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Hispanic link weekly report, April 21, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 21, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This
Pope John Paul II names Jesuit priest Enrique San Pedro as auxiliary bishop of the Galveston-Houston Diocese. Monsignor San Pedro, who was teaching the Old Testament at the St. Vincent de Paul seminary in Boynton Beach, Fla., when appointed, raises to 18 the number of Hispanic bishops in the United States... New York Mayor Ed Koch swears in Michael Huerta as Commissioner of Department of Ports and Terminals... Pedro Reboredo is re-elected mayor of West Miami after stepping down in January to run for the office again. The city’s charter, which allows the top vote-getter two years as mayor, then two as a City Council member, does not allow for successive office-holders. Citizens also approve a referendum April
8 to split the mayoral and council races.. ^Ajp^li§nlqj Castillo, who served as Los Lunas, N.M., mayor for 18 years, sheriff for 6 terms and school board member 18 years, dies April 12 there... William Luna, president of a management consulting firm in Chicago, is named by Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan as chairman of the state’s Hispanic Task Force The task force is responsible for analyzing and making recommendations on the effects of all House legislation on Hispanics... Louis Nunez, president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition formerly based in Alexandria, Va., announces the opening of new offices in Washington, D.C. . . .FBI agent Edmundo Mireles Jr. is credited with killing two bank robbery suspects in a suburb of Miami April 11 after the suspects killed two FBI agents. Mireles, wounded by the suspects before gunning them down, was among five agents wounded in the shootout...
^^JLHl£^^^^iKWEEKLYREPOELjG^2l
FCC Closing Door on Ownership, Latinos Charge
The number of Hispanic-owned broadcast stations has declined in the last two years because, Latino experts say, minority ownership is no longer a priority with the Federal Communications Commission. The drop reverses a growth trend in the first three years of 1980 following FCC implementation of several favorable policies during the Carter administration.
Latino stations represent one-third of one percent of the 1,219 television stations and four-tenths of one percent of the 9,849 radio stations in the United States, according to 1985 figures from the National Association of Broadcasters updated by Hispanic Link
HISPANIC-OWNED BROADCAST PROPERTIES
BY STATE - 1985
Texas RADIO 12 TV 4
California 10 -
New Mexico 7 -
Florida 4 -
Connecticut 1 1
Illinois - 1
Arizona 1 -
Colorado 1 -
Maryland 1 -
TOTAL 37 6
Source: National Association of Broadcasters
Chavez Trails in Funds
Linda Chavez, former White House aide running for the U.S. Senate seat of retiring Republican Charles McC. Mathias Jr., trailed the other Republican and four Democrat candidates in funds raised so far this year, according to campaign finance reports filed last week with the Federal Election Commission.
Chavez reported raising $108,822 between Jan. 1 and March 31, barely one-third of the top money raiser- U.S. Rep. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), $300,586.
A recent poll by presidential pollster Richard Wirthlin showed Maryland voters favored Ch6vez’s Republican rival Richard Sullivan 24% to 17% with 59% undecided.
Weekly Report.
NAB figures showed Hispanic-owned stations declining from 45 in 1983 to43 as of October 1985. It counted 33 Hispanics owning radio and television stations. (Some own more than one.) This is a drop from the 35 Hispanic owners in 1984. There were 16 owners in 1979; 25 in 1980.
Since the NAB count three of the six Hispanic-owned TV stations- in Chicago, and Midland and Big Springs, Texas- have been or are in the process of being sold to non-Hispanics.
One new station, KRRT-TV in San Antonio, started operations in November. It is owned by a group headed by Washington, D.C., communications attorney Raul Tapia.
Latinos in the industry view this minimal participation of Hispanics in the industry as not likely to increase so long as the current FCC agenda of deregulation and free market policies is advanced by Chairman Mark Fowler.
Presently, no Hispanic serves on the five-member regulatory body. One of the strongest advocates for minority ownership was attorney Henry Rivera, the commission’s first Hispanic member. Appointed by President Reagan in August 1981, he resigned last September to enter private law practice in Washington, D.C. Fellow New Mexican Patricia Diaz Dennis
Chicago Race Undecided
The Chicago Board of Elections Commission held a hearing April 17 to decide on the validity of nine write-in ballots that can determine the outcome of the city’s contentious 26th Ward aldermanic race between Luis Gutierrez and Manuel Torres.
Gutierrez, an ally of Mayor Harold Washington, leads Torres by 5,239 - 5,214, but will not have a required majority if the nine ballots are added to already-validated write-ins for other candidates. Then a runoff would be held April 29.
Gutierrez overcame another legal hurdle on April 14 when the state Supreme Court ruled not to invalidate the election results because of late closing hours at some polls.
The Illinois Appellate Court ruled April 16 that the commission should decide the issue. As Weekly Report went to press, the commission had not rendered a decision.
was nominated by the White House last month to complete Rivera’s term, which ends July 30,1987. Her confirmation is now pending in the Senate.
Rivera told Weekly Report that while the FCC was strongly committed to increasing minority ownership in the past, now “it is almost an afterthought.”
In 1978, the commission implemented a series of policies that provided owners with incentives to sell their stations to minorities. In the case of new facilities, it set preferences for minorities in the issuance of licenses.
Benjamin Perez, another Washington communications attorney, said that while the policies have not been eliminated, their use has been restricted in recent years.
One example is lack of enforcement in distress sales, through which 35 stations have been transferred to minorities- including five to Hispanics- since 1979. The measure permits owners who are designated for an FCC hearing to sell their properties to minorities at 50% of the market value. The hearings target owners who have allegedly violated agency rules The policy gives them the opportunity to regain 50% of their investment before completely losing their licenses to operate.
Last October, Chairman Fowler lowered the stipulated distress sale percentage from 75% to 50%. At the same time, he warned that the commission would limit the number of stations designated for hearing. “If there
continued on page 2
USCCR to Rewrite Report
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights voted April 11 to send back to staff a report that recommended the suspension of federal programs that set aside some contracts for minority-and women-owned businesses.
The 5-3 vote came after the defeat, also by a 5-3 margin, of a move by two commissioners to reject the report outright. The move was initiated by'.BIandina Cardenas Ramirez and Mary Frances Berry. Esther Gonzalez-Arroyo Buckley voted against killing the report but for sending it back to be revised.
The commission vote came a day after the White House announced its support of the set-aside programs.


Sin Pelos en la. lengua
WHO’S NEWS? We’re halfway through a decade that has already produced lots of Hispanic newsmakers.
It saw Xavier Sudrez become the first Cuban-born mayor of our most Cuban city, Miami. Franklin Chang-Diaz became the first U.S. Hispanic astronaut to explore space.
And although it seems longer, it was 1981 when Henry Cisneros was first elected as mayor of San Antonio.
For many other Latinos who made Page 1, however, fame has been more fleeting.
In tune with the national trend to honor people simply because they are “newsmakers,” and in recognition of the fourth National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami this week, Sin Pelos is offering you the names of 15 other Page 1 Hispanic newsmakers of the ’80s.
All you have to do is connect their names with their deeds.
We offer no prizes or rewards, other than the personal satisfaction you might feel if you get them all correct. If you get them all wrong, you probably live on Long Island or in Beverly Hills, or maybe Dade County’s Kendall area. (Answers next week.) -Kay Barbaro
1. FELIPE GARZA JR.
2. ROBERTO GOIZUETA
3. OCTAVIO GOMEZ
4. DIEGO ASENCIO
5. STEPHEN TRUJILLO
6. ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ
7. RICHARD RODRIGUEZ
8. RICHARD RAMIREZ
9. ROSIE RUIZ
10. KATHERINE ORTEGA
a) Became the first Latino in history to be appointed as Sergeant at Arms of the U.S. Senate.
b) Chosen by President Reagan as the keynote speaker at the 1984 Republican National Convention.
c) New York City Schools chancellor who resigned after taking $100,000 in loans from subordinates.
d) Became the first undocumented worker to win $2 million in a California state lottery.
e) Plotted the Machiavellian campaign to make America beg on hands and knees for a Classic Coke.
f) Aztlan misfit whose novel “Hunger of Memory” made him the darling of the Eastern literary mob.
g) Author Dan James (“Famous All Over Town”) pseudonym which enraged Latino literary critics.
h) Accused “Night Stalker" now on trial in Los Angeles, charged with 14 murders, 54 other felonies.
i) Soldier hailed and hosted by Ronald and Nancy Reagan as a hero of the Grenada invasion.
0 Reluctant Iran hostage crisis hero who dazzled California Latino journalists with his oratory.
11. ERNIE GARCIA
12. JIMMY LOPEZ
13. DANNY SANTIAGO
14. ANTHONY ALVARADO
15. JOSE CABALLERO
k) Schoolboy died mysteriously at age 15, giving his heart by transplant to his ailing girlfriend.
l) Apparent winner of the 1980 Boston Marathon who was disqualified for taking the subway.
m) La Opinion newspaper photographer who won $195,000 in court judgment vs. INS for harassment.
n) Low Rider magazine photog awarded $204,000 for beating by four Los Angeles County sheriffs.
o) U.S. ambassador to Colombia who was held hostage for 61 days by M19 guerrillas in Bogota.
How Latinos in Congress Voted
GUN SALES ACROSS STATES
A bill by the National Rifle Association, sponsored by Rep. Harold Volkmer(D-Mo.), would make it easier to buy, sell and transport certain firearms across state lines. HOUSE VOTE
Approved April 10 by vote of 286-to-136. A provision permitting the sale of pistols across state lines was rejected by a 233-to-184 vote.
