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Hispanic link weekly report, March 31, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 31, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News This Week
Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hem6ndez Col6n is host to Guatemala President Marco Vinicio Cerezo, Jamaica Prime Minister Edward Seaga, Dominican Prime Minister Eugenia Charles and representatives of 13 other Caribbean Basin countries at the annual Citibank 936 conference on the island March 21,22. A proposal of the Puerto Rican government that would inject new momentum to President Ronald Reagan’s Caribbean Basin Initiative highlighted the gathering. . .U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) receives the League of United Latin American Citizens National Educational Center’s “Trustee of Education” award for his efforts in helping Hispanics and other minorities in gaining better educational opportunities.. .California
Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Jamie SepOlveda-Bailey as liaison to the Hispanic community in the Office of Community Relations Sepulveda-Bailey is former deputy director of Game Operations for the California State Lottery. . .Stockton, Calif., aluminum sign maker Francisco Campos wins a record $6.38 million in that state’s “Big Spin” lottery contest. . .Golfer Nancy L6pez wins her third Seagram Sports Award as 1985 Women’s Golfer of the Year.. .World Boxing Council President Jos6 Sulaiman calls for the retirement of boxers Roberto Durdn, Alexis Arguello, Wilfredo G6mez and Wilfred Benitez, claiming their skills have eroded All four are currently considering an attempt at a title in a fourth division, something no boxer has ever attained . .Transsexual Raquel Cruz, 21, wins the “Miss Man Made 1986” beauty pap^anUpgNew York and$1,000 first-prize... nR/vn
HISPANI^UNK
Hispanic Confrontations with Police Increasing
Increased friction with the police, growth of Ku Klux Klan-type of “hate groups,” youth gang rivalries, school violence and confrontations against newly arrived immigrants are the major five areas of conflict identified in today’s Hispanic America by the Community Relations Service of the U.S. Department of Justice.
Instances of tension between Hispanic communities and police - tallied in the first five months of fiscal year 1986 (October 1985 through February 1986) - show a reversal of a three-year downward trend.
CRS director Gilbert Pompa told Weekly Report that half of the 146 Hispanic cases in that period involved the police In fiscal 1985, they comprised 41.1 % of the cases-161 out of 401. Included were 37 instances of alleged use of excessive force by police. There were
Latinos Protest in Colo.
The eight-member Hispanic caucus of Jhe Colorado Legislature will introduce a joint resolution this week in both chambers calling for toilets and potable water to be mandatory for migrant farm workers.
The resolution follows a rally March 19 by Hispanic citizens and politicians at the state capitol in Denver asking for the resignation of a state legislator who said that farm workers have to be trained to use toilets.
Rep. Walt Younglund, chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture, made the remarks during a debate by the committee on a bill that would have mandated fresh water and restrooms for farm workers. The committee killed the bill.
The caucus resolution is a symbolic gesture^ having no legal force.
Denver Mayor Federico Pefta said that the agriculture committee’s action disregards the civil rights of farm workers Said Pena “It is truly a sad day when our legislature refuses to guarantee these basic safe and sanitary working conditions for the thousands of farm laborers* men, women and youngsters, who through stoop labor help feed Americans every day.”
LATINO‘CONFLICT EPISODES
By National Origin Group Oct. ’84 through Feb. ’86
Admin, of Educa- Comm
Justice tion ReL
Mex-Am 31 10 19
Cuban 8 - 9
P.R. 13 4 10
Cen/So Am 3 - 3
Various* 50 22 29
TOTAL 105 36 70
* Hispanic but national origin wasn’t recorded.
Source: Community Relations Service, U.S. Dept, of Justice.
13 more in the first five months of fiscal 1986.
The CRS evaluation is part of its ongoing “racial tension assessment” based on direct complaints, news stories or agency investigations through its 10 regional offices. The assessment results are included in an internal end-of-the-year report, called the Early Warning System, which circulates among top departmental officials to forwarn them of possible violent incidents.
Established in 1964 under the Civil Rights Act, CRS mediates with police, schools and other local institutions to prevent litigation or other adversarial solutions to racial or ethnic-related community conflicts.
In fiscal 1985, CRS identified 703 cases involving police and minority friction. Of those 404 involved Hispanics. Pompa aide George Rodriguez said that although problems with police have been a constant for Hispanics over the years, the cases now involve new regions and communities. The conflicts, he said, are frequently triggered by resentment of old community members toward the new Latino immigrant population or from lack of services by local institutions, such as the schools, which are not prepared to absorb them. In fiscal 1985, for example, there were 29 public protests against immigrants logged by CRS.
Rodriguez cited the well-covered 1984 racial disturbances in Lawrence, Mass., a community still being monitored by the agency. CRS
identified it as a trouble spot even before the first violent outbursts between whites and the growing Puerto Rican community there. Similar early warnings are currently coming from communities such as Central Falls, R.I., where Colombians are relocating.
“There is a lot of surveillance by the police, and the colombianos there feel that they are being looked at as nothing but a group of drug traffickers,” said Rodriguez, who added that there are few if any Hispanics on its police force.
He said that CRS services range from providing police training programs to control police brutality to“opening the lines of communication” between police chiefs and community leaders It encouraged, for example, police departments in Montgomery and Prince Georges counties in Maryland to hire translators for the expanding Salvadoran community there.
The agency has also seen greater activity by “hate groups” Early this month, in a report to the League of United Latin Citizens’ board of directors in Atlanta, Pompa said that reported Klan incidents have somehow decreased, though they still remained “at an unacceptable level.” Activities by other hate groups have
____________________________continued on page 2
LATINO‘CONFLICT EPISODES
By Region
Oct. ’84 through Feb. ’86
New England Admin, of Justice Educa- tion 2 Comm. Rel. 2
Northeast 22 8 9
Mid-Atlantic 3 - 3
Southeast 3 1 4
Midwest 12 - 10
Southwest 35 6 8
Central 6 2 10
Rocky Mt 11 5 6
Western 5 6 12
Northwest 3 6 3
TOTAL 100 36 67
Note: Totals in two charts do not agree because eight episodes involved more than one national origin group.
