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Hispanic link weekly report, April 26, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 26, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News ThisWeek
Colorado state Sen. Bob Martinez co-sponsors a resolution calling on state farmers and ranchers to provide toilet facilities and water for drinking and washing for migrant workers. It follows remarks by state Rep. Walt Younglund last month that farm workers from Mexico needed training to use toilets and wash their hands. Approved on a 27-4 vote, the resolution carries no force of law... The Immigration and Naturalization Service formally apologizes to Ricardo Tostado and Antonio Herndndez, both officials in Chicago’s Department of Economic Development, after stopping them last year in a search for undocumented immigrants working as cabdrivers. Another stipulation in the settlement of the class action suit brought by the two Latinos
calls for INS not to stop Hispanics solely because of “Hispanic appearance or origin”... Chicago Mayor Harold Washington appoints Jessica Valencia director of administration in the Purchasing Department, Rosita Ponce del Le6n as contractor auditor in the Purchasing Department, and Carlos Flores as contract compliance director in the Department of Aviation. Valencia and Ponce del Le6n had been working for the city. Flores worked for the U.S. government... The Hispanic Women’s Council in Los Angeles honors the first male in its 13-year history- Daniel Villanueva, general manager and president of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles - with its Special Recognition Award... Paul Gonzales, 1984 Olympic gold medalist from Los Angeles and North American Boxing Federation flyweight champion, wins his fourth professional fight in as many starts with a unanimous 1O-round decision over Javier Barajas in Bakersfield, Calif....
^^^^^SPANICUNyKWEEK^^EPO^^^^
Steady Latino Vote Gains Shown; Youth Lag
The number of Hispanics registered to vote grew by 52% from 1972 to 1984, but younger Hispanics continued to turn out poorly at the polls, according to a Census Bureau report released this month.
During this period, Hispanic registered voters increased from 2.5 to 3.8 million. The increase for blacks was 38%; for whites, 15%. As of 1984, there were 12.2 million registered blacks and 102.2 million registered whites.
The report revealed that Hispanics who
Pioneer Journalist Dies
Marina Mireles MacPherson, who blazed trails both for women and Hispanics as a newspaper correspondent, reporter and columnist, died April 15 in San Diego following hospitalization for a bacterial infection. She was 59.
At one point, Mireles MacPherson was the only U.S. journalist covering Fidel Castro’s early revolutionary activities in the mountains of Cuba. She also reported on U.S. Hispanic issues and general news for the Los Angeles Examiner and KMEX-TV there in the’50s and ’60s.
Born in Brawley, Calif., of Mexican parents, she was publisher of a classroom newspaper, El Informador, and co-owner of Fiesta Mexican Foods at the time of her death.
Among survivors are her-husband, Vernon MacPherson, a former editor with the Los Angeles Mirror-News, and their adopted son, Luis Manuel, 4.
actually cast votes grew at a slower clip than those who registered - 47%. In 1972 (the first year such data were collected on Hispanics) 2.1 million Latinos voted; this increased by 1 million for the November 1984 election. Black voters increased 46%. White voters, like white registrants, were up 15%.
The report found that only 32.6% of voting-
ELIGIBLE VOTERS - 1984
Total Registered Voted Hispanic 6,444,000 58.9% 48.0%
Black 17,808,000 68.6% 57.8%
White 141,826,000 72.0% '63.6%
Source: “Voting and Registration in the Election of November,” U.S Census Bureau.
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart
age Hispanics voted in the elections of 1984 - 27 points lower than the 60% national rate. Bob Brischetto, research director of the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project, said that about one-third of all Latinos included by the Census Bureau are non-citizens and that theirfigures unfairly deflate actual Hispanic electoral participation.
SVREP, the Midwest Voter Registration and Education Project and the National Puerto Rican/Hispanic Voter Participation Project registered 605,000 additional Latinos in 20 states for the 1984 election.
Brischetto and Juan Andrade, executive director of MVREP, agreed that one of the
positive findings of the report was that Hispanic voter registration was progressing faster than that of blacks or whites. Another positive development, added Brischetto) was that the voting rate for Latinos 65 years and older had gone from 39% in 1972 to 59% in 1984. The negative: Hispanic voter participation among those aged 18-24 continued to lag.
Citing an “increasing disaffection and alienation among all youth,” Brischetto offered a figure different from that of the census. Subtracting non-citizens, he found a voting rate of 31% for Hispanics in that age group. The report showed a 22% rate.
From 1972 to 1984,*18-lto 24-year-old Hispanics grew 54%, compared with 29% for blacks and 9% for whites. Also, Hispanics have the lowest median age at 25.
SVREP does not plan a special voter education campaign '-targeting Hispanic youth. Said Brischetto: “Our strategy is really to approach the family. . . We found work in the high schools not to be productive.” SVREPs focus is on local and state races rather than national.
MVREP initiated the Midwest Hispanic Youth Leadership Conference last fall to get more Hispanic youth involved in the political process. Through a network of approximately 100 youth organizations across the Midwest, the conference will sponsor voter education activities to teach the basics of the political process, said Andrade.
The census report showed that 43% of all continued on page 2
HISPANIC VOTING AND REGISTRATION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGION
Eligible Voters - November 1984
New Middle E North W. North South W. South Mountain Pacific
England (1) Atlantic (2) Central (3) Central (4) Atlantic (5) Central (6) (7) (8)
TOTAL 99,000 1,198,000 385,000 109,000 444,000 1,653,000 762,000 1,766,000
Registered 49.5% 59.0% 66.0% 58.7% 64.6% 59.3% 57.7% 56.6%
Voted 40.4% 49.8% 56.6% 45.9% 57.2% 43.0% 47.8% 47.6%
Regions: (1) Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont; (2) New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania; (3) Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin; (4) Kansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota; (5) Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia; (6) Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma; (7) New Mexico, Arizona^ Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming; (8) California, Alaska, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington.
Note: The East South Central region, which consists of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee, was excluded because of the unavailability!of percentages.
Source"Voting and Registration in the Election of November of 1984,” U.S Census Bureau.