CAUCUS VOTE
Five voted in favor, five voted against (Rep Manuel Lujan did not vote). YES: Tony Coelho(Calif.), Bill Richardson(N.M.), Albert Bustamante, E.“Kika” de la Garza, Solomon Ortiz (all Texas). NO: Matthew Martinez, Edward Roybal, Esteban Torres(all Calif.), Robert Garcia (N.Y.), Henry B. Gonzalez (Texas).
STATUS
The bill, sent to the Senate the same day, contained a provision banning the sale and possession of machine guns not included in a similar bill passed by the Senate in July. The House bill awaits Senate action.
Joint Fund-Raiser Held
A political fund-raising reception- believed to be the first-ever joining Hispanic, black and Asian American members of Congress-was held April 10 in Washington, D.C.
The effort, titled MORE in ’86 (Minorities Organized for Representation in Elections in 1986), hopes to raise $40,000 to $50,000 to be divided evenly among 21 members of Congress, including 10 from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.
Ownership Door Closing
continued from page 1
are no hearings, there are no sales to minorities,” Perez said.
Other 1985 actions cited as counterproductive
• Elimination of a minority preference in the licensing of AM radio stations in the clear channels.
• Inclusion of a local ownership preference that neutralized the effects of a minority preference in comparative licensing hearings.
Rivera said that these decisions are particularly adverse now because prices for broadcast stations have skyrocketed in the past two years. He attributed part of the increase to an FCC decision which expanded ownership limits from seven to 12 stations in June 1984. According to P6rez, major TV stations in prime markets are presently selling for about $200 million, while in smaller cities they approach $20 million.
While blacks have strongly criticized these decisions, Hispanics “have not been very vocal or active on these issues and I think that is one of the problems,” Rivera said. He added “Blacks are ahead of us in understanding the importance of being part of the communications industry in this country.”
-Dora Delgado
D.C Office for Chamber
The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce announced April 11 that it will open an office this month in Washington, D.C., to better represent U.S. Hispanic business interests.
Hector Barreto, president of the Kansas City, Mo.-based umbrella group, said the office will be staffed by two to three people who will keepa running“reportcard” on how Congress votes on issues of concern to Hispanic business interests. The office will be funded initially by grants from Anheuser-Busch and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO).
Pilot Search Called Off
The Defense Department called off April 16 its search for the missing U.S. Air Force bomber involved in last Monday’s air raid against Libya.
Capt. Fernando Ribas-Dominicci, 33, was at the controls of the bomber, one of 18 dispatched from Britain. Ribas-Dominicci, born in Utuado, Puerto Rico, is survived by his Mexican wife, Blanca Linda, and their four-year-old son, Fernando.
Also missing is the plane’s navigator, Capt. Paul Lorence.
Voting Rights Suit Filed
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund along with four other civil and voter rights groups sued Los Angeles and Tulare, Calif., counties April 9, accusing officials there of purposely disenfranchising minority and low-income voters.
The suit, filed with the state Supreme Court, seeks a court order implementing two state Election Code sections designed to increase voter registration among minorities and the poor. Under one Election Code section, county employees would be asked to inquire if clients were registered to vote and, if not, to offer a registration card.
Resolutions encouraging registration by county employees were rejected by the Los Angeles (Dec. 28) and Tulare (Feb. 17) County Boards of Supervisors.
Census data for the Los Angeles area showed 83% of white and 63% of Latino eligible citizens were registered to vote in 1984.
A spokesman for the coalition of organizations said a ruling by the court was not expected before the June 3 statewide primary, but hoped for a decision prior to the Nov. 6 general election.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed •of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
| CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
; DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES j (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) | $35 per column inch.
NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO seeks CORRES-jj PONDENT, FOREIGN DESK Candidate develops ideas/proposals for major reports, series, programs and serves as substitute host for All Things Considered and other NPR news programs College degree or equivalent education/experience, extensive broadcast journalism and product knowledge and five years reporting experience required. Submit tapes with resumeto Newsand Information Programs, National Public Radio, 2025 M St NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202)822-2000.
RADIO PRODUCER/WRITER KUAT-TV, AM/FM, Tucson, Arizona, seeks a radio producer/writer. The individual selected for this position will work in the Spanish-language programming services of KUAT radio and will be responsible for producing news, public affairs and occasional documentaries, although some assignments may be for other program production in English. Bachelor's degree in communications, radio-TV or related field plus two years news and public affairs experience with proven work in radio required. The individual must be equally capable in the writing, reading and delivery of English and Spanish, and be able to relate to and work with the Hispanic communities of southern Arizona Salary range $18,836 - $20,720. Usual university benefit package. Submit resume to Employment Office, University of Arizona 1717 E Speedway, Tucson, Ariz. 85721.
INTERNSHIPS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.: Hispanic Link News Service expects to have new paid internships for developing journalists to work in Washington, D.C., in summer or fall of 1986. If interested in receiving an application for any such opportunities, write now to H&ctor Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
SIXTH ANNUAL“GOLDEN REEL” AWARDS The National Federation of Community Broadcasters is accepting entries for its 1986 Community Radio Awards competition.
Deadline is May23,1986. Programs must be submitted by their copyright owners/principal producers. This competition is open to all radio producers, regardless of affiliation. All types and styles of programs are eligible. NFCB is especially interested in receiving programs which best typify its philosophy of fostering “freewheeling, risk-taking radio... not afraid of experimentation and controversy... or of beauty.”
Entries may be up to 60 minutes in length. Both open and cassette formats are acceptable. A fee of $10 must accompany each entry. For more information on submission guidelines, please write or call NFCB, 1314 14th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 797-8911.
Ordered by ______
Title ___________
Area Code & Phone Advertiser Name__
Bill To _____
Address _________
City, State & Zip __
JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
Twenty congressional internships for junior or senior full-time undergraduate journalism and mass communication students enrolled in accredited programs Stipend of $2,150 awarded along with travel allowance Must obtain application from and be recommended by department chair. Internships begin Feb. 1,1987 and continue for three months Sponsored by Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication. For more information contact Julius Dickens, 633 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20004 (202) 737-4900.
PRODUCERS/DIRECTORS Distribution Opportunity
THE LATINO CONSORTIUM, distributor/syndi-cator/producer of Hispanic-theme programming, seeks dramatic, current affairs, and cultural programs for distribution nationwide to its PBS members. Contact Mark Carreno or Carolisa Morgan, Latino Consortium, KCET-TV, 4401 Su.nset Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90027 (213) 667-9425.
CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report — $25 for humorous or political cartoons. Submit to: Carlos Morales, Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THE LOS ANGELES TIMES seeksapplicants for 10-week paid winter and fall internships in its Washington Bureau. College seniors or recent graduates with a liberal arts background preferred; previous internship or experience on a school newspaper essential. Bureau interns work as regular members of a 38-member staff and are expected to perform to exacting standards under tight deadlines. Send cover letter and| resume toe Assignment Editor, Los Angeles Times, 1875 Eye St. N W, Suite 1100, Washington, D.C.! 20006.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington, D.C. - based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737.
CORPORATIONS & NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS: Established Washington Hispanic firm is ready to assist you with your training, ADP services, research & evaluation, management consulting, and representation needs For more information or employment opportunities, contact Business Information & Services Corp. 2025 I St. NW, Suite 1115, Washington, D,C. 20006 (202) 223-6100.
VICTOR ROMERO, Producer/Director. Documentary and training videos for target audience. Call WEST END VIDEO (202) 775-8551.
ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
RESPONSIBILITIES: To teach public relations advertising, journalistic writing and advanced journalism courses also, mass media theory and communications policy, depending on qualifications To develop the public relations/ad-vertising specialization within the communications major.
QUALIFICATIONS: Master's degree required, doctorate preferred. At least three years management experience in public relations advertising or other closely related field. Teaching experience at the college level.
SALARY: Range from $24,114 to $45,021, depending on qualifications and experience.
DEADLINE DATE: Postmarked no later than May 15,1986.
Submit curriculum vitae and names of three references to: Professor Mark Schulman, Chair, Communications Search, Room Shepard 117, The City College of CUNY, Convent Ave. at 138th St., New York, N.Y. 10031.
REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650-word news features/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writer's guidelines write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Herman Sillas Jr.
Play the Symbols Game
We live in a world of symbols. We rely on them as truth, as communications short cuts. A dove is a sign of peace; the eagle, war.
Politicians love symbols. One that stands out to me is the Plymouth that Jerry Brown used when he was governor of California jt told the people that he was just like them.
To his credit, Brown never - as so many politicians have done-campaigned in the Hispanic community wearing a sombrero to demonstrate his empathy. Sombreros perpetuate stereotypes When Hispanics are involved, sometimes symbols conflict
For example, a home in the suburbs is a symbol of prosperity. If you see a man or a woman cutting the lawn or picking flowers in front of a $150,000 home, you might reasonably conclude that he or she is the owner.
My compadre Guillermo lives in an upper-middle-class neighborhood surrounded by Anglos He loves to recount the time he was cutting his front lawn when a woman stopped her car, approached him, and in a deliberate manner inquired, “What does the woman of the house pay you to do the lawn?"
“Nothing,” he responded. “She lets me sleep with her.”
