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Hispanic link weekly report, May 12, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 12, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News This Week
Dal las Mayor Starke Taylor appoints business consultant Samuel Moreno as assistant city manager- the first of Latino descent to hold that post. Nineteen state and local Hispanic organizations join in Dallas to stage a May 7 welcome for him... The Colorado Chapter of The American Jewish Committee names Richard Castro, executive director of the Denver Agency for Human Rights and Community Relations, as recipient of its 1986 Human Relations Award.. .Common Cause in Washington, D.C., chooses Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, as one of seven recipients of its 1986 Public Service Achievement Awards for his “life-long crusade on behalf of Hispanic Americans.., Stephen Herrera, a Santa Fe, N.M.,
lawyer in private practice, is elected president of the New Mexico Hispanic Bar Association.. .At its annual meeting in San Antonio, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s board of directors elects Eric Serna, chairman of the N.M. State Corporation Commission, as chairman of the board. He succeeds Fernando de Necochea, assistant provost at Stanford University in California .. Former police undercover agent Alejandro Gonzdlez Maiave acquitted in February by a federal grand jury in Puerto Rico of a kidnaping charge related to the 1978 Cerro Maravilla case, is killed instantly by three shotgun blasts as he enters his home in Bayamon, P.R A terrorist organization, Volunteer Organization for the Revolution, claims responsibility for the slaying and vows to kill all policemen involved in the deaths of two young men killed on the mountaintop...

Immigration Bill Still Breathing
Latinos Advance in Texas Primary
Seeking to become the first Hispanic ever elected to Texas statewide office, San Antonio District Judge Roy Barrera Jr., 33, won 46% (210,099) of the vote in the three-man Republican primary for state attorney general May 3.
Barrera will oppose Williamson County District Attorney Ed Walsh in a June 7 runoff. Walsh picked up36% (158,626 votes).
WINNER FACES MATTOX The winner will face incumbent Jim Mattox, who ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, in Texas’ Nov. 4 general election.
A total of 1.5 million persons cast votes in the primary, two-thirds of them Democrats Barrera’s father had served as appointed secretary of state from 1968-69 under Democratic Gov, John Connally.
CONGRESSMEN UNOPPOSED In contests for U.S Congress seats, three of four Hispanic Democrat incumbents ran unopposed. Only Solomdn Ortiz faced competition. He beat Ken Rich, 87%-13%. Incumbents E “Kika” de la Garza, District 15; Henry B. Gonzalez, District 20; Albert Bustamante, District 23, and Ortiz are assured their seats as no Republicans ran in the primary.
41% FOR GONZALEZ Raul Gonz&lez, appointed by Gov. Mark White as the first Hispanic to sit on the state’s Supreme Court, won 41 % (390,544) to former state Rep. Jay Gibson’s 29% (271,797) in a three-way Democratic primary race. The winner of that runoff will face Republican Waco attorney John Bates, who won 53% of the votes to Bill Stephens’ 47% for the Place 4 seat In the race for a Place 1 seat on the state’s Court of Criminal Appeals, George “Jorge” Martinez, 41, a Dallas attorney, gained 14,000 more votes than his closest Democratic rival, Rusty Duncan - 259,671 -245,270- in a four-way race. The winner of that runoff is assured the seat as Republicans did not field a candidate.
The House Judiciary Committee decision to postpone until June any action on the Simpson-Rodino immigration bill does not necessarily mean that the measure won’t be voted on during this congressional year, representatives of two Hispanic organizations in Washington, D.C., told Hispanic Link Weekly Report.
The delay “does not mean that the immigration bill is dead,” said John Moss, legislative aide of Rep. Matthew Martinez, chairman of the Hispanic Congressional Caucus. There is “a tremendous amount of pressure” by the Reagan administration to pass the bill, Moss said, and that could happen even with the end of the congressional session (Oct. 3) close. “The feeling here (in Congress) is that it is now or never,” Moss said.
On May 2, Rep. Daniel Lungren (R-Calif.) and other backers of the bill charged that the recent decision to deiiy by the 35-member committee was £ tactic to avoid a vote on the oill this year. The bill was scheduled to be marked up last week, but Chairman Peter Rodino(D-N.J.) decided to extend the deadline until the second week of June in response to a request from 16 of 20 committee Democrats.
Coalition in LA Remap
Latino, black and Asian groups in Los Angeles joined forces May 1 to draw new district boundaries that would increase minority representation on the City Council.
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Southern California Chinese Lawyers Association agreed to devise a plan that would protect the interests of each group.
