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Hispanic link weekly report, March 10, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 10, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This
Linda Chdvez, former director of the White House’s office of public liaison who resigned that post Feb. 3 to run for the U.S. Senate seat of retiring Maryland Republican Charles Mathias, formally announces her candidacy with a five-stop sweep through the state March 5. She says her outspokeness will make the race “more interesting”... Dan Silva, a member of San Francisco mayor's task force raising money to build a Vietnam War memorial in the city honoring residents killed in that war, kicks off the drive March 9. The task force hopes to raise $800,000 - to - $1.2 million for the project.. Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz is among 12 Americans selected as the first recipients of the Medal of Liberty for naturalized citizens who have become
leaders in their fields. President Ronald Reagan will present the awards at opening ceremonies of the Statue of Liberty July 3. Winner's names will be inscribed on a plaque at Ellis Island... Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster asks the House Budget and Interior committees to exempt rum excise tax rebates from the automatic budget ax of Gramm-Rudman. The move is in response to the General Accounting Office’s refusal to reconsider cutting the rebates.. .Jorge Herndndez, executive director of Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion (Puerto Rican Tenants in Action), announces the opening March 21 of New England’s first Hispanic Cultural Center in Boston. Gov. Michael Dukakis and Boston Mayor Raymond Flynn are slated to speak at the opening. . .Jockey Jorge Veldsquez is presented the 1986 George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award as chosen by fellow riders nationwide...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
EEOC Latino Members Back Goals, Timetables
The two Hispanic members of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Washington, D.C., told Weekly Report last week that they are tire commission’s lone votes for goals and timetables as settlements of race and sex discrimination cases with private employers.
A story printed in the Washington Post last month quoted EEOC acting general counsel Johnny Butler as saying that he informed regional enforcement attorneys last fall that ^settlements involving hiring goals and timetables should not be submitted. Butler said three of the five commissioners are opposed to goals and timetables.
EEOC Chairman Clarence Thomas said the policy had been in effect for a year and that such cases “don’t get approved.”
Commissioners Tony Gallegos and Fred Alvarez both agreed that goals and timetables were viable as a way of settling cases Gallegos added, “I still believe that this equitable remedy has not been applied as effectively for some of the protected groups.”
Rep. Matthew Martinez, chairman of the Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities, has requested the presence of all the EEOC commissioners and Butler before his committee March 11. They are to testify on their individual perceptions on the legality of the use of goals and timetables and statistical measures in the enforcement of federal anti-discrimination laws.
Latino Catholic Pupils’Scores Up
Garcia Criticizes Census
Congressman Robert Garda (D-N.Y.), chairman of the Subcommittee on Census and Population, criticized the U.S. Department of Commerce Feb. 27 forfaiting to confirm any members to four advisory committees for the 1990 Census.
The committees, which Garcia said should have been formed a year ago, will consist of nine members each on Hispanic, black Asian and American Indian communities.
Dr. Harry Scarr, executive assistant for Statistical Affairs at Commerce, said the delay was caused by problems in confirming some of the candidates, but that he expected to form the committees by May.
Hispanics in Catholic high schools enjoyed greater gains in standardized vocabulary, reading and math tests scores than their black or white classmates, revealed a study released Feb. 27.
Titled “Catholic High Schools: Their Impact
LULAC Joins Coors Pact
The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) joined March 3 in the Adolph Coors Company’s existing $360 million good-faith agreement with five other H ispanic organizations The other groups signed in October 1984.
The pact promises Coors will increase its Hispanic employment and investments in Hispanic businesses and organizations in that amount by 1990. LULAC held off joining until it received consensus from its member chapters, a spokesman said.
A sixth signatory to the original agreement, the National Puerto Rican Coalition, withdrew from the pact in May 1985 following division among its board members on NPRC participation.
In the past, labor and minority groups staged boycotts against the company, which they accused of employment discrimination and unfair labor practices.
Frank Solis, Coors national program manager, told Weekly Report that the company increased its share of sales in the Hispanic market from 6% in 1984 to 9% in 1985.
Other organizations participating in the agreement, which calls for them to '‘help eliminate misconceptions of Coors within the Hispanic community,” are The National Council of La Raza, National Image, United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, American G.I. Forum and the Cuban National Planning Council.
on Low Income Students,” the study compared the scores of freshmen and seniors in 1983 to arrive at the average gains.
The average score for all students was 50. Latinos gained between two and three points more than the others in the three areas. By the 12th grade, they were two to three points ahead of black students but still trailing whites by three to five points.
Hispanic students who came from families where the estimated annual income was less than $12,500 had slightly lower gains than other Hispanics, but they still improved more than the black average and exceeded white gains in all areas except vocabulary, where they equaled them.
Fifteen percent of the 7,551 students surveyed were Hispanic The 106 schools that participated were selected on the basis that at least 10% of their students have families whose incomes were below the federal poverty line.
Fifty-seven percent of the Hispanic students, 30% of the blacks and 29% of the whites came from such families.
Among the three groups, the attrition rate for H ispanics was highest Hispanics comprised 16% of the ninth graders but only 12% of students in the twelfth grade. Blacks did not experience a decline (22%). White students climbed from 51% to 58%.
Two-thirds of the Hispanic students were enrolled in academic or college preparatory tracks. The figure dipped 10 points among Hispanic students who were very poor. It increased to 81% for Hispanics whose families had incomes of $22,001 or more.
Other study findings:
• Seventy percent of the Hispanic students? mothers were employed, while only 22% of
continued on page 2
STUDENT GAINS IN CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS 1983 Test Scores for Freshmen and Seniors
Vocabulary Reading Math
9th 12th Gain 9th 12th Gain 9th 12th Gain
Hisp. 43.4 51.2 7.8 44.6 51.8 ^.2 45.0 51.4 6.4
Black 43.3 48.8 5.5 44.4 48.8 4.4 43.3 47.7 4.4
White 48.7 56.1 7.4 49.1 54.8 5.7 49.8 55.0 5.2
Source: "Catholic High Schools: Their Impact on Low Income Students," National Catholic Educational Associ


Sin pelos en la lengua
HISTORICAL FOOTNOTE: The February revolution of the Filipino people was fought in Asia over U.S. -style democracy by Spanish-surnamed rebel-patriots.
