Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, April 7, 1985

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, April 7, 1985
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya declares his state one of sanctuary for Central American refugees March 28, making it the first in the nation to do so. Most New Mexicans oppose the declaration, with Republican State Chairman Edward Lujan reacting, “It’s wrong to advocate going against the law.”. . . Hector Elizalde is named director of Hispanic marketing for Pepsi-Cola USA He will oversee Hispanic market development including new advertising, sales promotion and community relations. . . Texas Gov. Mark White selects George Cisneros of San Antonio as one of eight persons to receive the 1986 Governor's Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service this week. Cisneros is founder of the Alamo Area Stroke Club for victims of cerebral vascular accidents... Dominic Garcia, a driver
for United Parcel Service in Stockton, Calif., who was fired in 1983 for refusing to honk his horn when making home deliveries per company rules, wins his case against UPS in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. California law forbids horn-honking unless necessary for safety. . . John Echeveste is named vice president, corporate communications for The East Los Angeles Community Union. . . Frankie Gonzalez, a 10-year-old McFarland, Calif., youngster who was part of a cancer cluster study in that area, dies of the disease. Gonzalez was one of 10 cases reported in McFarland since 1981 and the third to die from cancer in a year. Three others have died since 1975... Jockey Angel Cordero Jr., recently released from a New York hospital following a serious spill at Aqueduct race course March 8, says he’d like to win the riding title at Saratoga, ride in the Breeders’ Cup in November and then “may retire”...
v°">~° ,4{|^ISPANI^iNK WEEKLY
Latino Scholars Launch Joint Research Efforts
There is a growing emphasis on the integration of research of Chicano and Puerto Rican scholars, says Albert Camarillo, the director of the Inter-University Program for Latino Research and an associate professor of history at Stanford University in California Camarillo and others cite the maturity and growing acceptance oLLalii i07JluUie^as an academic discipline
On^Cpril 10-12, more than 500 Latino scholars and students will convene in El Paso, Texafe> share research and discuss these and
New HUD Rules Rapped
Representatives of Hispanic and civil rights organizations will meet this week with members of the U.S. House Subcommittee on Housing to discuss an appropriate response to final regulations published April 1 by the U.S. Dept, of Housing and Urban Development barring undocumented immigrants from public housing and other housing assistance. The subcommittee is chaired by Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas).
Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, and Mario Moreno, associate counsel with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, issued a joint statement that said the new regulations would “facilitate housing discrimination against Hispanic Americans.”
According to HUD, the regulations are designed to “reserve scarce housing assistance resources” for U.S. citizens and other legal residents. The regulations, which also call for the eviction of tenants who cannot prove legal U.S. residence, take i effect July 30.
\ Occupants of public or subsidized housing \vill have at least 75 days to produce evidence f citizenship or legal residence for members 6-years-old and over in the household itader the regulations. Similar evidence musrt be presented once a year.
HUD said the new regulations apply to, 4.2 milKon units of assisted housing with more tharNJD million tenants.
other developments. The good news they cite is the increase in the quality and quantity of research. The bad news is that academic recognition is still slow in coming and a shortage of instructors is expected in the 1990s.
UCLA’s Chicano Studies Research Center reports that there are about 180 programs and departments nationally offering Chicano studies courses. The oldest began in 1968-69, with the California State Universities at >ng Beach and Northridge among the first TheSoldest Puerto Rican studies program was established in 1969 at City College at the City University of New York (CUNY). The Centro de Ebtudios Puertorriquehos at Hunter College at CUKY has identified 32 programs, departments ancKcenters in the United States that offer Puerto Ric^n studies courses.
The integration olnesearch exemplifies a “growing trend to look at the similarity of experiences for different Latino groups,” says Alma Garcia, assistant professor of sociology and ethnic studies at Santa Clara University
in California and cha ation for Chicano Sti
rofthe National Associ-dies. The association is sponsoring the El Piso conference.
I UP officially opened last July at Stanford’s Center for ChicanoiResearch. A consortium of four Latino research centers - Centro de Estudios Puertorriquehos of Hunter College at CUNY, the Center for Mexican-American Studies at the Umversity of Texas at Austin, the Chicano Stuaies Research Center at the
Chicago iRunoff Possible
The controversial 26th Ward aldermanic race in Chicago may be decided by a runoff on April 29 if a state appellate court rules in favor of candidate Man uel Torres on 31 affidavits he submitted March 31 from voters who claim to have voted with write-in ballots.
Currepltly, Torres’ opponent, Luis Gutierrez, leads/oy 20 votes. Eleven of the write-in baM^ts were accounted for in the original jsults, giving the remaining 20 an important role in determining if either candidate received 50%-plus-one of the vote. As Weekly Report went to press, the hearing on the disputed election was still in progress.
University of California at Los Angeles and the Stanford center - IUP will work closely with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials(NALEO) to influence public policy decisions.
Harry Pach6n, executive director of NALEO, sees the research as shortening the “time loop” in getting information to Hispanic officials.
Camarillo points out: “This is the first time that Puerto Rican and Mexican American scholars have worked together this way. For the most part, Latino scholars have worked in isolation.”
IUP, which will rotate its headquarters every three years among the participating research centers, is funded by foundation grants Since 1983, it has received $450,000.
Another development in Latino studies is the “proliferation” of research. An increasing number of Latino scholars’ work has been published by major university presses, says Arturo Madrid, president of the Tomas Rivera Research Center at Claremont College in Southern California.
A by-product of the social change of the 1960s, Latino studies consists of three disciplines: Chicano studies, centered in the Southwest; Puerto Rican studies, primarily in New York; and Chicano/Riqueho studies, dotting the Midwest There are also educational institutions that offer courses and seminars in Cuban studies, but these are scattered, with
continued on page2
Border Trade Hearings
The six-member United States International Trade Commission, chaired by Paula Stern, is conducting public hearings this month in the Texas cities of McAllen (April 7) and El Paso (April 8) and in San Diego, Calif. (April 10).
The commission will hear testimony on the impact of U.S.-Mexico trade on Southwestern U.S. border development and other bilateral trade issues.
Among those testifying will be Sen. Lloyd
Bentsen (D-Texas) and Rep. E. Kika de la
Garza (D-Texas) and border area banking,
I civic, business and academic leaders.
