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Hispanic link weekly report, March 24, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 24, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Rep. Edward Roybal(D-Calif.), chairman of the House Select Committee on Aging, issues a committee report that finds the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings bill could cut 22% from Medicare in the next five years. The report also projects cuts of up to 18% to housing, education, health research, older citizens and Head Start. Roybal says the cuts would “ pose a major threat to the elderly s access to quality health care...” Puerto Rico native Jos6 Aponte is named American Red Cross director of international services at national headquarters in Washington, D.C.... New York Mayor Ed Koch names Aida Alvarez, an investment banker, to a five-member committee that will seek out and screen potential appointees for up to 50 positions on nine city commissions and boards. . . Jack Agueros, executive director of El Museo del
Barrio in New York, is dismissed by tiy^fitifution^s trustees after refusing their request for his resignation. The museum, which had its funds frozen in November by the Cultural Affairs Commission for the alleged misuse of public funds, is currently under investigation by the city... Professional golfer Juan “Chi Chi” Rodriguez is among nine persons named as recipients of the 1986 Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans awards to be presented May 16 in Houston... Cuba native Ofelia Garcia assumes the presidency at the Atlanta College of Art... Vernon G6mez, head of the U.S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration office in Phoenix, is chosen to receive the departments Distinguished Career Service Award. The award recognizes Gomez for assistance to the Mexican government in rescuing victims of the Mexico City earthquake in September...
National Push for Latino Religious Television
The first national religious television station to carry Hispanic programming made its debut March 23 on the Rock Christian Network (RCN), based in Chesapeake, Va.
The station offered 3 1/2 hours of late-afternoonjSpanish-language programming,all produced by independent U.S Hispanic companies Most of its programs are weekly. They range from children’s shows to the more familiar preacher-congregation format The station is the brainchild of John Gimenez, creator of the four-year-old Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters(HNRB). RCN was in the planning stages a brief six months.
Gim&nez presently leads the 5,000-member Rock Church in Virginia Beach, Va The HNRB
A Hispanic won the Illinois Senate Democratic primary March 18 for the first time in that staters history, virtually assuring himself a victory in November. In Chicago three(Hispanic aider-men won and a Hispanic victory is a certainty in another ward. This increases their City Council representation from one to four.
In a major upset, Miguel del Valle, 34, former executive director of a social service agency, ousted incumbent Edward Nedza in the 5th District Senate race. With nearly all of the votes counted, del Valle led with 56% of the vote.
In the Illinois House of Representatives, Joseph Berrios (62%) retained his seat in the 9th District against challenger Charlie Serrano(38%). Incumbent state Rep. Juan Soliz won in the 20th District with 74% of the vote. Soliz, who also ran and won in the Chicago aldermanjc election, will resign his state seat.
Soliz’s successor will be chosen by the three ward committeemen whose wards comprise the 20th district.
The seven aldermanic races received national media attention because their outcomes would determine the balance of power in the City Council. Before the elections, Cook
is an offshoot of the National Religious Broadcasters (NRB).
Initially, it is airing on a Chicago-area cable service that reaches 87,000 homes. RCN marketing director Jay Lindsey is presently negotiating with a New York cable system that has 300,000 subscribers He told Weekly Report that he hopes to finalize the deal within the next two weeks The station projects that it will reach major Southeastern and Southwestern markets in two or three months
Independent Hispanic television studios in cities such as Albuquerque, Phoenix, San Antonio, Miami, San Diego and San Jose, Calif., produce the primarily religious talk shows for national syndication. RCN plans to
County Democratic Chairman and 10th Ward Alderman Edward Vrdolyakcontrolled29 of the 50 seats. If Mayor Harold Washington picked up four seats, that would give both factions 25 seats with Washington owning the tie-breaking vote.
Four of the seven aldermanic seats up for election are assured of going to Hispanics. Lone Hispanic incumbent, Manuel Santiago, a Vrdolyak ally, retained his seat garnering 55%of the vote.
I n the 22 nd Ward Jesuis Garcia, a Washington ally, pulled in 54% of the vote.
Soliz obtained 55% of the vote in a field of four candidates. His nearest competitor, Juan Velasquez received 23%. Although receiving support from the Vrdolyak camp, Soliz has declared his independence and could become a major power broker in the war between the two council factions.
The closest race was between Luis Gutierrez and Manuel Torres in the 26th Ward. With one precinct to be counted, Gutierrez was ahead by nine votes. A winner will not be declared, however, until a federal judge decides on the validity of several hundred ballots. Gutierrez is allied with Washington and Torres with Vrdolyak.
use many of these studios for its programming
Among prominent Hispanic religious broadcasting figures RCN plans to utilize are Alberto Mottessi, an Argentinian evangelist working out of Los Angeles; Vicente Montano from San Diego; and Rudy Hern&ndez, an evangelist from San Antonio. Luis Palau, known as the “Billy Graham of Latin America” and who has radio and television programs syndicated throughout the world, will eventually appear on RCN, according to station program director Stan Jeter.
Due to the infancy of Hispanic television broadcasting, there is little variety in programming. But, said Jeter, the station hopes to produce up to 35% of its programs when it
continued on page 2
S.D. Councilor Arraigned
San Diego Councilman Uvaldo Martinez pleaded not guilty March 18 to grand jury charges of illegal appropriation of $1,879 in public funds through the use of a city credit card in 14 San Diego restaurants. Superior Court Judge Donald Smith set a trial date for June 30.
The 43-year-old Republican was set free on his own recognizance. He will appear again in court June 9 to formally enter his plea.
In December, Mayor Roger Hedgecock submitted his resignation after a perjury and conspiracy conviction. Currently, another non-Hispanic councilman is under investigation by the district attorney for a trip paid for with city funds.
Martinets expenditures were allegedly made in fiscal year 1984-85 during the course of social engagements with friends and acquaintances or with persons who have denied being with him at those times.