The non-violent miracle of the triumph of Corazdn Aquino gained a boost from all three cultural influences, Oil Daily reporter Victoria Villena-Denton tells us. Each made its unique contribution to the character of the modern-day Filipino:
• The people’s desire for non-violence she credits foremost to their Malay ancestors, whose hospitality was reflected when they first welcomed the Spaniards to the islands more than400 years ago.
• The appeal of Western-style democracy she credits to the United States, which held the islands between 1898 and 1946.
• And the people’s faith, unity and strength which ultimately toppled the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos she attributes to the Spaniards who imported the Catholic religion when they began their 300-year-plus rule.
The Philippines’ Hispanic legacy includes a population more than 80% Catholic, a dominance of Spanish surnames and, for the epicureans,
delicious “Filipinized Spanish” cuisine.
Why didn’t the Spanish language take hold?
“Because the conquistadores intentionally prevented its spread among the natives,” Villena-Denton says.
She concludes: “The cornerstone of Filipino identity lies on these three cultures... Instead of rejecting our colonial past, we should be proud of our cultural diversity.”
LITERARY STRAIGHT-ARM: Not everyone has such a high regard for our Hispanic heritage. Reviewing a new translation of “The Adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha” in The Atlantic magazine (March ’86), writer Martin Ames pens:
“With (Don Quixote) rides Sancho Panza, who with Hispanic panache has‘deserted his wife and children,’ without a farewell, the better to serve his master.”
That’s Hispanic panache?
TELEVISION TOE HOLD: Then there’s television. Last weeks ABC-TV movie, “The Children of Times Square,” was inspired by a gang of black teenage drugrunners in Detroit But explained network v.p. Alan Wurtzel, so ABC couldn’t be accused of stereotyping, it cast the drug ring with three blacks, three whites and three Hispanics.
I wonder what they'll do if they remake The Alamo? ? ?
- Kay Barbaro
Chicagoans Unjustly Purged - MVREP
Twenty percent of the 55,000 Hispanic voters purged in Chicago during the last four years have been wrongfully stricken from the voting roster in that city, according to a study commissioned by the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project to be released in April.
Purging is the removal of voters from the roster who have died, moved, changed their name or failed to vote in the last four years The process takes place every year.
According to MVREP, Hispanic voter registration increased 91 % since 1982 (82,000 to 157,000), but the after-purge increase was only 27% (104,000).
Juan Andrade, president of MVREP, attributed the high incidence of purging to canvassers’ laxity in ascertaining the status of Hispanic voters (including failure to visit Hispanic neighborhoods for verification). Once a voter is purged, the burden posed by the process for reinstatement and the little time allotted for it put voters at a further disadvantage, said Andrade.
Prompted by the MVREP study, the Chicago
Judge Halts INS Raids
The Immigration and Naturalization Service cannot conduct raids at workplaces without warrants or “exigent” circumstances while an Oct. 11 U.S. District Court’s decision mandating those stipulations is appealed, Supreme Court Judge William Rehnquist ordered.
Rehnquist let stand the lowercourt decision by denying March 3 a motion to stay filed by INS. The appeal of the decision in International Molders’ Union vs. INS starts this month in the San Francisco District Court of Appeals.
Filed November 1984 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), the suit charged that from 1982 to 1985 INS conducted 30 raids at 24 work sites without the consent of or by coercing owners into consent.
Board of Elections Commission, the agency charged with overseeing the purging process, has agreed to institute measures to give voters more time and convenience in applying for reinstatement. Voters have until March 12 to respond to the latest purge that occurred Feb. 19, 20.
Primary and special aldermanic elections will be held March 18.
Exacerbating the wrongful purging is the fact that47% of 285,000 voting-age Hispanics in Chicago were ineligible to register in 1984, according to a survey by Chicago’s Latino Institute. Undocumented workers and noncitizens comprised the vast majority of this group, it concluded.
MVREP conducted an audit of the latest purging process to determine its reliability and whether canvassers followed the new procedures. The audit results will be released this week.
Cook Awarded $2 Million
A Hispanic cook was awarded $2.1 million by a U.S. District Court jury Feb. 27 in Los Angeles after having served 2 1/2 years in prison for a murder he did not commit.
His attorneys charged that Juan Venegas, now 36, was convicted after three Long Beach police officers persuaded witnesses to lie about his involvement in the 1971 murder of an acquaintance following a Christmas Eve drinking bout.
Another man was found guilty and served time for the murder. Venegas was released from prison in October 1974 after the California Supreme Court ruled that there had been insufficient evidence to find him guilty. He had won a $1 million judgment against the officers and city of Long Beach in Los Angeles Superior Court in 1980, but the verdict was reversed by an appellate court ruling that the officers were immune from civil liability for acts performed while on duty.
Latino Catholic Scores
continued from page 1
the Hispanic students came from single-parent homes
• Almost 5% of the teachers in schools serving low-income students were Hispanic, compared to 2.8% in the other Catholic schools In 1984, approximately 9% of the 800,000 students in Catholic high schools were Latino.
- Felix Perez
L.A, Latino Homicides Up
Los Angeles Hispanics are much less likely to be homicide victims than are blacks there, but more than twice as likely as Anglos, anew study covering the decade of the’70s shows.
The study, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and released Feb. 7, reported the following annual rates per 100,000 for the city’s 4,950 murder victims during that period:
Whites Hispanics Blacks
8.1 18.2 45.4
Among H ispanics, young males were found most at risk, with their murder rate having increased dramatically in that decade. Deaths and per-100,000 rates were:
Age group 15-24 25-34 35-44
1970 No. Rate 17 47.1 11 34.0 3 11.4
1979 No. Rate 89 97.3 70 88.0 29 69.0
Hispanic males were seven times more likely to be victimized than Hispanic females. Overall, Hispanic victims had the youngest median age, 25.3 vs. 29.4 for blacks and 40.3 for whites.
Among all females, Latinas had the lowest rate, 4.4 vs. 5.0 for Anglos and 17.8 for blacks.