The U.S. Justice Department, on behalf of Latinos, charged in a lawsuit filed last November that the city deliberately drafted a remapping plan in 1982 that would minimize the voting strength of Latinos.
A plan endorsed by the three groups, though not assured, would parlay into added leverage with the City Council committee overseeing the remap, said an aide to City Councilman Richard Alatorre. \ The councilman heads that committee.
The Democrats- no Hispanics among them-wanted additional time to work out a compromise on the bill’s controversial guest-worker provision, they said.
Opposed by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the League of United Latin American Citizens and other Hispanic organizations, the provision would allow growers to employ additional thousands of foreign workers.
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, with 11 voting members in the House, still has not formulated a position on the issue Lisa Navarrete, the Caucus’ legislative specialist said they are waiting for the bill to come out of committee.
Joseph Trevifto, LULAC executive director in Washington, D.C., said the delay is a sign that the committee recognizes that a compromise on the guest-worker plan “is necessary if we are to achieve immigration reform in this congressional year.
“No one in Congress, and that includes Rodino, wants to go home for an election campaign in which immigration might become an issue,” Trevifto said. He added, however, that if leaders of the committee want the bill, they could still pass* it before the congressional deadline.
In their letter requesting postponement, the committee Democrats promised no further delays will be requested, adding they expect to reach a consensus by June. A companion Senate bill, sponsored by Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), was passed Sept. 19.
MALDEF Associate Counsel Mario Moreno said, however, that even if the bill were passed by the House, there is still a chance for it to be killed in the House-Senate conference committee. Immigration reform legislation was stopped at that stage in 1984.
In spite of more members’ willingness to compromise on most of the bill’s provisions, the legislation is probably “on its death bed,” commented Arnoldo Torres, former LULAC executive director and key lobbyist against the bill in past sessions.
“The growers^ greed will kill it. With the solid support it’s getting from the administration, they are pushing a massive temporary worker program” which will be the cause of its ultimate demise, he predicted. -Dora Delgado


S/n pe/os en la lengua
IN THE IN-BASKET: Los Angeles County-based U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal and Matthew (Marty) Martinez are opposed in their congressional re-election bids this year by backers of Lyndon LaRouche. So is California Assembly incumbent Gloria Molina.
None are losing sleep over the competition, but Martinez must be confused by the recent news release from the U.S H ispanic Chamber of Commerce which refers to him as “Senator Matthew Martinez (D-N.Y.).”
IN THE NEWSPAPER RACKS: In a lengthy feature on sainthood candidate Father Junipero Serra, The Los Angeles Times suggests that the Catholic Church has put the California mission founder on a fast track to canonization as a public relations effort to appeal to Latino immigrants in the Southwest. It quotes one anonymous cleric that Serra could become an “affirmative action saint.”
In a two-part report on “Ethics in Washington,” The Washington Post- taking a cue from Doonesbury- lists Michael C6rdenas(Small Business Administration), John Hernandez (Environmental Protection Agency), Henry Chavira(Legal Services Corp. nominee) and Isidoro
I Rodriguez (Agriculture) among“110 senior (Reagan) administration officials (who) have been accused of unethical or illegal conduct..”
ON THE BORDER: San Diego Municipal Judge Victor Ramirez wants to move that city’s prison inmates who are undocumented to Mexico, where it costs 90 cents a day to house them vs. $39 a day in San Diego jails... Another Californian, U.S. Senate candidate Mike Antonovich, is campaigning to deploy U.S. troops along the Mexican border to help beef up the Border Patrol.
ON THE MENU: To pass the time while skiing in Vail, Colo., three young Texans constructed the world’s largest enchilada in recognition of the Lone Star state’s sesquicentennial. They used a 150iyard long corn tortilla, one yard for each year of Texas’ independence.
A Fontana, Calif., youth group made its bid for Guinness Book of World Records by putting 33 picnic tables end-to-end in a local park to prepare a 312-foot burrito.
And remember New York Times executive William Stockton, who set a record for putting his foot in his mouth at the'85 Hispanic media conference in Tucson? He missed Miami this year because the Times transferred him to Mexico, where he recently completed a feature on “the king of sauces in Mexican cooking,” mole. At last he has something tasty to chew on. -Kay Barbaro
Anselmo Out, Nicolas in
Emilio Nicolds Jr., general manager of San Antonio’s KWEX-TV, was named president of its parent Spanish International Communications Corporation May 5, following the resignation of Ren6 Anselmo as SICC’s head.
] Anselmo is a founder ’ and current president of (the SIN Television Network. He had served as SICC’s president for 14 years.