Source: Community Relations Service, U.S Dept of Justice.


Sin pelos en la lengua
MA, THEY’RE CALLING ME NAMES: Miami Herald music critic Tom Moon wrote a review on Los Lobos a few days ago. In it, he composed this sentence:
“Four of the five Lobos still live in unsavory East L.A., where they grew up, hardly the obvious digs for Rolling Stone magazine’s 1984 Band of the Year.”
Grammatically, the sentence needs a doctor. But what bothered me most was Moon’s description of East Los Angeles. UNSAVORY?
That’s where Edward James Olmos was born. Eddie Olmos The righteous Eddie Olmos who has swept more scummy lowlife dope dealers off the streets of Miami in a single TV season than the East Los Angeles sheriffs have arrested in the last century. (And Olmos only works on Friday nights.)
MA, THEY’RE SAYING I CAN’T WIZZ STRAIGHT: In Colorado, Rep. Walt Younglund, chairman of that state’s House Agriculture Committee, helped kill a bill requiring toilets for farm workers with an explanation that farm workers are accustomed to living in “dugouts” in Mexico and don’t need such frills.
The workers, he suggested at a committee hearing, “are a different class of workers. . . These people need help. I think they need
training.”
“To use a toilet?” he was asked.
“Yep,” Younglund answered.
MA, I’M CALLING THEM NAMES: Don't we ever get in the last word? Yes, we do. In Phoenix, ever-colorful state Sea Luis Gonzales tookacuefrom fellow legislators who labelled colleague Reid Ewing “a fungus among us” and amended a bill that designated an official state mammal, amphibian and reptile to make “Reidius Ewingium” the official state fungus.
Gonzales’ bill was passed unanimously by the Senate Natural Resources and Agriculture Committee.
MA, CHALK ONE UP FOR OUR SIDE: A couple of weeks ago, Armando Nevdrez, secretary of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences (HAMAS), heard a Hussong beer commercial on Los Angeles hard rock radio station KMET that played unmercifully on a “Mexican bandido" theme.
Outraged, he registered his protest first with the station and then with the commercial’s creator, Gray Advertising of Los Angeles. He invited both to “audition” it at the next HAMAS meeting.
Within a few days, he received a call informing him that the offending commercial had been removed from the air.
' Gee whiz, Ma, we are making progress!
-Kay Barbaro
Gutierrez Unofficial Chicago Winner
A Cook County Circuit Court dismissed March 25 a petition to challenge the results in a Chicago special aldermanic election held March 18. Luis Gutierrez was informally declared the winner by that city’s Board of Elections Commissioners.
(As Weekly Report went to press, a state appellate court was due to render a decision on the dispute late last week)
Gutierrez won by a 20-vote margin over Manuel Torres in the predominantly Puerto Rican 26th Ward. Torres was ahead by nine votes before the last precinct was tallied. Mechanical problems precluded the precinct’s ballots from being counted election night Torres also challenged the results on the grounds that two precinct polls were open two hours
Police Friction Increasing
continued from page 1
swelled, he said, mentioning the Aryan Nation, Posse Comitatus, Order of the Covenant and Sword and the Identity Church. He cited Latino communities in Georgia and Texas as having serious problems with these groups.
Pompa also told LU LAC’s board that his agency is “providing draft legislation raising the criminal penalties!’ for these types of racial or ethnic harassment. Hispanic cases involving interracial conflict increased from nine in fiscal 1980 to 19 in fiscal 1985.
Pompa stressed to LULAC leaders that the high dropout rate is a direct contributor to youth gang formation and violent incidents in schools and communities. In fiscal 1985, there were 60 school-related incidents reported, 20 more than in fiscal 1984.
Because of longer court >sentences implemented in recent years, more of the conflicts with law enforcement officials are taking place in correctional facilities, obliging CRS to devote more staff attention to prison violence, he said.
-Dora Delgado
beyond the official closing time.
Gutierrez, an ally of Mayor Harold Washington, will not be proclaimed the official victor until the elections commissioners conduct a precinct-. by-precinct recount.
The outcome is paramount to the power balance in the City Council. A Gutierrez victory, coupled with a likely win for another Washington supporter in an April 29 runoff, would result in a 25 to 25 split in the council between supporters . of Washington and Cook County Democratic Chairman Edward Vrdolyak Washington would represent the tie-breaking vote.
In a related item, the successor to Juan Soliz’s vacated 21st District seat in the Illinois House of Representatives will be chosen within 60 days The six committeemen whose wards comprise the district will choose the representative. More than half the district lies in a ward controlled by an ally of 10th Ward Alderman Vrdolyak Soliz resigned from the seat after winning the 25 th Ward aldermanic election.
Elsewhere, lone Hispanic incumbent Irene Hernandez was one of 10 people nominated in the Illinois Democratic primary, also held March 18, to be a Chicago representative on the 17-member Cook County Board.
(The first name of lone Hispanic council incumbent Miguel Santiago, 31st Ward winner, was incorrectly reported in last week’s Weekly Report)
LA. Latino Cops Increase
Hispanics in the Los Angeles Police Department now constitute 14.9% or 1,061 officers, a 4.9% increase from 1980 when a lengthy | sex and minority discrimination suit was settled.
A court mandated that 22.5% of the officers hired each year be Latino until the force is 24.6% Hispanic.
Police Chief Daryl Gates revealed the percentages Feb. 26, saying blacks had met their 11 % goal. They were 6.9% in 1980.
Voc. Ed. Students Stay
Hispanic students in Chicago’s vocational high schools enjoyed the lowest dropout rate (16.1 %) compared to their Hispanic classmates in other types of high schools, according to a study released March 19.
The study, conducted by De Paul University, concluded that dropout rates were more a function of the type of school attended than ethnicity.
The study divided high schools into four types: segregated (more than 70% minority), integrated (at least 30% white), vocational and those with selective admission standards
It traced 94,233 freshmen students who entered high school in 1978,1979 and 1980. Hispanics had a 19.5% dropout rate in selective schools, 32% in integrated schools and 38.1% in segregated institutions
How Latinos in Congress Voted
AID TO NICARAGUAN CONTRAS
President Reagan requested $100 million in military and humanitarian aid for the Contra forces fighting to overthrow the Sandi-nista government in Nicaragua.