The report’s principal author, UCLA professor Fred Loya, concluded that the deaths could be reduced significantly by police and mental health agencies’ efforts working with young Hispanics and blacks even before they reach the high-risk age groups.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESI) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ac rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
SIN Television Network seeks eager, outgoing writer for public relations department. Must be bilingual Prefer public relations agency and/or copywriting experience. Send resume to: Mariette Arguimbau, SI N, 460 W. 42 nd St., New York, N.Y. 10036.
NATIONAL SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc, Dallas, Texas. Nationwide non-profit employment and training organization seeks applicants for the position of vice president of planning and resource development and vice president of operations. Candidates are required to have a degree or equivalent job related experience, should have experience with government contracting, JTPA non-profit associations and corporate resource development. Salary commensurate with experience. Resumes should be received no later than March 14. Send to: SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc., 1355 River Bend Drive, Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75247 Attn: Jane Jackson.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND.
LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE - OPENINGS
ASSISTANT TO DIRECTOR, Community Services Program. DUTIES: Assist director in program management Programs for Deaf Adults, College for Children, Homeless Families and other community service efforts. Monitor budgets and grant appointments, data collection, research and preparation of reports, and liaison with project and divisional staff. Requirements: B.A. in Liberal Arts and prior administrative experience. Ability to handle diverse duties, excellent organizational and administrative skills, and ability to communicate positively with a variety of populations, strong analytical and writing skills. Salary: 12-month fulltime appointment at $19,000 - $22,000 depending on experience. (Grant funded). Send letter and resume by March 28 to: Director of Community Services Program,
Room 3, Division of Continuing Education.
PROGRAMMER/ANALYST VM/IDMS/ CICS. Seeking individual with strong technical skills to be Program Manager of on-line application migration to an IBM 4361. REQUIREMENTS: Bachelor's degree or equivalent experience. An outstanding fringe benefits package awaits an individual with the appropriate educational and technical background, and the creative resourcefulness necessary to assu me this challengi ng position. Send letter, resume and salary history by April 4 to: Director of Computer Services, Division of Administration.
LaGuardia Community College 31-10 Thomson Avenue Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 EOE/AA EMPLOYER
BORDER PATROL AGENT
(This is a Federal civilian law enforcement position.)
From February 18 - March 28,1986, the Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written examination forGS-5, BORDER PATROL AGENT positions in the Federal Government.
Initial duty stations are in the southern border states of Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas. Many are in small, isolated communities.
HOW TO APPLY: Obtain a Form 5000AB and a Qualifications Information Statement (QI-1896) from any Federal Job Information/Testing Office. FJI/Ts are located in principal cities across the country. They are listed under “U.S. Government” in metropolitan area telephone directories. If none is listed in your directory, you can call information for a large metropolitan area or you can contact your nearest State Job Service (or State Employment Security Office). When completing the Form 6000AB, be sure to enter the city and state of the test location you prefer. If that location is not available, you will be scheduled at a nearby location. Send the completed Form 5000AB to the OPM Area Office servicing the test location which you have chosen. Be sure it is postmarked no later than March 28,1986. Other required application forms will be sent to you at the time you receive notice of whef) and where to report for the written test.
ORAL INTERVIEW and Spanish Language: An interview is required. You must know or learn Spanish as noted in the Qualifications Information Statement (QI-1896). Five points will be awarded for Spanish proficiency.
MAXIMUM AGE LIMIT: Provisions of Public Law 93-350 allow the imposition of a maximum age for original entry into certain Federal law enforcement occupations. Border Patrol Agents are currently covered by such a restriction, the date preceeding one’s 35th birthday, as authorized by the Congress of the United States and as adopted by the U.S. Department of Justice.
If you are age 35 or older or will shortly reach your 35th birthday, but have previously served in a Federal civilian law enforcement position which may exempt you from the original entry age restriction, please provide the following information: the name of the Federal agency where you worked, the title of your position; and the dates employed. Please attach this Information to the completed Form 5000AB.
WRITTEN TEST: The written examination will be administered nationwide The exact date will vary from location to location. Candidates may take the written test only once during the period.
THE GOOD NEWS
CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS: The 282-page “Catholic High Schools: Their Impact on Low Income Students” is available from: National Catholic Educational Association, ($23.75, $17 for members) Publications Dept., 1077 30th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 293-5954.
PURGING VOTERS: A20-pagestudy,“The Impact of the Purging Process on Hispanic Voters in Chicago,” will be published in April. For a free copy write to: Marfa Molina, Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, 50 W. Broad St., Suite 622, Columbus, Ohio 43215(614) 614-1116.
LOS ANGELES HOMICIDE STUDY: The Centers for Disease Control compiled and compared the homicide rates for Latinos, blacks and whites in the study “The Epidemiology of Homicide in the City of Los Angeles, 1970-79.” For a free copy contact Dr. Jim Mercey, Violence Epidemiology Branch, CDC, Atlanta, Ga. 30333 (404) 329-3534.
VOTER PARTICIPATION IN CHICAGO: “Latino Participation in Chicago’s Electoral Process” is a seven-page report examining the number of H ispanic voters in that city and their participation rate. For a free copy write to: Latino Institute, 53 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 940, Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 663-3603.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AWARD DINNER New York March 11
The National Puerto Rican Forum will host a banquet honoring a corporation that has shown extra effort to recruit Hispanics into its ranks.
Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311
HISPANIC BUSINESS MARKET New York March 12
La Voz Hispana will co-sponsor a conference to examine the H ispanic market and the most effective strategies to tap into it, with Vilma Colon, president Hispanic Link Weekly Report
of the Chamber of Commerce of Puerto Rico as a speaker.
Herminia Ramos-Donovan (212) 561-2023
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HISPANIC
CULTURE
Paris March 12-14
Scholars from around the world will meet to share research on the state of Hispanic culture studies in a conference sponsored by the University of Paris. Juan Novoa (512) 736-7526
HIGHER EDUCATION
Washington D.C. March 12-15
The Hispanic Caucus of the American Association
of Higher Education will have a forum on education
as it relates to Hispanics.
Laura Rendon (202) 254-6050
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Atlanta March 12-16
The American Association for Affirmative Action will hold its 12th annual conference covering such topics as recruitment quotas and reverse discrimination. Judy Burnison (312) 329-2512
TRANSPORTATION JOBS SYMPOSIUM Wilberforce, Ohio March 13 Opportunities available for minorities in the transportation industry will be discussed at this event sponsored by the National Council of Negro Women. Marcella Sampson (513) 376-6383
NATIONALCHICANOSTUDENTCONFERENCE Berkeley, Calif. March 14-16 The 7th annual student conference by the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan.
