in the deaths of the Armed Revolutionary Movement. . . N . M . , Banquest First National Bank sues former governor and current President of University of New Mexico Board of Regents Jerry Apodaca and his family claiming overdue debts of almost $100,000 . Apodaca defaulted in January on a $609,000 loan for a health spa ... Nelson Grillo and Daniel Flores are sworn in as the first Latino Inspectors with the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department following promotions from field captains . . . Former assistant state director of the Veterans' Employment and Training Service in Sacramento, Calif., Charles Martinez, is named VETS director ... The California Senate Rules Committee names Gilbert Contreras, a San Diego businessman and developer, to the California Costal Commission ... United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez unveils a new campaign to counter growers' advertising which portrays fresh grapes as a natural snack Feb. 26 at the Maryland State House in Annapolis. Chavez also testifies on a resolution to endorse the boycott by the Maryland General Assembly. . . Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n serves as honorary chairman at a celebration in New York March 6 marking the 25th anniversary of the Puerto Rican Family Institute, a non-profit service agency "working to preserve and strengthen Puerto Rican and other Hispanic families in New York and Puerto Rico" ... A federal grand jury in San Juan, P.R., finds former police undercover agent Alejandro Gonzalez Malave not guilty by a 9 to 3 vote on a kidnaping charge ted to the 1978 Voi.•No.OI HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Ma•ch3, 1986 Latino Fortune 500 Corporate Counci-l Launched A network of Hispanic executives repre senting Fortune 500 companies was formally launched Feb. 26 in Arlington, with a declared goal to "encourage corporations into developing partnerships with Hispanics at all levels within the corporate hierarchy." The National Hispanic Corporate Council, which began forming in July 1985 and includes 12 Hispanics from major corporations, will be based in Phoenix, Ariz . , and headed by Olga NHCC Founding Board Olga Aros (Pres.), Gannett Co., Inc. Charles Barajas (1st VP), Southland Corp. Rita Di Martino (2nd VP), AT&T Charles Shoumaker(financial officer), Circle K Corp . Patricia Asip (operations officer), J.C. Penney Jesse Aguirre, Anheuser-Busch Cos. Richard Amundsen, Coca-Cola USA Jaime Ramirez, The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. Jose Ruano, Miller Brewing Co. David Rubio, McDonald's Corp. Alex Vasquez, Allstate Insurance Co. Albert Zapanta, Atlantic-Richfield Co . First Colombian LULAC Oscar Moran, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, inaugurated LULAC's first Colombian American council in Miami Feb. 8. "We are becoming what our founding fathers intended to form, that is: a group of united Latin American citizens, as our name says," Moran told Weekly Report. The organization is "about 67% Mexican American," according to Moran, but it has approximately six East Coast councils that are Puerto Rican and Cuban American run. "We are seeing more Ecuadorans, Dominicans and Bolivians entering the organization as well," he added. Presided over by businessman Fernando Cerrato, the new council will try to bring national attention to the concerns of U.S. Colombians, Moran said. Aros, regional marketing manager with USA TODAY and liaison with the Hispanic community for the Gannett Co . Inc . The council, Aros said, will provide information to corporations to enable them to make more decisions and commitments and broaden their involvement with Hispanics. That involve ment has been limited to philanthropy, affirma tive action and high-visibility community relations, she noted, adding that it needs to be broadened to include investments, finance, sales, marketing and procurement. "We want to provide corporations with infor mation and data that is reliable," Arosexplained "We will offer approaches and techniques that have worked with the Hispanic community to enable corporations to balance their business responsibilities with social responsibilities across the board." The council is presently relying on volunteers for staff. It has no funding support for staff as Eight Challenge Polanco Richard Polanco, erstwhile aide to former California Assemblyman Richard Alatorre, is being challenged for that state's vacated 55th Assembly District seat by bond agent Mike Hernandez . Seven other candidates met the Feb. 24 filing deadline. The seat was held by Alatorre for 13 years until his election to the Los Angeles City Council last December. The winner will hold the seat for the remainder of Alatorre's term, which expires this year. Although considered by many to be the frontrunner, Polanco faces in Hernandez an opponent who has received important endorsements and has proven . fund-raising