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart


Sin pelos en la lengua
GIVE ME YOUR RICH: Miami always gets the dubious credit for providing mansion-sized refuges for Latin American millionaires on the lam.
Now, notes Valdemar de Murguia, a University of California researcher, Mexico’s super-rich are fleeing their homeland’s economic turmoil to San Diego’s swank neighbor, La Jolla. Mexicans are buying 25-30% of the homes there now, he says, observing that its Mexican population has doubled from 1,211 to 2,200 in the last five years.
WHO’LL FOLLOW GAVIN? Mexico’s press expressed its expected elation at U.S. Ambassador John Gavin’s announcement that he was packing his tux and “returning to the private sector.”
El Universal labelled him arrogant, meddlesome, and ghastly - to quote a few adjectives in its Page 1 political assessment commenting on “one of the best news stories that Mexicans have received...”
The financial daily El Financiero inquired following the former actor’s announced departure: “Nowwhowillfollow: WoodyAllenor Jerry Lewis?”
GEORGE’S LAST NAME: George Rodrigue, who won the Pulitzer for national reporting April 17 with Craig Flournoy for their lengthy Dallas Morning News series on subsidized housing, is neither a typo
nor a Latino.
But News’ business writer Maggie Rivas, who contributed two articles to the series, is as Latina as they come.
HENRY NIPS CLINT: In cjase you’re asked, Henry Cisneros won 72.9% of the vote when elected to a third term as San Antonio mayor last April. Clint Eastwood received only 72.2% this month in his victorious Carmel mayoral campaign. (Cisneros sent Eastwood a telegram anyway, welcoming him to “the good, bad and ugly world of local government.”)
THE ALCALDE IS TOILET WATER: With Vice President George Bush as speaker at the April 19 Texas Sesquicentennial banquet in Houston, guests were offered the option of being recognized as conquistadores ($2,500 per table of 10), virreys ($2,000), empresarios ($1,500) or - at $50 a head - plain old alcaldes.
And back in San Antonio, there’s a thrilling new toilet water on the perfume counters called “Henry C.”
ANSWERS TO WHO’S NEWS: Last week we challenged your memories on such Page 1 Hispanic newsmakers of the ’80s as Roberto Goizueta and Rosie Ruiz. Here are the match-ups: 1-k, 2-e, 3-m, 4-o, 5-i, 6-n, 7-f, 8-h, 9-1, 10-b, 11-a, 12-j, 13-g, 14-c, 15-d.
Since every good contest has a tie-breaker, those who scored 100% can tackle this one: What Hispanic will Ronald Re&gan name to his Cabinet before the next presidential election?
-Kay Barbaro
Latino Voters Increase
continued from page 1
18-to 24-year-old Hispanics who were enrolled in college voted, while only 18% of those not enrolled did. Excluding non-citizens, 63% of Latino college enrollees voted; the figure for those not enrolled in college jumped nine points to 27%.
Other findings on eligible Hispanic voters in 1984:
• Sixty-two percent of Latinos who owned homes voted in 1984, compared with 41% of those who rented their homes.
• Sixty-nine percent of those with college degrees voted, 49% of high school graduates turned out and 39% with eight years or less of schooling cast ballots.
• Employed Hispanics outvoted unemployed Hispanics 51% to 33%.
• Eighty-one percent - 1.67 million - of the 2.05 million Latinas who were registered went to the polls; 82% - 1.43 million - of the 1.74 million registered Latinos cast their ballots.
(For a copy of the 98-page report titled “Voting and Registration in the Election of November of 1984,” send $5 to the U.S. ! Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. Specify Series P-20, No. 405.)
-Felix Perez
Two Vie for Space Trip
Puerto Rican Geraldo Rivera, now a freelance broadcast journalist, and Maximo G6mez, health/science editor for Philadelphia station KYW-TV who is of Cuban descent, have been selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration among 100 candidates for NASA’s journalist-in-space project.
Screening to select a single journalist begins this week at Chapel Hill, N.C. The field will be trimmed to 40 by mid-May, with five finalists to be reviewed by a 15-member national panel at a date not yet determined.
Deportations Stopped
The district director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Florida announced April 16 that he would not send Nicaraguans back to that country for fear that they would be persecuted by the Sandinista government
Perry Rivkind is the only one of 33 district directors to adopt such a policy, something that a spokesman for the I NS in Washington, D.C., said is within his authority. He has stopped the deportation of eight Nicaraguans from Florida this month.
Rep. Peter Rodino Jr. (D-N.J.), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said he was, concerned with INS’s handling of asylum claims, calling them inconsistent “without providing identical treatment to Salvadorans and Haitians.”
The House Judiciary Committee will soon consider a bill sent to it by the Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and International Law April 16 that would temporarily bar the Attorney General from deporting Salvadorans who entered the United States before Nov. 7, 1985.
Republicans Launch Drive
Project Adelante, a pilot effort to target Hispanic voters nationwide, was announced April 23 at a Washington, D.C, news conference by Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahrenkoph Jr.
Project activities will include establishment of a network of Hispanic spokespersons for the party across the country and advertisements in Hispanic publications. Some ads tied in with the Mexican Cinco de Mayo holiday have already been placed.
The project will test a variety of ways to reach Hispanic voters, Fahrenkoph said. “In states such as California, Texas, Florida and Colorado, where we have crucial Senate races, the GOPs ability to reach Hispanics could very well mean the difference between victory and defeat.”
Guiding the project will be Republican National Hispanic Assembly Chairman Fernando de Baca, with staff support from the Republican National Committee. An initial commitment of nearly $300,000 has been made, de Baca said, with emphasis on Southwest voters.
PRESIDENTIAL VOTING 1972-1984 - PERSONS 18-24
1972 1976 1980 1984
HISPANIC Total* 1,338,000 1,559,000 2,047,000 2,064,000
Voted 414,000 340,000 326,000 452,000
Percent* 30.9% 21.8% 15.9% 21.9%
BLACK Total 2,994,000 3,323,000 3,559,000 3,875,000
Voted 1,040,000 926,000 1,071,000 1,572,000
Percent 34.7% 27.9% 30.1% 40.6%
WHITE Total 21,339,000 23,141,000 23,976,000 23,227,000
Voted 11,074,000 10,344,000 10,027,000 9,667,000
Percent 51.9% 44.7% 41.8% 41.6%
* The totals and percentages include non-citizens.