Gisela Macedo (415) 642-6673
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Arts & Entertainment
A CURRENT STOP IN THE UNITED STATES BY Spain’s traveling Antologia de la Zarzuela company coincides with the recent announcement of a new opfera about Spanish painter Francisco de Goya that will be premiered in this country in November.
Antologia de la Zarzuela, a Spanish company of singers, dancers and musicians, visits the United States intermittently on tours of the American continent. Under the direction of its founder Jos6Tamayo, Antologia de la Zarzuela concludes its current U.S. visit with a March 4-16 engagement at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.
In a related item, Placido Domingo has announced that he will sing the title role in the world premiere of Goya, now scheduled for November in Washington D.C Chilean mezzo-soprano Victoria Vergara will also star in the opera- a $1 million co-production by the Wahington Opera at the Kennedy Center.
Domingo reportedly suggested Goya as the theme for composer Gian Carlo Menotti, who called the famed Spanish painter a “great challenge.”
Recent operatic works by Hispanics in the United States have met varying degrees of success recently. Last December, San Antonio’s Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center staged four sold-out performances
of Nuestra Sehora de Guadalupe, an opera in two acts by that city’s Eduardo C. Garza The work, with a libretto written by Elizabeth Shaw and Gaiza, premiered Dec 12,1981, in Tucson. The date commemorated the 450th anniversary of the Virgin’s miraculous apparition.
In Puerto Rico, anew opera based on the folk tradition of the Fiesta de Santiago de los Caballeros will premiere Oct 9. Set against the Afro-Caribbean customs of the northern coastal village of Loiza Aldea, El mensajero de plata will be staged in the island’s Centro de Bellas Artes. Robert Sierra composed the work, with a libretto by Myrna Casas.
Excerpts from another Puerto Rican stage musical work will be performed later this year at the Kennedy Center. The musical comedy Fela, about San Juan’s ex-Mayor Felisa Rincon de Gautier, premiered last year in Puerto Rica The Kennedy Center performances will be part of a gala celebrating Rincdn’s 90th birthday.
The premiere of another U.S. Hispanic opera- based on the life of Mexican patriot Emiliano Zapata - never took place. Zapata had been commissioned in 1981 byTitoCapobianco, then director of the San Diego Opera, fora staging during the 1984-85 season. Incoming artistic director Ian Campbell made the decision in 1983 not to stage the work by Spanish composer Leonardo Balada.
Zapata is reportedly now set to premiere next season in Pittsburgh.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
Despite a 17% increase ($49 million) in ad dollars targeted to the U.S. Hispanic market in 1985, the portion devoted to the Hispanic market from the nation’s top 25 advertisers fell from 0.99% in 1984 to 0.84% in 1985.
The Feb. 27 issue of Advertising Age Thursday, borrowing liberallyfrom Hispanic Business magazine, puts ad expenditures for the Hispanic market at $335 million for 1985, up from $284 million in 1984. The increase falls shy of the 26.8% jump from 1983-84 and 35.2% from 1982-83. Put another way, the top 25 advertisers committed less than 1% of their total ad dollars to reach the 8.5% of the U.S. population that Hispanics represent.
In its annual issue devoted to Hispanic marketing, Ad Age had 18 articles, none by Hispanic surnamed writers, on how different
industries approach Hispanics and problems confronting Hispanic media
The magazine noted that the top 10 advertisers in the Hispanic market spent $41.2 million in 1985, or a little less than one-eighth of 1985’s Hispanic ad budget. The three top advertisers were Philip Morris ($7 million), Procter & Gamble ($6.5 million) and Anheuser-Busch ($6.5 million).
Among other questions raised was how to address the Hispanic market Do you use Spanish- or English-language ads, and, if you use Spanish, do you use different dialects when addressing subgroups of the U.S. Latino market?
It reported that some advertisers, such as Hallmark Cards, use “generic” or textbook Spanish. Others, such as Anheuser-Busch, have regional ads catering to particular groups of Hispanics. Yet another approach is to fashion ad campaigns according to the socio-economic status of the customer.
Other facts and numbers it reported:
• In Los Angeles, Miami and New York, the top three markets for Hispanic media dollars, print received $20.4 million, or 12%, of the $166.4 million ad dollars spent on Hispanics in 1985.
• Spanish-speaking adults are 44% less likely to purchase life insurance than .the general population.
• Spanish-speaking adults are 59% less likely to purchase a new domestic car.
For a copy of the Feb. 27 edition, send $2.75 to Ad Age Thursday, 740 Rush St, Chicago, III. 60611.
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Lorenzo Chavez, reporter with the West Palm Beach Times in Florida, has joined Vista magazine in Coral Gables as a staff writer... Galavision’s West Coast operations chief John Figueroa has been promoted to national marketing v.p.... Oscar Reyes replaced Enrique Eduardo as editor of the Washington, D.C., Spanish-language weekly, El Pregonera ..
- Felix Perez
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen- Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejfas* Rentas , Teresita Carribn No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $98 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen*Mendoza (202) 234-0737. '
U.S. CENSUS FORM 11980 1990? —►
7. Is this person of Spanish/Hispanic origin or descent?
Fill one circle.
O No (not Spanish/Hispanic)
O Yes, Mexican, Mexican-Amer., Chicano O Yes, Puerto Rican O Yes, Cuban
O Yes, other Spanish/Hispanic
7. Is this person of Spanish/Hispanic origin?
Fill ONE circle for each person.
AND
If “Yes, other Spanish/Hispanic’’print one group.
O No (not Spanish/Hispanic)
O Yes, Mexican, Mex.-Am.,Chicano O Yes, Puerto Rican O Yes, Cuban
O Yes, other Spanish/Hispanic (Print one
group, for example: Argentinean,
Colombian, Costa RicanDominican^
Spaniard,etc.) |
i i
CENSUS DAY: March 16 is “Census Day for 21 communities- including many Hispanic ones- in Los Angeles County. This week’s pre-test for 1990 includes a revised Hispanic origin box (See related story, page 1.)