capability. U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Assemblywoman Gloria Molina (D-Los Angeles) have publicly endorsed Hernandez. Polanco has received the public endorsement of Alatorre, state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) and Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley. The special primary election will be held April 8 . The only other Hispanic candidate among the remaining seven is retired Los Angeles county employee Gonzalo Molina A June runoff willbe held if no one receives a majority of the vote. yet , although it will be seeking it. Corpora tions pay $500 yearly membership dues. A major concern voiced by Hispanics across the country, Aros said , is that they lack infor mation on how to gain access to corporate America and often do not know whom to contact within corporations. The council, she added, will attempt to fill those voids. Tonv Bonilla, Corpus Christi attorney who chairs the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, i s one of several Hispanic organi zational leaders who expressed strong support for such a group . Bonilla, recent past president of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), pointed out that the founding member-corpocontinued on page 2 Campbells, FLOC Sign A union of predominantly Hispanic farm workers , their employers and the Campbell Soup Co. signed the country's first three party labor contract Feb . 19. It ended a seven-year boycott against the food processor. Negotiated over a five-month period, the agreement calls for wage increases and improved housing, working and health care conditions for about 600 workers in 16 tomato farms in Ohio and 12 cucumber farms in Michigan. The workers, unionized under the Toledo based Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) in Ohio, pushed Campbell ' s entry into the negotiations with a boycott started in 1979 against the company and its lending institutions. A three-year agreement with tomato pickers increases wages-pr.eviously in a $2.95 to $3.35 scale-tc, $4.50 an hour. Pay scales for cucumber pickers are still being worked out. FLOC leaders said they are going to use the farm labor contract, the first outside of California , to unionize workers in farms contracted by other food processing com panies . Workers from 71 cucumber farms contracted by Campbell will hold elections in the summer to decide if they want to be represented by the union .

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua is about to get its first non-Latino chief now that VIdal Rivera has been cast aside. WHERE-OH-WHERE? It might be an overstatement to call it a purge. May be U .S. Secretary of Education William Bennett just can't find any Hispani c e ducators who meet his personal standards. But whereo h-w here have all of the Latinos gone in the one federal department w hich once considered them such critical assets? AND WHERE ELSE? In New York City more than a dozen Puerto Rican organ i zations joined to stage a press conference on the steps of City Hall Feb. 26 protesting Mayor Ed Koch's "failure to appo int a Latino to the Board of Education and his public statements implying that there are no Latinos qualified to sit on this body." The nation ' s largest public school district is one-third Lat ino. In the Carter y ears, t h ere were half a dozen Latinos serving at the supergrade Sen io r E xecutive Service level in the department. In the last couple of months, Koch named two non-minority males to serve as his representatives on the seven-member board . Today there are non e . In the Carter years, t h ere were 11 at the top regular civil service (G&15) level spre ad throughout the department. Today there ar e four. Two are in bilingual education and another one is in limbo. AND ELSEWHERE: Miami is still rebounding from the Marine Stadium appearance of Phil Donahue, where he staged his nationally . televised shouting match on "official English " before 4 ,000 spectator participants last month. The departme n t' s O ffic e of Civil Rights used to have three Hispanic regional directors. A mong OCR's 200 employees today, our sources can't think of more t han one Hispanic at any level. "People went crazy," state Rep . Arnhllda Gonzalez Quevedo described it. Arnoldo Torres, who absorbed many of the anti-bil i ngualism proponents ' barbs as a participant, had the prize reaction. The Office of His panic Concerns has been emptied. And the departme nt's mig r ant education division-which serves a 75% Hispan i c cl ientele (and from Day One had a Hispanic director). Torres, the former LULAC executive director now working as an independent consultant, assessed it: " I enjoy this aud i ence . It's a solid , vicious audience. " -Kay Barbaro PACs Woo C aucus, Too Hispanic Fortune 500 is Launched Six o f the 11 vot ing members of the Congressiona l Hisp anic C aucus all expected to seek re-election th is yea r received more than 40% of their