Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, April 14, 1985

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, April 14, 1985
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
U.S. Rep. Manuel Lujdn (R-N.M.) is recovering satisfactorily after undergoing triple coronary bypass surgery April 6 in Albuquerque, N.M. The nine-term congressman went to a hospital there complaining of indigestion, was checked and found to be experiencing a heart attack... Actress, singer and dancer Chita Rivera is reported in good condition following an accident April 6 in which her car was broadsided by a taxi in New York City. Rivera, who suffered a compound leg fracture, was starring in the Broadway musical “Jerry’s Girls”. . . Pathologists determine that Alberto Ospino, 39, Colombia-born
resident of Stratford, Conn., was the lone victim of the TWA jetliner explosion April 2 over Greece who was killed by the terrorist bomb blast. The other three victims blown from the plane died on impact with the ground... Lawrence Santistevan is appointed by the Taos, N.M., Town Council to replace Mayor Phil Lovato who died recently... U.S. Olympic silver medal winner Pablo Morales lowers own U.S. Open, American and NCAA records in the 100-yard butterfly at an NCAA meet in Indianapolis. The Stanford University swim star trims his mark from 46.52 to 46.26 seconds... Panama-born jockey Alex Solis, 22, coasts to a six-length victory aboard Snow Chief in the $500,000 Santa Anita Derby, assuring the three-year-old colt of the odds-on favorite role in next month’s Kentucky Derby...

High Farm Worker Disease Incidence Reported
Communicable diseases such as dysentery, hepatitis, typhoid fever and other respiratory and intestinal ailments are present in the U.S. farm worker population at levels similar to those found in developing countries, a recent compilation of regional migrant health data showed.
The data, compiled in the report “Occupational Health of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in the United States,” will be presented during the National Association of Community Health Centers annual conference on migrant health April 17-20 in Minneapolis.
NACHC represents 122 clinics in 40 states and Puerto Rico that, funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,
USCCR vs. Set-Asides?
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights was to meet April 11 to vote on a draft report that recommended the suspension of federal programs that set aside money or contracts for businesses owned by Hispanic Americans, blacks or women.
The report, which was leaked to the New York Times, concluded that the programs were frought with corruption, benefited primarily wealthy minority business owners and caused economic hardships for businesses owned by whites.
Last year, $5.1 billion was awarded to minority businesses through the Small Business Administration, the Public Works Employment Act and the Surface Transportation Assistance Act. The report recommended a one-year moratorium on the awarding of contracts through these programs.
A spokesperson for the commission would not comment on the report’s contents. The commission can accept, reject or send the report back to a committee for a rewrite.
Gavin Quits Mex. Post
U.S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin announced April 7 he will leave his post on May 15 to return to private life.
Gavin, whose mother is a native of Mexico, was nominated in 1981 to replace Julian Nava, who had served as this nation’s first Chicano ambassador to Mexico during the Carter administration.
No successor has been named.
offer primary health care to migrant and seasonal workers. With a budget that has not increased significantly since 1981 and which stands at $45 million this fiscal year, the clinics reach only 15% of an estimated 2.7 million farm workers.
Projections made with regional data (there are no national statistics) show that about 60% of the farm workers are Hispanic. They include primarily Mexican Americans and, to a lesser degree, Central Americans, Cubans and Puerto Ricans - some coming directly from the island Northward migratory streams of workers start every spring, mainly from California, Texas and Florida.
David Cavenaugh, a consultant to NACHC, said that the conference will serve to remind people about the many health problems of farm workers ignored during the current public debate on the U.S. farming crisis. He said that while congressional action to apply federal sanitary field regulations - potable water, sewage and toilet facilities - on farms has been stalled for 20 years by the agribusiness lobby, an array of diseases related to unsanitary conditions are afflicting the migrant and seasonal
Polanco Reaches Runoff
Richard Polanco edged Mike Hernandez in a special California election April 9 for that state’s vacated 55th Assembly District seat. Nine candidates competed.
Polanco won by 329 votes, with 8,150 (38.9%) to Hernandez’s 7,821 (37.3%). The narrow margin of victory was determined by absentee ballots, with Polanco receiving 2,085 (45.8%) compared with 1,019 (30.4%) for Hernandez.
Having failed to get a majority of the vote, Polanco, a Democrat, will face Republican Loren Lutz, who received 9.9% of the vote, and two other non-Hispanic minor party candidates in a June 3 runoff.
If Polanco wins as expected, he will finish out the term of his former boss, Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre, who resigned the seat. The term expires in November.
However, Polanco must face Hern&ndez again, as well as other candidates, in the state’s regular primary election the same day as the runoff for the two-year assembly term to begin in January 1987.
workers at dangerous levels.
There is yet no nationwide study on migrant health, but regional studies and observations from clinicians show that some of the most common problems are:
• Advanced gum and dental diseases such as rotten teeth in babies whbse mothers give them water and sugar to pacify them.
• Pesticide contamination by direct spraying or contact with contaminated clothing or other objects. (A $350,000 HHS grant is currently funding a study on pesticide effects on migrant pregnant women in California - a population which is almost 100% Hispanic. It is believed that pesticides cause fetal limb defects and Down’s Syndrome in newborn babies.)
• Chronic anemia or malnutrition resulting from parasitic infections.
• Urinary track infections caused by workers^ urine retention in fields without toilet facilities.
• Musculoskeletal problems - traumatic injuries, tissue irritation around the joints and accelerated joint degeneration - caused by inadequate agricultural equipment
Compiled by the National Rural Health Care Association with a $70,000 grant from HHS’s Office of Migrant Health, the report also showed that poor working conditions made agriculture the second (mining is the first) most dangerous occupation in the nation. This finding is based on a 1984 survey of the National Safety Council, which reported 1,800 work-related deaths and 180,000 disabling injuries in the nation’s fields in 1983.
continued on page 2
FCC Nominee Testifies
The White House nominee to the Federal Communications Commission, Patricia Diaz Dennis, testified on her qualifications before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation April 9. The committee is expected to vote on her nomination and send it to the Senate floor within two weeks.