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week leaders in their fields. President Ronald Reagan will present the awards at opening ceremonies of the Statue of Liberty July 3. Winner's names will be inscribed on a plaque at Ellis Island ... Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster asks the House Budget and Interior committees to exempt rum excise tax rebates from the automatic budget ax of Gramm-Rudman. The move is in response to the General Accounting Office's refusal to reconsider cutting the rebates. .. Jorge Hernandez, executive director of lnqui/inos Boricuas en Acci6n (Puerto Rican Tenants in Action), announces the opening March 21 of New England's first Hispanic Cultural Center in Boston. Gov. Michael Dukakis and Boston Mayor Raymond Flynn are slated to speak at the opening . . . Jockey Jorge Velasquez is presented the 1986 George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award as chosen by fellow riders nationwide ... Linda Chavez, former director of the White House's office of public liaison who resigned that post Feb. 3 to run for the U.S. Senate seat of retiring Maryland Republican Charles Mathias, formally announces her candidacy with a five-stop sweep through the state March 5. She says he r outspokeness will make the race "more interesting" ... Dan Silva, a member of San Francisco mayor's task force raising money to build a Vietnam War memorial in the city honoring residents killed in that war, kicks off the drive March 9. The task force hopes to raise $800,000 to-$1.2 million for the project . . Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz is among 12 Americans selected as the first recipients of the Medal of Liberty for naturalized citizens who have become Vol. 4 No.10 HISPANIC LINK W 10,1986 EEOC Latino Members Back Goals, Timetables Latino Catholic Pupils'Scores Up The two Hispanic members of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Washington, D .C., told Weekly Report last week that they are ttfe commission's lone votes for goals and timetables as settlements of race and sex discrimination cases with private employers. A story printed in the Washington Post last month quoted EEOC acting general counsel Johnny Butler as saying that he informed regional enforcement attorneys last fall that -settlements involving hiring goals and timetables should not be submitted Butler said three of the five commissioners are opposed to goals and timetables . EEOC Chairman Clarence Thomas said the policy had been in effect for a year and that such cases "don't get approved." Commissioners Tony Gallegos and Fred Alvarez both agreed that goals and timetables were viable as a way of settling c;_ases. Gallegos added, "I still believe that this equitable remedy has not been applied as effectively for some of the protected groups . " Rep . Matthew Martinez, chairman of the Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities, has requested the presence of all the EEOC commissioners and Butler before his com mittee March 11. They are to testify on their individual perceptions on the legality of the use of goals and timetables and statistical measwes in the enforcement-of federal anti-discrimination laws . Garcia Criticizes Census Congressman Robert Garcia (D-N. Y.), chairman of the Subcommittee on Census and Population, criticized the U .S. Department of Commerce Feb. 27 for failing to confirm any members to four advisory committees for the 1990 Census. The committees, which Garcia said should have been formed a year ago, will consist of nine members each on Hispanic, black, Asian and American Indian communities. Dr. Harry Scarr , executive assistant for Statistical Affairs at Commerce, said the delay was caused by problems in confirming some of the candidates, but that he expected to form the committees by May. Hispanics in Catholic high schools enjoyed greater gains in standar _ dized vocabulary, reading and math tests scores than their black or white classmates, revealed a study released Feb . 27 . Titled "Catholic High Schools: Their Impact LULAC Joins Coors Pact The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) joined March 3 in the Adolph Coors Company's existing $350 million good-faith agreement with five other Hispanic organizations. The other groups signed in October 1984. The pact promises Coors will increase its Hispanic employment and investments in Hispanic businesses and organizations in that amount by 1990. LULAC held off joining until it received consensus from its member chapters, a spokesman said. A sixth signatory to the original agreement. the National Puerto Rican Coalition, withdrew from the pact in May 1985 following division among its board members on NPRC participation In the past, labor and minority groups staged boycotts against the company, which they accused of employment discrimination and unfair labor practices . Frank Solis, Coors national program manager, told Weekly Report that the company increased its share of sales in the Hispanic market from 5% in 1984 to 9% in 1985. Other organizations participating in the agreement, which calls for them to 1'help eliminate misconceptions of Coors within the Hispanic community," are The National Council of La Raza, National Image , United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, American G .l. Forum and the Cuban National Planning Council. on Low Income Students," the study compared the scores of freshmen and seniors in 1983 to arrive at the average gains. The average score for all students was 50. Latinos gained between two and three points more than the others in the three areas. By the 12th grade, they were two to three points ahead of black students but still trailing whites by three to five points. Hispanic students who came from families where the estimated annual income was less than $12,500 had slightly lower gains than other Hispanics, but they still improved more than the black average and exceeded white gains in all areas except vocabulary, where they equaled them. Fifteen percent of the 7,551 students surveyed were Hispanic. The 1 06 schools that participated were selected on the basis that at least 10% of their students have families w.hose incomes were below the federal poverty line. Fifty-seven percent of the Hispanic students, 30% of the blacks and 29% of the whites came from such families . Among the three groups, the attrition rate for Hispanics was highest Hispanics comprised 16% of the ninth graders but only 12% of students in the twelfth grade. Blacks did not experience a decline (22%). White students climbed from 51% to 58% . Two-thirds of the Hispanic students were enrolled in academic or college preparatory tracks. The figure dipped 10 points among Hispanic students who were very poor. It increased to 81% for Hispanics whose families had incomes of $22,001 or more. Other study findings: • Seventy percent of the Hispanic students' mothers were employed, while only 22% of continued on page 2 STUDENT GAINS IN CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS 1983 Test Scores for Freshmen and Seniors Vocabulary Reading Math 9th 12th Gain 9th 12th Gain 9th 12th Gain Hisp. 43.4 51.2 7.8 44.6 51. 8 "'.2 45. 0 51.4 6.4 Black 43. 3 48. 8 5.5 44.4 48. 8 4.4 47.7 4.4 White 48.7 56.1 7.4 49. 1 54. 8 5.7 49. 8 55.0 5.2 Source: " Catholic High Schools: Their Impact on Low Income Students, " National Catholic Educational Association