ca mpaign contribut i ons from Political Act i on C ommittees in 1985, a Feb. 14 report by Com mon Cause showed. Rep . Tony Coe lho (DCalif . ) received t he largest amount of PAC money-$162,865 or 45% of his total contri but ions. Rep . Henry B . Gonzalez (DTexas ) received no PAC money in 1985. He h a d $ 34 , 700 in campaign contributions. The report on 39 9 representatives expected to seek re-el ection wa s t aken from Federal Electi on Commiss i on f i gures. It found that Hispanic con gres smen spent an average of $51 ,604 i n 1985 compared to $64,852 spent by non-Hi s pan ics. PAC contributi o n s t o t he other nine in 1985 were: E "Kika " de Ia Garza(D Texas) $71 ,850 ($96,81 0 to t al contr ibutions) ; Bill Richardson (D-N . M.) $45,187 ($71,091); Manuel L u jan (R-N.M. ) $ 3 8 ,200 ($82,448); Albert Bu stamante (DTexas) $33,250 ($151 ,76 8); Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas) $30,300 ($85,631 ) ; R o b ert Ga rc ia (D-N .Y.) $29,250 ($11 9,7 45 ) ; Est eban T orres ( D-Calif.) $23,950 ($79,607); M a tthew M art inez ( D-CalifJ $14 , 950 ($22,170); E d w a r d Roybal (D-Calif.) $3,550 ( $24,327). cont i nued from page 1 rations of the council have served as major voices for the Hispanic community within the corporate world for many years. But, he added , the number of Hispan i cs in decision-mak i ng positions in major U.S. corporations is still so small that "it's a national disgrace." While companies such as Southland , Miller Latino Prison AIDS High Hispanics represent 48% of the AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) cases in the New York state adult penal system desp i te comprising just 14% of the nation ' s AIDS cases overall, according to preliminary findings of a study to be released later th i s month . Titled"AIDS in Co r rectional Facilities: Issues and Options," the study finds that 75% of state and 72% of county/city AIDS cases i n such institutions are concentrated in Mid Atlantic states (New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania) . Ninety-five percent of the cases in the New York correctional system are intravenous drug abusers as opposed to . the other h i gh-risk group-homosexuals . The monograph attributes tiJe anomalous h i gh incidence among Hispanic convicts to their over-representation among i ntravenous abusers. Correctional AIDS cases numbered 765. Billions Spent on Cars and Trucks Hispanics spent $1. 9 billion on 1984 cars unit price$11,000to the total Hispanic a nd trucks in 19 m a rk ets containing 60% of population . the Latin o popu l at io n , a study commissioned Amanda Eastman, a spokeperson for SIN , b y the SIN Te le visi on Ne t work r evealed. said that the study's f i ndings disputed the A n indepen den t projection by Sl N found / perception that Hispanics do not buy expensive t h at over all , Hisp a nics c ould have spent$3.1 cars. Of 1 ,064 BMWssold in the Miami region, b i l lio n on 1984 vehicles. Sl N projected the ; she said that 15.9% or 170 were bought by numb e r o f vehi c le s s old to Hispanics in the Hispanics ; of 1,164 Mercedes Benz cars, surve y's m a r kets-166 ,839-and the average 11.3% or 132 were bought by Hispanics. Broadcasters Elect Reyes Jose Re y es w as elected president of the Hi s pani c N atio nal Religious Broadcasters Feb. 4 at t he g roups annual convent ion in Washington, D . C . HNRBhas50members. 2 The study, conducted by R.L. Polk& Co. and released last month, was done by comparing state lists of new vehicle registrants with lists of persons of Spanish surname . It included 19 cities in the states of Florida, Texas, Illinois, Arizona and California and Coca-Cola were cited by Bonilla as examples of those working positively with the Hispan i c community, most others have poor records, he sa i d . " Johnson & Johnson , " he cited, " sells baby foods and diapers . With Hispanics having such a high birthrate and their putting all of those diapers on little brown butts , you ' d think they would put a brown butt on their board." Angel Lopez, immediate past chair m an of SER-Jobs for Progress , said he sees the formation of the council as an essential step to help H i spanics gain access to corporate America . Lopez , an executive with Sears, noted that while SEA rece i ved contributions from 60 Fortune 500 companies , "440 is a long way to go. Twelve of 500 is even furt her . " At its first board meeting of the year , also held Feb . 26, the NHCC board dec i ded that each member would be respons i ble initially for contacting 24 additional Fortune 500 companies to encourage their participation . The council hopes to reach a membership of 75 by mid-July. -Carlos Morales Latinos Lack FlU Posts Hispanics and other minorities are under represented in administ r ative and f acu lty positions at Miamrs Florida lnternationaf University due to discriminatory hiring and promotion procedures, a special commission report showed . The six-member Commission on Minority Participation found that despite "moderate" increases i n minority representation, Hispanics, blacks and women are predominantly found in the " lower echelons" of the university administration . The Feb. 13 report presented to state universities Chancellor Charles Reed noted a drop in Hispanic faculty from 12..1% in 1980 to 11.'7% in 1985. Conversely, Hispanic re presentation in service and maintenance positions grew from 39. 