1 —


Sin pelos en la lengua
NAMES NOT QUITE MAKING THE NEWS THIS WEEK: Thornton, Colo., elementary school principal John Fajardo spends a day in a cage, wearing a gorilla suit, eating bananas, and reading monkey stories to 700 students - his promised pay-off for their reading 200,000 pages (1,763 books) in February... Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez threatens to execute 115 Little Havana parking meters with a machete to improve the area’s consumer flow... Cincinnati Reds pitcher Mario Soto, mindful of Dominican countryman Joaquin Andujar, categorizes Latinos in baseball: “Puerto Ricans, Mexicans and Venezuelans are more laid-back. Dominicans react strong. We do. I do.”... Yet another GS-15-level executive is squeezed from the U.S Department of Education. His job eliminated, Vidal Rivera resigns after 22 years of government service. Once 11, now there are two Hispanic GS-15s. . . The Colorado public policy center “Independent Institute” invites us to attend its statewide conference last week to hear “an eloquent analyst of the dangers of bilingual and bicultural separatism.” Who is it? Who else - Hunger of Memory’s Rich-heard Rodreeguess.. . And the governing board of Bisbee, Arizona’s Copper Queen Community Hospital votes to limit patient?’
visitors to two at a time and ban children under 14 because- explains board member Blanche Fingerson- too many “Mexican families” visit friends and relatives en masse. How uncivilized!
THE CANDIDATE IS: In addition to straw-polling 20 Hispanic local officials Henry Cisneros’ Democratic vice-presidential chances at the National League of Cities conference last month (Sin Pelos, March 17), our Weekly Reporters probed them as to (a) whom they thought the Democratic presidential candidate would be in ’88 and (b) whom they’d like the candidate to be.
To the former question, they offered five prospects: Gary Hart (8 votes), Mario Cuomo(3), Bruce Babbitt(2), Henry Cisneros(1) and Jesse Jackson (1). The remaining five declined even to venture a guess.
To the latter question, they offered eight preferences: Henry Cisneros(5), Mario Cuomo(4), Ted Kennedy(2), Bruce Babbitt(2), and one vote each for Ernest Holiings, Lee lacocca, Ricardo Montalbdn and Gary Hart. Three offered no opinion.
If we can draw anything from this early sounding, it’s that Hart has some work to do in the Hispanic community.
TACO BELL TOP THIS: Lucita’s, a Mexican restaurant in San Diego’s Fashion Valley, has a sign in the window: “Se habla espahol."
-Kay Barbaro
Scholars Combine
continued from page 1
the majority in Florida, and are mainly research centers and projects rather than courses.
These disciplines face similar barriers such as gaining legitimacy, according to Antonio Stevens-Arroyo, an associate professor of Puerto Rican studies at Brooklyn College in CUNY. “In the minds of some of our colleagues, we are not recognized,” he says.
Some others feel that the interdisciplinary nature of Latino studies has fostered Its acceptance. Explains Luis Davila, director of the Chicano/Riqueno Studies program and chairman of the department of Spanish and Portuguese at Indiana University at Bloomington: “I don’t worry about it (legitimacy) because it breeds defensiveness.”
Latino scholars also cite as a problem obtaining tenure or full professorial positions. A case in point is the controversial and widely publicized case.at the Univ. of Arizona at Tucson over the decision not to reappoint assistant Professor Armando M iguelez to the department
Poor Response to Census
The US, Census Bureau suspended a census test in 12 of 21 communities in southern Los Angeles County due to the lack of response to questionnaires mailed out March 14. As of April 2, only 27.6% of the questionnaires were returned. That is 17.4% short Of the acceptable limit
The 12 communities have received a heavy influx of H ispanic and Asian immigrants since 1980. At that time, the area was 50.9% Hispanic
A follow-up door-to-door enumeration there would be “too costly,” said Census public affairs officer Armando Rendon. Resources will now be allocated to nine communities in the northern county area, which average a71.4% Hispanic population. These include East Los Angeles, Pico Rivera, Montebello and Monterey Park.
Scheduled to be completed this summer, the Los Angeles survey will test questionnaires and procedures for the 1990 census.
2
Research Efforts
of Spanish and Portuguese. Miguelez claims that the decision by a peer-review board was due in large part to the prejudice of faculty members against his academic specialty -Chicano literature. The issue has pitted the Hispanic community against the university.
Disagreeing, history Professor and former director of UCLA’s Chicano Studies Research Center Juan G6mez-Quinones says most Latino scholars are regular faculty members as opposed to part-time instructors. The real issue, says Quinones, is that too many educators are receiving tenure who are not qualified. This will “insure mediocrity and cause the discipline to suffer, he claims.
Another concern voiced by many is the projected shortage of instructors within the next 10 years. This diminishing pool is due to the lower number of graduate students in Latino studies, says Camarillo. Beyond this, many more Latino students are opting for non-academic professions, he adds.
-Felix Perez
Diabetes Peril to Latinos
Mexican Americans suffer from diabetes at five times the rate of the overall U.S. population due to an interplay of hereditary, dietary and stress factors, said a panelist on women’s research March 6 at the University of Texas in San Antonio.
Maria-Luisa Urdaneta, a registered nurse and UTSA associate professor of anthropology, said existing research indicates that one out of four Mexican Americans develops diabetes, with women 14 times more likely than men to develop the disease. Only 5% or one in 20 persons in the in the overall population suffers from diabetes.
Urdaneta said the research, including a 1985 report to the Texas Legislature by the Texas Council on Diabetes, attributes the high incidence to a genetic marker on one of the chromosomes of Mexican Americans that makes them more prone to develop diabetes.
Supreme Court to Rule on Riverside Fee Case
Arguing a precedent civil rights case, Stanford University professor Gerald Lopez asked the U.S. Supreme Court March 31 to require the city of Riverside, Calif., to pay him and co-counsel Roy C&ceres, now a San Diego judge, $125 an hour for their 2,000 hours of work in a successful action against that city a decade ago.