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua delicious "Filipinized Spanish" cuisine. Why didn't the Spanish language take hold? "Because the conquistadores intentionally prevented its spread among the natives," Villena-Denton says. HISTORICAL FOOTNOTE: The February revolution of the Filipino people was fought in Asia over U.S. -style democracy by Spanish surnamed rebel-patriots. The non-violent miracle of the triumph of Coraz6n Aquino gained a boost from all three cultural influences, Oil Daily reporter Victoria Villena-Denton tells us. Each made its unique contribution to the character of the modern-day Filipino: She concludes: "The cornerstone of Filipino identity lies on these three Gultures ... Instead of rejecting our colonial past, we should be proud of our cultural diversity." • The people's desire for non-violence she credits foremost to their Malay ancestors, whose hospitality was reflected when they first welcomed the Spaniards to the islands more than400 years ago. • The appeal of Western-style democracy she credits to the United States, which held the islands between 1898 and 1946. LITERARY STRAIGHT-ARM: Not everyone has such a high regard for our Hispanic heritage. Reviewing a new translation of "The Adventures of Don Quixote de Ia Mancha" in The Atlantic magazine (March '86), writer Martin Ames pens: "With (Don Quixote) rides Sancho Panza, who with Hispanic panache has 'deserted his wife and children,' without a farewell, the better to serve his master." That's Hispanic panache? • And the people's faith, unity and strength which ultimately toppled the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos she attributes to the Spaniards who imported the Catholic religion when they began their 300-year-plus rule. The Philippines' Hispanic legacy includes a population more than 80% Catholic, a dominance of Spanish surnames and, for the epicureans, TELEVISION TOE HOLD: Then there's television . Last week's ABC-TV movie, "The Children of Times Square," was inspired by a gang of black teenage drugrunners in Detroit But, explained network v.p. Alan Wurtzel, so ABC couldn't be accused of stereotyping, it cast the drug ring with three blacks, three whites and three Hispanics. I wonder what they'll do if they remake The Alamo??? Chicagoans Unjustly Purged-MVREP Twenty percent of the 55,000 Hispanic voters purged in Chicago during the last four years have been wrongfully stricken from the voting roster in that city, according to a study commissioned by the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project to be released in April. Purging is the removal of voters from the roster who have died, moved, changed their name or failed to vote in the last four years. The process takes place every year. According to MVREP, Hispanic voter registration increased 91% since 1982 (82,000 to 157,000), but the after-purge increase was only 27% (104,000). Juan Andrade, president of MVREP, attributed the high incidence of purging to canvassers' laxity in ascertaining the status of Hispanic voters (including failure to visit Hispanic neigh borhoods for verification). Once a voter is purged, the burden posed by the process for reinstatement and the little time allotted for it put voters at a further disadvantage, said Andrade. Prompted by the MVREP study, the Chicago Judge Halts INS Raids The Immigration and Naturalization Service cannot conduct raids at workplaces without warrants or "exigent'' circumstances while an Oct. 11 U.S. District Court's decision mandating those stipulations is appealed, Supreme Court Judge William Rehnquist ordered. Rehnquist let stand the lower court decision by denying March 3 a motion to stay filed by INS. The appeal of the decision in International Molders' Union vs. INS starts this month in the San Francisco District Court of Appeals. Filed November 1984 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), the suit charged that from 1982 to 1985 INS conducted 30 raids at 24 work sites without the consent of or by coercing owners into consent. 2 Board of Elections Commission, the agency charged with overseeing the purging process, has agreed to institute measures to give voters more time and convenience in applying for reinstatement. Voters have until March 12 to respond to the latest purge that occurred Feb. 19, 20. Primary and special aldermanic elections will be held March 18. Exacerbating the wrongful purging is the factthat47% of285,000 voting-age Hispanics in Chicago were ineligible to register in 1984, according to a survey by Chicago's Latino Institute. Undocumented workers and non citizens comprised the vast majority of this group, it concluded. MVREP conducted an audit of the latest purging process to determine its reliability and whether canvassers followed the new procedures. The audit results will be released this week. Cook Awarded $2 Million A Hispanic cook was awarded $2.1 million by a U.S. District Court jury Feb. 27 in Los Angeles after having served 2 1/2 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. His attorneys charged that Juan Venegas, now 36, was convicted after three Long Beach police officers persuaded witnesses to lie about his involvement in the 1971 murder of an acquaintance following a Christmas Eve drinking bout. Another man was found guilty and served time for the murder. Venegas was released from prison in October 197 4 after the California Supreme Court ruled that there had been insufficient evidence to find him guilty. He had won a $1 million judgment against the officers and city of Long Beach in Los Angeles Superior Court in 1980, but the verdict was reversed by an appellate court ruling that the officers were immune from civil liability for acts performed while on duty. Kay Barbaro Latino Catholic Scores continued from page 1 the Hispanic students came from single-parent homes. • Almost 5% of the teachers in schools serving low-income students were Hispanic, compared to 2.8% in the other Catholic schools. In 1984, approximately 9% of the 800,000 students in Catholic high schools were Latino. Felix Perez L.A. Latino Homicides Up Los Angeles Hispanics are much less likely to be homicide victims than are blacks there, but more than twice as likely as Anglos, a new study covering the decade of the '70s shows. The study, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and released Feb. 7, reported the following annual rates per 1 00,000 fort he city's4,950 murder victims during that period: Whites 8.1 Hispanics 18.2 Blacks 45.4 Among Hispanics, young males were found most at risk, with their murder rate having increased dramatically in that decade. Deaths and per-1 00,000 rates were: Age group 15-24 25-34 35-44 1970 1979 No. Rate 17 47.1 11 34.0 3 11.4 No . Rate 89 97.3 70 88.0 29 69.0 Hispanic males were seven times more likely to be victimized than Hispanic females. Overall, Hispanic victims had the youngest median age, 25.3 vs. 29.4 for blacks and 40.3 for whites. Among all females, Latinas had the lowest rate, 4.4 vs. 5.0 for Anglos and 17 . 8 for blacks. The reporfs principal author, UCLA professor Fred Loya, concluded that the deaths could be reduced significantly by police and mental health agencies' efforts working with young Hispanics and blacks even before they reach the high-risk age groups. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Unk. 