Martinez, the only Hispanic on the council and representing the city’s 8th District since 1982, has said that he will not resign his post and that the trial will finally“vindicate” him. If convicted on all counts, he could face a maximum sentence of eight years and a $280,000 fine. His current term runs through 1987.
Latinos Win Illinois Sen., Chi. Seats


Sin pelos en la lengua
FIGHTING WORDS; Playing loosely with census figures, economist/ writer Lester Thurow concludes in a March 16 Los Angeles Times “think piece” that “If one adjusts for the two-year educational gap between the average Cuban worker and the average Mexican-American worker, it is clear that Mexican-Americans would be doing as well as the Cubans if they had equal educational backgrounds.” But, he finds, Puerto Ricans are Latinos of another stripe. “.. .Puerto Ricans who have now been living in an American culture for many years, both on the mainland and in Puerto Rico, have the handicap that they are all second-generation Americans without ever having been in some sense first-generation Americans,” he writes “This makes them less inclined to make the personal sacrifices that one generation has to make if a group is to be successful in America..
“But those immigrants such as Puerto Ricans who come from within the United States .. feel aggrieved at the disparities As a result, they are often too unwilling to do those things needed to become truly integrated into American society.”
Where does one start to critique such caca? I took the easy way,
out and sent a copy to Angelo Falcdn of the I nstitute for Puerto Rican Policy.
POOR SPORTS? With Nancy L6pez off the LPGA tour until July awaiting the birth of her second child, no Latinas grace the list of the women’sgolf association’stop50 money winners this year. With Lee Trevifto taking life easier, no Latinos are among the top 75 PGA money leaders (ChiChi Rodriguez and Antonio Cerda are Nos 77 and 78.) And there’s not a single Hispano among the top 30 money leaders in men’s tennis
Want more? Parade magazine’s 1986 All-American boys high school basketball listings published last week, didn’t include a single Latino on its four top teams. The NCAA basketball championships? Watching them on TV, I think I saw an hermano selling peanuts in the aisle.
Thank goodness baseball’s back on the sports pages even though the sportswriters enjoy eating Joaquin Andujar for breakfast every morning.
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY: “We give INS $15 million a year for naturalization of new Americans while we spend $225 million to give the Statue of Liberty a facelift.” -Harry Pachon.
-Kay Barbaro
Hispanic Religious
continued from page 1
becomes self-sufficient Currently, the network is funded by Gim6nez's church members and other ministries.
Jeter said advertisers and cable system representatives across the nation have expressed a strong interest in the venture because of the Hispanic block it offers. “There is room, for a 24-hour Spanish (broadcasting) service in the Hispanic community,” he added.
The HNRB grew from its original seven members whose programs drew an audience of five to six million in 1982 to more than 70 members with a current audience of 70 million listeners and viewers per week in the United States and Latin America Radio broadcasters comprise 90% of HNRBs membership There has been some shift of emphasis to television during the last two years, according to Jose Reyes, its president.
The largest concentration of Hispanic radio ministries are in South Texas, according to
H. O. Espinoza, former president of HNRB. Most of these programs are studio- produced..
NRB, whose membership grew from 200 to
I, 000 during the last ten years, controls 80% of
Business Bureau Opens
The New Jersey Department of Commerce and Economic Development opened a state Bureau of Hispanic Enterprise March 17 to promote Hispanic businesses and help them obtain more state government contracts.
In the past, Hispanics were not able to “get their fair share of the contracts” because the department did not have the bilingual personnel who could inform them of government assistance programs, said Roland Alum, one of the three-person staff assigned to theTrenton bureau. Alum is a former regional director of the League of United Latin American Citizens in New Jersey.
He said that in June a new departmental program will set aside 25% of contracts for women and minorities, keeping for the first time statistics on Hispanic participation.
Television Pushed
I
religious broadcasting worldwide. The top three television religious service networks had 49.9 million subscribers as of November 1985.
Although records on the number of H Ispanic religious broadcasters in NRB are incomplete, a spokeswoman estimated that Hispanics ' represent 2% of its members.
David Ochoa, chairman of the Los Angeles-based BuenavisiOn Cablevision and senior communications officer with the United Methodist Church, criticized the lack of diversity in Hispanic religious television programming. He said it mirrored a “Jerry Falwell type of thinking^
“Hispanic broadcasting in the ’80s is a mere reflection of the hustle for the dollar by religious broadcasters,” he charged, adding that Hispanic religious broadcasters must also address issues such as the drop-out rate and unemployment in the Hispanic community.
Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the U.S. Catholic Conference, said the Catholic church has a venture titled the Catholic Communications Campaign to instill diversity in the media The campaign raised $2 million last year and funded different Hispanic religious productions around the nation.
Gimenez agreed that there is a dearth of program variety. He attributes this to the prohibitive costs of stations and production facilities and the paucity of frequencies. He countered Ochoa’s assertion that Hispanic television religious broadcasters avoid a social agenda The Hispanic block of RCN will confront social issues but from a Christian perspective, said Gimenez.
-Felix Perez
Latino Suspensions at Par
Latino middle school and high school students in Denver’s public schools comprised 38% of the 2,043 students suspended and 36% of 36 students expelled during a January-July 1985 survey period. The figures are close to their 34% enrollment.
Fillmore Boycott Threat
Opponents of Fillmore, Calif.’s adoption of a resolution making English its official language vowed to continue fighting after failing in a recall effort of three City Council members who won re-election March 11.
Cynthia Reyes, a spokeswoman for Citizens Coalition, said protests and a possible economic boycott of Fillmore were possibilities “to get someone to listen to the Hispanics in this city.”
Caucus‘Pro-Environment
Nine members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus voted better on environmental issues than their House of Representatives peers, said a survey released March 17 by the League of Conservation Voters.
While House members averaged a 52% positive score on their recorded votes on 12 issues related to the environment, health and energy, the nine Latino representatives ranged from 58% to 83%.