HOUSE VOTE
Rejected March 20 by vote of 222-to-210. CAUCUS VOTE
Two in favor. Nine against. Yes: Manuel Luj£n (N.M.), Solomdn Ortiz (Texas). NO: Tony Coelho, Matthew Martinez, Edward Roybal, EstebanTorres(all California), Bill Richardson (N.M.), Robert Garcia (N.Y.), Albert Bustamante, E. “ Kika” de la Garza, Henry B. Gonzdlez (all Texas).
STATUS
As Weekly Report went to press, the Republican-controlled Senate was due to vote on the aid package March-27.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
CHICAGO DROPOUTS: A 100-page report “We have a Choice: Students at Risk of Leaving Chicago Public Schools” documents differences in dropout rates according to type of high school. Free single copies are available April 9 from: Sarah Goodwin, Public Relations, De Paul University, 243 S. Wabash, Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 341-8591.
MEDIA NOTES: The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., published Vol. I, No. 1 of its 6-page quarterly “Hispanic Media Notes” last week. For a free copy, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to David Saah, Editor, Hispanic Media Notes, 1420 N St. NW, #1001, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CHICANO OFFICE HOLDERS: Prof. Arthur Martinez from Western New Mexico University compiled a 112-page directory of Chicanos in the local, state and federal government level and other primarily Southwestern community and political organizations. For the sixth edition of “Who’s Who: Chicano Officeholders, 1985-86,” send $19.95 to: Dr. Arthur Martinez, P.O. Box 2271, Silver City, N.M. 88062 (505) 538-6229.
LATINA UNEMPLOYMENT: The fact sheet “Women of Hispanic Origin in the United States Labor Force” gives data on educational attainment and labor force participation. For free single copies of Fact Sheet No. 85-11, send self-addressed envelope to: Women’s Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor, Third St. & Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20210 (202) 523-6665.
CHANGES IN THE AMERICAS: The 25-page booklet “The Future of Inter-American Relations” analyzes how North and South America’s social, economic and political changes will impact relations. For free single copies, write to: Institute of the Americas, 10111 N. Torrey Pines Rd, La Jolla, Calif. 92037 (619) 453-5560 Telex: 287818 IOAUR.
PEACE CORPS: The federal agency is actively seeking U.S. Hispanic citizens to work in over 80 programs in 61 Third World countries. Volunteers receive a monthly allowance, with fringe benefits, and $175 per month after two years of service. Contact: Edwin Jorge, Peace Corps, 26 Federal Plaza, Rm. 1607, New York, N.Y. 10278 (212) 264-7123.
CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link pays $25 for cartoons, editorial or humorous, for publication in Weekly Report Submit to: Editor, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help yoiHn your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch.
PERSONNEL STAFFING SPECIALIST. Marine Corps Development and Education Command, Quantico, Va Incumbent will be required to perform the full range of staffing services, Le., recruitment and placement, de-termining qualification requirements, staffing methods, and recruitment sources. Forms and information may be obtained by calling MCDEC Job Information Office at (7G3) 640-2048.
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT New Catholic Encyclopedia The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., seeks an editorial assistant The position is a two-year contract with limited benefits. DUTIES: Manage editorial office, edit copy, check bibliographies, prepare manuscripts for typesetter, compose and type routine correspondence. QUALIFICATIONS: Experience in editing, familiarity with library and Fast-paced, action-oriented human rights reference materials, especially Catholic reoffice seeks associate with in-depth under- sources, good typing skills and experience standing of U.S.-Central American relations, with word processor. Salary up to $19,000 Stronganalytical/communication/diplomacy depending upon qualifications. Send resume skills and knowledge of Spanish required, ta Office of Personnel,The Catholic University of Resumes by April 14 to: Search Committee, America, Washington, D.C. 20064.
110 Maryland Ave. NE,Suite404,Washington,
D.C. 20002. EOE ANTICIPATED FACULTY OPENINGS
Delta College, Fall 1986
AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL POSITIONS Delta College is a community college serving Ann. No. FAA/ATC-008 Bay, Midland and Saginaw counties in the
Applications to take the air traffic control east-central portion of the state of Michigan, written test will be accepted on a continuous Anticipated faculty openings are in the basis effective April 1. A maximum age limit following divisions: Business, technical, English, of 30 at the time of initial appointment to nursing, mathematics-computer scjence^ allied towers and route centers has been established. * health, social science and humanities. Salary To apply, complete OPM form 5000-AB, Admi9- is commensurate with education and experience, sion Notice, available from any U.S. Office of Send letter of application, resume, copies of Personnel Management near you. You will be transcripts and three letters of recommendation notified by return mail when and where to to: Personnel Office, Delta College, University report for the written test. Center, Mich. 48710 (517) 686-9000.
ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE Ann. No. 1606-61 Arlington County, Virginia Salary $21,057 per year Administrative positon with WATER POLLUTION CONTROL PLANT. Maintains inventory control system involving receipt, storage and issuance of materials used in plant operation. Assists in conversion of manual to automated system. Requires a Bachelor's degree in business or public administration. For required Arlington County application call or write: Arlington County Personnel Department, 2100 North 14th “St., Arlington, Va 22201 (703) 558-2167 (8 am. - 5 p.m.). Filing deadline April 10.
EOE M/F/H
CENTRAL AMERICAN EXPERT
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANICS IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS Anaheim, Calif. March 31 - April 3 The National Catholic Educational Association will sponsor a convention with workshops on how to better serve and attract Hispanic students.
Father Richard Elmer (202) 293-5954
HIGH SCHOOL ESSAY AWARDS Washington, D.C. April 1
The Washington Post and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington will host an awards luncheon at the Post for winners of their high school essay contest
Dora Delgado (202) 234-0737
TEXAS MIGRANT WORKERS Austin, Texas April 1-4
The Texas Dept, of Community Affairs will sponsor a conference to discuss farm worker education, health and child care and how federal funding cuts will
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
affect these areas.