-W A SICC owns and operates -5^1,(â– â–  Spanish-language tele-vteion stations in Los â–  Angeles, Miami, New
York and Fresno, as ANSELMO well as San Antonio. A
statement released by Anselmo's office said that he was resigning as SICC chief “involuntarily” in the hope that his resignation would lead to a successful resolution of a 10-year-old shareholders derivative lawsuit pending in California.
The suit charged that Anselmo, who owns 24% of the five SICC stations, and other SICC officials engaged in transactions between SICC and SIN which were detrimental to the former.
Anselmo told Los Angeles reporters that he was urged to quit his SICC post by Los Angeles U.S. District Judge Mariana Pfaelzer, who is presiding over the case.
LA. Disc Jockey Slain
Rodolfo Garcia Cortez, 43, popular KWKW radio disc jockey in Los Angeles, was stabbed to death and robbed April 28. His body was found in a downtown trash container. His wallet jewelry and 1979 Porsche were missing.
Garcia Cortez, noted for his skill at imitating Latino regional dialects, came to the United States from Guadalajara, Mexico, six years ago. His wife, Bertha, and three children, Bertha, 22, Claudia, 18, and Rodolfo Jr., 14, were expected to join him in California on completing their education.
As yet, police have no suspects.
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Hispanic Class Suit OK
All U.S. Hispanics residing in the central judicial district of California can be represented as a class in a lawsuit against the Immigration and Naturalization Service, ruled a Los Angeles federal court judge April 23.
The ruling was a result of a suit filed in 1979 by seven Orange County, Calif., Hispanic residents. It charged that INS illegally entered their homes or places of business without a search warrant or owner’s consent.
In response, U.S. District Court Judge David Williams issued an injunction in 1980 forbidding INS from entering homes or businesses illegally. But a U.S Circuit Court of Appeals judge later ruled that the injunction could apply only to the plaintiffs unless the lower court ruled the case to be a class action. The trial is scheduled for next month.
Counties included in the judicial district are Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Riverside, Orange and San Luis Obispo.
Natl. Guard Use Protested
Leaders and representatives of four Hispanic organizations protested outside the California capitol in Sacramento April 30 against the use of Hispanic U.S. National Guardsmen in Honduras.
The protesters, including dancers in Aztec dress, were members of the League of United Latin American Citizens, American G.I. Forum, Mexican-American Political Association and San Francisco-based Chicano Moratorium.
Thirty California Guardsmen - mostly Hispanics- were sent to Honduras last month to serve as interpreters and guards for a Missouri National Guard engineering unit which is building a road near the Nicaraguan border.
California Gov. George Deukmejian said the troops volunteered for the assignment, would not be there for long and were not in a “combat zone.”
The protesters said the governor could have refused to let the troops go, as he did last year.
Jury Ruling Aids Latinos
The U.S. Supreme Court decision on April 30 restricting prosecutors from excluding prospective black jurors in cases where the defendant is black will also aid Hispanic defendants, said an attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
Mario Moreno, an associate counsel at MALDEFs Washington D.C, office, said the ruling will help Hispanics and other minorities avoid inappropriately “lily-white” juries and truly be judged by a jury of their peers.
“Before, we(Hispanics) could not even get our foot in the dooi" to determine jury makeup^ Moreno said.
The 7-2 decision places a heavy burden of proof on prosecutors to show that their reason for excluding a juror is not racially motivated. The ruling rejected a 21-year-old precedent that held the defendant had to prove there was a pattern of discrimination that extended beyond the case.
The case, Batson vs. Kentucky, stems from a burglary conviction in 1981 by an all-white jury. The prosecution removed all four black prospective jurors through peremptory challenge - a tool to remove jury candidates whom a trial lawyer feels would not be impartial. No reason had to be given. The number of challenges differs according to jurisdiction.
Steering away from whether the decision applies retroactively, Associate Justice Byron White wrote in a separate concurring opinion that there will have to be“much litigation” to shape the scope of the decision. The Batson case was remanded to the lower court to determine whether jury selection was racially motivated.
Peabody to SIN Station
The SIN Television Networks San Francisco affiliate station, KDTV, won the 1985 George F. Peabody award May 7 in the news and community service category.