For the third year in a row, Bill Richardson (83%) led the pro-environment Latinos and fellow New Mexican Manuel Lujan (25%) -lone Republican in the caucus - scored lowest
The other “anti-environment” rating went to Californian Tony Coelho (44%).
Members’ ratings for the past three years, along with their states’ 1985 average, were:
1983 1984 1985
California (58)
T. Coelho 56 64 44
E. Roybal 64 87 63
M. Martinez 69 82 81
£ Torres New Mexico (39) 75 79 75
M. Lujan 7 34 25
B. Richardson 84 88 83
New York (58)
R. Garcia 73 87 75
Texas (45)
E de la Garza 59 61 58
H.B. Gonzalez 61 67 75
A. Bustamante - - ■ ‘ ; 58
S. Ortiz 57 73 58
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
CONGRESS RATED ON ENVIRONMENT: A 16-page report, “How the U.S. House of Representatives Voted on Energy and the Environment,” is available by sending $3.50 to: League of Conservation Voters, 320 Fourth St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 547-7200.
RETAIL ADVERTISING: By special arrangement with Madison Avenue magazine, Weekly Report readers may receive a copy of its article (March edition) “For Fin, National Retailers Are Thinking Hispanic.” Send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to The Good News, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
TRANSPORTATION CAREERS FOR WOMEN: The Transit Management Career Project informs minority women of transportation careers, educational programs, internships and^inancial aid available in the transit field. To request information write to: The NationalCouncil of Negro Women, Transit Management Careers, 701 North Fairfax St, Suite 330, Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 683-8580.
HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS: The Census Bureau reports on value, rent, occupant income, kitchen facilities and other housing unit characteristics in “Part E, Urban and Rural Housing Characteristics for the United States and Regions: 1983,” Series H-150-83. Price: $9.50. Orderfrom: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
MEDIA INTERNSHIPS: Two minority internships carrying $5,000 stipends plus salaried employment in such fields as promotion, accounting, sales, programming and news writing will be awarded by Greater Media, a multimedia company with radio, cable and publishing operations. The one-year training program for persons who graduated from college within the last five years starts in July. Deadline: April 30. Contact: Internship Coordinator, Greater Media Inc., P.O. Box 859, East Brunswick, N.J. 08816 (201) 247-6161.
EMPLOYER SANCTIONS: The U.S. General Accounting Office issued a 21-page report which found that employer sanctions in nine countries deterred the employment of undocumenteds. Price: free for first five copies; additional ones are $2 with 25% discount on orders of 100 or more. Request “Illegal Aliens: Information on Selected Countries’ Employment Prohibition Laws,” from: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link pays $25 for cartoons, editorial or humorous, for publication in Weekly Report Submit to: Editor, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
CORRECTIONAL OFFICER $18,243
Very responsible position in the Arlington County Detention Center. Responsible for supervising the activities of inmates on eight-hour rotating shift basis Duties include: Being responsible for the security, safety arid control of the inmate population, the supervision of meals recreation and transportation activities Must have ability to stand guard for long periods under varied work conditions Requires high school graduation or GED equivalent at least 18 years of age at time of appointment, excellent physical condition, U.S.citizenship, must live within 30-mile radius of Arlington County Court House, bondable and a Virginia drivers license, must be able to react appropriately under stress Position involves the potential, for physical injury, ability to learn the use of ; firearms safely and competently, must be able to work on eight-hour rotating shifts j, Closing date is March 27,1986. For additional1 information contact Arlington County Per-sonnel Department, 2100 North 14th St, Arlington, Va., 22201.
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS
Exciting employment opportunities at the Census Bureau, Washington, D.C., for experienced computer programmers who speak fluent Spanish. Varied and challenging assignments involving training and technical assistance for developing countries, and the opportunity for international travel.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Contact Rosa Bolen, (301) 763-2750 for additional! information.
The Census Bureau, a part of the Department of Commerce^ is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel -has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
ASPIRA NATIONAL office seeks a DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR who will be responsible for planning, organizing and implementing a comprehensive development program which includes annual foundation, corporation and membership fund raising. Three to five years successful development experience required. BA degree essential, advanced degree preferred. Salary commensurate with experience Send vita and cover letter stating salary requirements to ASPIRA National Office, 1112 16th St. NW, Suite 2900, Washington, D.C. 20036.
VICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS
The Vice President will report directly to the President and will be responsible for the day-to-day program and administration of the National Puerto Rican Coalition, Inc.
Candidates should be bilingual and familiar with public policy issuesconfronting the Puerto Rican community in the United States. Candidate should also possess an advanced degree in management social sciences or education and have eight years of professional experience with a minimum of two years of supervisory experience. Salary $40,000 -$45,500 per annum dependent on experience and previous salary history. An extensive fringe benefit package is also offered.
Interested candidates should submit resumes no later than April 11 to: Louis Nuhez, President, NPRC, Inc., 701 N. Fairfax St, Suite 310, Alexandria, Va 22314.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND.
Calendar^
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC WOMEN IN AMERICAN CULTURE Rockville, Md. March 27
The Women’s Commission of Montgomery County, Md., will sponsor a conference on how Hispanic women adapt to American culture.