If confirmed, Diaz Dennis, 39, will replace Henry Rivera, who resigned from FCC in 1985. His term ends June30,1987. A Democrat New Mexican, Diaz Dennis currently serves as a member of the National Labor Relations Board. Her nomination was referred by the White House March 12. __________________________________


S/'n Pelos en la. lengua
THE POLITICAL CAULDRON: Politics has a way of bringing out the worst in us sometimes, and the special election to fill the vacated California Assembly seat of Richard Alatorre was no exception.
“Lewd and Lascivious Act Upon the Body of a Child Under the Age of 14,” read the bold letters on the front of one campaign pamphlet mailed out by Richard Polanco.
Turn the page and you learn, “The crime was committed by a man that Political Candidate Mike Herndndez bailed out of jail.”
Hern&ndez, Polanco’s chief rival, is partner in a family bail bond business. And bondsmen, like lawyers, don’t get too many Mary POppins types as clients.
THE POLITICAL MANIPULATORS: After San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez was indicted by a grand jury on charges of illegal appropriation of public funds (Weekly Report, March 24), La Prensa San Diego, was quick to react:
“The Martinez scandal is not an indictment of the Chicano-Latino community, the Mexican culture, our mores or value systems. It is an indictment of the political process of San Diego.
“Council District 8, with a majority of Chicano/black/white working-class people, has not had the constitutional right to elect its own representative for over 20 years.
“Martinez, like Jess Haro and Lucy Killea, was first appointed by
the prevailing power structure, then maintained in office by their economic clout and control... Uvaldo Martinez was rejected by the District 8 voters when he came up for re-election. However, the economic power and the control of the Republican power brokers got Martinez re-elected in the citywide election.
“Our gente have enough of a burden to carry,” concludes La Prensa, as it calls for Martinez to resign “in the interest of thousands of chicanitos who need some good role models to emulate.” ANOTHER POLITICAL BAD GUY: Then there’s P.S. Ervin of Dallas, a Democratic nominee to the Texas Railroad Commission, whose immigration reform plan is to “shoot about the first 25 that cross the border after public warnings.”
A POLITICAL GOOD GUY: San Antonio Judge Tony Jimenez, an obvious political rookie, returned $8,000 in political contributions last month just because he’s running unopposed.
AND MY FAVORITE POLITICAL OPPORTUNIST: The commissioners of Cameron County, Texas (which includes now-famous Harlingen) turned down Sheriff Alex Perez’s fund request for new equipment So after Ronald Reagan made his statement that Harlingen is just two days driving time from Nicaragua, el jerife wrote elprez to tap him for $125,000 - the price tag for seven patrol vehicles, riot gear, pump shotguns, bullet-proof vests and a couple patrol car cages. Just in case.
-Kay Barbaro
Ethnic Crime Stats Given
Fifty^five percent of Hispanics entering state prisons in 1983 were sentenced for violent crimes or drug offenses, a March 31 study by the Bureau of Justice Statistics of the U.S. Department of Justice showed. Only 44.5% of the blacks and 40.5% of the whites were committed for offenses in these crime categories.
The study found 9,185 Hispanics out of 126,839 entering prisoners in 18 states whose reports include ethnic breakdowns The larger percentages of Latinos were found at prisons in California, 27.8%; Colorado, 24.7%; Massachusetts, 8.1 % and Wyoming, 7.5%. Other states with significant Hispanic populations, including New York, Florida, New Mexico and Arizona, were not among the 30 states participating in the study. Texas and Illinois did participate, but they do not report ethnicity in prison statistics.
Percentages of entering prisoners in 1983 by type of offense and ethnic group are as follows:
Offenses Hispanics Blacks Whites
Violent 41.2% 37.8% 31.0%
Property 38.6% 47.8% 49.6%
Drug 14.0% 6.7% 9.5%
Public order 3.0% 6.6% 8.3%
Other 3.2% 1.1% 1.6%
Bil. Ed. Cap Challenged
A bill to rescind the 4% spending cap for alternative bilingual instruction methods was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives April 9 by Rep. Jim Jeffords (R-Vt.).
Currently, 96% of federal funds for bilingual education are slated for instruction methods that include use of the students! native language.
A similar bill was introduced in the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee March 27 by Sen. Dan Quayle (R-Ind.).
2
Chokehold Suit Settled
The family of a Hispanic man who died in Los Angeles police custody in 1984 after a forbidden “chokehold" restraint was applied, was offered $585,000 April 2 by the Los Angeles City Council as settlement for two lawsuits.
Raul Guevara Jr., 30, died in January 1984 after struggling with a civilian jailer who applied the chokehold - a controversial restraint in which an arm is depressed across the throat. The hold was forbidden by the department since 1982.
Guevara was in custody on charges of receiving stolen property and struggling with police attempting to retrieve a phone receiver he had torn from a pay phone in his cell block when the incident occurred.
The wife and four children of Guevara were awarded $510,000 in one suit with his mother and stepfather offered $75,000 as settlement in another. The widow has agreed to the settlement, according to her attorney.
No disciplinary action was taken against the jailer who applied the chokehold because he resigned, a police spokesman said.
Texas to Test 1 st Graders
The Texas Education Agency has developed a Spanish-language pilot test to be given April 21-25 to first-grade Hispanic students not fluent in English. The pilot follows Hispanic parent complaints that the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimal Skills test put their children at an educational disadvantage.
If a student does not pass the current English-languagetest - administered yearly to 1st, 2nd, 5th, 9th and 11th graders -remedial courses are required.
The pilot test will be administered to 10,000 of the state’s 30,000 Hispanic Limited English Proficient first-grade public school students.
Farm Disease Rate High
continued from page 1
Valerie Wilks, author of the report and a Farmworker Justice Fund lobbyist said that while about 2% of the U.S. population has parasites, the rate can be as high as 70% in migrant children, who perform about 25% of all farm labor. “These are levels found more in places like Mexico and Guatemala and they are all preventable diseases,” she said.
Last September, U.S. Secretary of Labor William Brock declined to impose federal field sanitation standards and gave the states 18 months to provide adequate drinking and washing water and toilet facilities The secretary was responding to a suit filed in 1973 by a coalition of farm workers’ organizations. By the March 1987 deadline, he is expected to evaluate the state regulations and decide if federal standards are necessary. At present 13 states have set some sanitation standards, but critics contend that under state control they cannot be effectively enforced.