L6pez and Caceres, then law partners in San Diego, won a judgment of $33,350 for eight Hispanic plaintiffs following an August 1975 police raid on a barrio party at the home of Jennie and Santos Rivera Riverside police used tear-gas grenades and a helicopter and marked the foreheads of participants “409” (the code for failure to disperse) with a grease pencil.
L6pez argued before the Supreme Court that a standard one-third-of-award fee for the attorneys would have amounted to $5.65 an hour. A 1976 law allows attorneys in civil rights cases to collect reasonable fees from losers, but Riverside refused to pay the winning lawyers! bill of $245,000.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and civil rights groups hr:c r eported Lopez in the claim, saying that unreasonably low fees would discourage lawyers from taking on difficult lengthy civil rights actions.
The court is expected to rule by July.
U.S. -Mexico Census Pact
An agreement signed by U.S. and Mexican census bureau officials March 27 provides for a series of cooperative projects, including assistance to Mexico in planning its 1990 Census.
The agreement, signed by Rogelio Montemayor, president of Mexico's National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics, and John Keane, director of the Bureau of the Census, was formalized at the bureau’s annual research conference March 24-26 in Washington, D.C.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
PUERTO RICAN STUDIES: The 139-page “Guide to Puerto Rican Studies in Institutions of Higher Education in the United States, 1985-1986” is available by sending $3 to: Centro de Estudios Puertorriquehos, Hunter College, 695 Park Ave., Box 548, New York, N.Y. 10021 (212)772-5687.
CHICANO STUDIES: For information on institutions that offer Chicano studies programs and on related research centers, contact UCLA’s Chicano Studies Research Center at 405 Hilgard, Los Angeles, Calif. (213) 825-2363.
SPECIAL MEDIA EDITION: A special April 21 media edition of Weekly Report will be distributed to all participants at the fourth annual National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami, Fla., April 23-27, as well as to our regular subscribers. It will include an expanded Corporate Classified section listing opportunities of interest to Hispanics in the media, with no increase in rates. (Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.) Mail or phone your classified ads for that edition by April 10 to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS’.The 175-page “National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials, 1985” includes names, addresses, telephone numbers and election dates. Price $30 each plus $2.40 for postage. National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Roster, 420 S. Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536^
NEW YORK GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIPS: The New York Department of General Services has 45 internships for undergraduate and graduate students nationwide. Job descriptions are contained in a CGS brochure available in school placement offices. Deadline: April 30. For a school copy of the brochure, contact: Penny Chumbley, Intern Coordinator, Department of General Services, Financial Manage-! ment and Administration Division, Municipal Building, 17th Floor,
| New York, N.Y. 10007 (212)669-7178.
NON-PROFIT WORK: Management degree programs, internships j and other training programs for non-profit organization personnel j are listed in the 215-page directory, “An Independent Sector Resource Directory of Education and Training Opportunities and Other Services.” Send a $18 prepaid order to:. Independent Sector, 1828 L Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202)223-8100.
HOW TO CONTROL UNEMPLOYMENT: The 109-page “Reducing Urban Unemployment: What Works at the Local Level” details 21 city programs that reduced the jobless rate of minorities, dropouts, female heads of families and other affected groups. Price: $15 plus $2 for postage. Publication Sales, National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20004 (202) 626-3000.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC COMPUTING INSTRUCTOR/ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, DATA PROCESSING ANTICIPATED OPENINGS, SEPTEMBER 1986
Overall management of large academic computing laboratory, incorporating microcomputers, RJE terminals, printers and telecommunications. Supervision of five technicians. Coordination of services(to 500 students per day) and equipment troubleshooting. Requirements: Experience required with IBM mainframes, mini and microcomputers. Knowledge of operating systems such as VM, UNIX, MS-DOS and popular applications software such as LOTUS 1-2-3 and DBase II. Managerial experience in computer center preferred. Minimum of bachelor's degree required. Salary and faculty rank commensurate with experience (some teaching required).
INSTRUCTOR/ASSISTANT PROFESSOR The department of Data Processing has tenure track and substitute vacancies beginning Fall 1986. Teaching respon-
RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE MANAGER Must be pleasant and courteous and have the ability to handle busy telephone system. Bilingual (Spanish/English) preferred. Contact Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St NW, 2 nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001.
PARK NATURALIST I $17,559 Ann. No. 73026ACAF
Entry level professional position working in one of Arlington County's two Nature Centers Employee provides interpretive programs to promote the conservation and appreciation of Arlington County's natural resources through various activities and demonstrations Plans, coordinates and conducts interpretive nature programs; develops and constructs exhibits, schedules group tours and other duties as assigned.
Requires bachelor's degree in Wildlife, Forestry or closely related field. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in designing, coordinating and conducting a variety of nature interpretive programming and/or exhibits for various age groups.
Official Arlington County application form required. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 weekdays between 8 am. and 5 p.m.
Applications must be received into the Person-
sibilities may include courses in Data Communications, Computer Technology, Computer Science, Computer Operations and Business Applications Programming. All candidates should possess a minimum of a master's degree in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics or related field. Doctorate or Ph. D. candidate preferred. Teaching or other work experience in Data Communications, microprocessor interfacing techniques, systems or scientific applications programming a plus.
Send resume and cover letter indicating position desired by May 9 to:
Chairman, Department of Data Processing-Room 5
LaGuardia Community College/CUNY 31-10 Thomson Avenue Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 EOE/AA Employer
nel Department by 5 p.m. on April 17, 1986. Arlington County Personnel Department, 2100 14th St North, Arlington, Virginia 22201. EOE.
PROGRAMMER COORDINATOR I (STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS)
Staff position in student life office responsible for coordinating the undergraduate paraprofessional program “REACH.” Candidate provides services to individual students, •campus clubs and organizations, provides leadership for student organization development and facilitates the role of faculty and staff advisors. Bachelor's degree in communications, student development, couseling, student personnel administration or social sciences and one year adm inistrative/coordf-native experience; OR five years progressively responsible administrative/coordinative program experience; OR any approved equivalent combination of experience, training or education. Effective use of communications skills, organization development skills use of student development theory and knowledge of group process skills desired. Salary $18,836 for 12 months. Applications must be received by May 9 in the Personnel Office, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz. 85287. Equal Opportunity Employer.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING SYMPOSIUM San Antonio April 9-12
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will keynote the 10th annual symposium by the Mexican American Engineering Society.
