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Hispanic link weekly report, March 17, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 17, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
In his first personal lobbying effort on current immigration legislation, President Ronald Reagan meets March 11 with Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.) and Rep. Peter Rodino (D-N.J.), sponsors of immigration legislation, to express his support for their bills. Simpson's bill was passed by the Senate last September. Rodino’s is pending in the House Judiciary Committee... Democratic National Committee Chairman Paul Kirk appoints New Mexico State Democratic Party Vice Chair Bea Castellano as vice chair of a committee to choose a site for its 1988 convention. Kirk also appoints Colorado state Sen. Polly Baca and Albuquerque businessman Ed Romero as members ofthecommittee... New York Gov. MarioCuomoand NYC Mayor Ed Koch appoint former Republican minority leader of the City Council Angelo Arcuelo and Wildcat Service Corporation President Amalia Betanzos to a joint state-city commission to examine corruption,
MAR 1 8 W
favoritism and cortflictS'pf interest in government.... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Roberto Garcia of Sacramento as Hispanic recruitment project manager for the State’s Department of Corrections. He also reappoints Fernando Aldecoa to the state
Board of Corrections___Republican National Committee Chairman
Frank Fahrenkopf hosts a reception March 12 for 10 mayors from Puerto Rico who switched from the Democratic to Republican party... Jockey Angel Cordero Jr. undergoes more than four hours of surgery for a lacerated liver following a March 8 trampling from a trailing .horse after falling from his mount at Aqueduct in New York. He is expected to be hospitalized for two weeks.,.. Raquel Martinez, regarded as the worlds only fully qualified matadora, performs last week in the Houston Astrodome’s World Class Bullfights. Born in Tijuana, Mexico, and now residing in San Diego, Martinez says “being a woman... I have to prove myself each time. Every mistake is noticed.”...
Hispanic Elected Local Officials Set ’86 Agenda
The Hispanic caucus of the National League of Cities set an agenda to be discussed at its first-ever pre-conference workshop scheduled for Nov. 29 in San Antonio. The agenda, set March9 atthe league’s Maich8-11 Washington, D.C., annual Congressional City Conference, will include issues such as immigration, the
60% Cen. Am. Rise Seen
Central America’s population nearly tripled from 9.1 million in 1950 to 26.4 million in 1985 and it is projected to increase another 60% to 40 million by the enc) of the century.
According to a report by the Population Reference Bureau released March 13 titled “Conflict in Central America The Demographic Dimension," this rapid growth will have negative political and economic repercussions. As the ranks of the unemployed and impoverished grow, the stability of already weak political institutions will come under fire, concluded the report’s author, Sergio Diaz-Briquets.
The growth, noted the report, is due to the decrease in the mortality rate and continued high birth rates.
Those immigrants from Central America receiving legal status in the United States may increase the flow here as they attempt to reunite their families, the report concluded. In 1984, 24,000 Central Americans were admitted legally into the United States.
CENTRAL AMERICA POPULATION PROJECTIONS (in thousands)
1985 2020
Costa Rica 2,600 5,000
El Salvador 5,552 12,000
Guatemala 8,403 20,000
Honduras^ 4,372 13,000
Nicaragua 3,272 8,000
Panama 2,180 4,000
Total 26,379 62,000
Source: “Conflict In Central America The Demographic Dimension” by the Population Reference Bureau.
1990 Census and U.S. English campaign.
The agenda for San Antonio, which will coincide with NLCs Nov. 30-Dec. 3 annual conference, is one Hispanic Elected Local Officials(HELO) Second Vice President Elias Bermudez termed necessary to“educate Hispanic officials on how to participate fully in the political process.” Bermudez, vice mayor of San Luis, Ariz., said steps will be developed to counter the U.S. English campaign, which seeks to declare English the official language of the United States.
NLC President and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros called the U.S English movement “unnecessary",and one that “only serves to divide the community.”
Other agenda item$ include voter registration
$1/2 Million Health Grant
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Otis Bowen announced March 11a $450,000 grant award to a Hispanic umbrella organization for data analysis of the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (H HANES), released by the department Nov. 19.
The grant will be administered by the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations(COSSMHO), which will create a Hispanic Health Consortium to channel the funds to individual researchers and organizations interested in analyzing HHANES findings.
HHANES is a battery of tests, examinations and interviews on the health condition of Mexican Americans; Cubans and Puerto Ricans in the United States. The survey’s raw results are stored on computer tapes and forthcoming studies could help define the department’s future programs for Hispanics.
The first studies conducted with the grant will be available in the next 18 months, according to Jane Delgado, COSSM HO executive director. She also announced that the organization’s scope will be broadened to include all types of Hispanic health groups. The organization will retain the acronym COSSMHO, but delete the word “Mental” from its former title.
and economic development along the U.S. -Mexico border. Bermudez said HELO plans on working with the Southwest and Midwest Voter Registration Education Projects to register new Hispanic voters. The caucus also plans to ask Cisneros to set up a separate task force on immigration to look at the issues that affect border cities such as education, housing, unemployment and economic development. V
Ron Gonzales, vice mayor of Sunnyvale, Calif., and HELO president, said specific Hispanic issues were not on the agenda for the Washington conference. He said the issues facing Hispanic local officials are basically the same as those Confronting other city officials.
“We all face the dilemma of trying to tell our citizens of the importance of government in their.lives, that we have more of an opportunity to have an impact on their lives on the local rather than the federal level,” Gonzales explained.
Last week’s NLC conference focused its attention on proposed cuts in federal aid,to cities, President Reagan’s budget and the Gramm-Rudman deficit-reducing bill.
Denver Mayor Federico Pefta said federal support for community programs was essential, particularly in the Southwest where “we've
continued on page 2
Hispanic Jobless Jumps
The Hispanic unemployment rate increased from 10.1% in January to 12.3% in February, as part of the biggest monthly surge in the nation's unemployment since 1980. The overall rate rose from 6.6% to 7.2% during the same period, according to the U.S, Department of Labor.
The decline in general employment was more acute in California, Illinois and Texas, all with large Hispanic populations. Unemployment increased from 5.8% to 7.2% in California, 7.7% to 9.5% in Illinois and 6.4% to 8.4% in Texas.


Sin pelos en la lengua
VICE PRESIDENT CISNEROS: Politics is a game of seizing the moment, and Henry Cisneros is doing just that.