In response to Brock’s decision to delay federal action, Rep. Joseph Gaydos (D-Pa.) introduced legislation Jaa 22 to impose federal regulations. The bill is pending in the House, where a hearing is scheduled April 16. No action has been proposed in the Senate as
Vet- -Dora Delgado
Hispanic Jobless Down
The unemployment rate for Hispanics declined last month to 10.3%, down from February’s 12.3%, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The overall rate declined from 7.2% to 7.1%.
Hispanic veterans who served in Vietnam between 1964 and 1975 had a 6.3% unemployment rate in April 1985, the department reported inanothersurvey. Thatfigurewas higher than the white rate (5.4%) and lower than the 14.1 % black rate.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
FARMWORKERS’ HEALTH: The 132-page report “The Occupational Health of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in the United States” can be purchased from the National Rural Health Care Association, 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, Mo. 64108 (816) 421-3076. (Price undetermined at press time.)
HISPANIC PRISONERS: The 11-page report “Prison Admissions and Releases, 1983” lists percentages of inmates by ethnicity and type of offense. Single copies are available free from: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, Box6000, Rockville, Md. 20850 (800) 732-3277.
MAN A SCHOLARSHIPS: The Mexican American Women’s National Association is accepting until June 2 applications for two $1,000 scholarships to Hispanas with leadership potential attending postsecondary or vocational institutions. For applications, write to: Scholarship Committee, MANA, 1201 16th St NW, #420, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-3440.
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS: The Adolph Coors Co. will award at least 100 scholarships of $5,000 maximum to eligible freshmen from U.S veterans’ parents. Deadline is July 1. Write to: Coors Veterans’ Memorial Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 7529, Wheeling, III. 60090, or 1-800-49COORS.
HISPANA WORKERS: The report “Women of Hispanic Origin in the United States Labor Force” found that working Hispanas are younger than the general female population in the U.S. labor force. For free single copies, send self-addressed label to: Women’s Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor, Third St & Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20210 (202)523-6665.
LOS ANGELES’ HISPANIC AGENCIES: A 300-page bilingual “Directory of the Hispanic Community of the County of Los Angeles, Third Edition” includes 1,000 entries of primarily non-profit organizations and agencies that provide a wide variety of services. Price: $25 for non-profit organizations; $50 for others. Send check or money order to: Dr. Samuel Mark, College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, Hispanic Programs, University of Southern California, University Park, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-4012 (213)743-0977.
LATIN AMERICAN ISSUES: The second of a series of booklets on Latin America has been released by the League of United Latin American Citizens For a copy of “Voices from the Americas: Perspectives on Current Events from Latin American and Caribbean Ambassadors to the United States,” send a 39-cent stamped, self-addressed 7 1/2 X 10 1/2 inch envelope to: LULAC, 400 First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202)628-8516.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (E7) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week Rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY (County Manager's Office) $18,279-$23,279 plus benefits
Excellent opportunity for a person with very strong administrative and clerical skills to join an administrative team providing support to the County Manager and executive staff. Duties includec
• Serving as backup to the Administrative Assistant
• Keeping abreast of projects, priorities and commitments of staff
• Heavy typing and word processing
• Extensive public contact
Requires two years responsible secretarial
experience at upper administrative level, plus high school or equivalent Considerable knowledge of English grammar and good communication skills are essential to deal tactfully with the public. Must be able to
handle and maintain sensitive and con* fidential information. Must type50 wordsa minute and have skill or ability to learn NBI word processor at full level within six months.
Official Arlington County Application form required. To request application ma* terial please call (703) 558*2167 and refer to announcement number 11276* CCMG. Applications must be received into the personnel department no later than April 24,1986 at 5 p.m.
ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 14th Street North Arlington, Virginia 22201 EOE
RESEARCH ANALYST BIOMEDICAL STATISTICIAN Minimum B.Sn computer, survey/research design, feasibility studies, randomization values and sample size, evaluation of outcome measures Good communication/writing skills National non-profit health education organization headquartered in the Washington, D.C., area. Salary in the low 20s. Resumes with cover letters to: L Roesing, 9411 Connecticut Ave., Kensington, Md. 20895.
The following two positions are with LaGuardia Community College/CUNY.
INSTRUCTOR OR ASST. PROFESSOR Business Admin, and Management Duties To teach a full range of business administration and management courses Requirements: Minimum MBA, Ph. D. preferred. Teaching and/or busi ness experience required. (Temporary one-year position.)
Send resume and cover letter indicating position desired by May 16 to: Chairperson,-
Accounting/Managerial Studies Department Room 4, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Ave., Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
ACCOUNTING INSTRUCTOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Duties To teach a full range of accounting courses Requirements Minimum MBA/CPA, Ph. D. preferred. Teaching and/or business experience required.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISOR
Responsible for supervision of international/ intercultural programs for faculty, students and the business community in the Center for International Studies Bachelor's degree and Spanish-English fluency required. Good salary, excellent benefits. If interested, please send resume to: Mr. GR Hannah, Director of Personnel, Bergen Community College, 400 Paramus Road, Paramus, N.J. 07652 by April 25,1986.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MINORITIES IN MATH AND SCIENCE San Francisco April 14-16 A symposium co-sponsored by the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering will discuss topics such as admissions, dropouts and attracting minority students to graduate schools. Fred Moreno (212) 713-8000
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING Arlington, Va. April 15
The I bero-American Chamber of Commerce and the Committee of the Spanish Speaking Community of Virginia will co-sponsor a workshop on procurement opportunities at all levels of government.
Orlando Mayorga (703) 558-2128
HISPANIC ECONOMIC GROWTH
Miami April 15-18
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
SER-Jobs for Progress will conduct its 20th annual conference titled “ H ispanic Americans: Pathway to Economic Growth.”
Willie Acosta (214) 631-3999
BACA FOR CONGRESS RECEPTION Washington, D.C. April 16
A reception will be held in honor of Colorado state Sen. Polly Baca, a candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives.
Manny Fierro (202) 243-2876
MIGRANT WORKER HEALTH Minneapolis April 17-20
The 9th annual conference by the National Association of Community Health Centers will have sessions on field sanitation, pre-natal care, environmental and occupational hazards and dental care.
Francine White (202) 833-9280
FUND-RAISING DANCE New York April 18
The National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights will holds its 5th anniversary dance.
Efrain Roche (215) 634-4443
MALDEF AWARDS DINNER Chicago April 18
At its 6th annual dinner, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will give awards to individuals who have contributed to the Hispanic community.