Source: "Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1984," U.S Census Bureau.
- Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
following is a list of newsletters published by Hispanic media associations across the country. The editor of each one has agreed to send a free sample copy of his or her publication to any Hispanic Link Weekly Report reader who requests it and includes a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS: The monthly, four-page “NAHJ Membership Newsletter” is available through a $35 annual membership. NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION (Los Angeles): The monthly, eight-to-ten page“CCNMA Newsletter,” which includes timely listings from its JoBank, is available through a $10 annual subscription. Suzanne Manriquez, executive director, California Chicano News Media Association, USC School of Journalism, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695 (213) 743-7158.
CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION (San Diego): The monthly, four-page “CCNMA San Diego Newsletter” is available through a $25 annual subscription. Paul Espinosa, KPBS-TV, San Diego State University, San Diego, Calif. 92182 (619) 265-6415.
HISPANIC NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON, D.C.: The quarterly, six-page “Hispanic Media Notes” is available through a$15 annual subscription. Subscribers also receive notices on all HNMA meetings and other functions. David Saah, editor, Hispanic Media Notes, 1420 N St. NW, #1001, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
HISPANIC ACAPEMY OF MEDIA ARTS AND SCIENCES: The monthly, four-page “HAMAS Newsletter” is available through a $15 annual subscription. HAMAS Newsletter, 5451 Laurel Canyon Blvd., Suite 100, N. Hollywood, Calif. 91607-2188 (818) 509-1066.
ASSOCIATION OF LATIN AMERICANS IN COMMUNICATIONS: The monthly, six-page “Association of Latin Americans in Communications^’ is available through a $12 annual subscription. ALAC, P.O. Box 785, Natick, Mass. 01760 (617) 653-8089.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
CORONADO FOUR-COUNTY BROADCASTING, INC. HISPANIC-OWNED media company in California seeks individuals for radio sales, on-air (Spanish-language news) and management. Contact: Rosario Leal (714) 981-8893.
REPORTERS/COPY EDITORS Detroit Free Press, Michigan, seeks reporters, copy editors. Openings exist in local, features and business departments. Send a resume, cover letter and clips to: Charles Fancher, Assistant Editor, Detroit Free Press, 321 W. Lafayett, Detroit, Mich. 48231 or call (313) 222-6400.
The following two positions are with LaGuardia Community College
Cooperative Education Coordinator DUTIES: I nternship development teaching a co-op preparatory course, field visits and evaluation of co-op interns in data processing area Travel in Long Island, Westchester and New Jersey may be required. Candidate should be capable of guiding students through the combined career, academic and personal learning which occurs through work Candidate will also work on divisional and college projects and committees. REQUIREMENTS: BA required; M.A and prior experience in job placement, cooperative education or personnel highly desirable. SALARY: Substitute lecturer level; upper twenties; commensurate with qualifications.
Job Placement Counselor DUTIES: Job development and job placement for both graduates and students needing
employment Also career counseling, assisting students in resume preparation and the initiation of career related workshops Position is housed in the Placement Office and the successful candidate will work with all students of the college. REQUIREMENTS: BA required; prior experience in job placement or personnel highly desirable. SALARY: Substitute lecturer level; upper twenties; commensurate with qualifications.
LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Ave., Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
MINNESOTA HISPANIC WOMEN’S Development Corporation seeks EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Must have strong management, business and program background. Bilingual/ bicultural preferred. Salary negotiable. Deadline: May 15. Phone (612) 641-1619.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse 'for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena BeltrAn (213) 743-7158.
ACCOUNTANTS/AUDITORS Opportunities nationally for entry-level positions (GS 5*9 with potential to GS 12) in the federal government Applipation forms may be obtained from anpPM job center near you.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202)483-1140.
Calendar
Following is a list of events planned by non-Hispanic media organizations. Exact dates for some have not yet been set.
NATIVE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION Scottsdale, Ariz. June 5*7 The association will have its 2nd annual media convention discussing facets of the newspaper business such as advertising, balanced reporting and management techniques.
Margaret Clark-Price (602) 947-1603
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK
JOURNALISTS
Dallas August 13-17
NABJ will conduct its 11 th annual journalism conference consisting of workshops and a job fair.
Al Fitzpatrick (305) 376-3934
NATIONAL BLACK MEDIA COALITION Washington, D.C. Oct. 22-25 This group will have its 13th annual convention with workshops on issues concerning blacks and the media The coalition will also stage a fund-raiser. Carmen Marshall (202) 387-8155
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEWSPAPER EDITORS ASNE will have a series of job fairs in 16 cities from Hispanic Link Weekly Report
November 1986 to February 1987 aimed at college juniors and seniors seeking entry-level jobs and internships. The cities will be Akron, Ohio; Ann Arbor, Mich.; Baltimore; Birmingham, Ala; Boston; Charlotte, N.C.; Denver, El Paso, Texas; Jackson, Miss.; Kansas City, Mo.; Louisville, Ky.; Milwaukee; Sacramento; San Antonio; San Diego; and St Petersburg, Fla.
Lee Stinnet (303) 620-6087
NEWSDAY JOB FAIR
Long Island, N.Y. Jan. 25. 26,1987
Newsday will sponsor its4th annual job conference
to match students and recent graduates with positions
on newspapers
Reginald Tuggle (516)454-2183
HOWARD UNIVERSITY MEDIA CONFERENCE
Washington, D.C. February 1987
The School of Communications and the Continuing
Education and Community Service Program will
hold their 16th annual conference covering issues
in the media pertinent to minorities along with a job
fair.
Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636-7491
ASIAN AMERICAN JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION Los Angeles Spring 1987
The association will conduct its first job development convention examining issues affecting all journalists and a job fair for students, graduates and working journalists.
Karen Seriguchi (213)389-8383
Media Report: Changes
continued from page 4
to send copy compatible with the computer systems of subscribing newspapers.