The award was given for its extensive, fast coverage of the 1985 Mexico City earthquake and KDTVs follow-up relief efforts.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
HISPANIC FEDERAL CONTRACT PROCUREMENT: For a free copy of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ audit of the minority set-aside program, write to NALEO, 420 S. Capitol St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
OPPORTUNITY FOR ORGANIZATIONS: Key members of Hispanic organizations may be able to receive Hispanic Link Weekly Report regularly through a “networking agreement developed by the organization, Hispanic Link and a sponsoring corporation. For information on developing such agreements, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
BASEBALL (ANNOUNCER) SCOUTS: How well do Major League baseball announcers pronounce the names of Spanish-surnamed ballplayers? Hispanic Link is looking for “scouts” in each Major League city to assess who’s the best and the worst. If you would like to participate in the survey, please contact Felix Perez, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 237-0737
ALL YOU WANTTO KNOW: “’86 Facts About Newspapers,” a/25-page brochure with easy-to-read charts and graphs, covers all aspects of the newspaper business. For a free copy, contact Public Affairs Dept., American Newspaper Publishers Assn., Box 17407 Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041. Phone (703) 648-1000.
RIGHTS OF AIDS VICTIMS: The American Civil Liberties Union has published a four-page policy guide listing areas such as mandatory testing, education, health care and employment in which people with AIDS are discriminated against. Copies of “AIDS and Civil Liberties” are available free from: ACLU-NC AIDS Policy, 1663 Mission St., # 460, San Francisco, Calif. 94103 (415)621-2493.
LATIN AMERICAN SPECIALISTS: The Library of Congress? Hispanic Division has published the 1,011 -page “National Directory of Latin Americanists,” which lists data on 4,915 experts. Price: $34. Request Stock No. 030-013-00009-3 from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per words. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST for a national association in downtown Washington, D.C. Skills: 1-2 yrs. secretarial experience, 50 wpm typing, computer experience desirable, fluency in Spanish/ English essential. Duties: handle phone calls, light typing and filing, photocopying, prepare mailings, maintain office supplies Salary range: $15,000-$17,000. Contact Frank Newton, Ph.D., National Association of Hispanic Journalists, (202) 783-6228.
CORONADO FOUR-COUNTY BROADCASTING, INC.
HISPANIC-OWNED media company in California seeks individuals for radio sales, on-air (Spanish-language news) and management Contact Rosario Leal(714) 981 -8893.
MINNESOTA HISPANIC WOMEN'S Development Corporation seeks EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Must have strong management, business and program background. Bilingual/ bicultural preferred. Salary negotiable. Deadline: May 15. Phone (612) 641-1619.
REPORTERS/COPY EDITORS
RECEPTIONIST, Washington, D.C. $ 11,000-SI 2,000. Resumes to: American Society for Public Administration, 1120 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THE CHICAGO REPORTER, an awardwinning, investigative monthly, has an opening for a reporter. Two years daily newspaper experience required. Bilingual preferred. Knowledge of Chicago area a plus. Send resume, clips ta Managing Editor, The Chicago Reporter, 18 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, lit 60603.
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
HISPANIC ENGINEER MAGAZINE seeks editorial assistant $16,000-$20,000. Send resume and salary history to: Career Communications Group, 1007 North Calvert St, Baltimore, Md. 21202.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltr&n (213) 743-7158.
Detroit Free Press Michigan, seeks reporters copy editors Openings exist in local, features and business departments. Send a resume, cover letter and clips to: Charles Fancher, Assistant Editor, Detroit Free Press, 321 W. Lafayett, Detroit Mich. 48231 or call (313) 222-6400.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
• GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics Washington, D.C., provides: Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats El Barrio Graphics 3045 15th St NW. Washington, D.C. 20010 (202)483-1140.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SUBSTANCE ABUSE Washington, D.C. May 13
Andromeda Hispano Mental Health Center will cosponsor its first Atlantic regional conference on substance abuse among Hispanics, including workshops on the educational, legal and medical aspects. Clotilde Benitez (202) 483-8548
COMMUNITY LEADER AWARDS Brooklyn, N.Y. May 14
The Cortimittee for Hispanic Children and Families will hold its spring gala to recognize leaders’ contributions to the Hispanic community and hold its annual fund-raiser.
; Helene Carr (718) 596-1800
CENTRAL AMERICAN POLICY Washington, D.C. May 15
Elliott Abrams, assistant secretary of state for Inter-American Affairs, will discuss U.S. policy in Central America at a luncheon sponsored by the Ibero American Chamber of Commerce.
Linda Rentz (202) 296-0335
TRANSPORTATION BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Los Angeles May 15,16
The Department of Transportation will sponsor this symposium to provide information and resources to Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Hispanic business owners looking to do business with this federal agency.
Clara Ruiz Engel (602) 268-5803
HISPANIC CIVIC LEADERSHIP
Las Vegas, Nev. May 15-18
U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Antonia
Hern&ndez, president and generalcounsel of Mexican
American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, will
be among the panelists at the National Association
of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials? 4th annual
conference.