Ed Gutierrez (512) 834-6050
BILINGUAL EDUCATION Chicago April 1-5
The theme of the National Association for Bilingual Education’s 15th annual conference is “Academic Excellence and Equity Through Bilingual Education.” Marfa Seidner (312) 917-3850
HISPANIC MEDICAL STUDENTS’ SCHOLARSHIP FUND
Costa Mesa, Calif. April 2
The University of California at Irvine will sponsor a dinner honoring Hispanics who have been active in the community.
Ricardo Valdez (714) 856-6196
HISPANIC SCHOOL BOARDS CAUCUS Las Vegas, Nev. April 5-8
The National School Boards Association will conduct a luncheon to discuss the educational needs of Hispanics. Phil Smith (703) 838-6743
COMING SOON
HISPANICS IN ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE Mexican American Engineering Society
San Antonio April 9-12 Salah Diab (512) 697-0222
WOMEN’S AWARDS DINNER H'spanic Women’s Council Los Angeles April 10 Rose Weiss (213) 725-1657
CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE National.Association for Chicano Studies El Paso, Texas April 10-12 Roberto Villarreal (915) 747-5462
HISPANIC HOMELESS HEARING
U.S. House Subcommittee on Census and Population
New York April 11
Gretchen Sierra (202) 226-7523
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will conduct its first conference to look at the ways culture has influenced Hispanics? self-perception in employment health, education and business. The event will be held April 23,24 in Columbus For further information contact Maria de la Rosa at (614) 466-8333.
3


Arts & Entertainment
“WE NEVER HAVE ENOUGH HISPANIC PARTICIPATION in the Oscars and that’s one of the reasons why we formed this organization 18 years ago,” said Fernando Campos, past president of the New York-based Asociacidn de Cronistas de Espectaculos.
The group of Spanish-language journalists staged its 18th annual ACE awards March 15, and one of the winners coincided with this year's sole Hispanic winner of an Academy Award.
Argentina’s La historia oficial was a predictable “best foreign film” winner at this year’s Oscar ceremony carried live by ABC March 24. The award was presented by its star Norma Aleandro and accepted by director Luis Puenzo.
La historia oficial- which had picked up a“best foreign film” Golden Globe award earlier this year - had also been nominated for “best original screenplay” by Puenzo and Aida Bortnik. No other Hispanics picked up Oscars, though William Hurt was named “best actor” for his starring role in Kiss of the Spider Woman.
“I share this with Raul,” Hurt said upon accepting the Oscar, referring to co-star Raul Julia who was not nominated for an award. Hurt was the only winner for Kiss of the Spider Woman, a film based on Manuel Puig’s novel, nominated in three other categories.
Also present at the Oscar ceremony was Kiss co-star Sonia Braga, director Hector Babenco (with two nominations) and filmmakers Lourdes Portillo and Susana M unoz whose film Las madras had been nominated as “best feature-length documentary.”
Past Oscar winner Irene Cara sang Here's to the Loser, a song about famous movies people assume have won Oscars but really haven’t She also gave the award for sound.
At the New York ceremony, La historia oficial won ACE film awards for Puenzo (“best director”), Aleandro (“best actress”) and was itself named “best movie.” A total of 52 ACE awards were given in film, television, theater and nightclub categories.
ONE LINERS: James Fedares, associate conductor of the San Antonio Symphony, has accepted a new post as resident conductor with the Phoenix Symphony Orchestra... Entries to the Costa Mesa, Calif., South Coast Repertory’s Hispanic Playwright Project will be accepted postmarked no later than April 1. . . An April 2 gala commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Ballet Folklorico de San Antonio... Henry Diaz Cobos teaches an extension program titled Music of Mexico: From the Aztecs to Los Lobos at the University of California Los Angeles campus April 3 to June 19.. .State-owned film companies in Mexico and Cuba will join this year to produce Oh vida, about the life of Cuban singer Beny More...
Antonio.Mejias-Renfas
Media Report
MEXICAN STANDOFF: ‘Standoff in Mexico” a 60-minute television documentary on the recent election turmoil in Mexico’s states of Chihuahua and Sonora, will be aired by most of the Public Broadcasting Service’s 300 affiliated stations on Tuesday, April 1, at 9 p.m. (ES7). Check local listings.
Producer H6ctor Gal6n arranged advance showings of the program this month for Hispanic media groups in Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.
N EW TV N ETWORK: A Venezuelan television network will start September operations in Miami, becoming the second Spanish-language network in the United States and sole competitor to Spanish International Network (SIN), the gargantuan Mexico TV operation launched here in 1961.
With a 6-11 p.m. satellite transmission, the
new network, called Latinet, is negotiating contracts with Spanish-language stations in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, San Francisco and San Diego.
It will produce its own news programs and variety shows, as well as sell Latin American-made programming.
The network is a subsidiary of Radio Caracas Televisidn, Venezuela’s largest media conglomerate. Some of its programs, mostly soap operas, have already been shown here on SIN affiliate stations. The program supply to SIN stations will be continued through the Miami-based network.
Federal Communications Commission rules permit distribution of programs by foreign entities in the United States. The present battle between the FCC and SIN is over the latter's ownership of 13 television stations.
DEADLINE: Tuesday, April 1, is deadline day to take advantage of the $100 early registration fee for the April 23-27 National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami. Appli-
cations postmarked after that date will be required to pay the full $150 fee. The fee includes seven meal functions
This year's conference will include a two-day job fair April 25-26.
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Maria C. Garcia, assistant editor of The Miami Herald, was named managing editor of El Miami Herald... Sergio Munoz of the Los Angeles daily La Opinidn moved up from managing editor to executive editor... Publisher Kirk Whisler has left Caminos magazine... Rick Garza, former co-publisher with Pablo Cavazos of Seattle’s monthly Hispanic News, has launched the twice-monthly Hispanic Journal, a full-size bilingual newspaper, there...
VISTA ADDITIONS: Beginning in April, The Los Angeles Herald Examiner and The Santa Fe New Mexican will start carrying Vista, the Sunday Hispanic magazine. Twenty-one newspapers now distribute it.