The San Antonio mayor is as astute and caring and self-controlled a politician as you can find in the nation today. If he were white, the press would be toying with his name - as it is with that of ex-Virginia Gov. Charles Robb - as presidential timber.
But Cisneros was born brown. So his sights for’88 are set a notch lower. He is carefully putting everything in place so that it will be very difficult for the Democratic Party NOT to select him as its vice presidential nominee next time around.
Cisneros has put together a tight team of planners and thinkers and writers to increase national visibility for himself and his ideas. He now bylines a syndicated newspaper column; books with his nameon them are being written.
By leapfrogging from local to national politics Cisneros will avoid the mental squalor ofaraceforTexasstatewideoffice. Anything less than a shot at the governor's chair or a U.S. Senate seat wouldn’t make political sense for him, anyway. And for those top positions i n a state that includes the redneck power bases of Dallas and Houston, a San Antonio Mexican American starts with two strikes on him.
Henry Cisneros visited Washington, D.C., last week to preside over a gathering of 3,500 mayors and city officials who are active in the National League of Cities.
Cisneros balanced well his roje as NLC president and as a success symbol for its 100-member Hispanic caucus. The applause he received following his keynote address to the full NLC assembly even outstripped the aplausos and abrazos he had received earlier at the caucus reception following a more intimate talk.
At the reception, Weekly Report asked 20 assorted Latino mayors and city council members to assess Cisneros’ chances of gaining the Democratic v.p. nomination.
The results, if hot surprising to his backers, should be encouraging to them. Eight said excellent; 4 very good; 5 good; 1 fair and 2 poor.
Another positive sign: During the conference, The Washington Post devoted a full page of its front news section to Cisneros and his hometown (“Mayor Cisneros Builds Consensus, but Struggles to Benefit Poor,” by David Broder).
A tougher critic in the months ahead will be his hometown press. With long needles and sharp barbs, the media there regularly tries to trim its near-flawless native son back to its own size whenever the suggestion is made that Henry has grown up and is ready to play in a bigger ballpark.
- Kay Barbaro
HELO Sets 1986 Issues Agenda
continued from page 1
Holding Center Opening
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will open a new detention center March 21 to alleviate harsh conditions, overcrowding and the lack of facilities for imprisoned Cubans awaiting deportation.
Currently, about 2,500 of the 125,000 Mariel Cubans who arrived in 1980 are being held in state and local correctional facilities across the nation. After serving their sentences, they are transferred to federal prisons from where they are deported.
The situation has deteriorated since Cuban President Fidel Castro decided to renege last May on an agreement with the United States to take back more than 2,700 of the Marielitos. Two hundred men had been deported before the pact was abrogated Castro responded to the U.S. decision to beam Radio Marti, a U.S. government radio station, to Cuba
The new facility, located in Oakdale, La, will hold 1,000 detainees. The Federal Bureau of Prisons plans to add room for an additional 300 late this year.
N. Y. Museo to Stay Open
El Museo del Barrio New York City's premier Hispanic museum founded in 1969, will remain open despite a freeze by the city on a majority of its funds since November.
The Museo’s board of directors decided March 6 to seek help from Mayor Edward Koch to expedite an investigation into alleged financial irregularities by the museum. The board also asked the city’s Cultural Affairs Commission to release emergency operating funds.
The four-month-old freeze on the funds, which make up two-thirds of its $600,000 annual budget, has left the Museo operating with a volunteer staff.
A spokesman - r the commission said there was no indication as to when the investigation would be concluded.
2
relied heavily on federal aid for bilingual education, low-income housing projects, health programs and economic development projects that bring money to our cities.”
The league, founded in 1924, established the Hispanic caucus in 1976. It currently has 100 members, most of whom attended the Washington event A total of 3,500 mayors and other city officials participated.
Hispanics serve as vice chairs on two of NLC’s five policy committees. They include Yuma, Ariz., Councilman John Rodriguez, who participated in the Energy, Environmental and Natural Resources Committee deliberations in Washington, and Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez who serves on the Human Development Committee but was unable to attend.
Figures released by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) in September showed 1,041 Hispanic elected municipal officials senring nationwide, with3,202 Hispanics serving in elective positions at local, state and national levels.
Gonzales said the trip to Washington was a first for many of the Hispanics who need to
Vote Plan Aids Latinos
The Eddy County Commission in Carlsbad, New Mexico, whose at-large elections were outlawed by sweeping state voting rights reforms in 1982, agreed Feb. 27 to create five electoral districts, giving Hispanics there a first chance at representation. Hispanics are 32% of the county population.
The new plan stems from a September 1985 suit which charged that a three-district plan proposed by incumbent commissioners still discriminated against Hispanics.
It offered one district with a 43% Hispanic population.
The five-district plan includes districts with 61% and 44% Hispanics. Elections are set for June.
become exposed to and better understand the government process at the federal level.
“Just as we travel to our state capitols, it is equally important that we travel to the nation’s capitol to understand how the process works and the politics involved,” Gonzales explained.
Members of the NLC’s Hispanic caucus were given briefings by NALEO and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus; sessions Gonzales termed important to help officials to begin developing the networking process.
- Carlos Morales
Martinez Blasts EEOC
Rep. Matthew Martinez, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities, opened a hearing March 11 on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s abandonment of goals and timetables as a remedy in discrimination cases, charging “EEOC has set out to reverse 20 years of sound civil rights policies.”
The hearing followed recent published reports that the commission’s acting general counsel, Johnny Butler, had informed regional enforcement attorneys last fall that settlements involving goals and timetables should not be submitted.
Butler testified his decision followed his assessment that a majority of the board did not support such settlements.
EEOC Chairman Clarence Thomas told subcommittee members he did not direct Butler to issue the order but that he supported his action.
Questioning of all five commissioners revealed that only the two Hispanic members - Tony Gallegos and Fred Alvarez- su pported the continued use of goals and timetables.
Martinez closed the hearing by telling the commissioners, “I don’t believe that EEOC will be effective if it abandons all available remedies.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N Si NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESI) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ao rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
REPORTER/PROOFREADER
Professional association seeks editorial assistant with good news reporting and proofreading skills for varied duties in Communications Department Degree in Journalism and some reporting experience required. Knowledge of government and public policy helpful Salary $14,000- $16,500 depending on qualifications Send resume to Department of Communications American Society for Public Administration, 1120 G St NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20005.
VICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS
The Vice President will report directly to the President and will be responsible for the day-to-day program and administration of the National Puerto Rican Coalition, Inc
Candidates should be bilingual and familiar with public policy issuesconfronting the Puerto Rican community in the United States Candidate should also possess an advanced degree in management social sciences or education and have eight years of professional experience with a minimum of two years of supervisory experience. Salary $40,000 * $45,500 per annum dependent on experience and previous salary history. An extensive fringe benefit package is also offered.
Interested candidates should submit resumes no later than April 11 toe Louis Nunez, President
NPRC, Inc, 701 N. Fairfax St. Suite 310. Alexandria, Va 22314.
NATIONAL 8ER-Jobs for Progress. Inc. Dallas, Texas. Nationwide non-profit employment and training organization seeks appHcants for the position Of vice president of planning and resource development and vice president of operatione Candidates are required to have a degree or equivalent fob related experience, should have experience with govern ment contracting, JTPA non-profit associations and corporate resource development Salary commensurate with experience. Resumes should be received no later than March 14. Send to: SER*Jobs for Progress. Inc, 13SS River Bend Drive Suite 350, Dallas. Texas 75247 Attn*. Jane Jackson.
ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA., JOB OPPORTUNITIES
The following four positions aose Thursday, March 27, at 5 pm.
INTERNAL AUDIT SUPERVISOR $27,160-$36,333 Ann. #14216ADM F Supervisory work directing a small group of professional auditors in the Department of Management and Finance. Plans, coordinates and directs the work of auditors; performs management operational, financial and compliance audits; performs technical accounting and auditing work for the Countys annual audit and financial reporting process and other related duties. Requires college degree in accounting or related field plus two years experience in accounting and auditing work. Preference may be given to applicants with auditing experience beyond the minimum, accounting experience with local government, experience with the audit of complex automated financial systems, C.P.A anchor maste/sin Accounting or Business Administration.
INSTRUMENT TECHNICIANS Level I: $21,091 -$21,985 Level II: $21,985 - $22,919 Ann. #234860DPW Highly skilled work in the Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and lift stations. The WPCP is a30MGD advanced wastewater treatment plant with sludge dewatering and incineration facilities. Instrumentation includes over 1,000 wastewater treatment instruments monitoring flow, chemical perimeters, temperature, pressure, etc.
Instrument Technician II requires high school plus two years of electronics technology training and four years experience in industrial instrumentation maintenance,
collaboration and repair, preferably in wastewater treatment plant plus considerable experience in all types of specialized electronic test equipment used in instrumentation maintenance and repair.
Instrument I requires high school plus two years experience in the repair and maintenance of the instrumentation equipment and systems preferably in a water or wastewater treatment plant Working knowledge of pneumatic, hydraulic and mechanical instrument and control devices Skill in performing troubleshooting techniques involving signal tracing, wave form analysis voltage, current and resistance checks are preferred.
PLANNER II (URBAN DESIGN) $25,317 - $33,862 Ann. #31646DCAF Professional work in the field of community planning and urban design. Responsible for assessing neighborhood or other area needs for public improvements and developing, designing and coordinating the implementation of a broad variety of capital improvements Person will interact with architects engineers and other design professionals agencies private owners developers and citizen groups Both positions require college degree supplemented by a master's degree in Planning, Architecture, Urban Design or Landscape Design plus one year experience
in professional planning and urban design work and/or architecture and landscape architecture. Preferred qualification information is found on the official job announcement
PLANNERS llfS
$25,317 - $33,862 Ann. #36146CCAF
Professional position in urban design and urban planning. Responsible for preparation of a broad variety of urban projects and land use planning studies Person is expected to represent the County and Planning Division before public bodies and groups on established planning policy.
The following position closes Thursday, March 20, at 5:b0 p.m.
OFFICE SUPERVISOR $19,146 Ana #11146ADPW
Supervisory, technical and clerical work in utility service division of the Department of Public Works Supervises 11 clerical employees maintains an accurate and comprehensive utility billing and collections record systems
Produces monthly water, sewer, refuse billings for County.
Requires high school or equivalent plus three years responsible experience in detailed technical and clerical operations Supervisory experience is desirable.
The following position Is open untH filled.
POLICE OFFICER $21,201 Ana #5120APOL Premium Pay: $1,000 for BA andSI 400 or master's
Arlington County is actively recruiting entry level Police Officers to join one of the few nationally accredited departments in the country. This is professional law enforcement work in which the employee is responsible for protection of life and property. Duties include patrolling by car/ motorcyde/foot to detect or prevent crime. assisting in investigations of major crimes such as homidds raps etc, and testifying in court proceedings etc.
Requires two years of college (60 semester. 90 quarter houwf at anaccrerMted cottage or university, Virginia drivers Iconae at time of employment andUSdiienehipi New officers are required to attend a thirteen week training course at Northern Virginia Criminal Justice Academy-
Official Arlington County application form required for each position. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 weekdays between S.DO am. and 5:00 pirn. Applications must bo received into the personnel department by 6 pita on the specified closing date Arlington County. Personnel Department 2100 North 14th St, Arlington Va, 22201. EOE/M/F/H
THE GOOD NEWS
Circulation Dept, P.O. Box 35012, Washington, D.C. 20013 (202) 639-8040.
CENTRAL AMERICAN DEMOGRAPHICS: The 16-page report “Conflict in Central America: The Demographic Dimension,” looks at population growth and its economic and political impact in the region. Send $3, plus $1 for postage, to: Population Reference Bureau,
HHANES RESEARCH: Persons interested in grant money to research data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey should contact Linda Neal, National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, 103015th St NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100.
Calendar
MALDEF DINNER San Francisco March 18
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will sponsor its 11 th annual dinner to recognize individuals for their contributions in corporate, legal, civic and cultural areas.
Mariano Diaz (415) 981-5800
FINANCIAL INVESTMENT SEMINAR Washington, D.C. March 19 The National Council of H ispanic Women will hold a seminar to discuss investment strategies.
Anna O’Brien (202) 343-6816 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY
Washington, D.C. March 20,21
The 9th annual conference sponsored by the Center
for Migration Studies of New York will look at
legislative developments affecting immigrants and
refugees.