My compadre’s brown skin symbolized “laborei” to the womaa She couldn’t connect him with ownership of the home.
MISREADING MY NEW TUXEDO
Furs and tuxedos are badges of wealth, too. I remember a formal event in Long Beach, California, when I got to wear my first store-bought tuxedo. I entered the restaurant aboard the converted ocean liner Queen Mary and was waiting for the maitre d' to return to his station when a man with a tuxedo I considered less elegant than mine walked in and snapped at me, “Swanson, party of four.”
Swanson had misread my symbol. He saw my emblem of success as a uniform of employment.
I flushed with indignation. (Hecouldn’ttell, of course.) Recovering quickly, I snapped back, “Right this way," and led him and his three companions to the least desirable table I could find, next to the swinging kitchen door.
That experience served me well when I twice ran for statewide office in the'70s. I used my tuxedo regularly when attending political fund-raisers of fellow Democratic candidates for other offices Invariably, they were held at the best hotels and commanded a ticket price of $100 or more.
Since my campaigns had limited funds I would carry a small white towel and wrap it over my arm as I walked past the ticket-taker. Once inside, I disposed of the towel and mixed with the politicos and donors My black tux and brown skin were my admission ticket.
There’s also the classic anecdote about my friend, Philip M6ntez, the western regional director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Years ago, Montez, attending a reception in Washington, was introduced to a black guest from one of the capital’s many bureaucracies.
“Mon-TEZZZ?” the new acquaintance inquired loudly, sipping his martini. “Is that a Mexican name?” M6ntez acknowledged that indeed his parents were from Mexico.
The black guest explored further. “Do you play the guitar?”
“No,” M6ntez responded. “Do you tap dance?”
The point was made. Guitars and tap-dance shoes do not always accompany Hispanics and blacks. Blacks must live with outdated, inappropriate, often ridiculous symbols, too. So must Asians, Native Americans, and, certainly, women.
Only one group comes to mind that might be able to play the symbols game - sending appropriate positive signals to others with their clothes and cars and homes. Maybe some white males can do it. So long as they’re not Irish or Polish or Jewish or...
(Herman Sillas Jr. is a partner in the law firm of Ochoa and Sillas, with offices in Los Angeles, Sacramento, Oakland and Mexico City.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Jose Antonio Burciaga
Beware of the Tall Ones
The City Council of Los Altos, in Northern California, recently voted English as their official language. I understand the proceedings were all in the English language.
To say that Los Altos is teeming with swarthy Latino types would be a digression from the truth. To say that it has a small barrio would also be a lie. Except for a very few residents, the only Spanish-speaking people in Los Altos are the gardeners, domestic servants and, most probably, a few restaurant workers For the most part, Los Altos is an affluent Anglo community located between San Francisco and San Jose, close to Silicon Valley. It has a population of 28,630, not counting gardeners, domestic servants and kitchen workers Nonetheless, in keeping with an All-American patriotic trend, Los Altos joined a number of other cities across the country in voting English as its official language.
In the same All-American spirit, I feel that Los Altos should have gone all the way and changed its Spanish name to The Highs, Highlands, or more appropriately, The Tall Ones.
All across the country, defenders of ye olde English would do well to authenticate, in English, the “foreign” names of our cities and towns.
For example, here in California we could begin by translating Los Banos to The Bathrooms and Sobrantes to Leftovers.
LIVING IN A MUD PUDDLE
San Francisco, of course, would be renamed Saint Francis of Assisi. Atascadero could become Mud Puddle; Manteca, Lard; Panocha, Brown Sugar; and Aromas could become Smells, California.
Los Angeles? Anaheim already took away the citys baseball Angels, so how about Lost Angels or Lost Anglos?
That’s only California Texas and other states have just as many Spanish-named towns and cities. Forexample, Torn/Mo, Texas could easily be changed to Screw, Texas Laredo could be translated to a different musical scale, like Doremi. My hometown of El Paso could be changed to The Pass
Some of the changes could be image-shattering. For instance, Amarillo, Texas would not sound as macho if changed to Yellow, Texas. But to conserve the purity of the English language, Amarillo would have to go.
In Florida, you may have heard of Boca Raton. Would you like to live in Rafs Mouth, Florida?
What’s fair for Spanish names is fairfor other non-English names, of course. So Baton Rouge, Louisians would have to convert to Red Stick. The list is endless with communities founded by French, Indian and German settlers.
Soon some courageous legislator may introduce a bill to force those of us with “un-American” names like Anaya or Burciaga or Cisneros to change them, too.
My friend Nieves Palomares would be rechristened Ice Cream Pigeon House and Jose Feliciano would answer to Joe Happiness. I don’t know how to translate my friend Facundo into English. I guess they’ll have to deport him.
If Julio Iglesias and Placido Domingo were to become permanent residents, they would need to adopt the names July Churches and Serene Sunday. Definitely, that could hurt their record sales
My monolingual Anglo friends sometimes complain about my name. They say it’s too long. I ask them if they would prefer Joseph Anthony Abundance of Head? In Spanish, my name has only 19 characters. In English, it has 28.
I’m sure that there’s not a mean bone in the body of any of those Official English patriots Their intentions are undoubtedly the best.
But they’re making me one worried born-in-the-USA American. I’d hate to be rejected as “unofficial” just because some Tall Ones can’t pronounce their own home town.
(Jose Antonio Burciaga is a writer and artist. He teaches a course on murals at Stanford University in California.)
3


THE GOOD NEWS
Following are some training programs and internships for journalists More details on these and other programs can be found in the Journalism Career and Scholarship Guide, 1986, available free from: Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, P.O. Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540.
THE MODESTO BEE: Five paid summer internships for minorities to work in various departments. Send cover letter, resume (with three references) and five work examples Deadline: open. Contact Sanders LaMont, exec, editor, Modesto Bee, P.O. Box 3928, Modesto Calif. 95352 (209) 524-4041.
THE BOSTON GLOBE: One-year paid training for three minority reporters or other journalism professionals. Seventy percent of those finishing the program are offered staff positions Deadline: open. Contact: Ann Moritz, The Boston Globe, 35 Morrissey Blvd., Boston Mass. 02107 (6117) 929-3120.
THE HARTFORD COURANT: Two one-year paid minority internships in reporting positions. Candidates must be from New England area. Deadline: open. Contact Sally Jo Restivo, assistant metropolitan editor, The Hartford Courant, 285 Broad St, Hartford, Cona 06115 (203) 241-6200.
THE LOS ANGELES TIMES: One-year paid training program for eight minorities with little reporting experience. Deadline: December31, 1986. Write to: Ron Harris, Minority Editorial Training Program, Los Angeles Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 (213) 972-4463.
CAPITAL CITIES: Ten one-year paid training positions for minorities to work with three company newspapers Deadline: Jan. 31, 1987. Send resume, three-to-five samples of work and letter detailing qualifications and interest in the program to: David Daris, program coordinator, Capital Cities Communications, MinorityTraining Program, c/oTimes Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18711 (717) 829-7262.
ASSOCIATED PRESS: Twelve 13-week paid summer internships working in an AP bureau. It could lead to full-time employment Deadline: Mid-March 1987. Contact Wick Temple, director of Human Resources, AP, 50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10020 (212)621-1780.
EDITING PROGRAM FOR MINORITY JOURNALISTS: An eight-week summer session that trains reporters for newspaper editor positions. Deadline: March 1,1987. Contact The Institute for Journalism Education, University of Arizona, Department of Journalism, Franklin Building, Rm. 101 M, Tucson, Ariz. 85721 (602) 621-5777.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
on a contractual basis for one yr. Salary is $26,622/yr. Requires completed M.A. degree in Public Administration, Business Administration or closely related field by 7/1 /86. Resumes will be reviewed and evaluated for personal interviews. Resumes must include: honors and extracurricular activities names and telephone numbers of 3 references (one must be a faculty membei), official undergraduate and graduate transcripts and a 3-5 page typewritten paper on why you are seeking this position. Final filing date: 5/16/86. Send resumes to Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Dept., 801 N. First St., Room 207, San Jose, MINNESOTA HISPANIC WOMEN’S De Calif. 95110. (408) 277-4204. velopment Corporation seeks EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Must have strong management, business and program development background.
Bilingual/bicultural Dreferred. Salary negotiable.
Deadline April 29. Phone (612) 641-1619 .
PROGRAMMER COORDINATOR I (Student Organizations)
Staff position in student life office responsible for coordinating an undergraduate parapro-fessional program “REACH.” Candidate provides services to individual students, campus clubs and organizations; provides leadership for student organization development and facilitates the role of faculty and staff advisors.
Bachelor's degree in communications, student development, counseling, student personnel administration or social sciences and one year administrative/coordinative experience;
OR five years progressively responsible ad-ministrative/coordinative program experience;
OR any approved equivalent combination of experience, training or education. Effective use of communications skills, organization development skills, use of student development theory and knowledge of group process skills desired Salary$18,836 for 12 months. Appli- PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND, cations must be received by May 9 in the government office of personnel has a JOB Personnel Office, Arizona State University, hotline (301) 952-3408.
Tempe, Ariz. 85287. Equal Opportunity Employer. ---------------------------
MANAGEMENT INTERN PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
TheCityof San Jose is accepting applications GLOMB, HANTEN & BACA LAW FIRM: Im-
for the position of Management Intern. Interns nigration - civil litigation - commercial law-assist the City Manager and dept, heads in employment law-federal agency practice 1815 organizing, developing and evaluating City H St. NW, Suite 1000, Washington, D.C. services and programs. Interns will be hired 20006 (202) 466-2250.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESI) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates 75 cents per word Display rates $35 per column inch.
VICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS
The Vice President will report directly to the President and will be responsible for the day-to-day program and administration of the National Puerto Rican Coalition, Inc.
Candidates should be bilingual and familiar with public policy issuesconfronting the Puerto Rican community in the United States Candidates should also possess an advanced degree in management, social sciences or education and have eight years of professional experience with a minimum of two years of supervisory experience. Salary $40,000-$45,500 per annum dependent on experience and previous salary history. An extensive fringe benefits package is also offered.
Interested candidates should submit resumes no later than April 30 to: Louis Nuhez, President, NPRC, Inc., 1700 KSt. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20006.
\ Calendar
I
IiFollowing is a list of annual events byU.S. Hispanic media organizations In some instances exact dates have not yet been set.
CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF LATINOS IN
BROADCASTING
Los Angeles June 6
CALIB will have its annual scholarship fund-raising event for college-level Latinos interested in journalism. | Last year, the 12-year-old association generated [ $30,000 for scholarships.
| Fernando del Rio (213) 467-5459
MICHIGAN HISPANIC MEDIA ASSOCIATION Lansing, Mich. August
A one-day conference will be conducted on job improvement and career options by the 2-year-old association.
Jose Lopez (517) 485-4389
| . FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC j JOURNALISTS I Miami September
• FAHJ will sponsor its3rd annual high school writing ' Hispanic Link Weekly Report
contest and is seeking to establish a scholarship fund.
Evelyn Hernandez (305) 662-1007
NETWORK OF HISPANIC COMMUNICATORS Dallas September
The 5-year-old network will have a fund-raising dance for its writing contest and will sponsor a seminar later in the fall on how the public can use the media effectively.
Rosalind Soliz (214) 871-1390
PENNSYLVANIA HISPANICS IN THE MEDIA Philadelphia September
The 3-year-old organization will sponsor a project titled “Periddico Mural" aimed at elementary and junior high school students to publish a newsletter in the form of a mural Patrisia Gonzales (609) 667-7211
HISPANIC NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION Washington, D.C. October Three-year-old HNMA will begin its 2nd annual high school essay contest.
Dora Delgado (202) 234-0737
CONCERNED MEDIA PROFESSIONALS Tucson, Ariz. Nov. 7
The group will have its 4th annual roast recognizing individuals who have made contributions to the community. It alsoawards scholarships to Hispanic high school students who plan to pursue journalism in college. Ernest Gurule (602) 628-9262
CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA
ASSOCIATION
Los Angeles Feb. 6,7
CCNMA will conduct its 8th annual media jobs fair for Hispanics who want to interview with media representatives.
Magdalena Beltran (213) 743-7158
PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION OF MEXICAN AMERICANS IN COMMUNICATIONS El Paso, Texas Oct. 18,19
The 8-year-old POMAC will have its annual awards presentation to honor El Paso journalists.
Bert Salazar (915) 534-7109
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC
JOURNALISTS
Los Angeles April 24-28
The 5th annual Hispanic media conference and expo by NAHJ will have workshops on issues relevant to the media and Hispanics and a job fair.
Alisa Zepeda (202) 783-6228
5


Arts & Entertainment
A CHARITY GALA, A FILM AND VIDEO SCREENING program and various panels at this week’s fourth annual National Hispanic Media Conference signal a growing interest in Hispanic participation in arts and entertainment industries.
Many of the entertainment-related events at the conference are coordinated by the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, one of the three national organizations planning this year’s event.
A Gala to Benefit Education will follow the Gannett Foundation banquet April 26; the event launches HAMAS’ Scholarship Program. Actor Edward James Olmos will act as master of ceremonies and Richard Yniguez and Lupe Ontiveros are hosts. Scheduled talent at press time includes Luis Avalos, Diego Verdaguer, Yuri, Abel Franco, Maria Conchita Alonso, Fernando Allende, Diego Alvarez Guedes, Annette Cardona, Marc Allen Trujillo, Roxana Bonilla-Giannini, Herb Alpert, Lani Hall and Jimmy Osmond.
The Gala to Benefit Education is being produced by Armando Nevarez; Ron Diaz is coordinating producer. Victor Contreras directs.
Some 22 titles are scheduled to be shown at this conference’s second annual HAMAS Film and Video Screening Program. Ivy Orta, Antonio Ogaz and Eddie Dominguez coordinate the screenings at
the Omni Hotel, running concurrently with other conference activities.
Three entertainment industry panels are also being coordinated by HAMAS members:
Hispanic Image on TV (April 24): Moderator is Ed Cervantes; panelists are Luis Avalos, Jose Rivera, Migdia Varela and Luis Soto.
Programming Practices and the Independent Producer (April 25): Moderator is Armando Nev&rez; panelists are Liz Ch&vez, Barry Chase, Ron Gordon and Nely Galan.
Hispanics in the Entertainment Industry (April 26): Moderator is Richard Yniguez; panelists are Abel Franco, Melvin Karl, Jeff Peniche and Fernando Allende.
Another conference panel, scheduled for the 24th, is titled Covering the Hispanic Arts. According to moderator Miguel Perez, a columnist with the New York Daily News, the panel will be “a discussion on the need for more and better coverage of the Hispanic arts in both the English and Spanish language media, and the need for involving more Hispanic journalists in covering Latino arts and entertainment.”
Panelists are Andres Gutierrez, actor, public relations director and archivist for Teatro Campesino; Norma Niurka, arts and entertainment columnist at El Miami Herald; Dolores Prida, playwright and editor of Hispanic Art News, a publication of the Association of Hispanic Arts; and this reporter.
-Antonio Mejias- Rentas
Media Report
Forty-six percent of Hispanic journalists working for U.S. dailies as this year began are employed in California and Texas, an annual survey by the American Society of Newspaper Editors concludes.
Based on a questionnaire response rate of 62%, ASNE projects that there are now 884 Hispanic reporters, editors, photographers and artists working at the nation's 1,674 dailies Six states account for 74% of Hispanic editorial staffers The four others are Florida, New York, Arizona and New Mexico. Thirty-four states have five or fewer Latinos in their newsrooms; 10 have none.
ASNE projects, in survey results released this month, that Hispanics are 1.6% of the 53,895 newsroom employees of daily newspapers nationally. That compares with 1.5% at the start of 1985. Minorities in the newsroom
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants* packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234*0737.
have doubled their numbers since 1978, growing to 3,400 in 1986. Their representation grew from 3.9% in 1978 (the first year such data were collected) to 6.3% in 1986.
Blacks in the nation’s newsrooms represent more than twice the percentage of Hispanics at 3.5%, with Asians comprising 0.9% and Native Americans 0.3%. Asians are the second largest minority in California’s newsrooms, at 2.4%. Hispanics are 3.3%.
The ASNE Minorities Committee has initiated several projects to expedite integration in the nation’s newsrooms. One called on each of its 48 members to contact two newspapers that had no minorities on their staffs. The members were to offer assistance and seek a commitment to hire a minority.
Rolfe Neill, president and publisher of the Charlotte (N.C.) Observer, candidly reported in the February issue of the ASNE Bulletin: “Of our 48 members, 30 agreed to try. To date, not one, including myself, has been sufficiently persuasive to get results.”