-Dora Delgado and Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher. H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Fblix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejfas-Rentas , Teresita Carribn No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hbctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Jamie Sepulveda-Bailey as ' liaison to the Hispanic community in the Office of Community Relations. Sep(dved&Bailey is former deputy director of Game Operations for the California State Lottery ... Stockton , Calif., aluminum sign maker Francisco Campos wins a record $6.38 million in that state's "Big Spin" lottery contest. .. Golfer Nancy L6pez wins her third Seagram Sports Award as 1985 Women's Golfer of the Year ... World Boxing Council President Jose Sulaiman calls for the retirement of boxers Roberto Duran, Alexis Arguello, Wilfredo G6mez and Wilfred Benitez, claiming their skills have eroded. All four are currently considering an attempt at a title in a fourth division, something no boxer has ever attained. .. Transsexual Raquel Cruz, 21, wins the "Miss Man Made 1 986" beauty York and $1 ,000 firstPuerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hemandez , Col6n is host to Guatemala President Marco Vinicio Cerezo, Jamaica Prime Minister Edward Seaga, Dominican Prime Minister Eugenia Char1esand representatives of 13 other Caribbean Basin countries at the annual Citibank 936 conference on the island March 21,22 . A proposal of the Puerto Rican g9vernment that would inject new momentum to. President Roriald Reagan's Caribbean Basin Initiative highlighted the gath ering ... U.S. Rep . Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) receives the League of United Latin American Citizens National Educational Center's "Trustee of Education" award for his efforts in helping Hispanics and other minorities in gaining better educational opportunities ... California prize.. . n VoL 4N<>131 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REMRT IJMareh31 ,1986 Hispanic Confrontations with Police Increasing Increased friction with the police, growth of Ku Klux Klan-type of "hate groups," youth gang rivalries, sChool violence and confrontations against newly arrived immigrants are the major five areas of conflict identified in today's Hispanic America by the Community Relations Service of the U.S. Department of Justice. instances of tension between Hispanic com munities and police-tallied in the first five months of fiscal year 1986 (October 1985 through February 1986)-show a reversal of a three-year downward trend. CRS director Gilbert Pompa told Weekly Report that half of the 146 Hispanic cases in that period involved the police. In fiscal 1985, they comprised 41.1% of the cases-161 out of 401. Included were 37 instances of alleged use of excessive force by police . There were Latinos Protest in Colo. The eight-member Hispanic caucus of thE(. Colorado Leg islature will a joirinesolution this week in both chambers calling for toilets and potable water to for migrant farm workers . .,_. The resolution follows a rally March 19 by Hispanic ' citizens and politicians at the state capitol in Denver asking fort he resignation of a state legislator who said that farm workers have to be trained to use toilets. Rep. Walt Younglund, chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture, made the remarks during a debate by the committee on a bill that would have mandated fresh water and rest rooms for farm workers. The committee killed the bill. The caucus resolution is a symbolic gesture, having no legal force. Denver Mayor Federico Pena said that the agriculture committee's action disregards the civil rights of farm workers. Said Pena: "It is truly a sad day when our legislature refuses to guarantee these basic safe and sanitary working conditions for the thousands of farm laborers, men, women and youngsters, who through stoop labor help feed Americans every day." LATINO'CONFLIC1" EPISODES By National Origin Group Oct'84 through Feb. '86 Admin. of Educa Comm. .Justice tion Rei. MexAm 31 10 19 Cuban 8 9 P.R. 13 4 10 Cen/So Am 3 3 Various* 50 22 29 TOTAL 105 36 70 • Hispanic but Oational origin wasn't recorded . . Source : Community Relations Service , U . S . Dept. of Justice . 13 more in the first five months of fiscal1986. The CRS evaluation is part of its ongoing "racial tension assessment" based on direct complaints, news stories or agency investi gations through its 1 0 regional offices . The assessment results are included in an internal end-of-the-year report, called the Early Warning System, which circulates among top depart mental officials to forwarn them of possible violent incidents . Established in 1964 under the Civil Rights Act, CRS mediates with police, schools and other local institutions to prevent litigation or other adversarial solutions to racial or ethnic related community conflicts . In fiscal 1985, CRS identified 703 cases involving police and minority friction. Of those 404 involved Hispanics. Pompa aide George Rodriguez said that although problems with police have been a constant for Hispanics over the years, the cases now involve new regions and communities. The conflicts, he said, are frequently triggered by resentment of old community members toward the new Latino , immigrant population or from lack of services by local institutions, such as the schools, which are not prepared to absorb them. In fiscal1985, for example, there were 29 public protests against immigrants logged by CRS . Rodriguez cited the well-covered 1984 racial disturbances in Lawrence, Mass., a community still being monitored by the agency . CRS identified it as a trouble spot even before the first violent outbursts between whites and the growing Puerto Rican community there. Similar early warnings are currently coming from communities such as Central Falls, R.I. , where Colombians are relocating. "There is a lot of surveillance by the police, and the colombia nos there feel that they are being looked at as nothing but a group of drug traffickers," said Rodriguez, who added that there are few if any Hispanics on its police force . He said that CRS services range from providing police training programs to control police brutality to"opening the lines of communication" between police chiefs and community leaders. It encouraged, for example, police departments in Montgomery and Prince Georges counties in Maryland to hire translators for the expanding Salvadoran community there. The agency has also seen greater activity by" hate groups." Early this month, in a report to the League of United Latin Citizens' board of directors in Atlanta, Pompa said that reported Klan incidents have somehow decreased, though they still remained "at an unacceptable level . " Activities by other hate groups have continued on page 2 LATINO 'CONFLICT' EPISODES By Region Oct. '84 through Feb. '86 Admin. of Educa-Comm. .Justice tion Rei . New England 2 2 Northeast 22 8 9 Mid-Atlantic 3 3 Southeast 3 4 Midwest 12 10 Southwest 35 6 8 Central 6 2 10 Rocky Mt. 11 5 6 Western 5 6 12 Northwest 3 6 3 TOTAL 100 36 67 Note: Totals in two charts do not agree because eight episodes involved more than one national origin group. Source : Community Relations Service , U . S . Dept. of Justice.