Mari Fohrman (312) 427-9363
NICARAGUAN CONSTITUTION SYMPOSIUM New York April 18-20
Representatives from that country will meet with U.S. politicians, clergy and others to discuss a draft for a new constitution.
Betsy Carpenter (212) 732-8775
TEJANO PIONEERS TRIBUTE Houston April 19
Vice President George Bush will keynote this luncheon sponsored by Houston International University to honorHis panics who played a role in Texas’ development.
Tonie Cardenas (713) 923-4611
3


Arts & Entertainment
AN INTERNATIONAL AWARD, MUSIC VIDEO AND FILM projects and more charity benefits continue to keep U.S. Hispanic singers busy.
The group Miami Sound Machine, recent winner of the Tokyo International Song Festival with the song Conga, is now getting air time on MTV and on national music video programs for its latest hit Bad Boys
Sung in English and combining funk and tropical music sounds, Conga has already placed Miami Sound Machine on Billboard magazine’s top ten pop chart. The song, which played often on English and Spanish-language radio stations, has given the ten-year-old band instant recognition.
“It seems doubly ironic,” Larry Birnbaum wrote recently forthe New York Times, “that Miami Sound Machine, which recorded the first seven of its nine albums primarily in Spanish, should notch its greatest triumph among both English and Spanish-speaking listeners with an English song more authentically Latin in flavor than any of the group’s Spanish material.”
The band formed in 1975 with Cuban Americans Emilio Estefan Jr., Enrique “Kiki” Garcia and Juan Marcos Avila calling themselves The
Miami Latin Boys. A year later singer Gloria Estefan joined the group, which also includes six other members.
In a related item, San Antonio-based singer Patsy Torres is readying to break into the English-language rock market with Lover to Lover, a self-produced video expected to air soon on MTV. The video, which will be released without a record, was filmed by Bill Molina and Manuel Corales of First Video Productions.
Patsy Torres performs in English and Spanish, solo and with the band Towers that bears her last name in English.
Another crossover artist, Panamanian singer/composer Rub§n Blades, has been signed to co-star with Richard Pryor in Paramount Pictures’ Critical Condition. Michael Apted directed the film which began production in New York March 17. Blades will play an orderly who “befriends Mr. Pryor’s character in this comedy about the chaotic aftermath of a power failure at a big city hospital.” ,
Various charity events still keep Hispanic musicians involved. Julio Iglesias recently attended a bullfighting festival in Madrid to raise funds for victims of last year’s volcano eruption in Colombia.
Last month in Puerto Rico, Dominican singer Freddy Kenton suggested that a merengue telethon be held to raise funds to send undocumented Dominican workers back to their native island.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SLIGHT GAIN: Minorities working in the newsrooms of the nation’s daily papers recorded a significant percentage gain this year- from 5.7% to 6.3%, following a slight decrease for 1985.
Hispanics, who comprised 1.5% of newsroom personnel last year, moved up 1/1 Oth of a percentage point to 1.6% at the start of 1986.
These figures were released by the Minorities Committee of the American Society of Newspaper Editors at its annual conference in Washington, D.C., last week.
They are projections based on survey returns from 996 out of 1,658 queried daily newspapers A follow-up review suggested that the true minority employment figure is 1 /1 Oth to 2/1 Oths of a percentage lower than 6.3% because some non-responding papers that were test-sampled later reported fewer minorities.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Hispanics were 1.3% of the dailies' newsroom personnel- reporters, photographers, artists, copy desk and news executives-in 1982, the first year they were included separately in the survey.
ASNE dropped the Hispanic category for 1983 and 1984, but picked it up again last year after complaints from the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
PENNSYLVANIA SURVEY: Using a newsroom census design similar to ASNEs, the Pennsylvania Society of Newspaper Editors received responses from 87% of that state’s dailies and 73% of its weeklies to learn that:
• Seven out of eight Pennsylvania newsrooms employ no minorities.
• In a state which the 1980 Census showed being 10.2% minority, 4% of the journalists on daily papers and 2.1 % on weekly papers are minority.
The report, distributed at the ASNE meeting by Philadelphia Daily News Managing Editor Thomas Livingston, counted eight Hispanics
out of 2,695 newspersons working on dailies and none at all out of 571 working on weeklies It recorded 91 blacks and 10 Asians on dailies; nine blacks and three Asians on weeklies
DATESTOMARK: APRIL 19: Long Island’s Newsday stages its first job opportunity conference for minority college students and graduates who want to pursue marketing careers in print media It will be held at Hofstra University in Hempstead. Contact Reginald Tuggle, manager, Community Affairs Department News-day, Long Island, N.Y. 11747. Telephone (516) 454-2183.