Don Teschner, staff coordinator for AN PA’s Wire Services Committee, strongly disagreed. “That’s a cop-out,” he said, explaining that currently AP, United Press International and other carriers have the technical capability to transmit the signs and determine which papers are able to receive them. He said that there is agreement among news agencies, newspapers and manufacturers of newspaper equipment that this will be “a good thing to do.” But, he added, the news agertcies“choose not to do it.”
In Teschner*s opinion, the agencies will have to start transmitting diacriticals as the demand for this service grows. He added, “Right now, it is limited, but I see it increasing,” partly because of new capabilities in newspaper phototyping equipment.^
Among major publications in areas with large Hispanic populations that do not use Spanish diacriticals are The Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Chicago Tribune, San Antonio’s Express-News and Laredo Morning Times.
-Dora Delgado
3


Arts & Entertainment
AN 80TH BIRTHDAY SALUTETOTHE Mexican singer known as El samurai de la cancion begins a week full of arts and entertainment activities by Hispanics around the globe-
Dozens of artists from the United States and the Spanish-speaking world are expected to gather in Mexico City April 29 to honor singer Pedro Vargas, who turns 80 this year. The event is being organized by Julio Iglesias, who last year recorded the duet Felicidades with Vargas.
Born in San Miguel Allende, Guanajuato, April 29,1906, Vargas made his first recording for RCA in New York in 1928. The song, Mi primer amor, was released in a 78 rpm disc. The latest album by Vargas on RCA, titled Grande, grande,grande, is available on compact disc.
Other music events this week include the 16th Inter-American Music Fesf/Va/that takes off in the nation’s capital May 2 (through the 17th) and the Eurovision music festival in Oslo. The Spanish rock group Cadillac, which recently toured this country with CamiloSesto, is an official entry.
Meanwhile, the Los Angeles-based Bilingual Foundation of the
Arts holds its sixth annual fund-raiser, Ole Caribe, May 2 in Long Beach, Calif.
Using a Caribbean theme, the dinner-dance will be held in the Grand Salon aboard the permanently docked Queen Mary luxury liner; celebrity chairman of the event this year is C6sar Romero.
Another West Coast theater organization, the Costa Mesa, Calif.-based South Coast Repertory, reports that more than 80 new plays by Hispanic writers were received for its first Hispanic Playwrights Project. Three works will be selected for a week of workshops and public readings in the summer.
Out on the'Opposite coast, Argentine writer Ricardo Talesnik has concluded the preparatory phase for his next project - a play about Hispanics in the United States.
Invited by New Yorks Spanish Theater Repertory company, Talesnik spent three months in this country doing research for the play (in Spanish) to be staged next year.
Known as the author of La Fiaca, Talesnik performed a one-man show in New York, Kansas, California, Arizona, Florida and Washington, D.C., during his stay in the country. Upon leaving for Argentina earlier this month, Talesnik told United Press International that his new play is about a “foreign writer who is invited to write a play about Hispanics in New York and their experiences.”
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
The Spanish-language acento and letter h are earning popularity among U.S. English-language publications in recent years, based on responses from major print media canvassed by Hispanic Link Weekly Report.
The survey was partly prompted by the actions of The Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News, which added h fonts totheircomputer systems following the election of Denver Mayor Federico Pefta in June 1983. Post Assistant Editor Bill Price informed HLWR that they use accents only “if they would clear some confusion.”
Four other surveyed publications use all the Spanish-language diacritical marks. Five others are actively considering doing so. Two others- The Miami Herald and Associated Press- said they do not use the marks in their English, copy. Herald Associate Managing
Editor Bob Gilbert qualified later that his newspaper does use them when requested.
Newspapers reporting that they use accents and h’s were The New York Times (“have j always done so,” responded News Editor Allan Siegal); The San Jose Mercury News (since November 1985); The Laredo News (August 1982); The San Diego Union(January 1982). Presently, the Union uses some Spanish in its Sunday opinion section.
San Antonio Light Deputy Managing Editor Jeff Cohen said his paper is adjusting its computer system and plans to start using diacriticals “anytime now.” The Washington Post, reviewing its stylebook this year, is still debating whether to use them, said Deputy Managing Editor Richard Harwood. The Post currently uses diacriticals only in its Style section because of preferences by that section’s editor, Harwood said.
Although most of the papers that use Spanish punctuation do so in all instances, The New York Times does not do it with names of U.S.
residents. “Many have chosen to anglicize their names and we have no efficient way of finding out individual preference,” Siegal said.
Bob Hucker, San Jose Mercury News computer specialist, explained that a problem is posed when dealing with wire service stories, which do not carry Spanish diacriticals. The newspaper’s policy is to request from its reporters the correct Spanish spelling of names. For non-local stories, Hucker said the paper keeps a computerized list of newsmakers whose names include diacriticals.
“Take a person like (Fernando) V&squez Raha, the owner of UPI,” he said. “We know he uses an h and an accent. But what do you do with a guy who shows up in the news one day and the wire service doesn’t provide” the Spanish spelling?