Roger Rivera (202) 546-2536
WRITING FICTION
Washington, D.C. May 16,17
Hispanic novelist Rudolfo Anaya will give a reading
and conduct a fiction-writing workshop in this event
sponsored by the Washington School.
Ellen Nagle (202) 234-9382
HISPANAS UNIDAS San Antonio May 16-18
The conference “Hispanas Unidas II: Tejana Heroines of Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow” will examine health, education and economic issues and how they affect Hispanas and their families.
Choco Meza (512) 434-9056
COMING SOON
TRAINING CONFERENCE National Image Atlanta May 19-24 Franklyn Hernandez (404) 522-3055
CELEBRATION AND FUND-RAISER
Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund
New York May 20
Judy Ramos (212) 219-3368
PUERTO RICO’S ECONOMY
U.S. House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs
Washington, D.C. May 20 and 22
Gail Mukaihata (202) 225-9297
HISPANIC BUSINESS J.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Los Angeles May 23 Cindy Hall (816) 842-2228
4DELANTE MUJER HISPANA CONFERENCE El Paso Community College El Paso, Texas May 24 Lucy Calderon (915) 541-7650
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING SYMPOSIUM Association for Puerto Ricans in Science and Engineering.
Philadelphia May 28
Pablo Clemente-Colon (301) 763-8092
SPOTLIGHT
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF HISPANIC WOMEN: Sens. Nancy Kassebaum(R-Kan.) and John Warner (R-Va.) will address the 2nd annual conference conducted by NCHW June 2,3 in Washington, D.C. For more information on this event, which will cover business development, U.S. policy in Latin America and tax reform, contact Alba Moesser at (202) 639-8823.
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Arts & Entertainment
CUBAN PLAYWRIGHT STIRS CONTROVERSY: Objections to the political affiliation of a Cuban playwright has led to the elimination of her play from the first Hispanic Theater Festival that continues this week in Miami.
Coser y cantar, a play by New York resident Dolores Prida, was scheduled for performances May 9-11 at Miami’s Science Museum as part of the festival. The play, which was to have been staged along with two other works by exiled writers, was cancelled because of protests received by festival organizers. Protesters objected to Prida’s stand in favor of normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States.
At press time, Prida was scheduled to appear in Miami at one of the educational workshops being held as part of the festival. She was also expected to participate in readings from Coser y cantar at the May 8 workshop.
The Hispanic Theater Festival is being held May 2-25 by Acting Together Inc., a grouping of south Florida theater organizations.
HISPANICS RECEIVE TONY NOMINATION Latino^;$($pmpete in several major categories for TonyAwardsannounced Mayo forthe 1985-86 season.
Last year’s hit Tango Argentino was nominated for “best musical," a category for which no winner was announced in 1985. The show, currently on tour, also received nominations for“best choreography” for its Tango Argentino Dancers and “best direction of a musical” for Claudio Segovia and Hector Orezzoli.
Nominated as best “ director of a play” was Jose Quintero, for his revival of Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh.
Actress Chita Rivera, who starred in the recently cancelled Jerry's Girls, received a“best actress in a musical” nomination- a category in which she picked up a Tony in 1984 for The Rink
John Herrera picked up a “featured actor in a musical” nomination for his role in The Mystery of Edwin Drood The show led all musicals with 11 nominations.
The 40th annual awards will be televised live June 1 by CBS at 9 p.m. EDT from the Minskoff Theater in New York.
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
\ This week, “Media Report’ abridges a column from El Miami Herald written by its executive editor, Roberto Fabrickx)
I first saw Geraldo Rivera on television when I was in graduate school in New York City about 17 years ago. It was unusual to see a Hispanic reporter on a major-market news show. I liked his bouncy, flashy style, even after he was criticized for being more entertainer than newsmaa And later I thought he was one of the better reporters on ABC’s 20/20 news magazine.
I was disappointed when Rivera was fired by ABC. Network President Roone Arledge had killed a story dealing with President Kennedy’s personal life and possible links with Marilyn Monroe, and Rivera criticized Arledge in public.
But, then I heard Rivera speak about his ABC departure last month at a meeting of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists attended by 1,000 news people.
Rivera called for a boycott of television network and major-market stations that have no H ispanics as anchors. He specifically named Miami, Los Angeles and New York
“I can assure you that the executives of those networks and stations would tremble if they heard that a boycott was being organized,” he said.
But I wonder why Rivera wasn’t speaking about Hispanic issues all those years he was collecting superstar salaries at ABC.
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists was formed three years ago. Rivera never joined. There are Hispanic media groups on both the East and West coasts and Rivera belongs to none of them.
Rivera shed his Latino coat when he became a New York City reporter for WNBC in 1969.