-Felix Perez
NEWSROOM STAFFING U.S. Dailies - by State (as of Dec. 31, 1985)
% All
% Hisp. % Black Minority
New Mexico 10.3 0.7 12.3
Texas 5.6 2.6 9.3
Arizona 4.8 2.0 7.7
Hawaii 4.3 0.0 37.8
California 3.3 2.0 8.0
Florida 2.8 4.5 7.9
Colorado 2.1 1.1 4.1
Connecticut 1.5 2.3 4.0
New York 1.4 4.9 7.0
Washington, D.C. 1.4 12.0 15.0
New Jersey 1.1 2.9 4.6
Washington 1.1 1.4 4.8
Illinois 1.0 3.6 5.0
Michigan 0.7 7.0 8.5
Pennsylvania 0.3 3.9 4.6
Source: American Society of Newspaper Editors
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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H /Cf6 ' Making The News This Week 8 to split the mayoral and council races .. who served as Los Lunas, N.M., mayor for 18 years, sheriff for 6 terms and school board member 18 years, dies April12 there . . . William Luna, president of a management consulting firm in Chicago, is named by Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan as chairman of the state's Hispanic Task Force . The task force is responsible for analyzing and making recommendations on the effects of all House legislation on Hispanics . . . Louis Nuiiez, president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition formerly based in Alexandria, Va., announces the opening of new offices in Washington, D.C ... . FBI agent Edmundo ' Mireles Jr. is credited with killing two bank robbery suspects in a suburb of Miami April11 after the suspects killed two FBI agents. Mireles, wounded by the suspects before gunning them down, was among five agents wounded in the shootout. .. Pope John Paul II names Jesuit priest Enrique San Pedro as auxiliary bishop of the Galveston-Houston Diocese. Monsignor San Pedro, who was teaching the Old Testament at the St. Vincent de Paul seminary in Boynton Beach, Fla., when appointed, raises to 18 the number of Hispanic bishops in the United States ... New York Mayor Ed Koch swears in Michael Buerta as Commissioner of Department of Ports and Terminals ... Pedro Reboredo is re-elected mayor of West Miami after stepping down in January to run for the office again . The city's charter, which allows the top vote-getter two years as mayor, then two as a City Council member, does not allow for successive office-holders. Citizens also approve a referendum April Voi.4N0.161 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Ap•ll21, 1986 FCC Closing Door on Ownership, Latinos Charge The number of Hispanic-owned broadcast stations has declined in the last two years because, Latino experts say , minority owner ship is no longer a priority with the Federal Communications Commission. The drop re verses a growth trend in the first three years of 1980 following FCC implementation of several favorable policies during the Carter administration. Latino stations represent one-third of one percent of the 1,219 television stations and four-tenths of one percent of the 9,849 radio stations in the United States, according to 1985 figures from the National Association of Broadcasters updated by Hispanic Link HISPANIC-OWNED BROADCAST PROPERTIES BY STATE1985 -1-RADIO TV Texas 12 4 California 10 New Mexico 7 Florida 4 Connecticut 1 1 Illinois 1 Arizona Colorado Maryland TOTAL 37 6 S o ur c e : N atio nal Asso c iati o n of Br oadcas t e r s Chavez Trails in Funds Linda Chavez, former White House aide running for the U . S . Senate seat of retiring Republican Charles McC. Mathias Jr., trailed the other Republican and four Democrat dates in funds raised so far this year , according to campaign finance reports filed last week with the Federal Election Commission. Chavez reported raising $108,822 between Jan. 1 and March 31, barely one-third of the top money raiserU.S. Rep. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), $300,586. A recent poll by presidential pollster Richard Wirthlin showed Maryland voters favored Chavez's Republican rival Richard Sullivan 24% to 17% with 59% undecided. Weekly Report. NAB figu res showed Hispanic-owned stations declining from 45 in 1983 to43 as of October 1985. It counted 33 Hispanics owning radio and television stations. (Some own more than one. ) This .is a d rop from the 35 Hispanic owners in 1984. There were 16 owners in 1979; 25 in 1980. Since the NAB count three of the six Hispanic owned TV stations-in Chicago, and Midland and Big Springs , Te xas-have been or are in the process of being sold to non-Hispanics. One new station, KRRT-TV in San Antonio, started operations in November. It is owned by a group headed by Washington, D .C., com munications attorney Raul Tapia . Latinos in the industry view this minimal participation of Hispanics in the industry as not likely to increase so long as the current FCC agenda of deregulation and free market policies is advanced by Chairman Mark Fowler . Presently, no Hispanic serves on the five member regulatory body. One of the strongest advocates for minority ownership was attorney Henry Rivera , the commission' s first Hispanic member. Appointed by President Reagan in August 1981, he resigned last September to enter private law practice in Washington, D . C . Fellow New Mexican Patricia Diaz Dennis Chicago Race Undecided The Chicago Board of Elections Commission held a hearing April 17 to decide on the validity of nine write-in ballots that can determine the outcome of the city's contentious 26th Ward aldermanic r ace between Luis Gutierrez and Manuel Torres . Gutierrez, an ally oi Mayor Harold Washington , leads Torres by 5,239 -5,214, but will not have a required majority if the nine ballots are added to already-validated write-ins for other candidates . Then a runoff would be held April 29. Gutierrez overcame another legal hurdle on April 14 when the state Supreme Court ruled not to invalidate the election results because of late closing hours at some polls. The Illinois Appellate Court ruled April 16 that the commission sho . uld decide the issue . As Weekly Report went to press, the commis sion had not rendered a decision. was nominated by the White House last month to c omplete Rivera ' s term , which ends July 30,1987. Her confirmation is now pending in the Senate. Rivera told Weekly Report that while the FCC was strongly committed to increasing minority ownership in the past, now " it is almost an afterthought." In 1978, the commission implemented a series of policies that provided owners with incentives to sell their stations to minorities. In the case of new facilities, it set preferences for minorities in the issuance of licenses. Benjamin Perez, another Washington com munications attorney, said that while the policies have not been eliminated, their use has been restricted in recent years. One example is lack of enforcement i n distress sales, through which 35 stations have been transferred to minoritiesincluding five to Hispanics-since 1979. The measure permits owners who are designated for an . FCC hearing to sell their properties to minorities at 50% of the market value . The hearings target owners who have allegedly violated agency rules. The policy gives them the oppor tunity to regain 50% of their investment before completely losing their licenses to operate. Last October, Chairman Fowler lowered the stipulated distress sale percentage from 75% to 50% . At the same time, he warned that the commission would limit the number of stations designated for hearing. "If there conti nu e d o n page 2 USCCR to Rewrite Report The U.S . Commission on Civil Rights voted April 11 to send back to staff a report that recommended the suspension of federal pro grams that set aside some contracts for minority-and women-owned businesses. The 5-3 vote came after the defeat, also by a 5-3 margin, of a move by two commissioners to reject the report outright. The move was initiated byl81andina Ca rdenas Ramirez and Mary Frances Berry . Esther Gonzalez-Arroyo Buckley voted against k illing the report but for sending it back to be revised . The commission vote came a day after the White House announced its support of the . set-aside programs.

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Sin Pelos en Ia lengua For many other Latinos who made Page 1 , however, fame has been more fleeting. In tune with the national trend to honor people simply because they are" newsmakers," and in recognition of the fourth National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami this week, Sin Pelos is offering you the names of 15 other Page 1 Hispanic newsmakers of the '80s. WHO'S NEWS? We're halfway through a decade that has already p roduced lots of Hispanic newsmakers. It saw Xavier Suarez become the first Cuban-born mayor of our most Cuban city, Miami. Franklin Chang-Diaz became the first U.S . Hispanic astronaut to explore space. All you have to do is connect their names with their deeds. And although it seems longer, it was 1981 when Henry Cisneros was first elected as mayor of San Antonio. We offer no prizes or rewards, other than the personal satisfaction you might feel if you get them all correct. If you get them all wrong, you probably live on Long Island or in Beverly Hills, or maybe Dade County's Kendall area. (Answers next week.) -Kay Barbaro 1. FELIPE GARZA JR. a) Became the first Latino in history to be appointed as Sergeant at Arms of the U .S. Senate. 2 . ROBERTO GOIZUETA 3 . OCTAVIO GOMEZ b) Chosen by President Reagan as the keynote speaker at the 1984 Republican National Convention. c) New York City Schools chancellor who resigned after taking $100,000 in loans from subordinates. 4 . DIEGO ASENCIO d) Became the first undocumented worker to win $2 million in a California state lottery. 5 . STEPHEN TRUJILLO e) Plotted the Machiavellian campaign to make America beg on hands and knees for a Classic Coke. 6. ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ f) Aztlan misfit whose novel "Hunger of Memory'' made him the darling of the Eastern literary mob . 7. RICHARD RODRIGUEZ g) Author Dan James ("Famous All Over Town") pseudonym which enraged Latino literary critics. 8. RICHARD RAMIREZ h) Accused "Night Stalker" now on trial in Los Angeles, charged with 14 murders, 54 other felonies. 9 . ROSIE RUIZ i) Soldier hailed and hosted by Ronald and Nancy Reagan as a hero of the Grenada invasion. 10. KATHERINE ORTEGA j) Reluctant Iran hostage crisis hero who dazzled California Latino journalists with his oratory. 11. ERNIE GARCIA 12. JIMMY LOPEZ k) Schoolboy died mysteriously at age 15, giving his heart by transplant to his ailing girlfriend. 0 Apparent winner of the 1980 Boston Marathon who was disqualified for taking the subway. 13. DANNY SANTIAGO m) La Opinion newspaper photographer who won $195,000 in court judgment vs. INS for harassment. 14. ANTHONYALVARADO n) Low Rider magazine photog awarded $204,000 for beating by four Los Angeles County sheriffs. 