2% in 1 980 to 54. 5% in 1985. Hispanics are 43% of undergraduate students at the university, 26% of graduate students. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS FORTUNE soo: For information on corporate memberships to the new National Hispanic Corporate Council (NHCC), contact Charles Barajas, Southland Corp., 2828 N. Haskell Ave., Box 719, Dallas, Texas 75221 (214) 828-7011, or Olga Aros, USA TODAY, 411 . N. Roosevelt Ave., Chandler, Ariz. 85224 (602) 961-6015. AIDS IN U.S. PRISONS: The National Institute of Justice will publish a report in early April examining the incidence of AIDS in U.S. correctional institutions. For a free copy write to NIJ, 1600 Research Ave., Rockville, Md. 20850 (301) 251-5500. (Specify inventory no. DD100126.) HISPANICS AT FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY: A member of the Commission on Minority Participation that examined Hispanic and minority faculty and administration employment will provide copies of the report on a cost basis. Contact: Dr. Willie Williams, Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, Florida International Univer sity, Tamiami Campus, Miami, Fla. 33199 (305) 554-2029. HISPANIC CAR MARKET: The SINTV network issued a report on the numbers and percentages of 1984 cars and trucks sold to markets. Fo'fa free copy, write to: SIN; 460West 42nd St., New York. N.Y. 10036 (212) 502-1300. PAC CONTRIBUTIONS: A 33-page report examines the amount of monies given by Political Action to members of Congress seeking re-election in 1986. Figures for Hispanic congressmen included in the appendix. For free copies write to: Common Cause, Press Office, 2030 M St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20036 (202) 8331200. ART CONTEST: A contest of paintings, engravings, drawings and collages is open to Puerto Rican high school students in the 50 states and Puerto Rico. Deadline for works, which should not exceed 30 X 30 inches in size, is May 14. Send entries to: Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster, 1428 Longworth HOB, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-2615. FINANCIAL AID: New booklets to help students finance their education are available in the areas of allied, health, business, education, engineering, law, mass communications, medicine and science. Each of eight 50 to 60-page brochures offer information on employment outlook, minority employment and available financial aid. Price: $3 per booklet; $20 for set of eight; $35 for two sets; $1.75 each in orders of 1 00 or more. Order from: Garrett Park Press, Garrett Park, Md. 20896 (301) 946-2553. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N .W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch. INPATIENT TEAM LEADER Grand Rapids, Michigan This is a professional position responsible forthecoordination of services to Community Mental Health clients in the Kent Oaks Psychiatric Unij of Kent Community Hospital Salary$25,459$33,654. Qualifications: Ph.D. in psychology and possession of Limited License froin State of Michigan. One yeafs experience post graduate (mastefs degree or within a residential treatment team All applications for county employment must be made on a oounty application loon Contact Kent County Personnel Department County Administration : Bldg . , Room 205, 300 Monroe NW, Grand Rapids, Mich. 49503 (616) 77 4-3513. SIN Television Network seeks eager, out going writer for public relations departm ent Must be bilingual Prefer public relations agency amVor copywriting experience. Send resume to: Mariette Arguimbau, Sl N, 460 W.42nd St., New York, N.Y. 10036. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST THE NATIONAL Economic Development , & Law Center, a non-profit community and i economic development support center, seeks 1 fuiHime employee fully bilingual (English/ : SpanisiV to provide organizational development training and technical assistance to community based organizations (CBOs). NEW YORK S TATE Department of Tra n sportation THE NEW YORK STATE Department of Transportation is presently preparing a list of who possess management administrati v e and advisor y capabilities to receive RFPs for administration of a D/WBE supportive servi c es p r ogram. The RFP will describe the specific obj ec tives of the program. Briefly, the se objectiv es include: 1. Revie w and coord i na t e w ith ex isting D/WBE associations w ith the goal of maximizing their effectiv eness in advising constituents of business