Salah Diab (512) 697-0222
HISPANIC WOMEN’S AWARDS j Los Angeles April 10
The 5th annual awards dinner by the Hispanic Women’s Council will honor three Latinas and one ■j Latino for their work in the arts and the community. Rose Weiss (213)V25-1657 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE
El Paso, Texas April 10-12
The National Association for Chicano Studies will
sponsor its 14th annual conference themed “Decisiones
Para el Futuro en Tiempos Criticos."
Roberto Villarreal (915) 747-5462
CONFERENCE ON DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Newark, N.J. April 10-12
Seton Hall University will co-sponsor its first conference on the Dominican Republic, including research on the U.S. Dominican population.
Asela Rodriguez de Laguna (201) 648-578y
HISPANIC HOMELESS HEARING New York April 11
This hearing by the U.S. House Subcommittee on Census and Population will be chaired by Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) to gauge the extent of Hispanic homelessness.
Gretchen Sierra (202) 226-7523
HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. April 11
Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) will be a presenter at this conference sponsored by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
Teresa Pacheco (816) 842-2228
HISPANIC WOMEN’S CONFERENCE San Antonio April 11-13
LULAC is conducting a conference for Hispanic women to discuss upward mobility in employment, education and politics.
Chacha Lopez (512) 552-4903
COMING SOON
HISPANIC ECONOMIC GROWTH SER-Jobs for Progress Miami April 15-18 Willie Acosta (214) 631-3999
3


Arts & Entertain
ACHIEVEMENTS BY LATINAS IN THE ARTS are highlighted by three separate events this week.
In Los Angeles, the Hispanic Women’s Council honors “three exceptional women in the arts” at its 5th annual awards dinner April 10. Honorees Judith Baca, Carmen Zapata and Julia Migenes-Johnson were chosen because “they contributed significantly to creating the positive image of Hispanic women in a non-traditional field”.
A muralist, best known for her 1976 The Great Wall of Los Angeles, Baca is being honored as“Woman of Promise.” Migenes-Johnson, a Grammy-winning singer of Greek and Puerto Rican/lrish descent, has been named “Woman of the Year.” Additionally, Zapata is honored for her "years of community service” as president and managing producer of the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts.
Two other Hispanic singers are featured in an exhibit of original Time magazine covers that closes April 13 at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Drawn from the Gallery’s collection, the works in Women On Time are said the reflect “the increasingly prominent role played by women in the professions, in political life
and in the creative arts."
Included in Women On Time are a 1 t^^ortrajtof Maria Callas who Time wrote that year “truly deserves™ljwoeromle of prima donna, with all its overtones of good and evit” and folksioger Joan Baez in a 1962 photograph. APR 8 k)o5J
Also, San Antonio’s Guadalupe Theater holds that city’s premiere of the Oscar nominated documentary Las Madres/The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo April 13.
A reception for co-producers/directors Susana Munoz and Lourdes Portillo will be held immediately following the screening. Renee Epelbaum, one of the mothers interviewed in the documentary, is expected to be at the event.
ONE LINERS: Los Angeles columnist for La Opinion Salvador Solis Hernandez reports that NBC is paying for “English, acting, singing, dance and social behavior classes” for Mexican idol Luis Miguel in preparation for his starring role in the series Tropics forthat network... The winner of the Hemingway Ritz Paris literary contest will be announced April 7. Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes is nominated for his latest novel Gringo viejo... And Ser puertorriquehos, an exhibit of photographs by Ricky Flores, continues at the New York Telephone building in the Bronx through May 29...
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NO MORE NEWS: Lino Dominguez and Carol Reuben, husband and wife, bought the dying Atlanta newspaper Mundo Hispanico for $10 in January 1982 and forged it into a crusading bilingual voice for Georgia’s Hispanica
They worked forfour years without rest and -without pay- supported by their small printing business - chronicling the successes of the Hispanic community there and exposing injustices in the schools, in kitchens and orchards, in state bureaucracy - wherever they found it Following the killings of Mexican farm workers in Cedartown, Reuben challenged the Ku Klux Klan on its turf, even after her life was threatened.
Dominguez and Reuben did everything right - producing a fat tabloid loaded with news and features twice a month They did everything right except make money.
Mundo Hispanico discontinued publication as a newspaper March 15. On April 15 it will become a publication of classified and display advertisements and carry a calendar of Hispanic activities.
THE READING ROOM: in April Esquire, Geraldo Rivera by-lines a blow-by-blow of how and why he and ABC parted company, concluding that he’s“effectively blackballed, at least for now, from working in the network news business.”...
The March31 edition of Time, with Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega on the cover, sees Ricardo Chavira sharing the by-line on the lead story-“Tough Tug of War” - from Washington and Laura Lopez receiving reporter credits for an Ortega profile and assessment from Managua..
Hispanic Business magazine offers an April change of pace, featuring Hispanic“Entre-preneurs in Agriculture.”... El Miami Herald’s 32-page 10th anniversary supplement- published March 26-provides Hispanic population and voter statistics on Hialeah that no other city
in the country is likely to match: Population
Year Total Hispano % Hisp.
1960 66,972 2,443 4%
1970 102,110 36,805 35%
1980 145,254 107,908 75%
1985 160,078 136,066 85%
Registered Voters
Year Total Hispano % Hisp.
1975 39,122 8,606 22%
1979 44,684 17,873 40%
1985 45,775 27,457 60%
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Idaho’s monthly La Voz Chicana is now La Voz de Idaho, and Meg Fereday has succeeded Victor Muftoz as its editor... Jos6 Sanz resigned as producer of the weekly half-hour Revista on WJLA-TV, Washington, D.C., to spend full time with the capital’s growing ZGS Productions. He’s part-owner. Long-time D.C. radio personality Carlos Gaivar replaced him at the ABC affiliate...
-Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen*Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
CHICAHO-RIQUENO STUDIES
/n
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week for United Parcel Service in Stockton, Calif., who was fired in 1 . 983 for refusing to honk his horn when making home deliveries per company rules, wins his case against UPS in the 9ih U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. California law forbids horn-honking unless necessary for safety ... John Echeveste is named vice president, corporate communications for The East Los Angeles Community Union ... Frankie Gonzalez, a 1 0-year-old McFarland, Calif., youngster who was part of a cancer cluster study in that area, dies of the disease. Gonzalez was one of 10 cases reported in McFarland since 1981 and the third to die from cancer in a year. Three others have died since 1975 ... Jockey Angel Cordero Jr., recently released from a New York hospital following a serious spill at Aqueduct race course March 8, says he'd like tow in the riding title at Saratoga, ride in the Breeders' Cup in November and then "may retire" ... New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya declares his state one of sanctuary for Central American refugees March 28, making it the first in the nation to do so. Most New Mexicans oppose the declaration, with Republican State Chairman Edward Lujan reacting, "lfs wrong to advocate going against the law . " . . . Hector Elizalde is named director of Hispanic marketing for Pepsi-Cola USA He will oversee Hispanic market development including new advertising, sales promotion and community relations ... Texas Gov . Mark White selects George Cisneros of San Antonio as one of eight persons to receive the 1986 Governor's Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service this week. Cisneros is founder of the Alamo Area Stroke Club for victims of cerebral vascular accidents . . . Dominic Garcia, a driver Voi .• No.l•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1Ap•U7 •1986 Latino Scholars Launch Joint Research Efforts There is a growing emphasis on the integration of research of Chicano and Puerto Rican scholars, says Albert Camarillo , the director of the Inter-University Program for Latino Research and an associate professor of history at Stanford University in California Camarillo and others cite the maturity and growing acceptance an academic disciplin . (.) pril1 0-12 , more than 500 Latino sc rs students will convene in El Paso, Texa , share research and discuss these and New HUD Rules Rapped Representatives of Hispanic and civil rights organizations will meet this week with members of the U.S. House Subcommittee on Housing to discuss an appropriate response to final regulations published April 1 by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development barring undocumented im migrants from public housing and other housing assistance. The subcommittee is chaired by Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D Texas). Raul Yzaguirre , president of the National Council of La Raza, and Mario Moreno, associate counsel with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund , issued a joint statement that said the new regula tions would "facilitate housing discrimination against Hispanic Americans." According to HUD, the regulations are designed to "reserve scarce housing as sistance resources" for U . S . citizens and other legal residents. The regulations, which also call for the eviction of tenants who cannot prove legal U.S. residence, take effect July 30. Occupants of public or subsidized housing ill have at least 75 days to produce evidence f citizenship or legal residence for members and over in the household u der the regulations. Similar evidence m t be presented once a year. H said the new regulations apply to 4.2 mi n units of assisted housing h more tha 0 million tenants. other developments. The good news they cite is the increase in the quality and quantity of research. The bad news is that academic recognition is still slow in coming and a shortage of instructors is expected in the 1990s. UCLA's Chicano Studies Research Center reports that there are about 180 programs and departments nationally offering Chicano studies courses. The oldest began in 1968 69, with the California State Universities at ng Beach and Northridge among the first. The ldest Puerto Rican studies program blished in 1969 at City College at the City iversity of New York (CUNY) . The Centro deE udios Puertorriqueiios at Hunter College at CU Y has identified 32 programs, departments an enters in the United States that offer Puerto ic n studies courses. The integration o esearch exemplifies a "growing trend to lo k at the similarity of experiences for differ t Latino groups," says Alma Garcia, assista t p ofessor of sociology and ethnic studies a Santa Clara University in California and cha rodhe National Associ ation for Chicano St dies. The association is sponsoring the El P so conference. IUP officially open d last July at Stanford's Center for Chicano esearch. A consortium of four Latino rese rch centers-Centro de Estudios Puertorri ueiios of Hunter College at CUNY, the Ce ter for Mexican-American Studies at the U versity of Texas at Austin, the Chicano Stu ies Research Center at the u noff Possible The controv sial 26th Ward aldermanic race in Chica may be decided by a runoff on April 29 if state appellate court rules in favor of candi ate Manuel Torres on 31 affidavits he submit d March 31 from voters who claim to ave voted with write-in ballots. Curre tly, Torres' opponent, Luis Gutierrez, lead y 20 votes. Eleven of the write-in ba ts were accounted for in the original suits, giving the remaining 20 an important role in determining if either candidate received 50%plus-one of the vote. As Weekly Report went to press, the hearing on the disputed election was still in progress. University of California at Los Angeles and the Stanford centerIUP will work closely with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials(NALEO) to influence public policy decisions. Harry Pach6n , executive director of NALEO, sees the research as shortening the "time loop " in getting information to Hispanic officials. Camarillo points out: "This is the first time that Puerto Rican and Mexican American scholars have worked together this way. For the most part , Latino scholars have worked in isolation." I UP, which will rotate its headquarters every three years among the participating research centers, is funded by foundation grants. Since 1983, it has received $450,000. Another development in Latino studies is the"proliferation" of research. An increasing number of Latino scholars' work has been published by major university presses, says Arturo Madrid, president of the Tomas Rivera Research Center at Claremont College in Southern California. A by -product of the social change of the 1960s, Latino studies consists of three disci plines: Chicano studies, centered in the South west; Puerto Rican studies, primarily in New York; and Chicano/Riqueiio studies, dotting the Midwest. There are also educational in stitutions that offer courses and seminars in Cuban studies, but these are scattered, with continued on page2 Border Trade Hearings The six-member United States International Trade Commission, chaired by Paula Stern, is conducting public hearings this month in the Texas cities of McAllen (April 7) and El Paso (April8) and in San Diego, Calif. (April 1 0). The commission will hear testimony on the impact of U .S.Mexico trade on South western U.S. bol'der development and other bilateral trade issues. Among those testifying will be Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and Rep. E. Kika de Ia Garza (DTexas) and border area banking, . civic , business and academic leaders.