15. JOSE CABALLERO o) U.S. ambassador to Colombia who was held hostage for 61 days by M19 guerrillas in Bogota. How Latinos in Congress Voted GUN SALES ACROSS STATES A bill by the National Rifle Association, sponsored by Rep . Harold Volkmer(D-Mo.) , would make it easier to buy, sell and transport certain firearms across state lines. HOUSE VOTE Approved April 10 by vote of 286-to136. A provision permitting the sale of pistols across state lines was rejected by a 233-to184 vote. CAUCUS VOTE Five voted in favor; five voted against (Rep. Manuel Lujan did not vote). YES: Tony Coelho(Calif. ) , Bill Richardson (N . M . ) , Albert Bustamante, E. "Kika" de Ia Garza, Solomon Ort i z (all Texas). NO: Matthew Martinez, Edward Esteban Torres( all Calif . ) , Robert Gaida (N.Y.), Henry B . Gonzalez (Texas) . STATUS The bill, sent to the Senate the same day, contained a provision banning the sale and possession of machine guns not included in a similar bill passed by the Senate in July. The House bill awaits Senate action. Joint Fund-Raiser Held A political fund-raising receptionbelieved to be the first-ever joining Hispanic, black and Asian American members of Congresswas held April 10 in Washington, D .C. The effort, titled MORE in '86 (Minorities Organized for Representation in Elections in 1986), hopes to raise $40,000 to $50,000 to be divided evenly among 21 members of Congress, including 10 from the Congres sional Hispanic Caucus. 2 Ownership Door Closing continued from page 1 are no hearings, there are no sales to minorities, " Perez said. Other 1985 actions cited as counterproductive: e Elimination of a minority preference in the licensing of AM radio stations in the clear channels. e Inclusion of a local ownership preference that neutralized the effects of a minority preference in comparative licensing hearings . Rivera said that these decisions are particularly adverse now because prices for broadcast stations have skyrocketed in the past two years . He attributed part of the increase to an FCC decision which expanded ownership limits from seven to 12 stations in June 1984. According to Perez, major TV stations in prime markets are presently selling for about $200 million, while in smaller cities they approach $20 million. While blacks have strongly criticized these decisions, Hispanics " have not been very vocal or active on these issues and I think that is one of the problems," Rivera said. He added, " Blacks are ahead of us in understanding the importance of being part of the communications industry in this country. " -Dora Delgado D.C. Office for Chamber The U . S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce announced April11 that it will open an office this month in Washington, D .C., to better represent U.S . Hispanic business interests. Hector Barreto, president of the Kansas City, Mo.-based umbrella group, said the office will be staffed by two to three people who will keep a running" report card" on how Congress votes on issues of concern to Hispanic business interests. The office will be funded ini tially by grants from Anheuser-Busch and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARGO) . Pilot Search Called Off The Defense Department called off April16 its search for the missing U . S . Air Force bomber involved in last Monday's air raid against Libya. Capt. Fernando Ribas-Dominicci , 33, was at the controls of the bomber, one of 18 dispatched from Britain. Ribas-Dominicci, born in Utuado, Puerto Rico , is survived by his Mexican wife, Blanca Linda , and their four year-old son, Fernando. Also missing is the plane ' s navigator, Capt. Paul Lorence. Voting Rights Suit Filed The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund along with four other civil and voter rights groups sued Los Angeles and Tulare, Calif . , counties April9, accusing officials there of purposely disenfranchising minority and low-income voters . The suit , filed with the state Supreme Court, seeks a court order implementing two state Election Code sections designed to increase voter registration among minorities and the poor. Under one Election Code section, county employees would be asked to inquire if clients were registered to vote and, if not, to offer a registration card . Resolutions encoura_ging registration by county employees were rejected by the Los Angeles (Dec . 28) and Tulare (Feb. 17) County Boards of Supervisors. Census data for the Los Angeles area showed 83% of white and 63% of Latino eligible citizens were registered to vote in 1984. A spokesman for the coalition of organizations said a ruling by the court was not expected before the June 3 statewide primary , but hoped for a decision prior to the Nov. 6 general election. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: . No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. '20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. i CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by_ ________ _ 75 cents per word (city , state & zip Title . code count as 2 words; telephone Area Code & Phone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates Advertiser Name . on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . . NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO seeks CORRE& : : PONDENT, FOREIGN DESK Candidate develops ' ideaS/proposals for major reports, series, programs and serves as substitute host for All Things Considered and other NPR news programs. College degree or equivalent education/experience, ex tensive broadcast journalism and product know ledge and five years reporting experience required Submit tapes with resume to News and Information Programs , National Public Radio, 2025 M St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20036 (202) 822-2000. Bill To Address City, State & Zip JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES Twenty congressional internships for junior or senior full-time undergraduate journalism and mass communication students enrolled in accredited programs. Stipend of $2 , 150 awarded along with travel allowance. Must obtairi application from and be recommended by department chair. Internships begin Feb . 1, 1987 and continue for three months. Sponsored by Sears, Roebuck and Co . and Association of Schools of Journalism ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF COMMUNICATIONS RESPONSIBILITIES: To teach public relations, advertising , journalistic writing and advanced journalism courses; also, mass media theory and communications policy, depending on fications. To develop the public relations/ad vertising specialization within the communications major . QUALIFICATIONS : Maste(s degree required, doctorate preferred At least three years manage ment experience in public relations, advertising or other closely related field . Teaching experience at the college level. SALARY : Range from $24,114 to $45,021, depending on qualifications and experience. DEADLINE DATE : Postmarked no later than May 15, 1986. Submit curriculum vitae and names of three references to: Professor Mark Schulman, Chair, Communications i Search , Room Shepard 117, The City College of CUNY, Convent Ave. at 138th St., New York, N.Y. 10031 . REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650-word news featureS/opinion pieces weekly, paying on ac ceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writefs guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D .C. 20005. RADIO PRODUCER/WRITER and Mass Communication For more contact Julius Dickens, 633 Pennsylvania Ave . I NW , Suite 600, Washington, D.C. 20004 (202) KUAT-TV, AM/FM, Tucson, Arizona , seeks a radio producer/writer. The individual selec ted forth is position will work in the Spanish language programming services of KUAT . radio and will be responsible for producing news, public affairs and occasional docu mentaries, although some assignments may be for other program production in English. Bachelofs degree in communications, radioTV related field plus two years news aild . public affairs experience with proven work in radio required. The individual must be equally capable in the writing, reading and delivery of English and Spanish, and be able to relate to and work with the His panic communities of southern Arizona Salary rangeS 18,836 $20,720. Usual university benefit package . Submit resume to Employment Office, versity of Arizona, 1717 E. Speedway, Tucson, Ariz . 85721 . 737-4900. PRODUCERS/DIRECTORS Distribution Opportunity THE LATINO CONSORTIUM, calor/producer of Hispanic-theme programming, seeks dramatic, current affairs, and cultural programs for distribution nationwide to its PBS members. Contact Mark Carreno or Carolisa Morgan, Latino Consortium, KCET-TV, 4401 Su.nset Blvd., Los Angeles , Calif. 90027 (213) 667-9425. CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report -$25 for humorous or political cartoons. Sub mit to: Carlos Morales, Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. THE LOS ANGELES TIMES seeks.applicants '-----.,.-----------------J. I for 1 0-week paid winter and fall internships in INTERNSHIPS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.: His panic Link News Service expects to have new paid internships for developing journalists to work in Washington, D .C., in summer or fall of 1986. If interested in receiving an application for any such opportunities, write now to Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. SIXTH ANNUAL "GOLDEN REEL" AWARDS The National Federation of Community Broad casters is accepting entries for its 1986 Com munity Radio Awards competition. Deadline is May 23, 1986. Programs must be submitted by their copyright owners/principal producers. This competition is open to all radio producers, regardless of affiliation. All types i and styles of programs are eligible . NFCB is ' especially interested in receiving programs which : best typify its philosophy of fostering "freewheeling, risk-taking radio ... not afraid of experimentation and controversy ... or of beauty. " Entries may be up to 60 minutes in length. Both open and casseite formats are acceptable . its Washington Bureau. College seniors or recent . graduates with a liberal arts background preferred; previous internship or experience on a school newspaper essential. Bureau interns work as regular members of a 38-m ember staff and are expected to perform to exacting standards under tight deadlines. Send cover letter and 1 resume ta Assignment Editor, Los Angeles Times, 1875 Eye St. NW, Suite 1100, Washington, D.C.: 20006. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington , D.C.based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737. CORPORATIONS & NON-PROFIT ORGANI ZATIONS: Established Washington Hispanic firm is ready to assist you with your training, ADP services, research & evaluation, management consulting, and representation needs. For more information or employment opportunities, contact Business Information & Services Corp. 2025 I St. NW, Suite 1115, Washington, D . . C . 20006 (202) 223-61 00 . NEWS YOU CAN USE! HISPANIC LINK NEWS SERVICE currently serving 200 magazines and newspapers across the USA has something new JUST FOR YOU! HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT YOUR NATIONAL NEWS-WEEKLY 7 SPECIAL FEATURES COVERING HISPANIC * Calendar * Media Report * The Good News U.S.A. * Editorial Cartoons * Arts & Entertainment * Names Making News * Sin Pelos en Ia Lengua PLEASE START MY SUBSCRIPTION: Name ____________________________ __ Organization _____________ _ Addres$ _____________ _ City, State, Zip __________ _ o Start 13-week trial Subscription $26 0 Start 52-week Subscription$96.00 OBill me 0 Bill my Organization o Check encl . MAIL TO: Hispanic Link News SeiVice 1420 ' N ' St. N . W . Washington , D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 . A fee of S10 must accompany each entry. For more information on submission guidelines, 1 please write or call NFCB, 1314 14th St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 797-8911. VICTOR ROMERO, Producer/Director. Docu mentary and training videos for target audience. : Call WEST END VIDEO (202) 775. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Herman Sillas Jr. Play the Symbols Game We live in a world of symbols . We rely on them as truth, as communications short cuts. A dove is a sign of peace; the eagle, war. Politicians love symbols. One that stands out to me is the Plymouth that Jerry Brown used when he was governor of California. It told the people that he was just like them. To his credit, Brown never as so many politicians have done-campaigned in the Hispanic . community wearing a sombrero to demonstrate his empathy . Sombreros perpetuate stereotypes. When Hispanics are involved, sometimes symbols conflict. For example, a home in the suburbs is a symbol of prosperity . If you see a man or a woman cutting the lawn or picking flowers in front of a $150,000 home, you might reasonably conclude that he or she is the owner. My compadre Guillermo lives in u.n upper middle-class neighborhood surrounded by Anglos. He loves to recount the time he was cutting his front lawn when a woman stopped her car, approachE!P him, and in a deliberate manner inquired, "What does the woman of the house pay you to do the lawn?" "Noth, ing ," he responded. "She lets me sleep with her." My compadre ' s brown skin symbolized "laborer" to the woman. She couldn't connect him with ownership of the home. MISREADING MY NEW TUXEDO Furs and tuxedos are badges of wealth, too. I remember a formal event in Long Beach , California, when I got to wear my first store bought tuxedo. I entered the restaurant aboard the converted ocean liner Queen Mary and was waiting for the maitre d' to return to his station when a man with a tuxedo I considered less elegant than mine walked in .and snapped at me , "Swanson, party of four." Swaryson had misread my symbol . He saw my emblem of success as a .uniform of employment. I with indignation. (He couldn't tell, of course.) Recovering quickly, I snapped back, "Right this way," and led him and his three companions to the least desirable table I could find, next to the swinging kitchen door. That .experience served me well when I twice ran for statewide office in the '70s. I used my tuxedo regularly when attending political fund-raisers of fellow Democratic candidates for other offices. Invariably, they were held at the best hotels and commanded a ticket price of $1 00 o ' r more . Since my campaigns had limited funds, I would carry a small white towel and wrap it over my arm as I walked past the ticket-taker. Once inside; . I disposed of the towel and mixed with the politicos and donors. My black tux and brown skin were my admission ticket. There' s also the classic anecdote about my friend, Philip Montez, the western regional director of the U .S. Commission on Civil Rights. Years ago, Montez, attending a reception in Washington, was introduced to a black guest from one of the capital's many bureaucracies. "Mon-TEZZZ?" the new acquaintance inquired loudly, sipping his martini. "Is that a Mexican name?" Montez acknowledged that indeed his parents were from Mexico. The black guest explored further. "Do you play the guitar?" "No," Montez responded. "Do you tap dance?" The point was made . Guitars and taJFdance shoes do not always accompany Hispanics and blacks. Blacks must live with outdated, inappropriate, often ridiculous symbols, too. So must Asians, Native Americans, and, certainly, women . one g 'roup comes to mind that might be able to play the symbols game-sending appropriate positive signals to others with their clothes and cars and homes . Maybe some white males can do it. so long as they're not Irish or Polish or Jewish or ... (Herman Sil/as Jr. is a partner in the law firm of Ochoa and Sillas, with offices in Los Angeles, Sacramento, Oakland and Mexico City.) Hispanic . L .ink Weekly Report Jose Antonio Burciaga Beware of the Tall Ones The City Council of Los Altos, in Northern California, recently voted English as their official language . I understand the proceedings were all in the English language. To say that Los Altos is teeming with swarthy Latino types would be a digression from the truth . To say that it has a small barrio would also be a lie. Except for a very few residents, the only Spanish-speaking people in Los Altos are the gardeners, domestic servants and , most probably, a few restaurant workers . For the most part, Los Altos is an affluent Anglo community located between San Francisco and San Jose, close to Silicon Valley . It has a population of 28,630, not counting gardeners, domestic servants and kitchen workers. Nonetheless, in 1-:eeping with an All American patriotic trend, Los Altos joined a number of other cities across the country in voting English '----:...;;...._., as its official language. In the same All-American spirit, I feel that Los Altos should have gone all the way and changed its Spanish name to The Highs , Highlands, or more appropriately, The Tall Ones. All across the country, defenders of ye olde English would do well to authenticate, in English, the "foreign" names of our cities and towns. For example, here in California we could begin by translating Los Banos to The Bathrooms and Sobrantes to Leftovers. LIVING IN A MUD PUDDLE San Francisco , of course, would be renamed Saint Francis of Assisi. Atascadero could become Mud Puddle ; Manteca, Lard; Panocha, Brown Sugar, and Aromas could become Smells, California. Los Angeles? Anaheim already took away the city's baseball Angels, so how about Lost Angels or Lost Anglos? That's only California Texas and other states have just as many Spanish-named towns and cities. For example, Tornillo, Texas , could easily be changed to Screw, Texas. Laredo could be translated to a different musical scale, like Doremi. My hometown of El Paso could be changed to The Pass. Some of the changes could be image-shattering. For instance, Amarillo , Texas, would not sound as macho if changed to Yellow, Texas . But to conserve the purity of the English language, Amarillo would have to go. In Florida, you may have heard of Boca Raton . Would you like to live in Rat's Mouth , Florida? What's fair for Spanish names is fair for other non-English names, of course. So Baton Rouge , Louisiana, would have to convert to Red Stick. The list is endless with communities founded by French , Indian and German settlers. Soon some courageous legislator may introduce a bill to force those of us with " un-American" names like Anaya or Burciaga or Cisneros to change them, too. My friend Nieves Palomares would be rechristened Ice Cream Pigeon House and Jose Feliciano would answer to Joe Happiness. 1 don't know how to translate my friend Facundo into English . 1 guess they'll have to deport him . If Julio Iglesias and Placido Domingo were to become permanent residents, they would need to adopt the names July Churches and , Serene Sunday. Definitely, that could hurt their record sales. ' My monolingual Anglo friends sometimes complain about my name. They say it's too long . I ask them if they would prefer Joseph Anthony Abundance of Head? In Spanish, my name has only 19 characters. In English , it has 28. I'm sure that there's not a mean bone in the body of any of those Official English patriots. Their intentions are undoubtedly the best. But they're making me one worried born-in-the-USA American . I'd hate to be rejected as "unofficial" just because some Tall Ones can' t pronounce their own home town. (Jose Antonio Burciaga is a writer and artist. He teach-es a course on murals at Stanford University in California) 3

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THE GOOD NEWS Following are some training programs and internships for journalists More details on these and other programs can be found in the Journalism Career and Scholarship Guide , 1986 , available free from: Dow Jones Newspaper Fund , P . O . Box 300, Princeton , N . J . 08540. THE MODESTO BEE: Five paid summer internships for minorities to work in various departments. Send cover letter, resume (with three references) and five work examples . Deadline : open. Contact: Sanders LaMont, exec. editor, Modesto Bee, P . O . Box 3928, Modesto Calif. 95352 (209) 524-4041. THE BOSTON GLOBE: One-year paid training for three minority reporters or other journalism professionals. Seventy percent of those finishing the program are offered staff positions. Deadline : open. Contact: Ann Moritz, The Boston Globe, 35 Morrissey Blvd., Boston Mass. 021 07 (6117) 929-3120. THE HARTFORD COURANT: Two one-year paid minority internships in reporting positions. Candidates must be from New England area. Deadline : open. Contact Sally Jo Restivo, assistant metropolitan ed itor , The Hartford 285 Broad St, Hartford, Conn. 06115 (203) 241-6200. THE LOS ANGELES TIMES: One-year paid training program for eig ht minorities with little reporting e x perience. Deadline : December31, 1986. Write to: Ron Harris, Minority Editorial Training Program, Los Angeles Tim es, Times Mirror Square , Los Angeles , Calif . 90053 (213) 972-4463. CAPITAL CITIES: Ten one-year paid training positions for minor it ies to work with three company newspapers. Deadline: Jan . 31, 1987. Send resu me , three-to-five samples of work and letter detailing qualifications and interest in the program to: David Daris , program coordinator, Capital Cities Communications, Minority Training Program, c / o Times L eader, 15 N . Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa . 18711 (717) 829-7262. ASSOCIATED PRESS: Twelve 13-week paid summer internships working in an AP bureau. It could lead to fuiHime employment Deadline : Mid-March 1987 . Contact Wick Temple, director of Human Resources, AP , 50 Rockefeller Plaza , New York, . N . Y . 10020 (212) 621-1780. EDITING PROGRAM FOR MINORITY JOURNALISTS: An eightweek summer session that trains reporters for newspaper editor positions. D e adline : March 1, 1987. Contact: The Institute for ism Education, University of Arizona, Department of Journalism, Franklin Bu ilding, Rm . 101M, Tucson, Ariz . 85721 (602) 621-5777. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEl MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search lor executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Unk. 