He has never identified with minority issues His one claim to being sensitive to ethnic issues was that he represented the Young Lords, a militant Hispanic group, when he was a practicing lawyer in the Bronx.
Rivera’s argument for a boycott was flawed from the beginning. He claimed that his firing by ABC was a matter of “censorship,” not
discrimination.
The NAHJ has been working hard to build minority representation in the nation’s newsrooms by instituting scholarships seminars job fairs and placement computer banks
Manuel Galvdn, the new president of the NAHJ, is a reporter for The Chicago Tribune. He covers City Hall and represents what the up-and-coming minority journalist isall about - professional excellence and hard work
In his inaugural speech, Galv4n said, “The answer to our struggle for professional recognition has been working harderthan someone else to prove that we are just as good or better.. .and to any editor who would dare tell me'show me a good minority reporter and I’ll hire him,’ I say, just look around this room.”
It is a shame that a guy like Rivera has become, if somewhat belatedly, an ethnic advocate now that professionalism is fashionable. I suggest that in his job quest he call upon some of his old qualities- working hard and being good at what he does.
Or he could go back to representing the Young Lords.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link Haws Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, O.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, FAlix PArez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 Issues) S96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your next conference or convention Fordetaila contact HSctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
HENRY B.’s BIRTHDAY: Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas), along with wife Bertha, thank young mariachis from the San Antonio Independent School District for helping him celebrate his 70th birthday at a party attended by 2,000 on Capitol HilL
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week . . lawyer in private practice, is elected president of the New Mexico Hispanic Bar Association ... At its annual meeting in San Antonio, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund's board of directors elects Eric Serna, chairman of the N.M. State Corporation Commission, as chairman of the board. He succeeds Fernando de Necochea, assistant provost at Stanford University in California .. Former police undercover agent Alejandro Gonzalez Malave acquitted in February by a federal grand jury in Puerto Rico of a kidnaping charge related to the 1978 Cerro Maravilla case, is killed instantly by three shotgun blasts as he enters his home in Bayam6n, P . R A terrorist organization, Volunteer Organization for the Revolution, ::laims responsibility for the slaying and vows to kill all policemen involved in the deaths of two young men killed on the mountaintop ... Dallas Mayor Starke Taylor appoints business consultant Samuel Moreno as assistant city manager-the first of Latino descent to hold that post. Nineteen state and local Hispanic organizations join in Dallas to stage a May 7 welcome for him ... The Colorado Chapter of The American Jewish Committee names Richard Castro, executive director of the Denver Agency for Human Rights and Community Relations, as recipient of its 1986 Human Relations Award ... Common Cause in Washington, D.C., chooses Ra(ll Yzagutrre, president of the National Cou neil of La Raza, as one of seven recipients of its 1986 Public Service Achievement Awards for his "life-long crusade on behalf of Hispanic Americans ... Stephen Herrera, a Santa Fe, NJ\i1., Vol. 4 No. 19 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL May12, 1986 Latinos Advance in Texas Primary Immigration Bill Still Breathing Seeking to become the first Hispanic ever elected to Texas statewide office, San Antonio District Judge Roy Barrera Jr. , 33, won 46% (21 0,099) of the vote in the three man Republican primary for state attorney general May 3. Barrera will oppose Williamson County District Attorney Ed Walsh in a June 7 . runoff. Walsh picked up 35% (158,625 vote .s). WINNER FACES MATTOX The winner will face incumbent Jim Mattox, ' who ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, in Texas' Nov. 4 general election. A total of1.5 million persons cast votes in the primary, two-thirds of them Democrats. Barrera's father had served as appointed secretary of state from 1968-69 under Demo cratic Gov, John Connally. CONGRESSMEN UNOPPOSED In contests for U.S Congress seats, three of four Hispanic Democrat incumbents ran unopposed Only Solomon Ortiz faced compe tition. He beat Ken Rich, 87%-13%. In cumbents E. "Kika" de Ia Garza, District 15; Henry B. Gonzalez, District 20; Albert Busta mante, District 23, and Ortiz are assured their seats as no Republicans ran in the primary. 