PAGE 2

Sin pelos en Ia lengua visitors to two at a time and ban children under 14 becauseexplains board member Blanche Fingerson-too many "Mexican families" visit friends and relatives en masse. How uncivilized! NAMES NOT QUITE MAKING THE NEWS THIS WEEK: Thornton, Colo., elementary school principal John Fajardo spends a day in a cage, wearing a gorilla suit, eating bananas, and reading monkey stories to 700 students his promised pay-off for their reading 200,000 pages (1 ,763 books) in February ... Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez threatens to execute 115 Little Havana parking meters with a machete to improve the area's consumer flow ... Cincinnati Reds pitcher Mario Soto, mindful of Dominican countryman Joaquin Andujar, categorizes Latinos in baseball: "Puerto Ricans, Mexicans and Venezuelans are more laid-back. Dominicans react strong. We do. I do. " ... Yet another GS-15-Ievel executive is squeezed from the U.S Department of Education. His job eliminated, Vidal Rivera resigns after 22 years of government service. Once 11, now there are two Hispanic GSs ... The Colorado public policy center "Independent Institute" invites us to attend its statewide conference last week to hear"an eloquent analyst of the dangers of bilingual and bicultural separatism." Who is it? Who elseHunger of Memory's Rodreegl.iess ... And the governing board of Bisbee, Arizona's Copper Queen Community Hospital votes to limit patients' THE CANDIDATE IS: In addition to straw-polling 20 Hispanic local officials Henry Cisneros' Democratic vice-presidential chances at the National League of Cities conference last month (Sin Pelos , March 17 ), our Weekly Reporters probed them as to (a) whom they thought the Democratic presidential candidate would be in '88 and (b) whom they'd like the candidate to be. To the former question, they offered five prospects: Gary Hart (8 votes), Mario Cuomo(3), Bruce Babbitt(2), Henry Cisneros(1) and Jesse Jackson (1). The remaining five declined even to venture a guess. To the latter question, they offered eight preferences: Henry Cisneros(5), Mario Cuomo(4), Ted Kennedy(2), Bruce Babbitt(2), and one vote each for Ernest Hollings, Lee lacocca, Ricardo Montalban and Gary Hart. Three offered no opinion. If we can draw anything from this early sounding, ifs that Hart has some work to do in the Hispanic community. TACO BELL TOP THIS: Lucita' s , a Mexican restaurant in San Diego' s Fashion Valley, has a sign in the window: "Se habla espanol." -Kay Barbaro Scholars Combine Research Efforts Supreme Court to Rule on Riverside Fee Case continued from pa g e 1 the majority in Florida, and are mainly research centers and projects rather than courses. These. disciplines face similar barriers such as gaining legitimacy, according to Antonio Stevens-Arroyo, an associate professor of Puerto Rican studies at Brooklyn College in CUNY. "In the minds of some of our colleagues, we are not'recognized," he says . Some others feel that the interdisciplinary nature of Latino studies has fostered . tts acceptance. Explains Luis Davila, director of the Chicano/Riqueno Studies program and chairman of the department of Spanish and Portuguese at Indiana University at Bloomington: "I don't worry about it (legitimacy) because it breeds defensiveness." Latino scholars also cite as a problem obtaining tenure or full professorial positions. A case in point is the controversial and widely publicized case. at the U niv. of Arizona at Tucson over the decision not to reappoint assistant Professor Armando M iguelez to the department Poor Response to Census The US. Census Bureau suspended a census test in 12 of 21 communities in southern Los Angeles County due to the lack of response to questionnaires mailed out March 14. As of April 2, only 27.6% of the questionnaires were returned. That is 17.4% short of the acceptable limit. The 12 communities have received a heavy influx of Hispanic and Asian immigrants since 1980. At that time, the area was 50.9% His panic . A follow-up door-to-door enumeration there would be "too costly," said Census public affairs officer Armando Rendon . Resources will now be allocated to nine communities in the northern county area, which average a 71.4% Hispanic population. These include East Los Angeles, Pico Rivera, Montebello and Monterey Park . Scheduled to be completed this summer, the Los Angeles survey will test questionnaires and procedures for the 1990 census. 2 of Spanish and Portuguese. M iguelez claims that the decision by a peer-review board was due in large part to the prejudice of faculty members against his academic specialty Chicano literature. The issue has pitted the Hispanic community against the university. Disagreeing, history Professor and former director of UCLA's Chicano Studies Research Center Juan Gomez-Quinones says most Latino scholars are regular faculty members as opposed to part-time instructors. The real issue, says Quinones, is that too many educators are receiving tenure who are . not qualified. This will "insure mediocrity'' and cause the discipline to suffer, he claims. Another concern voiced by many is the projected shortage of instructors within the next 10 years . This diminishing pool is due to the lower number of graduate students in Latino studies, says Camarillo . Beyond this, many more Latino students are opting for non-academic professions, he adds. -Felix Perez Diabetes Peril to Latinos Mexican Americans suffer from diabetes at five times the rate of the overall U.S. population due to an interplay of hereditary, dietary and stress factors , said a panelist on women's research March 6 at the University of Texas in San Antonio. Maria-Luisa Urdaneta, a registered nurse and UTSA associate professor of anthropology , said existing research indicates that one out of four Mexican Americans develops diabetes, with women 14 times more likely than men to develop the disease. Only 5% or one in 20 persons in the in the overall population suffers from diabetes. Urdaneta said the research, including a 1985 report to the Texas Legislature by the Texas Council on Diabetes, attributes the high incidence to a genetic marker on ohe of the chromosomes of Mexican Americans that makes them more prone to develop diabetes. Arguing a precedent civil rights case , Stanford University professor Gerald Lopez asked the U.S . Supreme Court March 31 to require the city of Riverside, Calif., to pay him and co-counsel Roy Caceres, now a San Diego judge, $125 an hour for their 2,000 hours of work in a successful action against that city a decade ago. Lopez and Caceres, then law partners in San Diego, won a judgment of $33,350 for eight Hispanic plaintiffs following an August 1975 police raid on a barrio party at the home of Jennie and Santos Rivera Riverside police used tear-gas grenades and a helicopter and marked the foreheads of participants "409" (the code for failure to disperse) with a grease pencil Lopez argued before the Supreme Court that a standard one-third-of-award fee for the attorneys would have amounted to $5. 65 an hour. A 1976 law allows attorneys in civil rights cases to collect reasonable fees from losers, but Riverside refused to pay the winning lawyers' bill of $245,000. The Equal Employment Opportunitv Com mission and civil rights groups h.:::::'-: •:--:-x>rted Lopez in the claim, saying that unreas onably low fees would discourage lawyers from taking on difficult , lengthy civil rights actions. The court is expected to rule by July. U.S. -Mexico Census Pact An agreement signed by U.S. and Mexican census bureau officials March 27 provides for a series of cooperative projects, including assistance to Mexico in planning its 1990 Census. The signed by Rogelio Montemayor , president of Mexico's National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics, and John Keane, director of the Bureau of the Census, was formalized at the bureau ' s annual research conference March 24 in Washington, D .C. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