Maggie Sullivan (718) 351-8800
GRAPE BOYCOTT FUND-RAISER New York March 21
C6sar Ch&vez, president of the United Farm Workers, and Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) will brief the Hispanic media on the boycott.
Ed Sdnchez (212) 242-0700 Ext 251
COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARDS San Diego March 21
The Chicano Federation of San Diego County will sponsor its 16 th annual banquet to recognize contributions to the community.
Jos6 Muniz (619) 236-1228
OFFICER INSTALLATION BANQUET Houston March 21
Joe Russo, co-owner of United Press International, will keynote this event by the Houston Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
Carmen Orta (713) 880-0808
HISPANIC ELDERLY
San Francisco March 21-23
The National HtsjranicCouncii on Aging will sponsors
conference on issues pertinent to Hiqpanic elderly.
Rebeca Gilad (202) 265-1288
3


Arts & Entertainment
“SOME OF THE BEST ACTORS IN'AMERICA are blacks, Latinos, Asians and American lndians,” attorney Nancy Tuthilltold a crowd of entertainment professionals at a March 9 seminar on ethnic minorities in'the film and television industry. ,
“We know.this and it is vitally important that producers, directors and casting agents be made aware of it, believe it and act upon it,” Tut hill sajd.- /
Th'e> seminar - “Racial' Discrimination in the Motion Picture and Television Industry: Solutions for Survival" - ended a three-day conference in Los Angeles by members of ethnic equal opportunity committees of the Screen Actors Guild and American Federation - of Television and Radio Artists chapters around the country. Juthill, a volunteer with* the Albuquerque-based American Indian Registry, said that a common goal for'all actors from ethnic minority groups is to be offered>the “first good reading” for an ethnic role.
fUnless film and television convey accurate images and stories a^out ,lindiah people arid all ethnic minorities. . . the public will cOntinue to thihk that Indians are still riding around on horseback... or (m inorities) carry On I ike Charlie Chans and Uncle Remusea”
■ t;‘The iesue is beyond just getting jobs for actors,” expanded Nolan
Bowie, a second speaker at the seminar.
Bowie, a communications lawyer and aspiring social scientist, called racism an “industry-wide problem.” He said social scientists should apply the tools of content analysis to “develop indicators of racism that are commonly agreed upon.” By counting the indicators and analyzing them statistically, he explained, figures are obtained that can be used as evidence of racism.
One problem in selecting the “indicators of racism,” as evidenced in post-seminar discussions, was agreeing upon which images and actions can be universally deemed “racist”
The SAG/AFTRA conference ended with various proposals that will be submitted for action by the boards of directors of both unions A SAG spokesman declined to elaborate on the proposals pending board hearings. He told Weekly Report that one included the use of arbitration in ethnic discrimination complaints ONE LINERS: The New York-based Asociacidn de Cronistas de Espectaculos handed out dozens of its ACE entertainment awards at a banquet March 15... F6lix Hern&ndez and Karen Jefferson have received funding from National Public Radio’s Satellite Program Development Fund to produce Harlem Hit Parade. Nineteen projects received a total of $300,000 from the fund in January...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
the entire bilingual education program into the block grant pot. In a private conversation in his office, I succeeded in persuading Stockman to back off on this initiative,” he wrote, adding “Following this initial episode, we proceeded to withdraw the bilingual education regulations that had been approved by former Secretary of Education Shirley Hufstedler. Then, in 1984, we heard the President assure Hispanics during a visit to Texas that we would continue to support funding for bilingual education...” It was at a campaign stop to address the American G.f. Forum convention in El Paso where the president stated his commitment to bilingual ed.
(By arrangement with the Phi Delta Kappan magazine, Weekly Report readers may receive a copy of Bell’s article. Send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to Media Report, Hispanic Link, 1420NSLNW, Washington, DC 20005.)
HIGH SCHOOL CONTEST: Eight regional media associations submitted entries for the first high school writing contest sponsored
by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
The El Paso Association of Hispanic Journalists, Florida Association of Hispanic Journalists, Atlanta Community Television Association, Tucson’s Concerned Media Professionals, the Massachussetts Association of Latin Americans in Communications, the Los Angeles-based California Chicano News Media Association and its San Diego chapter, and Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., sent entries in at least one of the three categories - English composition, Spanish composition and news stories
The winners, to be announced in April, will be flown to the National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami to receive their awards
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Ricardo Chavira has joined the Washington, D.C, office of Time magazine as a State Department correspondent after a lengthy assignment in Mexico
-Teresita Carridn and Charlie Ericksen
Report
^ BELL TELLS ALL: Terrel Bell, U.S. Secretary of Education during President Reagan’s first i^rm, Offers an unusually revealing look at K@w federal education policy was shaped during his administration in the March issue q£the education journal, Phi Delta Kappan. ;;Much of the article deals with Belf s personal efforts to -resist “proponents of the doctrines of the extreme right.” He added that had his own position not been Cabinet-level “more of tip revolutionary and shockingly radical agenda qf theTair Rightyrouldhave been realized.” Bell-called some department actions “at times eohtradift tory;and inconsistent,” citing bilingual jiduca'bPf1 33 ahexample.
£? “We began with the passage of block grant legislation for elementary and secondary schools - legislation that included (Budget brfrector David) Stockman’s proposal to put
HISPANIC LINK REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 *N' Street NW Washington, 0.C. "20005 .
(202) 234-0280 or 234^737
Publisher. pric^eiirM^njciozpj.
Editor Cartos.J^pf«iJ^^. 4* /
. Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lfx Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas . Teresita Carridn-t ;
No portion (^Hispanic UnkWpekiyfieport may be reproduced or broadcast in ahy form wtyidM' advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
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CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets ait your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hdctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737..
National League of Cities President Henry Cisneros addresses 3,500 participants at NLC’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C. (See story, page 1.)