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p .m. (ES1) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ao rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch. SIN Television Network seeks eager, out going writer for public relations department. Must be bilingual. Prefer public relations agency and! or copywriting experience. Send resume to: Mariette Arguimbau, Sl N, 460 W. 42 nd St. , New York, N.Y. 10036. NATIONAL SERJobs for Progress, Inc., Dallas, Texas. Nationwide non-profit employ ment and training organization seeks applicants for the position of vice president of planning and resource development and vice president of operations. Candidates are required to have a degree or equivalent job related ex perience, should have experience with govern' ment contracting, JTPA, non-profit associations ' and corporate resource development. Salary commensurate with experience. Resumes should be received no later than March 14. Send to: SERJobs for Progress, Inc., 1355 River Bend Drive, Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75247 Attn: Jane Jackson. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has werecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND. LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE-OPENINGS ASSISTANT TO DIRECTOR, Community Services Program DUTIES: Assist director in program Programs for Deaf Adults, College for Children, Homeless Families and other community service efforts. Monitor budgets and grant appoint ments, data collection, research and pre paration of reports, and liaison with project and divisional staff. Requirements: B.A. in Liberal Arts and prior administrative experience. Ability to handle diverse duties, excellent organizational and administrative skills, and ability to communicate positively with a variety of populations, strong analytical i!nd writing skills. Salary: 12-month fu'" time appointment at $19,000-$22,000 depending on experience. (Grant funded). Send letter and resume by March 28 to: Director of Community Services Program, Room 3, Division of Continuing Educ . ation. PROGRAMMER/ANALYST VM/IDMS/ GIGS. Seeking individual with strong technical skills to be Program Manager of application migration to an IBM 4361. REQUIREMENTS: Bachelor's degree or equivalent experience. An outstanding fringe benefits package awaits an individual with the appropriate edu cational and technical background, and the creative resourcefulness necessary to assume this challenging position. Send letter, resume and salary history by April 4 to: Director of Computer Services, Division of Administration . LaGuardia Community College 31 Thomson Avenue Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 EOE/AA EMPLOYER BORDER PATROL AGENT (This is a Federal civilian law enforcement position . ) From February 18-March 28, 1 986, the Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written examination for G&5, BORDER PATROL AGENT positions in the Federal Government. Initial duty stations are in the southern border states of Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas. Many are in smal( isolated communities. HOW TO APPLY: Obtain a Form 5000ABand a Qualifications Information Statement(QI-1896) from any Federal Job Information/Testing Office. FJI/Ts are located in principal cities across the country. They are listed under "U.S. Governmenf' in metropolitan area telephone directories. If none is listed in your directory, you can call information for a large metropolitan area or you Ciln contact your nearest State Job Service (or State Employment Security Office). When completing the Form 5000AB, be sure to enter the city and state of the test location you prefer. If that location is not available, you will be scheduled at a nearby location. Send the completed Form 5000AB to the OPM Area Office servicing the test location which you have chosen. Be sure it is postmarked no later than March 28, 1986. Other required application forms will be sent to you at the time you receive notice of whet) and where to report fort he written test. THE GOOD NEWS CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS: The 282-page "Catholic High Schools: Their Impact on Low Income Students" is available from: National Catholic Educational Association, ($23.75, $17 for members) Publications Dept., 1077 30th St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20007 (202) 293-5954. PURGING VOTERS: A 20-page study, "The Impact of the Purging Process on Hispanic Voters in Chicago," will be published in April. For a free copy write to: Maria Molina, Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, 50 W. Broad St., Suite 622, Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 614-1116. ORAL INTERVIEW and Spanish Language: An interview is required. You must know or learn Spanish as noted in the Qualifications Information Statement(QI-1896). Five points will be awarded for Spanish proficiency. MAXIMUM AGE LIMIT: Provisions of Public Law 93 allow the imposition of a maximum age for original entry into certain Federal law enforcement occupations. Border Patrol Agents are currently covered by such a restriction, the date preceeding one's 35th birthday, as authorized by the Congress of the United States and as adopted by the U .S. Department of Justice. If you are age 35 or older or will shortly reach your 35th birthday, but have previously served in a Federal civilian law enforcement position which may exempt you from the original entry age restriction, please provide the following information: the name of the Federal agency where you worked, the title of your position; and the dates employed. Please attach this Information to the completed Form 5000AB. WRITTEN TEST: The written examination will be administered nationwide. The exact date will vary from location to location. Candidates may take the written test only once during the period. LOS ANGELES HOMICIDE STUDY: The Centers for Disease Control compiled and compared the homicide rates for Latinos, blac . ks and whites in the study"The Epidemiology of Homicide in the City of Los Angeles, 1970-79. " For a free copy contact Dr. Jim Mercey, Violence Epidemiology Branch, CDC, Atlanta, Ga. 30333 (404) 329-3534. VOTER PARTICIPATION IN CHICAGO: "Latino Participation in Chicago's Electoral Process" is a seven-page report examining the number of Hispanic voters in that city and their participation rate . For a free copy write to: Latino Institute, 53 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 940, Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 663-3603. Calendar of the Chamber of Commerce of Puerto Rico as a speaker. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Atlanta March 12 THIS WEEK AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AWARD DINNER New York March 11 The National Puerto Rican Forum will host a banquet honoring a corporation that has shown extra effort to recruit Hispanics into its ranks. Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 HISPANIC BUSINESS MARKET New York March 12 La Voz Hispana will co-sponsor a conference to examine the His panic market and the most effective strategies to tap into it, with Vilma Colon, president Hispanic Link Weekly Report Herminia Ramos Donovan (212) 561 2023 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HISPANIC CULTURE Paris March 12 Scholars from around the world will meet to share research on the state of Hispanic culture studies in a conference sponsored by the University of Paris. Juan Novoa (512) 736 7526 HIGHER EDUCATION Washington, D .C. March 12 The Hispanic Caucus of the American Association of Higher Education will have a forum on education as it relates to Hispanics. Laura Rendon (202) 254-6050 The American Association for Affirmative Action will hold its 12th annual conference covering such topics as recruitment, quotas and reverse discrimination. Judy Burnison (31 2) 329 2 TRANSPORTATION JOBS SYMPOSIUM Wilberforce, Ohio March 13 Opportunities available for minorities in the trans portation industry will be discussed at this event sponsored by the National Council of Negro Women. Marcella Sampson (513) 376 NATIONALCHICANOSTUDENTCONFERENCE Berkeley, Calif . March 14 The 7th annual student conference by the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan. Gisela Macedo (415) 642 3