Joan Ury (301) 279-8346
COMING SOON
HISPANICS IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS National Catholic Educational Association Anaheim, Calif. March 31- April 3 Father Richard Elmer (202) 293-5954
BILINGUAL EDUCATION
National Association for Bilingual Education
Chicago April 1-5
Marfa Seidner (312) 917-3850
HISPANIC MEDICALSTUDENTS’ SCHOLARSHIP FUND
University of California, Irvine Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Costa Mesa, Calif. April 2 Ricardo Valdez (714) 856-6196
HISPANIC SCHOOL BOARDS CAUCUS LUNCHEON
National School Boards Association Las Vegas, Nev. April 5-8 Phil Smith (703) 838-6743
ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM Mexican American Engineering Society^
San Antonio April 9-12 Salah Diab (512) 697-0222
WOMEN’S AWARDS DINNER Hispanic Women’s Council Los Angeles April 10 Rose Weiss (213) 725-1657
CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE National Association for Chicano Studies El Paso, Texas April 10-12 Roberto Villarreal (915) 747-5462
CONFERENCE ON DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Rutgers University
Newark, N.J. April 10-12
Asela Rodriguez de Laguna (201) 648-5789
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE
SER-Jobs for Progress
Miami April 15-18
Willie Acosta (214) 631 -3999
MIGRANT HEALTH CONFERENCE National Assn, of Community Health Centers Minneapolis April 17-20 Francine White (202) 833-9280
HISPANIC COMMUNITY AWARDS DINNER Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund
Chicago April 18
Mari Fohrman (312) 427-9363
SPOTLIGHT
HOMELESSNESS AMONG HISPANICS: Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) will preside April 11 over a U.S. House subcommittee hearing in New York City to determine, among other things, the number of Hispanic homeless in that city. For further information contact Gretchen Sierra at (202) 226-7523.
3
'•9
HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM La Raza Law Journal Berkeley, Calif. April 17,18 Brigitte Innes-Davila (415) 642-3368


Arts & Entertainment
A SPANISH FILM SERIES, A NEW HISTORY OF cinema and various probable Academy Awards highlight Hispanic participation in film this week.
A series of four films by Spanish directors begins this week in Washington, D.C., with the screening of Manuel Gutierrez Aragon’s Demons in the Garden. The screening of the 1982 film, which stars Angela Molina and Ana Bel6n, will be preceded by a reception hosted by the Spanish Embassy.
The Contemporary Spanish Cinema series is sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution’s Resident Associate Program. Other titles to be screened are Marco Ferreri and Rafael Ascona’s El cochecito (March 25), Fernando Colomo’s SAy/Zne (April 1) and Pedro Almodovarfs Entre tinieblas (April 8).
In a related item, Argentine writer Nicolas Meyer has recently published in New York an informal history of world cinema Published in English, the book is titled Magic in the Dark: A Universal History of
Cinema for Young Readers
Meyer, who lives in New York, is a former film critic for the Buenos Aires Herald and a South American correspondent for Variety.
Argentina coincidentally, is a common denominator for seven nominees in this weeks Oscar presentation. Argentines and other Hispanics are nominated with three entries: Kiss of the Spider Woman (nominated for “best film,” “best director,” “best actor,” and “best screenplay adaptation”); La historia oficial(“best foreign film” and “best original screenplay”) and Las madres (“best feature documentary”).
Norma Aleandro, the Argentine star of La historia oficial who was named “best actress” last year at the Cannes Film Festival, will be a presenter at this year’s Oscar ceremony March 24 to be broadcast live by the ABC Television Network.
Aleandro is in Los Angeles following a one-night performance March 17 of her recital Sobre el amor y otros cuentos del amor, of works by Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel Garda Marquez and Federico Garcia Lorca.
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
GRANTS AND AWARDS: The National Endowment for the Arts announced that three Hispanic “creative writers of exceptional talent” were among the 49 poets nationally selected to receive 1986 support grants of $20,000 each to write and travel.
They are Achy Obejas of Chicago, Jayne Cortez of New York City and Martin Espana of Jamaica Plain, Mass.
No Hispanics were among the 44 award recipients in NEA’s prose category.
Diana Griego of the Denver Post won the Long Island University George Polk Award for national reporting this month. With colleague Louis Kilzer, she earned the award for “The Truth About Missing Children.”
The San Antonio Express-News has renamed its scholarship to Our Lady of the Lake University the Manuel Ruiz Ibahez Scholarship in recognition of the reporter/editor*s 23-year contribution to the newspaper.
READING ROOM: The March edition of
United Airlines magazine features San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros on its cover, with an article on how Cisneros has moved the nation’s No. 10 city forward... The Chicago Tribune’s Sunday magazine (March 16) offers the cover piece “Common Ground - Hispanics and Jews explore a new urban coalition.” . . . Exxon USA’s quarterly features a Q&A on “Educating Hispanics” with Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza.. March Madison Avenue magazine offers a piece on “For fin, National Retailers Are Thinking Hispanic.’ . . .And The New York Times Magazine (March 16) offers a travel piece by Carlos Fuentes, “Conquered by Mexico.”
HEREANDTHERE: Chicago’s two Spanish-language television stations, WCIU and WSNS, offered extensive live coverage of the aldermanic elections there March 18. It was a first-time effort for WSNS, whose hour-and-half coverage included a remote unit at the headquarters of Ward 25 winner Juan Soliz... Colorado Spring's KPIK radio station has changed its format from “modern Christian” to Hispanic... Radio Marti initiated its one-hour weekly “Puente
Familiar"- Family Bridge- last week, offering U.S. Cubans a chance to send personal messages to relatives and friends on the island. Its toll-free number 1-800-523-2639...
The New York and Los Angeles Spanish-language daily Noticias del Mundo began circulation in Chicago and San Francisco last week, with plans to expand to Miami and Washington, D.C., later this year... Omitted in last weeks listing of regional media associations participating in the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ high school writing contest was the Network of Hispanic Communicators of Dallas/Ft Worth, the group which started it all...
EXCELLENCE AWARD: Twenty-seven en-tries-two in radio, 13 in television and 22 in print - were submitted by this months deadline for a $1,000 journalism excellence award to be presented at theislational Hispanic Media Conference in Miami April 23-27.
The award, honoring international columnist Guillermo Martinez-Marquez, will be given annually by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
-Teresita Carrion and Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hbctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, FAlix PArez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Teresita Carribn No portion oi Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) S96.
Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact HActor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
t^\)e.oAfe* • MfttW LIU),- Bk
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week Rep. Edward Roybai(D-Calif.), chairman of the House Select Committee on Aging, issues a committee report that finds the Gramm-Rudman Hollings bill could cut 22% from Medicare in the next five years. The report also projects cuts of up to 18% to housing, education, health research, older citizens and Head Start. Roybal says the cuts would "pose a major threat to the elderly's access to quality health care . . : Puerto Rico native Jose Aponte is named American Red Cross director of international services at national headquarters in Washington, D.C .... New York Mayor Ed Koch names Aida Alvarez, an investment banker, to a five-member committee that will seek out and screen potential appointees for up to 50 positions on nine city commissions and boards . . . Jack Agueros, executive director of El Museo del Barrio in New York, is dismissed by after refusing their request for his resignation. The museum, which had its funds frozen in November by the Cultural Affairs Commission for the alleged misuse of public funds, is currently under investigation by the city ... Professional golfer Juan "Chi Chi" Rodriguez is among nine persons named as recipients of the 1986 Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans awards to be presented May 16 in Houston ... Cuba native Ofelia Garcia assumes the presidency at the Atlanta College of Art. .. Vernon G6mez, head of the U .S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration office in Phoenix, is chosen to receive the departmenfs Distinguished Career Service . Award. The award recognizes Gomez for assistance to the Mexican government in rescuing victims of the Mexico City earthquake in September ... Vol4No.l21 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Ma•ch 24, 1986 National Push for Latino Religious Television The first national religious television station to carry Hispanic programming made its debut March 23 on the Rock Christian Network (RCN), based in Chesapeake, Va. The station offered 3 1 /2 hours of late afternooniSpanish-language programming,all produced by independent U.S. Hispanic compa nies. Most of its programs are weekly. They range from children's shows to the more familiar preacher-congregation format. The station is the brainchild of John Gimenez, creator of the four-year-old Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters(HNRB) . RCN was in the planning stages a brief six months . Gimenez presently leads the 5,000-member Rock Church in Virginia Beach, Va The HNRB is an offshoot of the National Religious Broad casters (NRB). Initially, it is airing on a Chicago-area cable service that reaches 87,000 homes . RCN marketing director Jay Lindsey is presently negotiating with a New York cable system that has _ 300,000 subscribers. He told Weekly Report that he hopes to finalize the deal within the next two weeks. The station projects that it will reach major Southeastern and Southwestern markets in two or three months. Independent Hispanic television studios in cities such as Albuquerque, Phoenix, San Antonio, Miami, San Diego and San Jose, Calif., produce the primarily religious talk shows for national syndication. RCN plans to Latinos Win Illinois Sen., Chi. Seats . ' . A Hispanic won the lllh1ois Senate Democratic primary March 18 for the first time in that state's history, virtually assuring himself a victory in November . In Chicago three , Hispanic alde -r men won and a Hispanic victory is a certainty in another ward This increases their City Council representation from one to four. In a major upset, Miguel del Valle, 34, former executive director of a social service agency, ousted incumbent Edward Nedza in the 5th District Senate race. With nearly all of the votes counted, del Valle led with 56% of the vote. In the Illinois House of Representatives, Joseph Berrios (62%) retained his seat in the 9th District against challenger Charlie Serrano(38%). Incumbent state Rep. Juan Soliz won in the 20th District with 74% of the vote. Soliz, who also ran and won in the Chicago aldermanic election: will resign his state seat. Soliz's successor will be chosen by the three ward committeemen whose wards comprise the 20th district. The seven aldermanic races received national media attention because their outcomes would determine the balance of power in the City Council . Before the elections, Cook County Democratic Chairman and 1Oth Ward Alderman Edward Vrdolyak controlled 29 of the 50 seats . If Mayor Harold Washington picked up four seats, that would give both factions 25 seats with Washington owning the tie-breaking vote . Four of the seven aldermanic seats up for election are assured of going to Hispanics. Lone Hispanic incumbent, Manuel Santiago, a Vrdolyak ally, retained his seat garnering 55%of the vote . In the 22 nd Ward Jesus Garcia, a Washington ally, pulled in 54% of the vote. ' Soliz obtained 55% of the vote in a field of four candidates. His nearest competitor, Juan Velasquez received 23%. Although receiving support from the Vrdolyak camp, Soliz has declared his independence and could become a major power' broker in the war between the two council factions . The closest race was b9tween Luis Gutierrez and Manuel Torres in the 26th Ward . With one precinct to be counted, Gutierrez was ahead by nine votes . A winner will not be declared, however, until a federal judge decides on the validity of several hundred ballots. Gutierrez is allied with Washington and Torres with Vrdolyak use many of these studios for its programming. Among prominent Hispanic religious broad, casting figures RCN plans to utilize are Alberto Mottessi, an Argentinian evangelist working out of Los Angeles; Vicente Montano from San Diego ; and Rudy Hernandez, an evangelist from San Antonio. Luis Palau , known as the "Billy Graham of Latin America" and who has radio and television programs syndicated throughout the world, will eventually appear on RCN, according to station program director Stan Jeter. Due to the infancy of Hispanic television broadcasting, there is little variety in program ming . But, said Jeter, the station hopes to produce up to 35% of its programs when it continued on page 2 . S.D. Councilor Arraigned San Diego Councilman Uvaldo Martinez pleaded not guilty March 18 to grand jury charges of illegal appropriation of $1,879 in public funds through the use of a city credit card in 14 San Diego restaurants. Superior Court Judge Donald Smith set a trial date for June 30. The 43-year-old Republican was set free on his own recognizance. He will appear again in court June 9 to formally enter his plea . In December, MayorRogerHedgecocksub mitted his resignation after a perjury and conspiracy conviction Currently, another non . Hispanic councilman is under investigation by the district attorney for a trip paid for with city funds. Martinets expenditures were allegedly made in fiscal year 1984-85 during the course of social engagements with friends and acquaint ances or with persons who have denied being with him at those times. Martinez, the only Hispanic on the council and representing the city's 8th District since 1982, has said that he will not resign his post and that the trial will finally"vindicate" him. If convicted on all counts, he could face a maximum sentence of eight years and a $280,000 fine . His current term runs through 1987.