Tom Jory, an editor with Associated Press, contended that his agency cannot use foreign-language diacriticals because, according to regulations by the American Newspaper Publishers Association, wire services have
continued on page 3
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher. H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants^ packets at your next conference, or convention. For details, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Colorado state . Sen . Bob Martinez co-sponsors a resolution calling on state farmers and ranchers to provide toilet facilities and water for drinking and washing for migrant workers. It follows remarks by state Rep. Walt Younglund last month that farm workers from Mexico needed training to use toilets and wash their hands . Approved on a 27-4 vote, the resolution carries no force of law ... The Immigration and Naturalization Service formally apologizes to Ricardo Tostado and Antonio Hernandez, both officials in Chicago's Department of Economic Development, after stopping them last year in a search for undocumented immigrants working as cabdrivers. Another stipulation in the settlement of th e class action suit brought by the two Latinos calls for INS not to stop Hispanics solely because of "Hispanic appearance or origin" ... Chicago Mayor Ha 'rold Washington appoints Jessica Valencia director of administration in the Purchasing Depart ment Rosita Ponce del Le6n as contractor auditor in the Purchasing and Carlos Flores as contract compliance director in the Department of Aviation . Valencia and Ponce del Leon had been . working for the city. Flores worked tor the U . S . . .The Hispanic Women ' s Council in Los Angeles honors the f1rst male 1n 1ts 13-year historyDaniel Villanueva, general manager and president of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles-with its Special Recognition Award ... Paul Gonzales, 1984 Olympic gold medalist from Los Angeles and North American Boxing Federation flyweight champion, wins his fourth professional fight in as many starts with a unanimous 1 0 round decision over Javier Barajas in Bakersfield, Calif . ... Vol. 4 No. 17 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY RE . . Steady Latino Vote Gains Shown; Youth Lag Th e number of Hispanics registered to vote grew by 52% from 1972 to 1984, but younger Hispanics continued to t urn out poorly at the polls, according to a Census Bureau report released this month . During this period, Hispanic registered voters increased from 2 . 5 to 3.8 million. The inc reas e for blacks was 38% ; for whites, 15% . As of 1984, there were 12.2 million registered blacks and 1 02.2 million registered whites . The report revealed that Hispanics who Pioneer Journalist Dies Marina Mireles MacPherson, who blazed trails both for women and Hispanics as a newspaper correspondent, reporter and colum nist, died April 15 in San Diego following hospitalization for a bacterial infection. She was 59. At one point, Mireles MacPherson was the only U.S. journalist covering Fidel Castro's early revolutionary activities in the mountains of Cuba. She also reported qn U.S. Hispanic issues and general news for the Los Angeles Examiner and KMEX-TV there in the'50s and '60s. Born in Brawley, Calif., of Mexican parents, she was publisher of a classroom newspaper, Ellnformador, and co-owner of Fiesta Mexican Foods at the time of her death. Among , survivors are her husband, Vernon MacPherson, a former editor with the Los Angeles Mirror-News, and their adopted son, Luis Manuel, 4 . actually cast votes grew at a slower clip than those who registered-47% . In 1972 (the first year such data were collected on Hispanics) 2 . 1 million Latinos voted; this increased by 1 million for the November 1984 election . Black voters inc re a s ed 46% . Wh i te voters, like white regis trants • . were up 1 5% . The report found that only 32.6% of votingELIGIBLE. VOTERS-1984 Total Hispanic 6,444,000 Black 17 ,80 8,000 White 141,826,000 Registered 58 . 9% 68. 6 % 72.0% Voted 48.0% '57. 8% !63. 6% Source : "Voti ng and R egistration in the Election of November. " U.S Census Bureau . -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart age Hispanics voted in the elections of 1984 27 points lower than the 60% national rate. Bob Brischetto, research director of the South west Voter Registration and Education Project, said that about one-third of all Latinos included by the Census Bureau are non-citizens and that their figures unfairly deflate actual Hispanic electoral participation . SVREP, the Midwest Voter Registration and Education Project and the National Puerto Rican/Hispanic Voter Participation Project registered 605,000 additional Latinos in 20 states for the 1984 election. Brischetto and Juan Andrade, executive director of MVREP , agreed that one of the pos it ive findings of the report was that Hispanic voter registration was progressing faster than that of blacks or whites. Another positive development, added Brischetto, was that the voting rate for Latinos65 years and older had gone from 39% in 1972 to 59% in 1984. The negative : Hispanic voter participation among those aged 18-24 continued to lag . Citing an "increasing disaffection and alien ation among all youth," Brischetto offered a figure different from that of the census. Sulr t racting non-citizens, he found a voting rate of 31% for Hispanics in that age group. The report showed a 22% rate. From 1972 to 1984, 118-\to 24-year-old His panics grew 54% , compared with 29% for blacks and 9% for whites. Also, Hispanics have the lowest median age at 25. SVREP does not plan a special voter education campaign 'targeting Hispanic youth. Said Brischetto : "Our strategy is really to approach the family ... We found work In the high schools not to be productive." SVREPs focus is on local and state r aces rather than national. MVREP initiated the Midwest Hispanic Youth Leadership Conference last fall to get more Hispanic youth involved in the political process. Through a network of approximately 100 youth organizations across the Midwest, the conference will sponsor voter education ac tivities to teach the basics of the political process, said Andrade . The census report-showed that 43% of all . continued on page 2 HISPANIC VOTING AND REGISTRATION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGION Eligible Voters-November 1984 New Middle E North W North South W South Mountain Pacific England (1) Atlantic (2) Central (3) Central (4) Atlantic (5) Central (6) (7) (B) TOTAL 99,000 1,198,000 385,000 109,000 444,000 1,653,000 762,000 1,766,000 Registered 49. 5% 59.0% 66. 0% 58.7% 64.6% 59. 3% 57.7% 56.6% Voted 40.4% 49. 8% 56. 6 % 45.9% 57.2% 43. 0% 47. 8% 47. 6% Regions : (1) Connecti cut, Maine, Massachusetts , New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont ; (2) New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania ; (3) Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin ; (4) Kansas, I owa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota ; (5) Delaw are, District ot C o lumbia, Florida, Georgia, .Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia; (6) Texas, Arkansas, louisiana and Oklahoma; (7) New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho , Montana, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming; (8) California , Alaska , J awaii , Oregon a nd Washington . Note: he East South Central regi on , which consists ot Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi an d Tennesse e , was excluded because of the unavailability/ of percentages. Source : " Voting and Regi s tration in the Election of November of 1984," U . S Census Bureau . -Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua nor a Latino. But News' business writer Maggie Rivas, who contributed two articles to the series, is as Latina as they come. GIVE ME YOUR RICH : M i ami always gets the dubious credit for provid i ng mansion-sized refuges for Latin American millionaires on the lam . HENRY NIPS CLINT: In you ' re asked, HenryCisneroswon 72. 9 % of the vote when elected to a third term as San Antonio mayo r last April. Clint Eastwood received only 72. 2 % this month in his victorious Carmel mayoral campaign. (Cisneros sent Eastwood a telegram anyway, welcoming h i m to" the good, bad and ugly world of local government. " ) Now, notes Valdemar de Murguia, a University of California researcher , Mexico ' s super rich are fleeing their homelands economic t urmoil to San Diego' s swank neighbor, La Jolla. Mexicans are buying 25-30% of the homes ther e now, he says , observing that its Mex i c an population has doubled from 1 , 211 to 2 ,200 in the last five years . WHO'LL FOLLOW GAVIN? Me x ico's press e x pressed its expected ela tion at U . S . Ambassador John Gavin ' s announcement that he was packing his tux and "returning to the private sector. " THE ALCALDE IS TOILET WATER: With Vice President George Bush as speaker at the April19 Texas Sesquicentennial banquet in Houston, guests were offered the option of being recognized as conquistadores ($2 ,500 per table of 1 0), virreys ($2 , 000) , empresario s ($1 ,500) or-at $50 a headplain old alcaldes. El Universal labelled him arrogant, meddlesome, and ghastlyto quot e a few ad jecti ves i n its Page 1 political assessment commenting o n "one of the best news stories that Mexicans have received ... " The financial daily El Financiero inquired following the former actor's annou need departure: "Now who will follow: Woody Allen or J e rry Lewis?" And back in San Antonio, there' s a thrilling new toilet water on the perfume counters called "Henry C." ANSWERS TO WHO'S NEWS: Last week we challenged your memories on such Page 1 Hispanic newsmakers of the '80s as Roberto Goizueta and Rosie Ruiz. Here are the match -ups: 1k, 2-e , 3-m, 4-o, 5i, 6-n, 7-f, 8-h, 9-1, 1 0-b, 11-a, 12j , 13g , 14c , 15d . Since every good contest has a tie-breaker, those who scored 100% can tackle this one: What Hispanic will Ronald Reagan name to his Cabinet before the ne x t election? GEORGE'S LAST NAME: George Rodrigue, who won the Pulitzer for na t ional reporting April 17 with Craig Flournoy for their lengthy Dallas Morning News series on subsidized housing, is neither a typo Latino Voters Increase con ti nued f rom page 1 1 8 to 24year old Hispanics who were enrolled in college voted, while only 18% of those not enrolled did. Excluding non-citizens, 63% of Latino college enrollees voted; the figure for those not enrolled in college jumped nine points to 27% . Other findings on eligible Hispanic voters in 1984: e Sixty-two percent of Lat i nos who owned homes voted in 1984, compared with 41% of those who rented their homes. e Si x ty-nine percent of those with college degrees voted, 49% of high school graduates turned out and 39% with eight years or less of schooling cast ballots. e Employed Hispanics outvoted unem ployed Hispanics 51% to 33% . e Eighty-one percent-1 .67 millionof the 2 .05 million Latinas who were regis tered went to the polls; 82% 1.43 millionof the 1 . 7 4 million registe red Latinos cast their ballots. Deportations Stopped The district director of the Immigration and Natural i zation Service in Florida announced April16 that he would not send Nicaraguans back to that country for fear that they would be persecuted by the Sandinista government Perry Rivkind is the only one of 33 district directors to adopt such a policy, something that a spokesman for the INS in Washington, D.C., said is within his authority. He has stop ped the deportation of eight Nicaraguans from Florida this month . Rep . Peter Rodino Jr. (D-N . J . ) , chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said he was . concerned with INS ' s handling of asylum claims, calling them inconsistent " without pro viding identical treatment to Salvadorans and Haitians. " The House Judiciary Committee will soon consider a bill sent to it by the Subcommittee on Immigration , Refugees and International Law April 16 that would temporarily bar the Attorney General from deporting Salvadorans who entered the United States Nov . 7 , 1985. -Kay Barbaro Republicans Launch Drive Project Adelante, a pilot effort to target Hispanic voters nationwide, was announced April23 at a Washington , D . C., news conference by Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahrenkoph Jr. Project activities will include establishment of a network of Hispanic spokespersons for the party across the country and advertisements in Hispanic publications. Some ads tied in with the Mexican Cinco de Mayo holiday have already been placed . The project will test a variety of ways to reach Hispanic voters, Fahrenkoph said . " In states such as California, Texas, Florida and Colorado, where we have crucial Senate races, the GOP's ability to reach Hispanics could very well mean the difference between victory and defeat. " Guiding the project will be Republican National Hispanic Assembly Chairman Fernando de Baca, with staff support from the Republican Nati onal Committee. An initial commitment of nearly $300,000 has been made , de Baca said , with emphasis on Southwest voters. (For a copy of the 98 -page report titled " Voting and Registration in the Election of November of 1984," send $ 5 to the U . S . i Government Printing Office , Washington , D .C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. Spe c ify Series P-20 , No. 405.) PRESIDENTIAL VOTING 1972PERSONS 18 -Felix Pere z Two Vie for Space Trip Puerto Rican Geraldo Rivera , now a free lance broadcast journalist, and Maximo Gomez, health/science editor for Philadelphia station KYWTV who is of Cuban descent, have been selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration among 1 00 candidates for NASA' s journalist-in-space project. Screening to select a single journalist begins this week at Chapel Hill, N . C . The field wi l l.be trimmed to 40 by mid-May, with five finalists to be rev iewed by a 15-member national panel at a date not yet determined. 2 1972 1976 1980 1984 HISPANIC Total* 1 ,338,000 1 ,559,000 2 ,047,000 2 ,064,000 Voted 414,000 340,000 326,000 452,000 Percent* 30. 9 % 21. 8% 15.9% 21. 9 % BLACK Total 2,994 ,000 3 ,323,000 3 ,559,000 3 ,875,000 Voted 1,040 ,000 926,000 1 , 071 ,000 1 ,572,000 Percent 34. 7 % 27. 9 % 30. 1% 40. 6 % WHITE Total 21,339,000 23, 1 1 ,000 23,976,000 23,227,000 Voted 11,074,000 10,344,000 10,027,000 9,667,000 Percent 51. 