Also APRIL 19: Dallas’ Network of Hispanic Communicators stages its high school writing contest awards luncheon... APRIL 26: Howard University in Washington, D.C., presents an international video conference oh “The Role of the Broadcast Media in Reporting Major-World Issues” The Christian Science Monitor is sponsor... APRIL 23-27: The4th National Hispanic Media Conference will be held in Miami... -Charlie Ericksen
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week resident of Stratford , Conn . , was the lone victim of the TWA jetliner explosion April 2 over Greece who was killed by the terrorist bomb blast. The other three victims blown from the plane died on impact with the ground ... Lawrence Santistevan is appointed by the Taos, N .M., Town Council to replace Mayor Phil Lovato who died recently ... U . S . Olympic silver medal winner Pablo Morales lowers own U . S . Open, American and NCAA records in the 1 00-yard butterfly at an NCAA meet in Indianapolis. The Stanford University swim star trims his mark froni 46.52 to 46.26 seconds . . . Panama-born jockey Alex Solis, 22, coasts to a six-length victory aboard Snow Chief in the $500,000 Santa Anita Derby, assuring the three-year-old colt of the odds-on favorite role in next month's Kentucky Derby ... U . S . Rep . Manuel Lujan (R-N .M.) is recovering satisfactorily after undergoing triple coronary bypass surgery April 6 in Albuquerque, N .M. The nine-term congressman went to a hospital there complaining of indigestion, was checked and found to be experiencing a heart attack ... Actress, singer and dancer Chita Rivera is reported in good condition following an accident April6 in which her car was broad sided by a ta x i in New York City. Rivera, who suffered a compound leg fracture, was starring in the Broadway musical "Jerry's Girls" ... Pathologists determine that Alberto Ospino, 39, Colombia-born Vot•No.lSI HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Ap•ll14, 1986 High Farm Worker Disease Incidence Reported Communicable diseases such as dysentery , hepatitis , typhoid fever and other respiratory and intestinal ailments are present in the U . S . farm worker population at levels similar to those found in developing countries, a recent compi lation of regional migrant health data showed . The data, compiled in the report"Occupational Health of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in the United States," will be presented during the National Association of Community Health Centers annual conference on migrant health April17-20 in Minneapolis. NACHC represents 122 clinics in 40 states and Puerto Rico that, funded by the U . S . Department of Health and Human Services , USCCR vs. Set-Asides? The U .S. Commission on Civil Rights was to meet April 11 to vote on a draft report that recommended the suspension of federal pro grams that set aside money or contracts for businesses owned by Hispanic Americans, blacks or women. The report, which was leaked to the New York Times , concluded that the programs were fraught with corruption, benefited primarily wealthy minority business owners and caused economic hardships for businesses owned by whites. Last year, $5 . 1 billion was awarded to minority businesses through the Small Business Ad ministration , the Public Works Employment Act and the Surface Transportation Assistance Act. The report recommended a one-year moratorium on the awarding of contracts through these programs. A spokesperson for the commission would not comment on the reporfs contents. The commission can accept, reject or send the report back to a committee for a rewrite . Gavin Quits Mex. Post U.S . Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin announced April? he will leave his post on May 15 to return to pri vate life . Gavin , whose mother is a native of Mexico, was nominated in 1981 to replace Julian Nava, who had served as this nation ' s first Chicano ambassador to Mexico during the Carter administration. No successor has been named. offer primary health care to migrant and seasonal workers. With a budget that has not increased significantly since 1981 and which stands at $45 million this fiscal year, the clinics reach only 15o/o of an estimated 2 . 7 million farm workers. Projections made with regional data (there are no national statistics) show that .about 60% of the farm workers are Hispanic . They include primarily Mexican Americans and , to a lesser degree, Central Americans, Cubans and Puerto Ricans some coming directly from the island. Northward migratory streams of workers start every spring, mainly from California , Texas and Florida . David Cavenaugh , a consultant to NACHC, said that the conference will serve to remind people about the many health problems of farm workers ignored during the current public debate on the U . S . farming crisis . He said that while congressional action to apply federal sanitary field regulations potable water, sewage and toilet facilities on farms has been stalled for 20 years by the agribusiness lobby, an array of diseases related to unsanitary conditions are afflicting the migrant and seasonal Polanco Reaches Runoff Richard Polanco edged Mike Hernandez in a special Californ i a election April 9 for that state ' s vacated 55th Assembly District seat. Nine candidates competed. Polanco won by 329 votes , with 8,150 (38 .9%) to Hernandez's 7 , 821 (37.3%). The narrow margin of victory was determined by absentee ballots, with Polanco receiving 2,085 (45.8%) compared with 1,019 (30.4%) for Hernandez . Having failed to get a majority of the vote, Polanco, a Democrat, will face Rep . ublican Loren Lutz, who received 9 . 9% of the vote , and two other non-Hispanic minor party candi dates in a June 3 runoff . If Polanco wins as expected, he will finish out the term of his former boss, Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre, who resigned the seat. The term expires in November. However, Polanco must face Hernandez again , as well as other candidates, in the state's regular primary election the same day as the runoff for the two-year assembly term to begin in January 1987. workers at dangerous levels . There is yet no nationwide study on migrant health , but regional studies and observations from clinicians show that some of the most common problems are : • Advanced gum and dental diseases such as rotten teeth in babies whose mothers give them water and sugar to pacify them. • Pesticide contamination by direct spraying ot contact with contaminated clothing or other objects. (A $350,000 HHS grant is currently funding a study on pesticide effects on migrant pregnant women in Californiaa population which is almost 100% Hispanic. It is believed that pesticides cause fetal limb defects and Down's Syndrome in newborn babies.) • Chronic anemia or malnutrition resulting from parasitic infections. • Urinary track infections caused by workers' urine retention in fields without toilet facilities. • Musculoskeletal problems-traumati c injuries , tissue irritation around the joints and accelerated joint degeneration-caused by inadequate agricultural equipment Compiled by the National Rural Health Care Association with a $70,000 grant from HHS's Office of Migrant Health, the report also showed that poor working conditions made agriculture the second (mining is the first) most dangerous occupation in the nation. This finding is based on a 1984 survey of the National Safety Council, which reported 1,800 work-related deaths and 180,000 disabling injuries in the nation ' s fields in 1983. continued on page :i FCC Nominee Testifies The White House nominee to the Federal Communications Commission, Patricia Diaz Dennis , testified on her qualifications before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation April 9. The committee is expected to vote on her nomination and send it to the Senate floor within two weeks. If confirmed, Diaz Dennis, 39, will replace Henry Rivera, who resigned from FCC in 1985. His term endsJune30,1987. A Demo crat New Mexican, Diaz Dennis currently serves as a member of the National Labor Relations Board. Her nomination was referred by the White House March 12.