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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r"U1/liti Making The News This Week MAR 1 8 favoritism and conflicts of interest in government. .. California Gov. George Oeukmeji an ap p oints Roberto Ga rcia of Sacramento as Hispanic recruitmen f project manager f o r the state ' s Department of Corrections. He also reappoin t s Fernando Aldecoa to the sta t e Board of Corrections ... Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahrenkopf hosts a , reception March 12 for 1 0 mayors from Puerto Rico who switched from the Democratic to Republican party ... Jockey Angel Cordero Jr. undergoes more than four hours of surgery for a lacerated liver following a March 8 trampling from a trailing .horse after falling from his mount at Aqueduct in Ne\AI York He is expected to be hosp i talized for two weeks . ... Raquel Martinez, regarded as the world's only fully qualified matadors, performs last week in the Houston Astrodome's World Class Bullfights. Born in Tijuana, Mexico , and now residing in San Diego, Marti nez In his first personal lobbying effort on current immigration legislation , President Ronald Reagan meets March 11 with . Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo . ) and Rep. Peter Rodino (D-N.J.) , sponsors of immigration legislation, to express his s upport for their bills . S i mpson's bill was passed by the Senate last September . Rodino's is pending in the House Judiciary Committee ... Democratic National Committee Chairman Paul Kirk appoints New Mexico State Democratic Party Vice Chair Bea Castellano as vice chair of a committee to choose a site for its 1988 convention. Kirk also appoints Colorado state Sen . Polly Baca and Albuquerque businessman Ed Romero as members of the committee ... New York Gov. Mario Cuomo. and NYC Mayor Ed Koch appoint former Republican minority leader of the City Counc i l Angelo Arcuelo and Wildcat Service Corporation President Amalia Betanzos to a joint state-city commission to examine corruption , says "being a woman . . . 1 nave to prove myself each time . Every mistake is noticed."... HISPANIC LINKWEEKLY REPORT , ... "'""1 •86 Hispanic Elected Agendc:t The Hispanic caucus of the National League 1990 Census and U . S . English campaign . and economic development along ttie u , s . : Vol 4 No. 11 IJ of Cities set an agenda to be discussed at its The agenda for San Antonio, which will Mexico border. Bermudez said HELO plans . first-ever pre-conference workshop scheduled coincide w i th NLC ' s Nov . 30-Dec. 3 annual on working with the Southwest and Midwest for Nov. 29 in San Antonio . The agenda, set conference, i s one Hispanic E l ected Local Voter Registration Education Projects tore March 9 atthe league's March8 -11 Washington , Officials(HELO) Second Vice President Elias gister new Hispanic voters. The caucus also D .C., annua l Congressional City Conference, Bermudez termed necessary to"educate Hisplans to ask Cisneros to set up a separate will include issues such as immigration, the panic officia l s on how to participate fully in task force on immigration to look at -the the pol i tical process . " Bermudez, vice mayor issuesthataffectbo r dercitiessuchaseducat ion, of San Luis , Ar i z., said steps will be developed housing, unemployment and economic develoP. to counter the U ,S. English campaign, which ment. . 600/o Cen. Am. Rise Seen Central America's population nearly tripled from 9 . 1 million in 1950 to 26 . 4 million in 1985 and it is projected to increase another 60% to 40 million by the end of According to a report by the Population Reference Bureau released March 13 titled "Conflict in Central America: The Demographic Dimension, " this rapid growth will have negative political and economic repercussionS. As the ranks of the unemployed and impoverished grow, the stability of already weak political institutions will come under fire , concluded the report's author, Sergio Diaz-Briquets . The growth , noted the report , is due to the decrease in the mortality rate and continued high birth rates. Those immigrants from Central America receiving legal status in the United States may increase the flow here as they attempt to reunite their families, the report concluded . In 1984, 24,000 Central Americans were admitted legally into the United States . CENTRAL AMERICA POPULATION PROJECTIONS (in thousands) 1985 Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras ' Nicaragua Panama Total 2 ,600 5,552 8,403 4 ,372 3 ,272 2 ,180 26,379 2020 5 ;000 12,000 20,000 13,000 . 8 ,000 4,000 62,000 Source : " Con f lict in Central America: The Demographic Dimension " by the Population Reference Bureau . seeks to declare English the official language Ron Gonzales, vice ma yor of Sunnyvale , of the United States. Calif., and HELO president, said specific His. NLC President and San Antonio Mayor panic issues were not on the agenda for the . Henry Cisrieros . called the U.S. English move ment Washington conference . He said the is . sues "unnecessary" and one that "only serves to facing Hispanic local officials are basically divide the commun ity. " the same as those con (ronting other city Other agenda item$ include voter registration officials. $1/2 Million Health Grant U . S . Department of Health and Human Serv i ces Secretary Otis Bowen announced March 11 a $450,000 grant award to a His panic umbrella organization for data analysis of the Hispanic Health and Nutrit i on Examination Survey ( H HANES) , released by the department Nov . 19. The grant will be . administered by the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations(COSSM HO), which will create a Hispanic Health Consortium to channel the funds to individual researchers and organizations interested in analyzing HHANES findings . HHANES is a battery of tests , examinations and interviews on the health condition of Mexican Americans; Cubans and Puerto Ricans in the United States . The survey's raw results are stored on computer tapes and forthcoming studies ' could help define the departmenfs future programs for Hispanics . The first studies conducted with the grant will beavailable in the next 18 months, according to Jane Delgado, COSSMHO executive director. She also anpounced that the organization ' s scope will be broadened to include all types of Hispanic health groups. The organization will retain . the acronym COSSMHO, but delete the word "Mental" from its former title. " We all face the dilemma of trying to tell our citizens of the importance of government in their lives, that we have more of an opportunity to have ah . impact on their lives on the' local rather than the . federal level,'; . Gonzales explained . . ,, Last week's NLC confe rence focusecl'its attention on proposed cuts in federal aid .to cities , President Reagan's budget and the. Gramm-Rudman deficit-reducing bi . ll . Denver Mayor Federico Peiia said feder al support for community programs was particularly in the Southwest where "we've c on t inu e d o n pa ge 2 Hispanic Jobless Jumps The Hispan i c unemployment rate increased from 1 0 .1% in January to 12.3% in February , : as part of the biggest monthly surge in the nation's unemployment since 1980 . . The overall rate rose from 6.6% to 7 . 2% during the same period , according to the U .S. Department of Labor. The decline in gener al employment was more acute in California , lllin . ois and Texas, all with large Hispan i c populations . Unem ployment increased from 5 . 8% to 7 . 2% in Californ ia, 7.7% to 9 . 5% in Illinois and 6.4% to 8.4% in Texas .