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training . " Sin pelos en Ia lengua "To use a toilet?" he was asked. "Yep," Younglund answered. MA, THEY'RE CALLING ME NAMES: Miami Herald music critic Tom Moon wrote a review on Los Lobos a few days ago . In it, he composed this sentence: MA, I'M CALLING THEM NAMES: Don't we ever get in the last "Four of the five Lobos still live in unsavory East L.A, where they grew up , hardly the obvious digs for Rolling Stone magazine's 1984 Band of the Year. " • word? Yes, we do. In Phoenix, ever-colorful state Sert Luis Gonzales took a cue from fellow legislators who labelled colleague Reid Ewing "a fungus among us' ' and amended a bill that designated an official state mammal, amphibian and reptile to make "Reidius Ewingium" the official state fungus . Grammatically, the sentence needs a doctor. But what bothered me most was Moon's description of East Los Angeles . UNSAVORY? Gonzales ' bill was passed unanimously by the Senate Natural Resources and Agriculture Committee. Thafs where Edward James Olmos was born . Eddie Olmos . The righteous Eddie Olmos who has swept more scummy lowlife dope dealers off the streets of Miami in a single TV season than the East Los Angeles sheriffs have arrested in the last century. (And Olmos only works on Friday nights . ) MA, CHALK ONE UP FOR OUR SIDE: A couple of weeks ago, Armando Nevarez, secretary of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences (HAMAS), heard a Hussong beer commercial on Los Angeles l:lard rock radio station KMET that played unmercifully on a "Mexican bandido" theme. MA, THEY'RE SAYING I CAN'T WIZZ STRAIGHT: In Colorado, Rep . Walt Younglund, chairman of that state's House Agriculture Committee, helped kill a bill requiring toilets for farm workers with an explanation that farm workers are accustomed to living in " dugouts" in Mexico and don' t need such frills. Outraged, he registered his protest first with the station and then with the commercial' s creator, Gray Advertising of Los Angeles . He invited both to "audition" it at the next HAMAS meeting . Within a few days , he received a call informing him that the offending commercial had been removed from the air. The workers, he suggested at a committee hearing, "are a different class of workers ... These people need help. I think they need Gee whiz, Ma, we are making progress! Gutierrez Unofficial Chicago Winner A Cook County Circuit Court dismissed March 25 a petition to challenge the results in a Chicago special aldermanic election held March 18. Luis Gutierrez was informally declared the winner by that city's Board of Elections Commissioners . (As Weekly Report went to press, a state appellate court was due to render a decision on the dispute late last week) Gutierrez won by a 20-vote margin over Manuel Torres in the predominantly Puerto Rican 26th Ward. Torres was ahead by nine votes before the last precinct was tallied . Mechanical problems precluded the precincfs ballots from being counted election night Torres also challenged the results on the grounds that two precinct polls were open two hours Police Friction Increasing continued from page 1 swelled, he said, ment i oning the Aryan Nation, Posse Comitatus, Order of the Covenant and Sword and the Identity Church . He cited Latino communities in Georgia and Texas as having serious problems with these groups. Pompa also told LULAC's board that his agency is "providing draft legislation raising the criminal penalties" for these types of racial or ethnic harassment Hispanic cases involving interracial conflict increased from n i ne in fiscal 1980 to 19 in fiscal1985. Pompastressed to LULAC leaders that the high dropout rate is a direct contributor to youth gang formation and violent incidents in schools and communities. In f i scal1985, there were 60 school-related incidents reported, 20 more than in fiscal1984. Because of longer court -sentences imple mented in recent years , more of the conflicts with law enforcement officials are taking place in correctional facilities, obliging CAS to devote more staff attention to prison violence , he said. -Dora Delgado 2 beyond the official closing time . Gut i errez, an ally of Mayor Harold Washington, will not be procla i med the official victor until the elections commissioners conduct a precinct . by-precinct recount The outcome is paramount to the power balance in the City Council . A Gutierrez victory , coupled with a likely win for another Washington s _ upporter in an April29 runoff , would result in a 25 to 25 split in the council between supporters _ of Washington and Cook County Democratic Chairman Edward Vrdolyak Washington would represent the tie-breaking vote . In a related item , the successor to Juan Soliz's vacated 21! st District seat in the Illinois House of Representatives will be chosen within 60 days. The six committeemen whose wards comprise the district will choose the representative . More than half the district lies in a ward controlled by an ally of 1Oth Ward Alderman Vrdolyak Soliz resigned from the seat after winning the 25th Ward aldermanic election . Elsewhere , lone Hispanic incumbent Irene Hernandez was one of 1 0 people nominated in the Illinois Democratic primary , also held March 18, to be a Chicago representative on the 17-member Cook County Board. (The first name of lone Hispanic council incumbent Miguel Santiago , 31st Ward winner, , was incorrectly reported in last week's Weekly Report.) LA. Latino Cops Increase \ Hispanics in the Los Angeles Police Depart ment now constitute 14.9% or 1 ,061 officers, a 4 . 9% increase from 1980 when a lengthy I sex and minority discrimination suit was settled A court mandated that 22.5% of the officers hired each year be Latino until the force i s 24.6% Hispanic. Police Chief Daryl Gates revealed t _ he per centages Feb. 26, saying blacks had met their 11% goal. They were 6.9% in 1980. -Kay Barbaro Voc. Ed. Students Stay Hispanic students in Chicago's vocational high schools enjoyed the lowest dropout rate (16 .1%) compared to their Hispan i c clas& mates in other types of high schools, accord ing to a study released March 19. The study, conducted by De Paul University, concluded that dropout rates were more a function of the type of school attended than ethnicity . The study divided high schools into four types: segregated (more than 70% minority) , integrated (at least 30% white), vocational and those with selective admission standards. It traced 94,233 freshmen students who entered high school in 1978, 1979 and 1980. Hispanics had a 19.5% dropout rate in selective schools, 32% in integrated schools and 38.1% in segregated . institutions. How Latinos in Congress Voted AID TO NICARAGUAN CONTRAS President Reagan requested $100 million i n military and humanitarian aid for the Contra forces fighting to overthrow the Sandi nista government i n Nicaragua. HOUSE VOTE Rejected March 20 by vote of 222-to-21 0. CAUCUS VOTE Two in favor. Nine against. Yes: Manuel Lujan (N.M.), Solomon Ortiz (Texas). NO: Tony Coelho , Matthew Martinez , Edward Roybal , Esteban Torres(all California) , Bill Richardson (N. M .), Robert Garcia (N.Y.), Albert Bustamante, E." Kika" de Ia Garza, Henry B . Gonzalez (all Texas) . STATUS As Weekly Report went to press , the Republican-controlled Senate was due to vote on the aid package March -27. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS CHICAGO DROPOUTS: A 1 00-page report "We have a Choice: Students at Risk of Leaving Chicago Public Schools" documents differences in dropout rates according to type of high school. Free single copies are available April 9 from: Sarah Goodwin, Public Relations, De Paul University, 243 S. Wabash, Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 341-8591 . MEDIA NOTES: The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., published Vol. I, No.1 of its 6-page quarterly "Hispanic Media Notes" last week. For a free copy, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to David Saah, Editor, Hispanic Media Notes, 1420 N St. NW, #1001, Washington, D.C. 20005. CHICANO OFFICE HOLDERS: Prof. Arthur Martinez from Western New Mexico University compiled a 112-page directory of Chicanos in the local, state and federal government level and other primarily Southwestern community and political organizations. For the sixth edition of "Who's Who: Chicano Officeholders, 1985-86," send $19.95 to: Dr . Arthur Martinez, P.O. Box 2271, Silver City, N.M. 88062 (505) 538-6229. LATINA UNEMPLOYMENT: The fact sheet "Women of Hispanic Origin in the United States Labor Force" gives data on educational attainment and labor force participation. For free single copies of Fact Sheet No. 85-11, send self-addressed envelope to: Women's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor, Third St. & Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20210 (202) 523-6665. CHANGES IN THE AMERICAS: The 25-page booklet "The Future of Inter-American Relations" analyzes how North and South America's social, economic and political changes will impact relations. For free single copies, write to: Institute of the Americas, 10111 N. Torrey Pines Ad, La Jolla, Calif. 92037 (619) 453-5560 Telex: 287818 lOA UR. PEACE CORPS: The federal agency is actively seeking U.S. Hispanic citizens to work in over 80 programs in 61 Third World countries. Volunteers receive a monthly allowance, with fringe benefits, and $175 per month after two years of service. Contact: Edwin Jorge, Peace Corps, 26 Federal Plaza, Am. 1607, New York, N.Y. 10278 (212) 264-7123. CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link pays $25 for cartoons, editorial or humorous, for publication in Weekly Report Submit to: Editor, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737. affect these areas . CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column 1nch. ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE Ann , No , 1606 Arlington County , Virginia Salary S21 ,057 per year Administrative positon with WATER POL LUTION CONTROL PLANT. Maintains inventory control system involving receipt storage and issuance of materials used in plant operation. Assists in conversion of manual to automated system Requires a Bachelo(s degree in business or public administration For required Arlington Coun ty application call or write : Arlington County Personnel Department, 2100 North 14th St, Arlington, Va. 22201 (703) 558 (8 am.-5 p.m.). Filing deadline April 10. EOE M/F/H CENTRAL AMERICAN EXPERT PERSONNEL STAFFING SPECIALIST. Marine Corps Development and Education Command, Quantico , Va Incumbent will be required to perform the full range of staffing i . e . , recruitment and placement, de termining qualification requirements, staffing ' methods, and recruitment sources. Forms , and information may be obtained by calling MCDEC Job lnformatiorT Office at (703) 640 2048, EDITORIAL ASSISTANT New Catholic Encyclopedia The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., seeks an editorial assistant The position is a two-year contract with limited benefits. DUTIES: Manage editorial office , edit copy, check bibliographies, prepare manuscripts for typesetter, compose and type routine correspondence . QUALIFICATIONS : E x peri ence in editing, familiarity with library and Fastpaced, action-oriented human rights reference materials , especially Catholic reolfice seeks associate with indepth under sources, good typing skills and experience standing of U . S.Central American relations. with word processor. Salary up to $19,000 Stronganalytical/communication/diplomacy depending upon qualifications. Send resume skills and knowledge of Spanish required. to: OfficeofPersonnei , TheCatholicUniversityof Resumes by April 14 to: Search Committee, . America , Washington, D.C. 20064. 110 Maryland Ave. NE, Suite404,Washington, D.C. 20002. EOE AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL POSITIONS Ann. No. FAA/ATC ANTICIPATED FACULTY OPENINGS Delta College, Fall 1986 Delta College is a community college serving Bay, Midland and Saginaw counties in the Applications to take the air traffic control east-central portion of the state of Michigan. written test will be accepted on a continuous Anticipated faculty openings are in the basis effective April 1 . A maximum age limit following divisions: Business, technical English, of 30 at the time of initial appointment to nursing , mathematics-computer science, allied towers and route centers has been established • health, social science and humanities. Salary To apply , complete OPM form500Q-AB , Admisiscommensuratewitheducationandexperience. sion Notice, available from any U.S. Office of Send letter of application, resume, copies of Personnel Management near you. You will be transcripts and three letters of recommendation notified by return mail when and where to to: Personnel Office, Delta College, University report for the written test Center, Mich . 48710 (517) 6869000. San Antonio April 9 Calendar Ed Gutierrez (512) 834 Salah Diab (512) 697 THIS WEEK HISPANICS IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS Anaheim, Calif. March 31 April3 The National Catholic Educational Association will sponsor a convention with workshops on how to better serve and attract Hispanic students. Father Richard Elmer (202) 293-59_54 HIGH SCHOOL ESSAY AWARDS Washington, D.C. April 1 The Washington Post and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington will host an awards luncheon at the Post for winners of their high schooi essay contest. Dora Delgado (202) 234 TEXAS MIGRANT WORKERS Austin, Texas April1 The Texas Dept. of Community Affairs will sponsor a conference to discuss farm worker education, health and child care and how federal funding cuts will Hispanic Link Weekly . Report BILINGUAL EDUCATION Chicago April 1 The theme of the National Association for Bilingual Education's 15th annual conlerence is " Academic Excellence and Equity Through Bilingual Education." Maria Seidner (312) 917 HISPANIC MEDICAL