THE GOOD NEWS PUERTO RICAN STUDIES: The 139-page "Guide to Puerto Rican Studies in Institutions of Higher Education in the United States, 1985-1986" is available by sending $3 to: Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueiios, Hunter College, 695 Park Ave., Box 548, New York, N . Y . 10021 (212) 772-5687. CHICANO STUDIES: For information on institutions that offer Chicano studies programs and on related research centers, contact UCLA's Chicano Studies Research Center at 405 Hilgard, Los Angeles, Calif. (213) 825-2363. SPECIAL MEDIA EDITION: A special April 21 media edition of Weekly Report will be distributed to all participants at the fourth annual National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami, Fla., April2327 , as well as to our regular subscribers. It will include an expanded Corporate Classified section listing opportunities of interest to Hispanics in the media, with no increase in rates. (Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates : $35 per column inch.) Mail or phone your c lassified ads for that edition by April 1 0 to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS: The 175-page "National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials, 1985" includes names, addresses, telephone numbers and election dates. Price $30 each plus $2.40 for postage. National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Roster, 420 S. Capitol St. SE , Washington, D.C . 20003 (202) 546-2536. NEW YORK GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIPS: The New York Depart ment of General Services has 45 internships for undergraduate and graduate students nationwide. Job descriptions are contained in a CGS brochure available in school placement offices. Deadline: April 30. For a school copy of the brochure, contact: Penny Chumbley, Intern Coordinator, Department of General Services, Financial Manage ment and Administration Division , Municipal Building, 17th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10007 (212) 669-7178. NON-PROFIT WORK: Management degree programs, internships and other training programs for non-profit organization personnel are listed in the 215-page directory, "An Independent Sector Resource Directory of Education and Training Opportunities and Other Services." Send a $18 prepaid order to: . Independent Sector, 1828 L Street NW, Washington, D.C . 20036 (202)223-81 00. HOW TO CONTROL UNEMPLOYMENT: The 1 09-page "Reducing Urban Unemployment: What Works at the Local Level " details 21 city programs that reduced the jobless rate of minorities, dropouts, female heads of families and other affected groups. Price: $15 plus $2 for postage. Publication Sales, National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20004 (202) 626-3000. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC COMPUTING INSTRUCTOR/ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, DATA PROCESSING ANTICIPATED OPENINGS, SEPTEMBER 1986 Overall management of large academic computing laboratory , incorporating micro computers, RJE terminals , printers and telecommunications. Supervision of five technicians. Coordination of services(to 500 students per day ) and equipment troubleshooting . Requirements. Experi ence required with IBM mainframes, mini and microcomputers. Knowledge of op erating systems such as VM, UNIX , M& DOS and popular applications software such as LOTUS 1 and DBase II. Man agerial experience in computer center preferred. Minimum of bachelors degree required. Salary and faculty rank com mensurate with experience(some teach ing required). INSTRUCTOFVASSISTANT PROFESSOR The department of Data Proc essing has tenure track and substitute vacancies beginning Fall 1986. Teaching respon RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE MANAGER Must be pl easa nt and courteous and have the ability to handle busy telephone system. Bilingual (Spanish/English) preferred Contact LupeAguirre. National Council of La Raza , 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001. PARK NATURALIST I $17,559 Ann. No . 73026ACAF Entry level professional position working in one of Arlington County's two Nature Centers. Employee provides interpretive programs to promote the conservation a!1d appreciation of Arlington County's natural resources through various activities and demonstrations. Plans , coo rdinates and conducts interpretive nature programs; develops and constructs exhibits, schedules group tours and other dUties as assigned. Requires bachelors degree in Wildlife , For estryorclosely related field. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in designing, coordinating and conducting a variety of nature interpretive programming and/or exhibits for various age groups . Official Arlington County application form required To request application material please call (703) 558 weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Applications must be received into the Personsibilities may include courses in Data Communications , Computer Technology , Computer Science. Computer Operations and Business Applications Programming. All candidates should possess a minimum of a masters degree in Computer Sci ence, Electrical Engineering , Applied Math ematics or related field Doctorate or Ph. D. candidate preferred. Teaching or other work experience in Data Communications, microprocessor interfacing techniques , systems or scientific applications progral'll" ming a plus. Send resume and cover letter indicating position desired by May 9 to: Chairman, Department of Data Processing. Room 5 LaGuardia Community College/CUNY 3t Thomson Avenue Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 EOE!AA Employer net Department by 5 p.m. on April 17. 1986. Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St North, Arlington. Virginia 22201. EOE. PROGRAMMER COORDINATOR I (STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS) Staff position in student life office responsible for coordinating the undergraduate paraprofessional program "REACH." Candi date provides services to individual students , • campus clubs and organizations, provides leadership for student organization develop ment and facilitates the role of faculty and staff advisors. Bachelors degree in commu nications, student development, couseling, student personnel administration or social scienCes and one year adm native experience; OR five years progressively responsible administrative/coordinative pro gram experience ; OR any approved equivalent combination of experience, training or educa tion. Effective use of communications skills , organization development skills. use of student development theory and knowledge of group process skills desired. Salary$ 18,836 for 12 months. Applications must be received by May 9 in the Personnel Office, Arizona State University , Tempe, Ariz. 85287. Equal Oppor !unity Calendar CHICANO STUDIES CONFERENCE El Paso, Texas April 10-12 HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. April 11 THIS WEEK SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING SYMPOSIUM San Antonio April 9-12 San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will keynote the 1Oth annual symposium by the Mexican American Engineering Society. Salah Diab (512) 697-0222 HISPANIC WOMEN'S AWARDS Los Angeles April 10 The 5th annual awards dinner by the Hispanic Women ' s Council will honor three Latinas and one Latino for their work in the arts and the community. Rose Weiss (213)'125-1657 Hispanic Link Weekly Report The National Association for Chicano Studies will sponsor its 14th annual conference themed "Decisiones Para el Futuro en Tiempos Criticos." Roberto Villarreal (915) 747'5462 CONFERENCE ON DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Newark, N.J. April1 0-12 Seton Hall University will co-sponsor its first conference on the Dominican Republic, including research on the U.S. Dominican population. Asela Rodriguez de Laguna (201) 648-57tli:l HISPANIC HOMELESS HEARING New York April 11 This hearing by the U.S. House Subcommittee on Census and Population will be chaired by Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N .Y.) to gauge the extent of Hispanic homelessness. Gretchen Sierra (202) 226-7523 Rep. Esteban Torres(D-Calif.) will be a presenter at this conference sponsored by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Teresa Pacheco (816) 842-2228 HISPANIC WOMEN'S CONFERENCE San Antonio April11-13 LULAC is conducting a conference for Hispanic women to discuss upward mobility in employment, education and politics. Chacha Lopez (512) 552-49G3 COMING SOON HISPANIC ECONOMIC GROWTH SER-Jobs for Progress Miami April 15-18 Willie Acosta (214) 631-3999 3

PAGE 4

Arts & Entertainment and in the creative arts." Included in Women On Time area 1 Maria Callas who Time wrote that year "truly deserves t e PfMdlt1tle of prima donna, with all its overtones of g _ood and evi A' and Joan Baez in a ACHIEVEMENTS BY LATINAS IN THE ARTS are highlighted by three separate events this week. 1962 photograph. Ar R 8 In Los Angeles, the Hispanic Women's Council honors "three exceptional women in the arts" at its 5th annual awards dinner April 10. Honorees Judith Baca, Carmen Zapata and Julia Migenes Johnson were chosen because "they contributed significantly to creating the positive image of Hispanic women in a non-traditional field." Also, San Antonio' s Guadalupe Theater holds that city's premiere of the Oscar nominated documentary Las MadreS/The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo April 13. A muralist. best known for her 1976 The Great Wall of Los Angeles , Baca is being honored as " Woman of Promise . " Miqenes-Johnson, a Grammy-winning singer of Greek and Puerto Rican/lrish descent, has been named "Woman of the Year." Additionally, Zapata is honored for her " years of community service" as president and managing producer of the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts. A reception for co-producerS/directors Susana Munoz and Lourdes Portillo will be held immediately following the screening. Renee Epelbaum, one of the mothers interviewed in the documentary, is expected to be at the event. ONE LINERS: Los Angeles columnist for La Opinion Salvador Solis Hernandez reports that NBC is paying for "English, acting, singing, dance and social behavior classes" for Mexican idol Luis Miguel in preparation for his starring role in the series Tropics for that network. . . The winner of the Hemingway Ritz Paris literary contest will be announced April 7. Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes is nominated for his latest novel Gringo viejo ... And Ser puertorriqueflos, an exhibit of photographs by Ricky Flores, continues at the New York Telephone building in the Bronx through May 29 . . . Two other Hispanic singers are featured in an exhibit of original Time magazine covers that closes April 13 at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Drawn from the Gallery's collection, the works in Women On Time are said the reflect "the increasingly prominent role played by women in the professions, in political life Media Report NO MORE NEWS: Lino Dominguez and Carol Reuben, husband and wife, bought the dying Atlanta newspaper Mundo Hispanico for $10 in January 1982 and forged it into a crusading bilingual voice for Georgia's Hispanics. They worked for four years wifhout rest and without pay-supported by their small printing businesschronicling the successes of the Hispanic community there and exposing in justices in the schools, in kitchens and orchards, in state bureaucracy-wherever they found it Following the killings of Mexican farm workers in Cedartown, Reuben challenged the Ku Klux Klan on its turf, even after her life was threatened. Dominguez and Reuben did everything right -producing a fat tabloid loaded with news and features twice a month. They did everything right except make money. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publicatio n of .Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publisher. He ctor Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora D elgado, F e li x Perez, Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas No portion of H i spanic Link Weekl y Report may be reproduced or broadc a s t in any form without advan ce permiss i o n Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: In c lude the l atest edition of Hispanic L ink Week l y Report in parti c ipants' packets at your n ext c onference o r conve n t i o n . F o r details , contact Hector Ericksen Mendoza 1202) 234737. 4 Mundo Hispanico discontinued publication as a newspaper March 15. On April1 5 it will become a publication of classified and display advertisements and carry a calendar of Hispanic activities . THE READING ROOM: In April Esquire, Geraldo Rivera by-lines a blow-by-blow of how and why he and ABC parted company, concluding that he's "effectively blackballed, at least for now, from working in the network news business." . . . The March 31 edition of Time, with Nicaragua ' s Daniel Ortega on the cover, sees Ricardo Chavira sharing the by-line on the lead story "Tough Tug of War''-from Washington and Laura Lopez receiving reporter credits for an Ortega profile and assessment from Managua .. Hispanic Business magazine offers an April change of pace, featuring Hispanic"Entre preneurs in Agriculture . " . . . El Miami Herald's 32-page 1Oth anniversary supplementpublil?hed March 26-provides Hispanic population and voter statistics on Hialeah that no other city -Antonio Mejias-Rentas in the country is likely to match: Population Year Total Hispano % Hisp . 1960 66,972 2,443 4% 1970 102,110 36,805 35% 1980 145,254 107,908 75% 1985 160,078 136,066 85% Registered Voters Year Total Hispano % Hisp . 1975 39,122 8,606 22% 1979 44,684 17,873 40% 1985 45,775 27,457 60% ROLODEX ROULETTE: Idaho's monthly La Voz Chicana is now La Voz de Idaho, and Meg Fereday has succeeded Victor Munoz as its editor ... Jose Sanz resigned as producer of the weekly half-hour Revista on WJLATV, Washington, D.C., to spend full time with the capital's growing ZGS Productions. He's part-owner . Long-time D.C. radio personality Carlos Gaivar replaced him at the ABC affiliate .. . -Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Link Weekly R eport