9% 44.7 % 41.8% 41. 6 % • The t o tal s a n d p e r ce nt ages i n clude n o ncitizens. Sourc e : "Voting and R egistra t io n i n th e Ele ction o f Nol' emb e r 1 9 84," U.S Ce n s u s Bureau. Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS F.ollowing is a list of newsletters published by Hispanic media associations across the country. The editor of each one has agreed to send a free sample copy of his or her publication to any Hispanic Link Weekly Report reader who requests it and includes a stamped, self-addressed envelope . NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS: The monthly, four-page "NAHJ Membership Newsletter' ' is available through a $35 annual membership. NAHJ , National Press Build i ng, Suite 634, Washington, D . C . 20045 (202) 783-6228. CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION (Los Angeles) : The monthly, eight-to-ten page " CCNMA Newsletter," which includes timely listings from its JoBank, is available through a $10 annual subscription . Suzanne Manriquez, executive director , California Chicano News Media Association , USC School of Journalism, Los Angeles , Calif . 90089-1695 (213) 7 43-7158. CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION (San Diego): The monthly, four-page "CCNMA San Diego Newsletter" is available through a $25 annual subscription. Paul Espinosa, KPB& TV, San o"iego State University, San Diego , Calif. 92182 (619) 265-6415. HISPANIC NEWS MEDIA ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON, D.C.: The quarterly, six-page " Hispanic Media Notes" is available through a $15 annual subscription. Subscribers also receive notices on all HNMA meetings and other functions. David Saah, editor, Hispanic Media Notes, 1420 N St. NW , #1001, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737. HISPANIC ACADEMY OF MEDIA ARTS AND SCIENCES: The monthly, four-page "HAMAS Newsletter'' is available through a $15 annual subscription. HAM AS Newsletter, 5451 Laurel Canyon Blvd . , Suite 100, N. Hollywood, Calif. 91607-2188 (818) 509-1066. ASSOCIATION OF LATIN AMERICANS IN COMMUNICATIONS: The monthly , six-page " Association of Latin Americans in Communications " is available through a $12 annual subscription. ALAC , P.O . Bbx 785, Natick, Mass. 01760 (617) 653-8089. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals . Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports ma i led Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch . CORONADO FOURCOUNTY BROADCASTING, INC. HISPANI COWN ED media company in Cali fornia seeks individuals for radio sales , on-ai r (Spanish language news) and manage ment. Contact: Rosario Leal (714) 981. REPORTERS /COPY EDITORS Detroit Fr ee Press Mi c higan. seeks reporters. copy editors. Openings exist i n features a nd business departments. Send a resume , cove r letter and clips to: Charles Fancher. Assistan t Editor . Detro it Free Press . 321 W . L a fayett . Detroit. Mi c h . 48231 or call (313 ) 222400. The following two positions are with LaGu a rdia Community College. Cooperative Education Coordinator DUTIES: Internship development teaching a co-op preparatory course. field visits and evaluation of co-op interns in data processing area Travel in Long Island . Westchester and New Jersey may be required. Candidate should be c apabl e of guiding students through the combined career, academic and personal l earning which occurs through work Candidate will also work on divisional and college projects and committees. REQUIREMENTS : B.A. re quired; M.A. and prior e x perience in job place ment , cooperative education or personnel highl y desirable. SALARY : Substitute lecturer le vel; upper twenties; commensurate with qualifications. Job Placement Counselor DUTIES : Job development and job placement for both graduates a nd students needing . . employment Als o career c ounseling , assisting students in resum e preparation and the initi ation of career related workshops. Positi on is hou sed in the Placement Office and th e successful candidate wi ll work w ith all s tudent s of the college . REQUIREMENTS : BA requ i red ; prior experience in job placement or personnel highly d esi rable. SAL ARY : Substitute lecturer level : upper twenties; commensurate with qualifi cations. LaGuard ia Community College/ CUNY. 3 1 10 Thomson Ave., Long I s land City . N . Y . 11101. EOE /AA Employer. MINNESOTA HISPANIC WOMEN'S Development Corporation seeks E X ECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Must have strong m a nagement. business and program background . Bilingua V bicultural preferred . Salary negotiable . Dead line : May 15. Phone (612) 641. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse lfor Hispanics i n the media. For information .call Magdalena Beltran (213) 7437158. ACCOUNTANTS/AUDITORS Opportunities nationally for enti)VIevel positions (GS 5 with potential toGS I 2) in the federal gover!1" ment. forms may be obtained from an ,PPM job center near you. PRoFESSIONAL SERVIC"ES . GRAPHICS : El Barrio Graphics, Washington , D . C . . provides: e Design • Illustration e Typesetting • Layout e Silkscreen and e Stats. El Barrio Graphic s . 3045 15th St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483. Calendar Following is a list of events planned by non Hispanic media organizations. Exact dates for some have not yet been set. November 1986 to February 1987 aimed at college juniors and seniors seeking entry-level jobs and internships. The cities will be Akron , Ohio ; Ann Arbor, Mich.; Baltimore ; Birmingham , Ala.; Boston; Charlotte, N . C.; Denver; El Paso, Texas ; Jackson, Miss.; Kansas City, Mo. ; Louisville, Ky.; Milwaukee; Sacramento ; San Antonio; San Diego ; and St Petersburg, Fla . Media Report: Changes continued from page 4 to send copy compatible with the computer systems of subscribing newspapers. Don Teschner, staff coordinator for ANPA's Wire Services Committee, strongly disagreed. "That's a cop-out," he said, explaining that currently AP, United Press International and other carriers have the technical capability to transmit the signs and determine which papers are able to receive them. He said that there is agreement among news agencies, newspapers and manufacturers of newspaper equipment that this will be "a good thing to do. " But, he added , the news agencies " choose not to do it." NATIVE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION Scottsdale, Ariz. June 5 7 The association will have its 2nd annual media convention discussing facets of the newspaper business such as advertising, balanced reporting and management techniques. Margaret Clark-Price (602) 947-1603 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK JOURNALISTS Dallas August 13-17 NABJ will conduct its 11th annual journalism confer ence consisting of workshops and a job fair . AI Fitzpatrick (305) 376-3934 NATIONAL BLACK MEDIA COALITION Wash ington, D.C. Oct. 22-25 This group will have its 13th annual convention with workshops on issues concerning blacks and the media. The coalition will also stage a fund-raiser. Carmen Marshall (202) 387-8155 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEWSPAPER EDITORS ASNE w i ll have a series of job fairs in 16 cities from Hispanic Link Weekly Report Lee Stinnet (303) 620-6087 NEWSDAY JOB FAIR L o ng I sland, N.Y. Jan. 25. 