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Henry Cisneros visited Washington, D .C., last week to preside over a gathering of 3,500 mayors and city officials who are active in the National League of Cities. VICE PRESIDENT CISNEROS: Politics is a game of seizing the moment, and Henry Cisneros is doing just that. The San Antonio mayor is as astute and caring and self-controlled a politician as you can find in the nation today. If he were white, the press would be toying with his name-as it is with that of ex-Virginia Gov. Charles Robb-as presidential timber. Cisneros balanced well his role as NLC president and as a success symbol for its 1 DO-member Hispanic caucus. The applause he received following tiis keynote address to the full N LC assembly even outstripped the aplausos and abrazos he had received earlier at the caucus reception following a more intimate talk. But Cisneros was born brown. So his sights for'88 are set a notch lower. He is carefully putting everything in place so that it will be very difficult for the Democratic Party NOT to select him as its vice presidential nominee next time around. At the reception, Weekly Report asked 20 assorted Latino mayors and city council members to assess Cisneros' chances of gaining the Democratic v.p. nomination. The results, if riot surprising to his backers, should be encouraging to them. Eight said excellent; 4 very good; 5 good; 1 fair and 2 poor. Cisneros has put together a tight team of planners and thinkers and writers to increas . e national visibility for himself and his ideas. He now bylines a syndicated newspaper column; books with his name on them are being written. By leapfrogging from local to national politics, Cisneros will avoid the mental squalor of a race forT exas statewide office. Anything less than a shot at the governor's chair or a U.S. Senate seat wouldn't make political sense for him, anyway. And for those top positions in a state that includes the redneck power bases of Dallas and Houston, a San Antonio Mexican American starts with two strikes on him. Another positive sign: During the conference, The Washington Post devoted a full page of its front news section to Cisneros and his hometown ("Mayor Cisneros Builds Consensus, but Struggles to Benefit Poor," by David Broder). Holding Opening The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will open a new detention center March 21 to alleviate harsh conditions, overcrowding and the lack of facilities for imprisoned Cubans awaiting deportation. Currently, about 2,500 of the 125,000 Marie! Cubans who arrived in 1980 are being held in state and local correctional facilities across the nation. After serving their sentences, they are transferred to federal prisons from where they are deported The situation has deteriorated since Cuban President Fidel Castro decided to renege last May on an agreement with the United States to take back more than 2,700 of the Marielitos. Two hundred men had been deported before the pact was abrogated. Castro responded to the U.S. decision to beam Radio Mart{, a U.S. government radio station, to Cuba The new facility, located in Oakdale, La, will hold 1 ,000 detainees. The Federal Bureau of Prisons plans to add room for an addiffonal 300late this year. N.Y. Museo to Stay Open El Museo del Ba"io, New York City's premier Hispanic museum founded in 1969, will remain open despite a freeze by the city on a majority of its funds since November. The Museo's board of directors decided March 6 to seek help from Mayor Edward Koch to expedite an investigation into alleged financial irregularities by the museum. The board also asked the city's Cultural Affairs Commission to release emergency operating funds. The four-month-old freeze on the funds, which make up two-thirds of its $600,000 annual budget, has left the Museo operating with a volunteer staff. A spokesman' . • r the commission said there was no indication as to when the investigation would be concluded. 2 A tougher critic in the months ahead will be his hometown press. With long needles and sharp barbs, the media there regularly tries to trim its near-flawless native son back to its own size whenever the suggestion is made that Henry has grown up and is ready to play in a bigger ballpark. Kay Barbaro HELO Sets 1986 Issues Agenda continued from page 1 relied heavily on federal aid for bilingual education, low-income housing projects, health programs and economic development projects that bring money to our cities." The league, founded in 1924, established the Hispanic caucus in 1976. It currently has 1 00 members, most of whom attended the Washington event A total of 3,500 mayors and other city officials participated. Hispanics serve as vice chairs on two of NLC's five policy committees. They include Yuma, Ariz., Councilman John Rodriguez, who participated in the Energy, Environmental and Natural Resourt::es Committee deliberations in Washington, and Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez who serves on the Human Development Com mittee but was unable to attend. Figures released by the National Association of Latino Elected . and Appointed Officials (NALEO) in September showed 1,041 Hispanic elected municipal officials serving nationwide, with 3,202 Hispanics serving in elective positions at local, state and national levels. Gonzales said the trip to Washington was a first for many of the Hispanics wtlo need to Vote Plan Aids Latinos The Eddy County Commission in Carlsbad, New Mexico, whose at-large elections were outlawed by sweeping state voting rights reforms in 1982, agreed Feb. 27 to create five electoral districts, giving Hispanics there a first chance at representation. Hispanics are 32% of the c;ounty population. The new plan stems from a September 1985 suit which charged that a three-district plan proposed by incumbent commissioners still discriminated against Hispanics. It offered one district with a 43% Hispanic population. The five-district plan includes districts with 61% and 44% Hispanics. Elections are set for June. become exposed to and better understand the government process at the fEideral level. "Just as we travel to our state capitols, it is equally important that we travel to the nation's capitol to understand how the process works and the politics involved," Gonzales explained. Members of the NLC's Hispanic caucus were given briefings by NALEO and the Con gressional Hispanic Caucus, sessions Gonzales termed important to help officials to begin developing the networking process. • Carlos Morales Martinez Blasts EEOC Rep . Matthew Martinez, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities, opened a hearing March 11 on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's abandonment of goals and timetables as a remedy in discrimination cases, charging" EEOC has set out to reverse 20 years of sound civil rights policies." The hearing followed recent published reports that the commission's acting general Johnny Butler, had informed regional enfort::ement attorneys last fall that settlements involving goals and timetables should not be submitted. Butler testified his decision followed his assessment that a majority of the board did not support such settlements. . EEOC Chairman Clarence Thomas told subcommittee members he did not direct Butler to issue the order but that he supported his action. Questioning of all five commissioners revealed that only the two Hispanic members -Tony Gallegos and Fred Alvarezsupported the continued use of goals and timetables. Martinez closed the hearing by telling the commissioners, "I don't believe that EEOC will be effective if it abandons all available remedies." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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NPRC, Inc., 701 N. Fairfu St. Suite 310. CORPORATE CLASSIF.IEDS VICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS The Vice President will report directly lo the President and will be responaible for the day to-day program and administration of the National Puerto Rican Coalition, Inc. Alexandria, Va. 22314. PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search lor executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Unk. 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESl) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday ott he same week. Aa rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch . INTERNAL AUDIT SUPERVISOR $27,160-$36,333 Ann. #14216ADMF Supervisory work directing a small group o f professional auditors in the Department of Management and Finance. Plans. coordinates and directs the work of audttors performs management operationaL financial and compliance audits: performs technical accounting and auditing work for the CountYs annual audtt and financial reporting process and other related duties. Requires college degree in accounting or related field pius two years experience in accounting and auditing work. Preferel\j;:e may be given to applicants with audit i ng experience beyond the minimum,aocountingexperience with local government, experience with the audit of complex automated financial systems, C.PA and' or masters in Accounting or Bu si ness Administration. INSTRUMENT TECHNICIANS Leveli:$21 ,091-$21, 985 Levelll :$21,98 5 -$22,g19 Ann . #23486CDPW Highly skilled work in the Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and lift stations. The WPCP is a30MGD advanced wastewater treatment plant with sludge dewatering and incineration facilities. Instrumentation includes over 1,000 wastewater treatment instruments monitoring flow, chemical perimet ers, temperature, pressure, etc. Instrument Technician II requires high school plus two years of electronics technology training and four years experience in i ndustrial instrumentation maintenance , REPORTER/PROOFREADER Professional association seeks editorial assistant with good news reporting and reading skills lor varied duties in Communications Department Degree in Journalism and some reporting experience required. Knowledge of government and public policy helpful Salary $14,000-$16,500 depending on qualffications. Send resume to Department of Communications, 1\merican Society lor Public Administration, 1120 G St NW , Suite 500, Washington, D . C . 20005. Candidates should be bilingual and familiar with public policy isaueaconfronting the Puerto Rican community in the United States. Can didate should also posaess an advanced degree in management. social sciencea or education and have eight years ol prolesaional experience with a minimum of two years of supervisory experience . Salary $40,000 $45,500 per annum dependent on experience and previous salary history. An extensive fringe benefit package is also offerad . lnterestadcandidateaahouldaubmitreaumM nolaterthanApril11to: LouiaNUflez.Preeldent, ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA., JOB OPPORTUNITIES The following four positions c•ose Thursday, March 27, at 5 p.m. collaboration and repair, preferably in wastewater treatment plant plus considerable experience in all types of specialized electronic test equipment used in in strumentation maintenance and repair. Instrument I requires high school plus two years experience in the repair and maintenance of the instrumentation equip ment and systems preferably in a waterer wastewater treatment plant Working knowledge of pneumatic, hydraulic and mechanical instrument and control devices. Skill in performing troubleshooting tech niQues involving signal tracing, wave form analysis, voltage , current and resistance checks are preferred . PLANNER II (URBAN DESIGN) $25,317-$33,862 Ann . #31646DCAF Professional work in the field of com munity planning and urban design. Res ponsible for assessing neighborhood or other area needs for public improvements and developing, designing and coordinating the implementation of a broad variety of capital improvements. Person will interact with architects, engineers and other design p•ofessionais. agencies. private owners. developers and citizen groups. Both positions require college degree supplemented by a maste(s degree in Planning, Architecture, Urban Design or Landscape Design pius one year experience in profess i onal planning and urban design work and/or architecture and landscape architecture . Preferred qualification in formation is found on the official job announcement PLANNERS II' I $25,317-$33,862 Ann. #36146CCAF Professional position in urban design and urban planning. Responsible for pre paration of a broad variety ol urban projects and land use planning atudlea. Person Ia expected to repreaent the County and Planning Division before public bodies and groupe on ealabiiahed planning policy. The following positio n closes Thursday, March 20, at 5:00 p.m. OFFICE SUPERVISOR $19,146 Ann. #11146ADPW Supervisory, technical and clerical work in utility service division of the Department of Public Works . Supervises 11 clerical employees. maintains an accurate and comprehenalve utiltty blUing and collections record systems. Produces monthly water, aewer, reluae billings for County. Requires high school or equivalent plua three years responsible experience in detailed teehnical and clerical operation& Supervisory experience Ia desirable. NAnONAL SIR-Jobs lor Plogre ... Inc. . Dallas. Texas. Nationwide mentand training lor the poaltlon ol vice prelident ol plannlllfl and resource developmel)l end vice preeldeftl ol operatlona. Candidlllea are required to have a degrea or equivalent1011 related '!• perience,lhOuld have experlencewltll men! contracting. JTPA. non-l)lolil and corporall! ,_ Slllfr'. commenaurate with experience. R...,.... , ahould be recelvad no later theft Man:ll I 4. Sand to: SEA-Jobs lcir Progrea. Inc., I 351 River Bend Drive, Suite 350, Dallal. Teua 75247 Attn: Jane Jackaon. The following poaltlon Ia open Ul)tit filled. POUCE OFFICER $21 , 201 Ann. #5120APOL Premium Pay. S1.0001otBA.ancll1.400 or maatefa. Arlington County is actively racrultlno entry level Police Officers to join one of the lew nationally in the country. This Ia proleaaionlll law enforcement work lnwllich the is responsible lor protection of lite ancf property. Dullea lftCiude todetecl or.,._,Cflma aaalatlng In lnveatigatlona ol major crllnea such .. homicide, rape. elc..andllltiiWino"" court proceadtnga, etc. Requires two yeara ol college CIO aemeater. 