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESl) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the s.ame week. AO rates: 75 cents per word Display ra tes: $35 per column inch. MINNESOTA HISPANIC WOMEN' S De velop ment Corporation seeks EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Must ha v e strong managemen t . business and program deve l opment background BilinQuaVbicultural orele rred Salary n egotiable. Deadline Ap ril 29. Phone (612) 641-1 6 1 9 . PROGRAMMER COORDINATOR I (Student Organizations) S t aff posi tion in stude nt lif e off ice r esponsib l e for coordinating a n undergraduate parapro fessio n al program"'REACH."' Ca ndidate pro vides services to individual st udents, campus clubs and organization s ; provides leadership for student organization development and facilitates the r ole of faculty and staf f advisors. B achelor's degree in commun i cations. studen t development, counselin g , student personnel adm i nistra ti on or social sciences and one y ear administrative /coord inative experience; OR five years progressively responsible ad ministrat ive/ coordinative program expe r ience; O R any approved equiva lent combination of experience, training or education . Effective use of communication s skills , organization deve l opment ski lls, use o f st udent development theory a nd knowledge of group process skill s desi red. Sa lary$18,836 for12 m onths. App li cations must be received by May 9 in th e Personnel Office, A rizona State University, Tempe, Ariz. 85287 . Equal Opportunity Employer. MANAGEMENT INTERN The Cit y of San Jose is accep t ing app l ications for the positio n of Management Intern. Intern s assist the City Manager and dept. heads in organizing, developing and evaluating City s e rvices and programs. Interns w ill be hired on a contractual basis fo r one yr. Sal a r y is $26,622 / yr . Requires complet ed M.A d egree in Public Administration, Bus iness Administration or closely rela t ed field by? /1/86. R esumes wi ll be reviewed and evaluated for personal interviews. Resumes must include: h o n o r s and extrac urri c ul a r ac t iv ities. names and tele phon e numbers of 3 references(on e m u s t be a f acu lt y officia l undergraduate and gradua t e transcripts an d a 3 -5 page typ ewritten paper on why you a r e seekin g this position. Final filing date: 5 /16/86. Send resumes to Ed N ormandy, Ci t y of San Jose P e r son n e l D ept. , 801 N . St., Room 207, Sa n Jose, Calif . 95110 . (408) 277-4204. VICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS The Vice President will report directly lo lhe President and wil l be responsible for the day-t o-day program and administration of the Nati ona l Puerto Rican Coalition, In c . Candidates should be bilingual anct familiar with public Policy i ss u es con fr o ntin g the Puerto Ric an comm uni ty in th e Unit ed States. Candidates should a lso possess a n a d v an ced degree in management, social s ciences or educati o n an d have eight years of professional experience with a minimum of two years of supervisory experience . Salary $40,000-$45,500 per annum dependent o n experience and pre v ious salary history. An extensive fri nge benefits package i s a lso offer ed . Interested candidates should submit resumes no later than Apri\30 to: Louis Nunez, President, NPRC, Inc., 1700 K St. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20006. PRINCE GEORGE ' S COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301 ) 952-3408. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES G LOMB, H ANTEN & B ACA L AW FIRM: lm nigra t ion c iv i l litigation-comm e r c ial lawomplo ymentlaw-lederal agency practice. 1 8 1 5 H St. NW , Suite 1000, Washington, D . C . 20006 (202) 466-2250. Calendar contest and is seeking to es tablish a scholarship fund. The group will hav e its 4th annual roast recognizing individuals who have made contributions to the community. It a lso awards scholarships to Hispanic high school students who plan to pursue journalism in college. Ernest Gurule (602) 628-9262 Followingis a lis t of annual events by U.S. Hisp anic media o r ganizations. In some instances, exact dat es have not yet been set. CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF LATINOS IN BROADCASTING Los Angeles June 6 CALIS will have its annual scholarship fund-ra is ing event for co llege-level Latinos interested in journalism. La st yea r , the 12-yearold association generated $30,000 for scholarships. Fernando del Rio (213) 467-5459 MICHIGAN HISPANIC MEDIA ASSOCIATION L a nsing , Mich. August A o ne-day conference will be conducted on job imp r ovement and career options by the 2-year-old assoc iation. Jose Lopez (517) 485-4389 . FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS Miami September FAHJ will sponsor its3rd annual high school writing Hispanic Link Weekly Report Eve l y n Hernandez (305) 662-1007 NETWORK OF HISPANIC COMMUNICATORS Dallas September The 5-year-old network will have a fund-r-aising dance for its writing contest and will sponsor a se m i nar later in the fall on how th e public can use the media effectively. Rosalind Soliz (2 . 14) 871-1390 PENNSYLVANIA HISPANICS IN THE MEDIA Philadelphia September The 3-year-old organization will sponsor a project titled "Peri6dico Mural" aimed at elementary and junior high school students to publish a newsletter in the form of a mural . Pat r isia Gonza le s (609) 667-7211 HISPANIC NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION Washington, D . C . October Three-year-old HNMA will begin its 2nd annual high school essay contest. Dora Delgado (202) 234-0737 CONCERNED MEDIA PROFESSIONALS T uc son , Ariz. Nov . 7 CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION Los Angeles F e b . 6 , 7 CCNMA will conduct its 8 th annual media jobs fair for H ispanics who want to interview with m e dia rep re sentatives. Magdalena Beltran (213) 7 43-71 58 PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION OF MEXICAN AMERICANS IN CpMMUNICATIONS El Paso, Texas Oct. 18, 19 The 8ye ar -o ld POMAC will have its annual awards presentation to honor El Paso journalists. Bert Salazar (91 5) 534-71 09 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS Los Angeles April 24-28 The 5th annual Hispanic media conference a nd expo by NAHJ will have workshops on issues r e l eva nt to the media and Hispanics and a job fair. Alisa Zepeda (202) 783-6228 5 .

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Arts & Entertainment the Omni Hotel, running concurrently with other conference activities. Three entertainment indu 'stry panels are also being coordinated by HAMAS members : A CHARITY GALA , A FILM AND VIDEO SCREENING program and various panels at this week's fourth annual National Hispanic Media Conference signal a growing interest in Hispanic participation in arts and entertainment industries . Hispanic Image on TV (April 24): Moderator is Ed Cervantes ; panelists are Luis Avalos, Jose Rivera, Migdia Varela and Luis Soto. Programming Practices and the Independent Producer (April 25): . Many of the entertainment-related events at the conference are coordinated by the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, one of the three national organizations planning this year's event. Moderator is Armando Nevarez; panelists are Liz Chavez, Barry Chase, Ron Gordon and Nely Galan . Hispanics in the Entertainment Industry (April 26): Moderator is Richard Yniguez; panelists are Abel Franco, Melvin Karl, Jeff Peniche and Fernando Allende. A Gala to Benefit Education will follow the Gannett Foundation banquet April26; the event launches HAMAS' Scholarship Program. Actor Edward James Olmos will act as master of ceremonies and Richard Yniguez and Lupe Ontiveros are hosts . Scheduled talent at press time includes Luis Avalos, Diego Verdaguer, Yuri, Abel Franco , Maria Conchita Alonso, Fernando Allende, Diego Alvarez Guedes, Annette Cardona, Marc Allen Trujillo , Roxana Herb Alpert, Lani Hall and Jimmy Osmond. Another conference panel , scheduled for the 24th, is titled Covering the Hispanic Arts . According to moderator Miguel Perez, a columnist with the New York Daily News, the panel will be "a discussion on the need for more and .better coverage of the Hispanic arts in both the English and Spanish language media, and the need for involving more Hispanic journalists in covering Latino arts and entertainment." The Gala to Benefit Education is being produced by Armando Nevarez; Ron Diaz is coordinating producer. Victor Contreras directs . Some 22 titles are scheduled to be shown at this conference's second annual HAMAS Film and Video Screening Program . Ivy Orta, Antonio Ogaz and Eddie Dominguez coordinate the screenings at Panelists are Andres Gutierrez, actor, public relations director and archivist for Teatro Campesino; Norma Niurka, arts and columnist at El Miami Herald ; Dolores Prida , playwrigh\ and editor of Hispanic Art News, a publication of the Association of Hispanic Arts; and this reporter . Media Report Forty-six percent of Hispanic journalists working for U.S. dailies as th i s year began are employed in California and Texas, an annual survey by the American Society of News paper Editors concludes. Based on a questionnaire response rate of 62% , ASNE projects that there are now 884 Hispanic reporters , editors , photographers and artists working at the nation's 1,67 4 dailies. Six states account for 7 4% of Hispanic editorial staffers. The four others are Florida, New York, Arizona and New Mexico . Thirty four states have five or fewer Latinos in their newsrooms ; 1 0 have none. ASNE projects, in survey results released this month, that Hispanics are 1.6% of the 53,895 newsroom employees of daily news papers nationally. That compares with 1 .5% at the start of 1985. Minorities in the newsroom 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national pub l ication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado . Felix Perez , Cha r lie Ericksen . Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advanc e permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscrl.ptlon (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Includ e the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report i n participants ' packets at your ne x t o r convention . For details, contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234-0 737. have doubled their numbers since 1978, growing to 3,400 in 1986. Their representation grew from 3 . 9% in 1978 (the first year such data were collected) to 6 . 3% in 1986. 1 Blacks in the nation's newsrooms represent more than twice the percentage of Hispanics at 3 .5%, with Asians comprising 0 . 9% and Native Americans 0 .3%. Asians are the second largest minority in California's newsrooms, at 2.4% . Hispanics are 3.3%. The ASNE Minorities Committee has initiated several projects to expedite integration in . the nation's newsrooms . One called on each of its 48 members to contact two newspapers that had no minorities on their staffs. The members were to offer assistance and seek a commitment to hire a minority . Rolfe Neill, president and publisher of the Charlotte (N.C.) Observer, candidly reported in the February issue of the ASNE Bulletin: "Of our 48 members , 30 agreed to try. To date, not one, including myself, has been sufficiently persuasive to get results." -Felix Perez -Antonio Mejias-Rentas NEWSROOM STAFFING U.S. oailiesby State (as of Dec. 31, 1985) %All % Hisp . % Black Minority New Mexico 10.3 0 . 7 12 . 3 Texas 5 . 6 2 . 6 9 . 3 Arizona 4.8 2.0 7 . 7 Hawaii 4.3 0 . 0 37. 8 California 3.3 2 . 0 8.0 Florida 2 . 8 4.5 7 . 9 Colorado 2.1 1.1 4.1 Connecticut 1.5 2.3 4.0 New York 1.4 4 . 9 7 . 0 Washington, D .C. 1 . 4 12 . 0 15.0 New Jersey 1 . 1 2.9 4 . 6 Washington 1.1 1.4 4 . 8 Illinois 1 . 0 3 . 6 5 . 0 Michigan 0 . 7 7.0 8 . 5 Pennsylvania 0.3 3 . 9 4.6 Source : Am e ri c an Soc i ety ol Newspaper Editors ' i I : Q v ' Hispanic Link Weekly Report