opportunities with NYSDOT ; 2. Prepare a guidebo o k for dist r ibution to D/WBEs addressing NYSDOT procedures and opportunities, financing. bonding and insurance, marketing and estimating, record keeping and management; 3. Design and administer a construction management training program for the principles of D/WBE firms involved in , transportation related constructi on; 4. Coordinate with the supportive services consultants currently under contract with NYSDOT who prov id e individualized as sistance to NYSDOT certified D/WBEs. The RFP will further detai I these objectives and describe the criteria by which proposals will be evaluated. Letters of interest must be submitted by March 14 and addressed as follows: S . upportive Services Manager, NYSDOT 1220 Washington, Ave., Alb!'ny, N.Y. 12232. Applicant must have 3 years practical ex perience working with CBOs on general management and organizational issues including funding strategies; understanding the needs of minority, low income and refugee/immigrant communities. Ability to write and commun1cate clearly. Extensive travel required Salary com1V NEWS production company and members mensurate with experience, from $30,000/yr. of HAM AS in Los Angeles need news footage plus fringe benefits. on significant national Hispanic news events Submit resume postmarked on or before since start of National Hispanic Heritage Aoril 1 to: Marsha Brown, NED&LC, 1950 Week for immediate use. Will pay going rates. Addison St., Berkeley, Calif. 94704. Write or call Jose Luis Cedeno (213) 222NED&LC is an EOE!AA employer, M/F/H 8370, ROD Enterprises. P.O. Box 50472, urged to apply. 1 Pasadena, Calif. 91105. Deadline March 15. Calendar Laura Martinez-Herring,Miss USA, will preside over the 6th annual ceremony to recognize Hispanic vocalists, songwriters and musicians in that state . Rudy Trevino (512) 223-4721 CULTURE Interdisciplinary Centerfor North-American Research, University of Paris Paris March 12-14 THIS WEEK ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE West New York, N.J. March 4 The Hispanic Institute for Research and Development of Bergen County, N.J., will co-sponsor the conference covering government financing, exporting and oppor tunities abroad . Miriam Cuervo (201) 447-9477 MINORITY WOMEN AND DISCRIMINATION Los Angeles March 7 Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Grace Montanez Davis will keynote the 2nd conference by the LosAngeleG County Commission on Human Relations titled" Race and Sex Discrimination in the Labor Market Minority Women at Work." Reva Trevino (213) 974-7626 TEJANO MUSIC AWARDS San Antonio March 9 Hispanic Link Weekly Report NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES Washington, D .C. March 8-11 President Henry Cisneros presides over NLCs annual legislative session, which includes regular meetings of its Hispanic caucus. Ruth Santana (202) 626-3115 COMING SOON AJ;FIRMATIVE ACTION AWARD DINNER National Puerto Rican Forum New York March 11 Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 HISPANIC BUSINESS MARKET New York Chamber of Commerce and Industry New York March 12 Herminia Ramos-Donovan (212) 561-2023 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON . HISPANIC Juan Novoa (512) 736-7526 YOUNG REPUBLICAN LEADERSHI PCO N FE RENCE Young Republican National Federation Washington, D.C. March 13-16 Oscar Guarderas (202) 543-1771 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION American Association for Affirmative Action Atlanta March 12-16 Judy Burnison (312) 329-2512 NATIONALCHICANOSTUDENTCONFERENCE Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan Berkeley, Calif. March 1 5 Gisela Macedo (415) 642-6673 GRAPE BOYCOTT FUND-RAISER United Farm Workers New York March 21 Ed Sanchez (212) 642-6673 3

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Arts & Entertainment single Es facil amar. Nominated Latinos in other categories were Dave Valentin for "Best R&B Instrumental Performance" (won by Ernie Watts); Tania Maria for"Best Jazz Solo PerformanceFemale" (Cleo Lane); Cheech Marin for"Best Comedy Recording (Whoopi Goldberg) ; and Placido Domingo and Pilar Lorengar for " Best Classical Soloist Performance " (John Aler). FOUR LATINOS WALKED AWAY WITH Grammys at the Feb. 25 awards ceremony in Los Angeles, with one of the three" Latin" music categories going to a non-Hispanic singer. Linda Ronstadt was the only Hispanic performer honored by the Nat i onal Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences outside of the "Latin" categories. Rons t adt's album Lush Life won Grammys in two categories: "Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal" (by Nelson Riddle) and "Best Album Package" (by art directors Kosh and Ron Larson) . THE NATION'S TWO FILM AND TELEVISION ACTORS ' unions will join forces this week at a conference to discuss the industry's portrayal and employment of Hispanics and other minorities. Ronstadt was