41% FOR GONZALEZ Raul Gonzalez, appointed by Gov. Mark White as the first Hispanic to sit on the state's Supreme Court, won 41% (390,544) to former state Rep. Jay Gibson's 29% (271,797) in a three-way Democratic primary race. The winner of that runoff will face Republican Waco attorney John Bates, who won 53% of the votes to Bill Stephens' 4 7% for the Place 4 seat. In the race for a Place 1 seat on the state's Court of Criminal Appeals, George "Jorge" Martinez, 41, a Dallas attorney, gained 14,000 more votes than his closest Democratic rival, Rusty Duncan-259,671-245,270-in a four-way race. The winner of that runoff is assured the seat as Republicans did not field a candidate. The House Judiciary Committee decision to postpone until June any action on the Simpson-Rodino immigration bill does not necessarily mean that the measure won't be voted on during this congressionalyear, re presentatives of two Hispanic organizations in Washington, D.C., told Hispanic Link Weekly Report. The delay "does not mean that the immigration bill is dead," said John Moss, legislative aide of Rep. Matthew Martinez, chairman of the Hispanic Congressional Caucus. There is "a tremendous amount of pressure" by the Reagan administration to pass the bill, Moss said, and that could happen even with the end of the congressional session (Oct. 3) close. "The feeling here (in Congress) is that it is now or never," Moss said. On May 2, Rep. Daniel Lungren (A-Calif.) and other backers of the bill charged that the recent decision to dehy by the 35-member ::ommittee was Jl ta"ctic to avoid a vote on the ' )ill this year. The bill was scheduled to be marked up last week, but Chairman Peter Rodino (D-N.J.) decided to extend the deadline until the second week of June in response to , a request from 16 of 20 committee Democrats. Coalition in LA. Remap Latino, black and Asian groups in Los Angeles joined forces May 1 to draw new district boundaries that would increase minority repre sentation on the City Council. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Southern California Chinese Lawyers Association agreed to devise a plan that would protect the interests of each group. The U.S. Justice Department, on behalf of Latinos, charged in a lawsuit filed last November that . the city deliberately drafted a remapping plan in 1982 that would minimize the voting strength of Latinos. A plan endorsed by the three groups, though not assured, would parlay into added leverage with the City Council committee overseeing the remap, said an aide to City Councilman Richard Alatorre. \ The councilman heads that committee. The Democratsno Hispanics among themwanted additional time to work out a compro mise on the bill's controversial guest-worker provision, they said. Opposed by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the League of United Latin American Citizens and other Hispanic organizations, the provision would allow growers to employ additional thousands of foreign workers. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, with 11 voting members in the House, still has not formulated a position on the issue. Lisa Navarrete, the Caucus' legislative specialist, said they are waiting for the bill to come out of committee. Joseph Trevino, LULAC executive director in Washington, D.C., said the delay is a sign that the committee recognizes that a compro mise on the guest-worker plan "is necessary if we are to achieve immigration reform in this congressional year. "No one in Congress, and that includes Rodino, wants to go home for an election campaign in which immigration might become an issue," Trevino said. He added, however, that if leaders of the committee want the bill, they could still pass it before the congressional deadline. In their letter requesting postponement, the committee Democrats promised no further delays will be requested, adding they expect to reach a consensus by June. A companion Senate bill, sponsored by Sen . Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), was passed Sept. 19. MALDEF Associate Counsel Mario Moreno said, however, that even if the bill were passed by the House, there is still a chance for it to be killed in the House-Senate conference com mittee. Immigration reform legislation was stopped at that stage in 1984. In spite of more members' willingness to compromise on most of the bill's provisions, the legislation is probably"on its death bed," commented Arnoldo Torres, former LULAC executive director and key lobbyist against the bill in past sessions. "The growers' greed will kill it. With the solid support ifs getting from the administration, they are pushing a massive temporary worker program" which will be the cause of its ultimate demise, he predicted. -Dora Delgado

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Sin pelos en_ Ia lengua 1 IN THE IN-BASKET: Los Angeles County-based U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal and Matthew (Marty) Martinez are opposed in their con gressional re-election bids this year by backers of Lyndon LaRouche. So is California Assembly incumbent Gloria Molina. Rodrlguez(Agriculture) among "11 0 senior(Reagan) administration officials (who) have accused of unethical or illegal conduct. .. " ON THE BORDER: San Diego Municipal Judge VIctor Ramirez wants to move that city's prison inmates who are undocumented to Mexico, where it costs 90 cents a day to house them vs. $39 a day in . San Diego jails ... Another Californian, U.S. Senate candidate Mike Antonovich, is campaigning to deploy U.S. troops along the Mexican border to help beef up the Border Patrol . None are losing sleep over the competition, but Martinez must be confused by the recent news release from the U .S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce which refers to him as "Senator Matthew Martinez (DN.Y.)