26. 1987 Newsday will sponsor its4 th annual job conference to match students and recent graduates with positions on newspapers. Reginald Tuggle (516) 454-2183 HOWARD UNIVERSITY MEDIA CONFERENCE . Washington, D . C . February 1987 The School of Communications and the Continuing Education and Community Service Program will hold their 16th annual conference covering issues in the m,edia pertinent to minorities along with a job fair . Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636-7491 ASIAN AMERICAN JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION Los Angeles Spring 1987 The association will conduct its first job development convention examining issues affecting all journalists and a job fair for students, graduates and working journalists. Karen Seriguchi (213) 389-8383 In Teschner's opinion, the agencies will have to start transmitting diacriticals as the demand for this service grows. He added, "Right now, it is limited, but I see it increasing;"' partly because of new capabilities in newspaper phototyping equipmeni.r Among major publications in areas with large Hispanic populations that do not use diacriticals are The Los Angeles San Francisco Chronicle, Chicago Tnbune, San Antonio's Express-News and Laredo Morning Times. -Dora Delgado 3

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Arts & Entertainment Arts holds its sixth annual fund-raiser, Ole Caribe , May 2 in Long Beach, Calif. Using a Caribbean theme, the dinner-dance will be held in the Grand Salon aboard the permanently docked Queen Mary luxury liner, celebrity chairman of the event this year is Cesar Romero. AN Bl RTH DAY SALUTE TO THE Mexican as El de Ia begins a week full of arts and entertainment act1v1t1es by Hispanics around the globe. Another West Coast theater organization, the Costa Mesa, Calif. based South Coast Repertory, reports that more than 80 new plays py Hispanic writers were received for its first Hispanic Playwrights Project. Three works will be selected for a week of workshops and . public readings in the summer. Dozens of artists from the United States and the Spanish-speaking world are expected to gather in Mexico City April 29 to honor singer Pedroyargas,_ who turns 80 this year. The event is being organized by Julio lgles1as, who last year recorded the duet Felicidades with Vargas. Out on the-opposite coast, Argentine writer Ricardo Talesnik has concluded the preparatory phase for his next project-a play about Hispanics in the United States. Born !n Allende, Guanajuato, April 29, 1906, Vargas h1s f1rst recordmg for RCA in New York in 1928. The song, Mi prtmer amot; released in a 78 rpm disc. The latest album by on RCA, t1tled Grande , grande, grande, is available on compact diSC. Invited by New York's Spanish Theater Repertory company, Talesnik spent three months in this country doing research for the play (in Spanish) to be staged next year. Known as the author of La Fiaca, Talesnik performed a one-man show in New York, Kansas, California, Arizona, Florida and Washington , D . C., during his stay in the country. Upon leaving for Argentina earlier this month, Talesnik told United Press International that his new play is about a "foreign writer who is invited to write a play about Hispanics in New York and their experiences." Other music events this week include the 16th Inter-American Music Festival that takes off in the nation's capital May 2 (through the 17th) and _the Eurovision music festival in Oslo. The Spanish rock group Cadillac, wh1ch recently toured this country with Camilo Sesto is an official entry. ' Meanwhile, the Los Angeles-based Bilingual Foundation of the -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report The Spanish-language acento and letter fl . are earning popularity among U.S. English language publications in recent years, based on responses from major print media canvassed by Hispanic Link Weekly Report. The survey was partly prompted by the actions of The Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News, which added fr fonts to their computer systems following the election of Denver Mayor Federico Peiia in June 1983. Post Assistant Editor Bill Price informed HLWR that they use accents only " if they would clear some confusion. " Four other surveyed publications use all the Spanish-language diacritical marks. Five others are actively considering doing so . Two others-The Miami Herald and Associated Press-said they do not use the marks in their English. copy. Herald Associate Managing 4 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or 234-o737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting : Dora Delgado . Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No polfion of Hispanic Unk Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual aubacrlptlon (52 Issues) $96. Trial subac:rlptlon (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : In c lude the latest edition of Hispanic Link Wee kly Report in participants' packets at your next conference . or convention . For details, contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. Editor Bob Gilbert qualified later that his residents. "Many have chosen to anglicize newspaper does use them when requested. their names and we have no efficient way of Newspapers reporting that they use accents finding out individual preference," Siegal said. and ii's were The New York Times ("have 1 Bob Hucker, San Jose Mercury News always done so," responded News Editor computer specialist, explained that a problem Allan Siegal); The San Jose Mercury News is posed when dealing with wire service stories, (since November 1985); The Laredo News which do not carry Spanish diacriticals. The (August 1982); Thfl San Diego Union(January newspaper's policy is to request from its 1982). Presently, the Union uses some Spanish reporters the correct Spanish spelling of names. in its Sunday opinion section. For non-local stories, Hucker said the paper San Antonio Light Deputy Managing Editor keeps a computerized list of newsmakers Jeff Cohen said his paper is adjusting its whose names include diacriticals. computer system and plans to start using "Take a person like (Fernando) Vasquez diacriticals "anytime now." The washington Raiia, the o::vner of UPI," he said. "We know Post, reviewing its stylebook this year, is still he ann and an accent. But what do you debating whether to use them, said Deputy do w1th a guy who shows up in the news one Managing Editor Richard Harwood. The Post day and the wire service doesn' t provide" the currently uses diacriticals only in its Style Spanish spelling? section because of preferences by that section's Tom Jory, an editor with Associated Press, editor, Harwood said . contended that his agency cannot use foreignAlthough most of the papers that use Spanish language diacriticals because, according to punctuation do so in all instances, The New regulations by the American Newspaper York Times does not do it with names of u.s. Publishers Association, wire services have co ntinued on p a ge 3 . --. I NOW \.-./ILL you STOP /Ncr JVANITOS 11-J YOUR AtJ CE5rOR51 TAU