also nominated in the" Best Pop Vocal Performance Female" category. That award went to Whitney Houston . Equal employment opportunity comm ittee chairs from the various branches of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists are expected to participate in the conference to be held March 7-9 in Los Angeles. Both SAG and AFTRA have language in their contracts calling for producers to accurately "depict the American scene" by employing actors from Asian Pacific , b l ack, Latino and Native Amer i can groups. Only one of the three "Latin" categories was presented in the live telecast carried by CBS. "Best Mexican American Performance" Gram my went to Vikki Carr for her Simplemente mujer album . The " Best Tropical Latin Performance" award was shared by Tito Puente and his Latin Ensemble (for their Mambo Diablo album) with Eddie Palmieri (So/ito). According to Rodney Mitchell, SAG's affirmative action administrator, Hispanics in the industry have " suffered from historic underemployment and stereotypecasting ." Mitchell told Weekly Report that this week's conference could propose issues to be brought up for negotiation this summer when At the live ceremony, singer Ruben Blades and A&M Records owner Herb Alpert came out to read the third" Latin " winner. Honored for" Best Latin Pop Performance " was Alpert's wife , Lani Hall, for her union contracts expire . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report HOW TO HIRE: The half-million-dollar , five year commitment by the American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation to inte grate all departments of the nation's daily press is showing tangible progress this month. The foundation, which announced the pro ject in November , has recruited a full-time director, Terri Dickerson-Jones, who was a program manager for a Washington, D.C. based women's foundation. Its planned 40-plus-page publication, "Re cruiting and Retaining Newspaper Minority Employees: How To Do It," is due off the presses by the end of the month . The manual for newspaper executives will be distributed to ANPA members . It is also ava i lable to other interested parties for $5. Request it from the ANPA Foundation, Box 17 407, Washington Dulles International Airport, 4 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 • N' Street N W Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-o737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez. Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejia&Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced , or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 l88uee) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants ' packets at your next conference or convention . For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234. Washington, D.C. 20041 . The body's Task Force on Minorities in the Media held its second annual meeting Jan. 30, 31 at a Dulles Airport hotel. Some 50 representatives of nat i onal newspaper organi zations advertising , circulation , editorial, p r omotion, carriers, etc . participated. Covering Latino interests were representatives from the NationaiAssociationofHispanicJour nallsts and the Hispanic News Media As sociation of Washington, D.C. Frank Quine, director of the American Press Institute, announced plans to hold a seminar on minority hiring May 18, 19 in Reston, Va. It will include senior executives from some of the nation's largest dailies. HAPPY BIRTHDAYS: It's anniversary time for some major Hispanic media: El Miami Herald will celebrate its 1Oth anniversary with a record-sized edition and press run on Sunday, March 26. It plans to print an extra 1 00,000 copies, including a special section offering a 1 0-year retrospective on Latin M i ami. El Herald started with a daily circulation of Nowifs76POO. It was 10 years ago also that Fresno's KSJV radio bilingiie became a gleam in its founders' collective eye. It's planning a 1Oth anniversary celebration for July4, the date in 1980 it finally went on the air. Preceding it were other California bilingual stations KBBF of Santa Rosa (1973) and KUBO of Salinas (1979). KSJV's Noticiero Latino, the daily Spanish language news service now offered nationally w i thin the public broadcasting system , celebrated its f i rst anniversary March 1. Last month, San Diego's bilingual weekly , La Prensa San Diego, had its 1Oth birthday party. And this month, Oklahoma City's La Voz newspaper, published sporadically since 1976 by the Oklahoma Hispanic Cultural Center, locks into a monthly bilingual format. Charlie Ericksen and Carlos Morales HLNSIHt!>ctor Ericksen Mendoza NATIONAL HISPANIC CORPORATE COUNCIL: Seated members, left to right , are : Rita Di Martino , Charles Barajas, Olga Aros , Charles Shoumaker and Patricia Asip. Standing, left to right: Jaime Ramirez, Alex Vasquez, Jesse Aguirre, Albert Zapanta, Richard Amundsen , Jose Ruano and David Rubio. Hispanic Link Weekly Report