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Arts & Entertainment of Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe, an opera in two acts by that city's Eduardo C. Garza . The work, with a libretto written by Elizabeth Shaw and Garza, premiered Dec. 12, 1981, in Tucson. The date commemorated the 450th anniversary of the Virgin ' s miraculous apparition. A CURRENT STOP IN THE UNITED STATES BY Spain's traveling Antologia de Ia Zarzuela company coincides with the recent announcement of a new opera about Spanish painter Francisco de Goya that will be premiered in 'this country in November. In Puerto Rico, a new opera based on the folk tradition of the Fiesta de Santiago de los Caballeros will premiere Oct. 9. Set against the customs of the northern coastal village of Loiza Aldea, El mensajero de plata will be staged in the island's Centro de Bellas Artes. Robert Sierra composed the work, with a libretto by Myrna Casas. Antologia de , Ia Zarzuela, a Spanish company of singers, dancers and musicians, visits the United States intermittently on tours of the American continent. Under the direction of its founder Jose Tamayo, Antologia de laZarzuela concludes its current U.S. visit with a March 4-16 engage.ment at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. In a related item, Placido Domingo has announced that he will sing the title role in the world premiere of Goya, now scheduled for November in Washington, D.C. Chilean Victoria Vergara will also star in the opera-a $1 million by the Wahlngton Opera at the Kennedy Center. Excerpts from another Puerto Rican stage musical work will be performed later this year at the Kennedy Center. The musical comedy Fela, about San Juan's ex-Mayor Felisa Rinc6n de Gautier, premiered last year in Puerto Rico. The Kennedy Center performances will be part of a gala celebrating Rinc6n's 90th birthday . Domingo reportedly suggested Goya as the theme for composer Gian Carlo Menotti, who called the famed Spanish painter a " great challenge." The premiere of another U . S . Hispanic opera-based on the life of Mexican patriot Emiliano Zapata never took place. Zapata had been commissioned in 1981 byTito Capobianco, then director of the San Diego Opera, for a staging during the 1984-85 season. Incoming artistic director I an Campbell made the decision in 1983 not to stage the work by Spanish composer Leonardo Salada Recent operatic works by Hispanics in the United States have met varying degrees of success recently. Last December, San Antonio's Guadalupe.CulturaiArtsCenterstagedfoursold-out performances Zapata is reportedly now set to premiere next season in Pittsburgh . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report Despite a 17% increase ($49 million) in ad dollars targeted to the U .S. Hispanic market in 1985, the portion devoted to the Hispanic market from the nation ' s top 25 advertisers fell from 0.99% in 1984 to 0.84% in 1985. The Feb. 27 issue of Advertising Age Thursday, borrowing liberally from Hispanic Business magazine , puts ad expenditures for the Hispanic market at $335 million for 1985, up from $284 million in 1984. The increase falls shy of the 26.8% jump from 1983 and 35.2% from 1982 . Put another way, the top 25 advertisers committed less than 1% of their total ad dollars to reach the 8.5% of the U . S . population thet Hispanics represent. In its annual issue devoted to Hispanic marketing, Ad Age had 18 articles, none by Hispanic surnamed writers, on how different HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW . Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting : Dora Delgado , Feli x Perez, Char l ie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas , Teresita Carri6n No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $98 Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants ' packets at your next conference or convention . For details, contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234-0737 . 4 industries approach Hispanics and problems confronting Hispanic media The magazine noted that the top 1 0 advertisers in the Hispanic market spent $41.2 million in 1985, or a little less than one-eighth of 1985's Hispanic ad budget. The three top advertisers were Philip Morris ($7 million), Procter & Gamble ($6.5 million) and Anheuser Busch ($6.5 million). Among other questions raised was how to address the Hispanic market. Do you use Spanishor English-language ads, and , if you use Spanish, do you use different dialects when addressing subgroups of the U . S . Latino market? It reported that some advertisers , such as Hallmark Cards, use " generic" or textbook Spanish. Others, such as Anheuser-Busch, have regional ads catering to particular groups of Hispanics. Yet another approach is to fashion ad campaigns according to the status of the customer . Other facts and numbers it reported: U.S. CENSUS FORM 1990? 7 . Is this person of Spanish/Hispanic origin or descent? Fill one circle. 0 No (not Spanish/Hispanic) 0 Yes, Mexican , Mexican Amer., Chicano 0 Yes, Puerto Rican 0 Yes, Cuban 0 Yes, other Spanish/Hispanic • In Los Angeles, Miami and New York, the top three markets for Hispanic media dollars, print received $20. 4 million, or 12%, of the $166.4 million ad dollars spent on Hispanics in 1985. • Spanish-speaking adults are 44% less likely to purchase life insurance than . the general population . • Spanish-speaking adults are 59% less likely to purchase a new domestic car. For a copy of the Feb . 27 edition, send $2.75 to Ad Age Thursday, 740 Rush St., Chicago , Ill. 60611 . ROLODEX ROULETTE: Lorenzo Chavez, reporter with the West Palm Beach Times in Florida, has joined VIsta magazine in Coral Gables as a staff writer ... Galavlslon's West Coast operations chief John Figueroa has been promoted to national marketing v . p .... Oscar Reyes replaced Enrique Eduardo as editor of the Washington, D.C., Spanish language weekly , El Pregonero . . . Felix Perez 7 . Is this person of Spanish/Hispanic origin? Fill ONE circle for each person . AND If "Yes, other Spanish / Hispanic " print one group . 0 No (not Spanish / Hispanic) 0 Yes, Mexican , Mex. Am. , Chicano 0 Yes, Puerto Rican 0 Yes, Cuban 0 Yes, other Spanish/Hispanic (Print one group,for example : Argentinean, Colombian, Costa Rican , Dominican , Spaniard , etc . ) . --.......: : L ---=-=--=-=---:-----..J CENSUS DAY: March 16 is "Census Day" for 21 communities-including many Hispanic ones-in Los Angeles County. This week's pre-test for 1990 includes a revised Hispanic origin box. (See related story , page 1.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report