PAGE 2

Sin Pelos en Ia lengua the prevailing power structure, then maintained in office by their economic clout and control. .. Uvalda Martinez was rejected by the District 8 voters when he came up for re-election . However, the economic power and the control of the Republican power brokers got Martinez re-elected in the citywide election. THE POLITICAL CAULDRON: Politics has a way of bringing out the worst in us sometimes, and the special election to fill the vacated California Assembly seat of Richard Alatorre was no exception. "Lewd and Lascivious Act Upon the Body of a Child Under the Age of 14," read the bold letters on the front of one campaign pamphlet mailed out by Richard Polanco. "Our gente have enough of a burden to carry," concludes La Prensa, as it calls for Martinez to resign "in the interest of thousands of chicanitos who need some good role models to emulate." Turn the page and you learn, "The crime was committed by a man that Political Candidate Mike Hernandez bailed out of jail." Hernandez, Polanco's chief rival , is partner in a family bail bond business . And bondsmen, like lawyers, don't get too many Mary POppins types as clients. ANOTHER POLITICAL BAD GUY: Then there's P.S. Ervin of Dallas, a Democratic nominee to the Texas Railroad Commission, whose immigration reform plan is to "shoot about the first 25 that cross the border after public warnings." THE POLITICAL MANIPULATORS : After San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez was indicted by a g r and jury on charges of illegal appropriation of public funds (Weekly Report, March 24), La Prensa San Diego , was quick to react: A POLITICAL GOOD GUY: San Antonio Judge Tony Jimenez, an obvious political rookie, returned $8,000 in political contributions last month just because he ' s running unopposed. AND MY FAVORITE POLITICAL OPPORTUNIST: The commis sioners of Cameron County, Texas (which includes now-famous Harlingen) turned down Sheriff Alex Perez's fund request for new equipment So after Ronald Reagan made his statement that Harlingen is just two days driving time from Nicaragua , el jerife wrote el prez to tap him for $125,000the price tag for seven patrol vehicles, riot gear, pump shotguns, bullet-proof vests and a couple patrol car cages. Just in case. "The Martinez scandal is not an indictment of the Chicana-Latino community, the Mexican culture, our mores or value systems . It is an indictment of the political process of San Diego . "Council District 8, with a majority of Chicano/black/white working class people, has not had the constitutional right to elect its own representative for over 20 years. "Martinez, like Jess Haro and Lucy Killea, was first appointed by Ethnic Crime Stats Given F i fty-five percent of Hispanics entering state p risons in 1983 wer e sentenced for violent crimes or drug offenses, a March 31 study by the Bureau of Justice Statistics of the U.S. Department of Justice showed . Only 44.5% of the blacks and 40.5% of the whites were committed for offenses in these crime categories. The study found 9,185 Hispanics out of 126,839 entering p r isoners in 18 states whose reports include ethnic breakdowns. The larger percentages of Latinos were found at prisons in California, 27.8% ; Colorado , 24.7%; Mas sachusetts, 8.1% and Wyoming, 7 . 5% . Other state.s with sig.nificant Hispanic populations , inc l uding New York, Florida, New Mexico and Arizona, were not among the 30 states partici pati n g in the study. Texas and Illinois did participate, but they do not report ethnicity in prison statistics. Percentages of entering prisoners in 1983 by type of offense and ethnic group are as follows: Offenses Hispanics Blacks Whites Violent 41.2% 37. 8% 31.0% Property 38.6% 47. 8% 49.6% Drug 14. 0% 6 . 7% 9.5% Public o rder 3.0% 6 . 6% 8 . 3% Other 3.2% 1.1% 1.6% Bil. Ed. Cap Challenged A bill to rescind the 4% spending cap for alternative bilingual instruction methods was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives April 9 by Rep. Jim Jeffords (R-Vt.). Currently, 96% of federal funds for bilingual education are slated for instruction methods that include use of the students' native language. A similar bill was introduced i n the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee March 27 by Sen. Dan Quayle (R-Ind.) . 2 Chokehold Suit Settled The family of a Hispanic man who died in Los Angeles police custody in 1984 after a forbidden "chokehold' restraint was applied, was offered $585,000 April 2 by the Los Angeles C i ty Council as settlement for two lawsuits. , Raul Guevara Jr., 30, died in January 1984 after struggling with a civilian jailer who applied the chokeholda controversial restraint in which an arm is depressed across the throat. The hold was forbidden by the department since 1982. Guevara was in custody on charges of receiving stolen property and struggling with police attempting to retrieve a phone receiver he had torn from a pay phone in his cell block when the incident occurred . The wife and four children of Guevara were awarded $510,000 in one suit, with his mother and stepfather offered $75,000 as settlement in another. The widow has agreed to the settlement, according tb her attorney . No disciplinary action was taken against the jailer who applied the chokehold because he resigned, a police spokesman said . Texas to Test 1 st Graders The Texas Education Agency has developed a Spanish-language pilot test to be given April 21 to first-grade Hispanic students not fluent in English. The pilot follows Hispanic parent complaints that the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimal Skills test put their children at an educational disadvantage. If a student does not pass the current Englishlanguagetestadministered yearly to 1st, 2nd, 5th, 9th and 11th graders remedial courses are required. The pilot test will be adm i nistered to 1 0,000 of the state's 30,000 Hispanic Limited English Proficient first-grade public school students. -Kay Barbaro Farm Disease Rate High continued from page 1 Valerie Wilks, author of the report and a Farmworker Justice Fund lobbyist, said that while about 2% of the U.S. population has parasites , the rate can be as high as 70% in migrant children, who perform about 25% of all farm labor. "These are levels found more in places like Mexico and Guatemala and they are all preventable diseases , " she said. Last September, U . S . Secretary of Labor William Brock declined to impose federal field sanitation standards and gave the states 18 months to provide adequate drinking and washing water and toilet facilities. The secretary was responding to a suit filed in 1973 by a coalition of farm workers' organizations. By the March 1987 deadline, he is expected to evaluate the state regulations and decide if federal standards are necessary. At present 13 states have set some sanitation standards, but critics contend that under state control they cannot be effectively enforced . In response to Brock's decision to delay federal action, Rep. Joseph Gaydos (DPa.) introduced legislation Jan . 22 to impose federal regulations . The bill is pending in the House, where a hearing is scheduled Ap ril 16. No action has been proposed in the Senate as yet. -Dora Delgado Hispanic Jobless Down The unemployment rate for Hispanics declined last month to 1 0 . 3%, down from February's 12.3%, according to the U .S. Department of Labor . The overall rate declined from 7.2% to 7.1%. Hispanic veterans who served i n Vietnam between 1964 and 1975 had a 6.3% unem ployment rate in April1985, the department reported in another survey. That figure was higher than the white rate (5.4%) and lower than the 14.1% black rate. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