STUDENTS' SCHOLARSHIP FUND Costa Mesa, Calif. April 2 The University of California at Irvine will sponsor a dinner honoring Hispanics who have been active in the community. Ricardo Valdez (714) 856 HISPANIC SCHOOL BOARDS CAUCUS . Las Vegas, Nev. April 5 The National School Boards Association will conduct a luncheon to discuss the educational needs of Hispanics Phil Smith (703) 838 :COMING SOON HISPANICS IN ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE Mexican American Engineering Society WOMEN'S AWARDS DINNER H ' spanic Women's Council Los Angeles April 1 0 Rose Weiss (213) 725 CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE National Association for Chicano Studies El Paso, Texas April 10-12 Roberto Villarreal (915) 747 HISPANIC HOMELESS HEARING U.S. House Subcommittee on Census and Population New York April 11 Gretchen Sierra (202) 226 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC WOMEN'S CONFERENCE: The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will conduct its first conference to look at the ways culture has influenced Hispanics' self-perception in health, education and business. The event will be held April 23, 24 in Columbus. For further information contact Maria de Ia Rosa at (614) 466. 3

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Arts & Entertainment Also present at the Oscar ceremony was Kiss co-star Sonia Braga, director Hector Babenco (with two nominations) and filmmakers Lourdes Portillo and Susana Munoz whose film Las mad res had been "WE NEVER HAVE ENOUGH HISPANIC PARTICIPATION in the Oscars and that's one of the reasons why we formed this organization 18 years ago," said Fernando Campos, past president of the New York-based Asociaci6n de Cronistas de Espectaculos. nominated as "best feature-length documentary." Past Oscar winner Irene Cara sang Here's to the Loser, a song about famous movies people assume have won Oscars but really haven't. She also gave the award for sound . . The group of Spanish-language journalists staged its 18th annual ACE awards March 15, and one of the winners coincided with this year's sole Hispanic winner of an Academy Award. At the New York ceremony, La historia oficialwon ACE film awards for Puenzo ("best director'') ; Aleandro ("best actress") and was itself named "best movie." A total of 52 ACE awards were giveri in film, television, theater and nightclub categories. Argentina's La historia oficial was a predictable "best foreign film" winner at this year's Oscar ceremony carried live by ABC March 24. The award was presented by its star Norma Aleandro and accepted by director Luis Puenzo. La historia oficial-which had picked up a "best foreign film" Golden Globe award earlier this year-had also been nominated for "best original screenplay" by Puenzo and Aida Bortnik. No other Hispanics picked up Oscars, though William Hurt was named "best actor'' for his starring role in Kiss of the Spider Woman. "I share this with Raul," Hurt said upon accepting the Oscar, ' referring to Raul Julia who was not nominated for an award Hurt was the only winner for Kiss of the Spider Woman , a film based on Manuel Puig's novel, nominated in three other categories. ONE LINERS: James Fedares , associate conductor of the San Antonio Symphony, has accepted a new post as reside11t conductor with the Phoenix Symphony Orchestra ... Entries to the Costa M.esa, Calif., South Coast Repertory's Hispanic Playwright Project will be accepted postmarked no later than April 1 ... An ' Aprii 2 gala commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Ballet Folk/6rico qe San Antonio . . . Henry Diaz Cobos teaches an extension . program . titled Mvsic of Mexico: From the Aztecs to Los Lobos at the University of California Los Angeles campus April3 to June 19 . .. State-owned film companies in Mexico and Cuba will join this year to produce Oh vida, about the life of Cuban Beny Morel. .. Media Report MEXICAN STANDOFF: "Standoff in Mexico," a 60-minute television documentary on the recent election turmoil in Mexico's states of Chihuahua and Sonora, will be aired by most of the Public Broadcasting Service's 300 affiliated stations on Tuesday, April 1, at 9 p.m. (EST) . Check local listings. Producer Hector Galan arranged advance showings of the program this month for Hispanic media groups in Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles . NEW TV NElWORK: A Venezuelan television network will start September operations in becoming the second Spanish-language network in the United States and sole competitor to Spanish International Network (SIN), the gargantuan Mexico TV operation launched herein1961. With a 6-11 p.m. satellite transmission, the WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234 Publ i sher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting : Dora Delgado , Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias Rentas. Teresita Carri6n No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in a n y form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your ne x t conference or c onvention . For details, contact Hector Ericksen Mendoza (202) 234. 4 new network, called Latinet, is negotiating contracts with Spanish-language stations in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, San Francisco and San Diego . It will produce its own news programs and variety shows, as well as sell Latin American made programming. The network is a subsidiary of Radio Caracas Television, Venezuela's largest media con glomerate . Some of its programs, mostly soap operas, have already been shown here on SIN affiliate stations. The program supply to SIN stations will be continued through the Miami-based network. Federal Co'fnmunications Commission rules permit distribution of programs by foreign entities in the United States. The present battle between the FCC and SIN is over the latter's ownership of 13 television stations . DEADLINE: Tuesday , April 1, is deadline day to take advantage of the $1 00 early registration fee for the April 23 National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami. AppliAntonio Mejias-Rentas cations postmarked after that date will be required to pay the full $150 fee. The fee includes seven meal functions. This year's conference will include a day job fair April 25. ROLODEX ROULETTE: Maria C. Gatcia; assistant editor of The Miami Herald, was named managing editor of El . Miami Herald . . . Sergio Munoz of the Los Angeles daily La Opinion moved up from managing editor to executive editor ... Publisher Kirk Wllisler has left Caminos magazine ... Rick Garza, former with Pablo Cavazos of Seattle ' s monthly Hispanic News, has launched the twice-rnonthly Hispanic Journal, a full-size bilingual newspaper, there . . . VISTA ADDITIONS: Beginning in April , The Los Angeles Herald Examiner and The Santa Fe New Mexican will start carrying Vista, the Sunday Hispanic magazine . Twenty one newspapers now distribute it. -Dora Delgado and Charlie Ericksen IT ! Hispanic Link Weekly Report