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua out and sent a copy to Angelo Falcon of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy . FIGHTING WORDS: Playing loosely with census figures, economisV writer Lester Thurow concludes in a March 16 Los Angeles Times "think piece" that" If one adjusts for the two-year educational gap between the average Cuban worker and the average Mexican American worker, it is clear that Mexican-Americans would be doing as well as the Cubans if they had equal educational backgrounds . " " But, he Puerto Ricans are Latinos of another stripe. POOR SPORTS? With Nancy L6pez off the LPGA tour until July awaiting the birth other second child, no Latinas grace the list of the women's golf association's top 50 money winners this year. With Lee Treviflo taking life easier, no Latinos are among the top 75 PGA money leaders. (Chi Chi Rodriguez and Antonio Cerda are Nos . 77 and 78.) And there's not a single Hispano among the top 30 money leaders in men's tennis. .Puerto R1cans who have now been living in an American culture for years, both on the mainland and in Puerto Rico, have the handicap that they are all second-generation Americans without ever having been in some sense first-generation Americans," he writes. "This makes them less inclined to make the personal sacrifices that one generation has to make if a group is to be successful in America ... Want more? Parade magazine's 1986 All-American boys high school basketball listings , published last week, didn't include a single Latino on its four top teams. The NCAA basketball championships? Watching them on TV, I think I saw an hermano selling peanuts in the aisle . "But those immigrants such as Puerto Ricans who come from within the United States. . . feel aggrieved at the disparities. As a result, they are often too unwilling to do those things needed to become truly integrated into American society." Thank goodness baseball's back on the sports pages, even though the sportswriters enjoy eating Joaquin Andujar for breakfast every morning. THOUGHT FOR THE DAY: "We give INS $15 million a year for naturalization of new Americans while we spend $225 million to give the Statue of Liberty a facelift." -Harry Pach6n. Where does one start to critique such caca? I took the easy way1 -Kay Barbaro Hispanic Religious Television Pushed Fillmore Boycott Threat continued from page 1 I becomes self-sufficient Currently, the network religious broadcasting worldwide. The top is funded by Gimlmeis church members and three television religious service networks other ministries. had 49. 9 million subscribers as of November Jeter said advertisers and cable system 1985. representatives across the nation have expressed Although records on the number of Hispanic a strong interest in the venture because of religious broadcasters in NRB are incomplete, the Hispanic block it offers. "There is room a spokeswoman estimated that Hispanics for a 24-hour Spanish (broadcasting) service • represent 2% of its members. in the Hispanic community," he added. David Ochoa, chairman of the Los AngelesOpponents of Fillmore, Calif.'s adoption of a resolution making English its official language vowed to continue fighting after failing in a recall effort of three City Council members who won re-election March 11. Cynthia Reyes, a spokeswoman for Citizens Coalition, said protests and a possible econom i c boycott of Fillmore were possibilities "to get someone to listen to the Hispanics in this city." The HNRB grew from its original seven based Buenavision CablevisiOn and senior members whose programs drew an audience communications officer with the United Methodist CaUCUS 'ProEnvironmenf of five to six million in 1982 to more than 70 Church, criticized the lack of diversity in . . . . members with a current audience of 70 million Hispanic religious television programming. Nme members of the listeners and viewers per week in the United said it mirrored a "Jerry Falwell type of thinking." Caucus better on States and Latin America Radio broadcasters ' 'Hispanic broadcasting in the •80s is a their House of Representatives peers, comprise 90% of HNRB's membership. There : mere reflection of the hustle for the dollar by said a survey released March 17 by the has_ been some shift of emphasis to television ! religious broadcasters," he charged, adding League of Conservation Voters. durmg the last two years, according to Jose .: that Hispanic religious broadcasters must While House members averaged a 52% Reyes, its president. also address issues such as the drop-out rate positive score on their recorded votes on 12 The largest concentration of Hispanic radio and unemployment in the Hispanic community. issues related to the environment, health and ministries are in South Texas, according to Pablo Sedillo, director of the Hispanic Secreenergy, the nine Latino representatives ranged H.O. Espinoza, former president of HNRB. tariat of U .S. Catholic Conference , said from 58% to 83%. Most ofthese programs are studio-produced. the Catholic church has a venture titled the For the third year in a row, Bill Richardson NRB, whose membership grew from 200 to Catholic Communications Campaign to instill (83%) led the pro-environment Latinos and 1,000 during the lastten years, controls80% of . diversity in the media. The campaign raised fellow New Mexican Manuel Lujan (25%) -$2 million last year and funded different lone Republican in the caucus-scored lowest Hispanic religious productions around the The other "anti-environment" rating went Business Bureau Opens nation. to Californian Tony Coelho (44%). The New Jersey Department of Commerce and Economic Development opened a state Bureau of Hispanic Enterprise March 17 to promote Hispanic businesses and help them obtain more state government contracts. In the past, Hispanics were not able to "gettheirfair share of the contracts'' because the department did not have the bilingual personnel who could inform them of govern ment assistance programs, said Roland Alum, one of the three-person staff assigned to the Trenton bureau. Alum is a former regional director of the League of United Latin American Citizens in New Jersey. He said that in June a new departmental program will set aside 25% of contracts for women and minorities, keeping for the first time statistics on participation. 