110 quarter 11ou111 at an__.. college or unilleqlty, Vllglnla clrMI8 at time ol employmenl and US. cllllanllllp. Nofficers are required to attend a thirteen week training course at Nolthem Virginia Criminal Justice Academy. Official Arlington County application form requlfad lor each poaltlon. To 18Queat application material pleaae call C703) 558 weekdays '*-n 8:00 -.M. and5:00 p.m. AppllcatioNI'IIUIIIbe ..... Into the personnel department bY II p.ni, on the apecilled cloalng date. Arlington County, Peraonnel Oeparllnel"-2100 North 14th St. Allingtol\ Va, 22201. EOE/M/F/H . THE GOOD NEWS Circulation Dept, P .O. Box 35012, Washington, D.C. 20013 639-8040. CENTRAL AMERICAN DEMOGRAPHICS: The 16-page report, "Conflict in Central America: The Demographic Dimension," at population growth and its economic and political impact in the region. Send $3, plus $1 for postage, to: Population Reference Bureau, HHANES RESEARCH: Persons Interested In grant mon,y research data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition -=xamlnatlon Survey should contact Linda Neal, National Coalition of. H...,.nic Health and Human Servic;:es Organizations, 1030 15th St NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) Calendar MALDEF DINNER San Francisco March 18 The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will sponsor its 11th annual dinner to recognize individuals for their contributions in corporate, legal, civic and cultural areas. Mariano Diaz (415) 981 FINANCIAL INVESTMENT SEMINAR Washington, D .C. March 19 The National Council of Hispanic Women will hold a seminar to discuss investment strategies. Anna O'Brien (202) 343 Hispanic Link Weekly Report IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY Washington, D.C. March 20,21 The 9th annual conference sponsored by the Center for Migration Studies of New York will look at legislative developments affecting immigrants and refugees. Maggie Sullivan (718) 351 GRAPE 'BOYCOTT FUND-RAISER New York March 21 Cesar Chavez, president of the United Farm Workers, and Rep. Robert Garcia(D:N.Y . ) will briefthe Hispanic media on the boycott . Ed Sanchez (212) 242 Ext 251 COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARDS San Diego March 21 The Chicano Federation of San Diego County will sponsor Ita 16th annual banquet to recognize coni"' butions to the community. Jose Muftlz (619) 236-1228 OFFICER INSTALLATION BANQUET Houston March 21 Joe Russo, co-owner of United PreaalntematioNtl. will keynote this event by the Houston Hla.,.ftlc Chamber of Commerce. Carmen Orta(713) 88()-()808 HISPANIC ELDERLY San Franc:lac:o March 21 The National HlapanicCouncil onAglngwiiii)OniOfa conference on laauea pertinent to H•nlc elderly. Rebeca Gllad (202) 265-1288 3 . : :.;

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• ' r Arts & Entert a:in merlt BowJe, a second speaker at the seminar. Bowie, a communications lawyer and aspiring social scientist, called racism an . "industry-wide problem." He said social scientists should apply the tools of content "develop indicators of racism that are commonly agreed upon." By counting the indicators and analyzing them statistically, he explained ; figures are obtained that can be used as evidence of racism. Rep'ort ALL: Terrel Bell, u.s. Secretary during: Preside . nt Reagan's first gffer:s : a,n -unusually.revealing look at h,.Qw policy was shaped . during: his; adminjs(iafion in the March issue ' i:>.tthe:ea.lic atlon,Journal, Phi D _,itll Kappan. }.;:Much ' of the artiCle deals with Belrs personal to resisf"proponents of the doctrines of the extr.eme . right." He added that had his dwn position not been Cabinet-level"more of ; tile ang shockingly agenda . qf realized." . < Belfoalled some -deparhnent actions "at . tfmes contradlctoi"Y ; and' inconsistent, " citing 'as aifexample. "We' began 'VJ' it1{the passlige _pf block grant for-.. elementary ahd . secondary ..:. l .islatiori that included (Budget ; . . 'Drrettoi: t'>avid): ,$tqckm' an's proposal to put . . .... ,_:.::,." : '"': ,',: ; . -oi , Link. N-ews Se..Viee Inc, 14!iO: 'N' Stre'et.NW . washh1gtor1; o.c. 2ooos.' : (202) 234 or 234l0737: . ... ':". Pubhsher. A ' e .ctor , , Ed1tor. f<.1o[ares ;,. •. .. . . Reporting: Qora UE!Igado, Felix Perez , Charlie EricRsen, ; Mejias-Rentas : ' Teresita '; . ' .. . portion Lin kW,eekiyiJ e'fiijrt maybe rep;oduced or 1:/roadcast in any form witno :u( a&'vance pe r ;nission . Annual subscription is2 is.uasr : ' • , Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. . .i'.i • CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: ; Incl ud e the laiest edition of Hispanic .Link Weekly fiepor! in part. icipant!!' at your next conference oic;. onyention. For d e tails, contact .Hector Ericksen Mendpza (202) 234-0737 . . •' ' 4 One problem in selecting the "indicators of racism," as evidenced in post-seminar discussions, was agreeing upon which images and actions can be universally deemed "racist" The SAG/ AFTRA conference ended with various proposals that will be submitted for action by the boards of directors of both unions. A SAG spokesman declined to elaborate on the proposals pending board hearings. He told Weekly Report that one included the use of arbitration in ethnic discrimination complaints. ONE LINERS : The New York-based Asociaci6n de Cronistas de Espectaculos handed out dozens of its ACE entertainment awards at a banquet March 15. . . Felix Hernandez and Karen Jefferson have received funding from National Public Radio's Satellite Program Development Fund to produce Harlem Hit Parade. Nineteen projects received a total of $300,000 from the fund in January ... the entire bilingual education program into the block grant pot In a private conversation in his office, I succeeded in persuading Stockman to back off on this initiative," he wrote, adding: "Following this initial episode, we proceedec to withdraw the bilingual education regulations that had been approved by former Secretary of Education Shirley Hufstedler. Then, in 1984, we heard the President assure Hispanics during a visit to Texas that we would continue to support funding for bilingual education ... " It was at a campaign stop to address the American G .l. Forum convention in El Paso where the president stated his commitment to bilingual ed . (By arrangement with the Phi Delta Kappan magazine, Weekly Report readers may receive a copy of Bell' s article . Send a stamped, self addressed envelope to Media Report, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C. 20005.) HIGH SCHOOL CONTEST: Eight regional media associations submitted entries for the first high school writing contest sponsored -Antonio Mejias-Rentas by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. The El Paso Association of Hispanic Journalists, Florida Association of Hispanic Journalists, Atlanta Community Television Association, Tucson's Concerned Media Professionals, the Massachussetts Association of Latin Americans in Communications, the Los Angeles-based California Chicano News Media Association and its San Diego chapter, arid Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., sent entries in at least one of the three categories-English com position, Spanish composition and news stories. The winners, to be announced in April , will be flown to the National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami to receive their awards. ROLODEX ROULETTE: Ricardo Chavira has joined the Washington, D.C., office of Time magazine as a State Department corre spondent after a lengthy assignment in Mexico -Teresita Carrion and Charlie Ericksen National League of Cities President Henry Cisneros addresses 3,500 participants at NLC's annual meeting in Washington, D.C. (See story, page 1.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report