l ( ' i ! j I I I I I I i THE GOOD NEWS FARM WORKERS' HEALTH: The 132-page report " The Occupational Health of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in the United States" can be purchased from the National Rural Health Care Association , 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, Mo. 641 08 (816) 421-3075. (Price undetermined at press time. ) HISPANIC PRISONERS: The 11-page report"PrisonAdmissions and Releases, 1983" lists percentages of inmates by ethnicity and type of offense. Single copies are available free. from: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, Box 6000, Rockville, Md . 20850 (800) 732-3277. MANA SCHOLARSHIPS: The Mexican American Women ' s National Association is accepting until June 2 applications for two $1,000 scholarships to Hispanas with leadership potential attending post secondary or vocational institutions . For applications, write to: Scholar ship Committee, MANA , 1201 16th St. NW, #420, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-3440. UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS: The Adolph Coors Co. will award at least 1 00 scholarships of $5,000 maximum to eligible freshmen from U.S veterans' parents. Deadline is July 1 . Write to: Coors Veterans ' Memorial Scholarship Fund, P . O . Box 7529, Wheeling, Ill. 60090, or 1-80049COORS. HISPANA WORKERS: The report " Women of Hispanic Origin in the United States Labor Force" found that working Hispanas are younger than the general female population in the U.S. labor force. For free single copies, send self addressed label to: Women's Bureau , U.S. Department of Labor, Third St. & Constitution Ave . NW, Washington , D . C . 20210 (202) 523-6665. LOS ANGELES' HISPANIC AGENCIES: A 300-page bilingual "Directory of the Hispanic Community of the County of Los Angeles, Third Edition" includes 1 ,000 entries of primarily non-profit organizations and agencies that provide a wide variety of services. Price : $25 for non-profit organizations; $50 for others. Send check or money order to : Dr . Samuel Mark, College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, Hispanic Programs, University of Southern California, University Park, Los Angeles , Calif. 90089-4012 (213) 743-0977. LATIN AMERICAN ISSUES: The second of a seri es of booklets on Latin America has been released by the League of United Latin American Citizens. For a copy of " Voices from the Americas: Perspectives on Current Events from Latin American and Caribbean Ambassadors to the United States," send a 39-cent stamped, self-addressed 7 1/2 X 10 1 / 2 inch envelope to: LULAC, 400 First St. NW , Suite 721 , Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8516. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or pho _ ne your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W . , Washington, D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week Rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch . EXECUTIVE SECRETARY (County Manager's Office) $18,279-$23,279 plus benefits E xcellent opportunity for a p e r s on with v ery strong administra tive and c l e rical s kills to join a n adm i ni s trative t e am pro vidi ng s upport t o the County Manager and exec ut ive s t a ff . Dut ies in clude: • Serv ing as bac kup t o the Admini strat ive Ass i s t ant e Ke e ping abreas t of proje c ts. priorit ie s a nd commitme nt s o f s t a ff e Heavy typin g a n d word processing e E x t e n s ive publi c cont ac t Requires two y e a rs res pons i ble sec r e tari a l ex p erie nce a t uppe r administrat iv e l eve l , plu s high sc h oo l or eq uival ent Conside r able knowl e dge o f En g li s h g ramm a r a nd g ood C ommuni ca t io n sk ill s a re e sse nti a l t o d ea l tactfull y with th e public. Must b e a bl e to RESEARCH ANALYST BIOMEDICAL STATISTICIAN h a ndl e an d m ainta in sensitive a nd con fid e ntial inform atio n . Must type 50 w ords a minute and have ski ll or ability t o learn NBI w o rd processor a t full lev e l wi th in six m onths. Offi c i a l A rlingt o n County A pplicati o n form requir ed . T o re q uest appli cation m a t e rial pl ease call (7 0 3) 55867 and r efer to a nn o uncement numbe r 112 76 CCMG. Appli cations must be received into the personn e l department no later than April 2 4 , 1986 a t 5 p . m . ARLI NG T O N COUNTY PER SONNEL DEPARTMENT 2 1 0 0 14th Street North Arlin g t o n , Virginia 22201 EOE Accounting/M a n ageria l Stud i e s Depa rtm e n t R oo m 4 , L a Gu ardia Commun i t y C o ll ege / CUN Y , 31 Th o mson A v e., Long Island Cit y , N . Y . 11101. EOE / AA Employer. ACCOUNTING INSTRUCTOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Minimum B .S., compute r , surv e y / resea r c h d esi gn, feasibility s tu dies, randomi z ati o n va lues a n d sampl e size, eva luat ion o f o utcom e m eas ures. Good communi ca ti o n / writing skills. N a t io n a l n o n-profit health e du ca t io n o rganiz atio n h ea d qu a rtered in th e Wash i ngt o n , D.C. , ar e a . Sa l a ry i n the low20s. R es umeswithcoverlette r s to: Duties : To t eac h a full range of ac counting cours es. R e qu i r e m e nts. Minimum MBA/CPA, Ph. D . p re f e rr e d . T eaching and/or bu s in ess L. R oes ing, 9411 Co n nect i c ut Ave., Ke n si n g t on, ex pe rience r equire d . M d . 2089 5 . The f ollo w ing t wo positio n s a re with L aG u a r di a Com munity Co llege/CUNY. INSTRUCTOR OR ASST. PROFESSOR Business Admin. and Management Dutie s : T o t eac h a f ull ra ng e of b u s in ess a dmini st r a ti o n and man age ment cou rses . R & quirements: Minim um M B A , Ph . D . pre ferr e d . T eac hi n g a nd/or business ex p e r ie n ce required. ( T empora ry one-yea r p osi t i on. ) Se nd re su m e a nd cover lette r indicating p os ition d e sir e d b y M a y 16 to: Chairperson,. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISOR Respon s ibl e tor s up e rvision of int e rnationaV intercultura l progra m s for faculty , students a nd th e bu s iness community in th e Cente r for Int e rnati o n a l Stu dies. Ba c helo r's d egree and Sp a ni s h-En g li s h flue ncy required . Good sa l a ry , excellent b e n e fit s . If interested, please send res ume to: Mr. G.R H a nn ah, Director o f P ersonnel B e rgen C ommunity College, 400 P a r amus Road, P a r a mu s , N.J. 07652 b y Apr il 2 5 , 1986 . An Equ a l Opportunity Empl o yer Calendar SER -Jobs for Progress will conduct its 20th annual conference titled" His panic Americans : Pathw a y to E c onomi c Growth." Efr a in Roche (215) 634-4443 MALDEF AWARDS DINNER Chicago April 18 THIS WEEK MINORITIES IN MATH AND SCIENCE S a n Fran c i sco April 1 4 16 A symposium co-sponsored by the National Consort ium for Gr aduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering will dis c uss topics su c h as admissions , dropouts and attracting minority students to graduate schools. Fr e d Moreno (212) 713-8000 GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING Arlington , Va. April 15 The lbe ro-American Chamber of Commerce and the Committe e of the Spanish Speaking Community of Virginia will c o-sponsor a workshop on procurement opportunities at all levels of government. Orl a nd o Ma yorga (703) 558-2128 HISPANIC ECONOMIC GROWTH Mi a mi April15 Hi s p a ni c Link Weekly Report Willie Acosta (214) 631 BACA FOR CONGRESS RECEPTION Washington , D.C. April 16 A reception will be held i n honor of Co l o r ado st at e Sen . Polly Baca , a candidate for the U . S . House of Representatives. Manny Fierro (202) 2432876 MIGRANT WORKER HEALTH Minneapolis April17-20 The 9th annual conference by the National Association of Community Health Cente rs will have sessions on field san i tation , pre-natal care , env ironmental and oc cupational hazards and dental care . Francine White (202) 833-9280 FUND-RAISING DANCE New York April18 The National Congress for Puerto Rican R ights w ill holds its 5th anniversary dance. At its 6th annual dinner, the Mexican Ame r ican Legal Defense and Educational Fund will giv e awards to indi v iduals who hav e contributed to the Hispanic community. Mari Fohrman (312) 427363 NICARAGUAN CONSTITUTION SYMPOSIUM New York April 18 Representatives from that country will meet with U . S . politicians, clergy and others ,to discuss a draft for a new c onstitution. Betsy Ca rpenter (212) 732 TEJANO PIONEERS TRIBUTE Houston April 19 Vice President George Bush will keynote this lun c heon sponsored by Houston Inte rnational University to honor Hispanics who play e d a role in Texas ' develop ment. Toni e Cardenas (713 ) 9 2 34611 3

PAGE 4

Arts & Entertainment Miami Latin Boys. A year later singer Gloria Estefan joined the group, which also includes six other members. AN INTERNATIONAL AWARD, MUSIC VIDEO AND FILM projects and more charity benefits continue to keep U.S. Hispanic singers busy. In a related item, San Antoniobased singer Patsy Torres is readying to break into the English-language rock market with Lover to Lover, a self-produced video expected to air soon on MTV. The video, which will be released 'without a record, was filmed by Bill Molina and Manuel Corales of First Video Productions. The group Miami Sound Machine, recent winner of the Tokyo International Song Festival with the song Conga, is now getting air time on MTV and on national music video programs for its latest hit Bad Boys. Patsy Torres performs in English and Spanish, solo and with the band Towers that bears her last name in English. Sung in English and combining funk and tropical music sounds, Conga has already placed Miami Sound Machine on Billboard magazine's top ten pop chart. The song, which played often on English and Spanish-language radio stations, has given the ten-year old band instant recognition . Another crossover artist, Panamanian singer/composer Ruben Blades, has been signed to co-star with Richard Pryor in Paramount Pictures' Critical Condition. Michael Apted directed the film which began production in New York March 17 . Blades will play an orderly who "befriends Mr. Pryor's character in this comedy about the chaotic aftermath of a power failure at a big city hospital." "It seems doubly ironic," Larry Birnbaum wrote recently for the New York Times, "that Miami Sound Machine, which recorded the first seven of its nine albums primarily in Spanish, should notch its . greatest triumph among both English and Spanish-speaking listeners with an English song more authentically Latin in flavor than any of the group's Spanish material." Various charity events still keep Hispanic musicians involved. Julio Iglesias recently attended a bullfighting festival in Madrid to raise funds for victims of last year's volcano eruption in Colombia. Last month in Puerto Rico, Dominican singer Freddy Kenton suggested that a merengue telethon be . held to raise funds to send undocumented Dominican workers back to their native island . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas The band formed in 1975 with Cuban Americans Emilio Estefan Jr. , Enrique" Kiki" Garcia and Juan Marcos Avila calling themselves The Media Report SLIGHT GAIN: Minorities working in the newsrooms of the nation's daily papers recorded a significant percentage gain this year-from 5.7% to 6.3%, following a slight decrease for 1985. His panics, who comprised 1.5% of newsroom personnel last year, moved up 1/1 Oth of a percentage point to 1.6% at the start of 1986. These figures were released by the Minorities Committee of the American Society of New& paper Editors at its annual conference in Washington, D.C., last week. They are projec . tions based on survey returns from 996 out of 1 ,658 queried daily newspapers. A follow-up review suggested that the true minority figure is 1/1 Oth to 2/1 Oths of a percentage lower than 6.3% because some non-responding papers that were test sampled later reported fewer minorities. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado. Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234. 4 Hispanics were 1 .3% of the dailies' newsroom personnel-reporters, photographers, artists, copy desk and news executives-in 1982, the first year they were included separately in the survey . ASNE dropped the Hispanic category for 1983 and 1984, but picked it up again last year after complaints from the National Associ ation of Hispanic Journalists. PENNSYLVANIA SURVEY: Using a news room census design similar to ASNE's, the Pennsylvania Society of Newspaper Editors received responses from 87% of that state's dailies and 73% of its weeklies to learn that: • Seven out of eight Pennsylvania newsrooms employ no minorities. • In a state which the 1980 Census showed being 10. 2% minority, 4% of the journalists on daily papers and 2 . 1% on weekly papers are minority . The report, distributed at the ASNE meeting by Philadelphia Daily News Managing Editor Thomas Livingston, counted eight Hispanics out of 2,695 newspersons working on dailies and none at all out of 571 working on weeklies. It recorded 91 blacks and 10 Asians on dailies; nine blacks and three Asians on weeklies. DATES TO MARK: APRIL 19: Long Island's Newsday stages its first job opportunity confer ence for minority college students and graduates who want to pursue marketing careers in print media It will be held at Hofstra University in Hempstead. Contact Reginald Tuggle, manager, Community Affairs Department, News day, Long Island, N.Y. 11747 . Telephone (516) 454-2183. Also APRIL 19: Dallas' Network of Hispanic Communicators stages its high school writing contest awards luncheon ... APRIL 26 : Howard University in Washington, D.C., presents an international video conference on "The Role of the Broadcast Media in Reporting Major World Issues." The Christian Science Monitor is sponsor . .. APRIL 23-27: The 4th National Hispanic Media Conference will be held in Miami. . . -Charlie Ericksen NOlA VERy HEALIHY CRop liltS YAR,Bf.JT I TlJRNE[) A liaoD P!