2 Gimenez agreed that there is a dearth of Members' ratings for the past three years, program variety. He attributes this to the along with their states' 1985 average, were: prohibitive costs of stations and production 1983 1984 1985 facilities and the paucity of frequencies. He countered Ochoa's assertion that Hispanic television religious broadcasters avoid a social agenda The Hispanic block of RCN will confront social issues but from a Christian perspective, said Gimenez . -Felix Perez Latino Suspensions at Par Latino middle school and high school students in Denver's public schools comprised 38% of the 2,043 students suspended and36% of 36 students expelled during a January-July 1985 survey period. The figures are close to their 34% enrollment. California (58) T. Coelho E. Roybal M . Martinez E. Torres New Mexico (39) M. Lujan B. Richardson New York (58) R. Garcia Texas(45) E. de Ia Garza H.B. Gonzalez A Bustamante S. Ortiz 56 64 44 64 87 63 69 82 81 75 79 75 7 34 25 84 88 '83 73 87 75 59 61 58 61 67 75 58 57 73 58 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS CONGRESS RATED ON ENVIRONMENT: A 16-page report, "How the U.S . House of Representatives Voted on Energy and the Environment" is available by sending $3. 50 to: League of Conservation Voters , 320 Fourth St. NE, Washington , D . C . 20002 (202) 547. RETAIL ADVERTISING: By special arrangement with Madison Avenue magazine, Weekly Report readers may receive a copy of its article (March edition) "Por Fin, National Retailers Are Thinking Hispanic." Send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to The Good News, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20005. TRANSPORTATION CAREERS FOR WOMEN: The Transit Management Career Project informs minority women of transportation careers, educational programs, internships and.financial aid available in the transit field To request information write to: The Nationai Council of Negro Women, Transit Management Careers, 701 North Fairfax St. , Suite 330, Alexandria , Va. 22314 (703) 683. HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS: The Census Bureau reports on value, rent, occupant income, kitchen facilities and other housi ng unit characteristics in "PartE, Urban and Rural Housing Characteristics for the United States and Regions: 1983," Series H-150-83. Price : $9. 50. Order from : Superintendent of Documents, U . S . Government Printing Office , Washington, D .C. 20402 (202) 783. MEDIA INTERNSHIPS: Two minority internshipscarrying$5,000 stipends plus salaried employment in such fields as promotion, accounting, sales, programming and news writing will be awarded by Greater Media, a multimedia company with radio, cable and publishing operations . The one-year training program for persons who graduated from college within the last five years starts in July. Deadline: April 30. Contact: Internship Coordinator, Greater Media Inc . , P .O. Box 859, East Brunswick, N.J. 08816 (201) 247. .EMPLOYER SANCTIONS: The U . S . General Accounting Office issued a 21-page report which found that employer sanctions in nine countries deterred the employment of undocumenteds. Price: free for first five copi es; additional ones are $2 with 25% discount on orders of 100 or more. Request "Illegal Aliens: Information on Selected Countries' Employment Prohibition Laws," from: GAO, P . O . Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275. CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link pays $25 for cartoons, editorial or humorous, for publication in Weekly Report Submit to: Editor, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234. Costa Mesa , Calif. April 2 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St N.W., Washington, D .C. 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the s.ame week. Rates : 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column tnch. CORRECTIONAL OFFICER $18,243 Very responsibl e position in the Arlington County Detention Center. Responsible for supervising the activities of inmates on eight hour rotating shift basis. Duties include: Being responsible for the security , safety and control of the inmate population, the supervision of meals, recreation and transportation activities. Must have ability to stand guard for long periods under work c onditions. Requires high school graduation or GED at least 18 years of age at time of appqintment, excellent physical condition, U.S. citizenship, must live within 30 mile radius of Arlington County Court House, bondable and a Virginia ASPIRA NATIONAL office seeks a DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR who will be responsible for planning, organizing and implementing a comprehensive develop ment program which includes annual foundation, corporation and membership fund raising . Three to five years successful development experience required. B.A. degree essential, advanced degree pre ferred . Salary commensurate with ex perience. Send vita and cover letter stating salary requirements to ASPIRA National Office, 1112 16th St. NW, Suite 2900, Washington , D.C . 20036. drivers license, must be able to react appropriVICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS ately under stress. Position involves. the potential . for physical injury , ability to learn the use of TheVicePresidentwillreportdirectlytothe firearms safely and competently, must be President and will be responsible for the day able to work on eight hour rotating shifts. 1 . to-day program and administration of the Closing date is March 27, 1986. For additional • Nat1onal Puerto R1can Coaht1on , Inc. information contact Arlington County Per Candidates should be \Jilingual and familiar sonnel Department, 21 oo North 14th St., : with public policy issues confronting the Puerto Arlington, va., 22201 . Rican community in the United States. Can-COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS didate should also possess an advanced d eg ree in management, social sciences or E xc iting employment opportunities at the education and have eight years of professional Census Bureau , Washington , D.C., for ex-experience with a minimum of two years of perienced computer programmers who speak supervisory experience. Salary $40,000 fluent Spanish. Varied and challenging assign$45,500 per annum dependent on experience ments involving training and technical assistance and previous salary history. An extensive fordevelopingcountries,andtheopportunity fringe benefit package is also offered . for international travel. lnterestedcandidatesshouldsubmitresumes Applicants must be U . S . citizens. Contact nolaterthanApril11 to : LouisNunez,President Rosa Bolen, (301) 763 for additional ! NPRC , Inc., 701 N. Fairfax St., Suite 310, information. Alexandria, Va. 22314. The Census Bureau, a part of the Department of Commerce, is an Equal Opportunity Employer . THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, PRINCEGEORGESCOUNTY,MARYLAND, D . C., has prerecorded job listings, updated government office of personnelhas a JOB. Mondays, for positions at the university. Call hotline (301) 9523408. (202) 635LAND. Calendar Ricardo Valdez (714) 856 ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE SERJobs for Progress THIS WEEK HISPANIC WOMEN IN AMERICAN CULTURE Rockville, Md. March 27 The Women's Commission of Montgomery County, Md., will sponsor a conference on how Hispanic women adapt to American culture. Joan Ury (301) 279 COMING SOON HISPANICS IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS National Catholic Educational Association Anaheim, Calif. March 31April3 Father Richard Elmer (202) 293 BILINGUAL EDUCATION National Association for Bilingual Education Chicago April1 Maria Seidner (312) 917-3850 HISPANIC MEDICAL STUDENTS' SCHOLARSHIP FUND University of California , Irvine Hispanic Link Weekly Report HISPANIC SCHOOL BOARDS CAUCUS LUNCHEON National School Boards Association Las Vegas , Nev. April 5 Phil Smith (703) 838 ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM Mexican American Engineering Society/ San Antonio April 9 Salah Diab (512) 697 WOMEN'S AWARDS DINNER Hispanic Women's Council Los Angeles April 10 Rose Weiss (213) 725 CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE National Association for Chicano Studies El Paso, Texas April 1 0 2 Roberto Villarreal (915) 747 CONFERENCE ON DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Rutgers University . Newark, N . J . April 1 0 Asela Rodriguez de Laguna (201) 648 Miami April 15-18 Willie . Acosta (214) 631 HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM La Raza Law Journal Berkeley, Calif. April 17 , 18 Brigitte Innes Davila (415) 642-3368 MIGRANT HEALTH CONFERENCE National Assn . of C -ommunity Health Centers Minneapolis April 17 Francine White (202) 833 HISPANIC COMMUNITY AWARDS DINNER Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Chicago April 18 Mari Fohrman (312) 427-9363 SPOTLIGHT HOMELESSNESS AMONG HISPANICS: Rep . Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) will preside April 11 over a U.S. House subcommittee hearing in New York Gity to determine, among other things, the number of Hispanic homeless in that city . For further information contact Gretchen Sierra at (202) 226-7523. 3

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Arts & Entertainment Cinema for Young Readers. Meyer, who lives in New York, is a former film critic for the Buenos Aires Herald and a South. American correspondent for Variety. A SPANISH FILM ' SERIES, A NEW HISTORY OF cinema and various probable Academy Awards highlight participation in film this week. A series of four films by Spanish directors begins this week in Washington, D.Q., with the screening of Manuel Gutierrez Aragon's Demons in the Garden. The screening of the 1982 film , which stars Angela Molina and Ana Belen, will be preceded by a reception hosted by the Spanish Embassy. Argentina, coincidentally, is a common denominator for seven nominees in this week's Oscar presentation. Argentines and other Hispanics are nominated with three entries: Kiss of the Spider Woman (nominated for "best film," "best director," "best actor," and "best screenplay adaptation"); La historia oficial("best foreign film" and "best original screenplay'') and Las madres ("best feature docu mentary''). The Contemporary Spanish Cinema series is sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution's Resident Associate Program. Other titles to be screened are Marco Ferreri and Rafaei Ascona's El cochecito (March 25), Fernando Colomds Sky/ine(April1) and Pedro Almodovarrs Entre tinieblas (April 8). Norma Aleandro, the Argentine star of La historia oficial who was named "best actress" last year at the Cannes Film Festival, will be a presenter at this year's Oscar ceremony March 24 to be broadcast live by the ABC Television Network. Aleandro is in Los Angeles following a one-night performance March 1 7 of her recital Sobre el amory otros cuentos del amor, of works by Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Federico Garcia Lorca. In a related item, Argentine writer Nicolas Meyer has recently published in New York an informal history of world cinema. Published in English, the book is titled Magic in the Dark : A Universal History of "' Report GRANTS AND AWARDS: The National Endowment for the Arts announced that three Hispanic "creative writers of except i onal talenf' were among the 4 9 poets nationally selected to receive 1986 support grants of $20,000 each to write and travel. They are Achy Obejas of Chicago, Jayne Cortez of New York City and Martin Espana of Jamaica Plain, Mass. No Hispanics were among the 44 recipients in NEA's prose category. Diana Griego of the Denver Post won the Long Island University George Polk Award for national reporting this month. With colleague Louis Kilzer, she earned the award for "The Truth About Missing Children." The San Antonio Express-News has re named its scholarship to Our Lady of the Lake University the Manuel Ruiz Ibanez Scholar ship in recognition of the reporter/editor's 23-year contribution to the newspaper. READING ROOM: The March edition of HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Erickse"'Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Teresita Carri6n No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annuel su!Mcrlptlon (52 l"ues) $98. Trlel subscription (13 Issues) $28. CONFERENCE COORDIIIIATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in partic i pants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen Mendoza (202) 234. 4 I United Airlines magazine features San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros on its cover, with an article on how Cisneros has moved the nation's No.1 0 city forward ... The Chicago Tribune's Sunday magazine (March 16) offers the cover piece "Common Ground Hispanics and Jews explore a new urban coalition." ... Exxon USA's quarterly features a Q&A on "Educating Hispanics" with Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza .. March Madison Avenue magazine offers a piece on" Por fin, National Retailers Are Thinking Hispanic.' ... And The New York Times Magazine (March 16) offers a travel piece by Carlos Fuentes, "Conquered by Mexico." HEREANDTHERE: ChicagdstwoSpanish language television stations,WCIU and WSNS, offered extensive live coverage of the aldermanic elections there March 18. It was a first-time effortforWSNS, whose hour-and-half coverage included a remote unit at the headquarters of Ward 25 winner Juan Soliz. . . Colorado Spring's KPIK radio station has changed its format from "modern Christian" to Hispanic . .. Radio Marti initiated its one-hour weekly "Puente -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Familiar"Family Bridge-last week, offering U.S. Cubans a chance to send personal mes sages relatives and friends on the island Its toll-free number. 1-800-523-2639 . . . The New York and Los Angeles Spanish language daily Noticias del Mundo began circulation in Chicago and San Francisco last week, with plans to expand to Miami and Washington, D .C., later this year . .. Omitted in last week's listing of regional media associations participating in the National Association of Hispanic Journalists' high school writing contest was the Network of Hispanic Com municators of Dallas/Ft Worth, the group which started it all ... EXCELLENCE AWARD: Twenty-seven en tries-two in radio, 13 in television and 22 in print-were submitted by this month's deadline for a $1,000 journP?!ilis excellence award to ' be presented at th ational Hispanic Media Conference in M'ami April 23-27. The award, honoring international columnist Guillermo Martinez-Marquez, will be given annually by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. -Teresita Carrion and Charlie Ericksen Hispanic link Weeki y Report