." IN THE NEWSPAPER RACKS: In a lengthy feature on sainthood candidate Father Junlpero Serra, The Los Angeles Times suggests that the Catholic Church has put the California mission founder on a fast track to canonization as a public relations effort to appeal to Latino immigrants in the Southwest. It quotes one anonymous Cieric that Serra could become an "affirmative action saint." ON THE MENU: To pass the time while skiing in Vail, Colo., three young Texans constructed the worlds largest enchilada in recognition of the Lone Star state's sesquicentennial. They used a 150; yard long corn tortilla, one yard for each year of Texas' independence. A Fontana, Calif . , youth group made its bid for Guinness Book of World Records by putting 33 picnic tables end-to-end in a local park to prepare a 312-foot burrito. In a two-part report on "Ethics in Washington," The Washington Post-taking a cue from Doonesbury-lists Michael Cardenas( Small Business Administration), John Hernandez (Environmental Protection Agency), HenryChavira(Legal Services Corp . nominee) and lsidoro, And remember New York Times executive William Stockton, who set a record for putting his foot in his mouth atthe'85 Hispanic media conference in Tucson? He missed Miami this year because the Times transferred him to Mexico, where he recently completed a feature on " the king of sauces in Mexican cooking," mole. At last he has something tasty to chew on. -Kay Barbaro Anselmo Out, Nicolas In Emilio Nicolas Jr., general manager of San Antonio's KWEX-TV, was named president of its parent Spanish International Communications Corporation May 5, following the resignation of Rene Anselmo as SICC's head . ANSELMO Anselmo is a founder nd current president of he SIN Television Net He had served as SICC's president for 14 years. SICC owns and operates Spanish-language tele v isi on stat io ns in Los Angeles, Miam'i, New York and Fresno, as well as San Antonio. A statement released l)y Anselrrio'soffice said that he was resigning as SICC chief"involun tarily' ' in the hope that would lead to a successful resolution of a 1 0-year-old shareholders derivative lawsuit pending in California. The suit charged that Anselmo , who owns 24% of the five SICC stations, and other SICC officials engaged in transactions between SICC and SIN which were detrimental to the former. Anselmo told Los Angeles reporters that he was urged to quit his SICC post by Los Angeles U.S. D i strict Judge Mariana Pfaelzer , who is presiding over the case. LA. Disc Jockey Slain Rodolfo Garcia Cortez, 43, popular KWKW radio disc jockey in Los Angeles, was stabbed to death and robbed April28. His body was found in a downtown trash container. His wallet, jewelry and 1979 Porsche wer . e missing. Garcia Cortez, noted for his skill at imitating Latino regional dialects, came to the United States from Guadalajara , Mexico, six years ago . His wife , Bertha, and three children, Bertha, 22, Claudia, 18, and Rodolfo Jr. , 14, were expected to join him in California on completing their education. As yet, police have no suspects : 2 Hispanic Class Suit OK All U.S. Hispanics residing in the central judicial district of California can be represented as a class in a lawsuit against the Immigration and Naturalization Service, ruled a Los Angeles federal court judge April 23. The ruling was a result of a suit filed in 1979 by seven Orange County, Calif., Hispanic residents. It charged that INS illegally entered their homes or places of business without a search warrant or owner's consent. In response, U.S. District Court Judge David Williams issued an injunction in 1980 forbidding INS from entering homes or businesses illegally . But a U.S Circuit Court of Appeals judge later ruled that the injunction could apply only to the plaintiffs unless the lower court ruled the case to be a class action . The trial is scheduled for next month. Counties included in the judicial district are Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara,' Ventura, Riverside, Orange and San Luis Obispo . Natl. Guard Use Protested ;..eaders and representatives of four His panic orglnizations protested outside the California capitol in Sacramento April 30 against the use of Hispanic U.S. National Guardsmen in Honduras. The protesters, including dancers in Aztec dress, were members of the League of United Latin American Citizens, American G. I. Forum, Mexican-American Political Association and San Francisco-based Chicano Moratorium. Thirty California Guardsmenmostly His panics-were sent to Honduras last month to serve as interpreters and guards for a Missouri National Guard engineering unit which is building a road near the Nicaraguan border. California Gov. George Deukmejian said the troops volunteered for the assignment, would not be there for long and were not in a "combat zone ." The protesters said the governor could have refused to let the troops go, as he did last year. Jury Ruling Aids Latinos The U.S. Supreme Court decision on April 30 restricting prosecutors from excluding prospective black jurors in cases where the defendant is black will also aid Hispanic defendants, said an attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Mario Moreno , an associate counsel at MALDEF's Washington D.C., office, said the ruling will help Hispanics and other minorities avoid inappropriately "lily-white" juries and truly be judged by a jury of their peers. " Before , we (Hispanics) could not even get our foot in the door" to determine jury makeup, Moreno said. The 7-2 decision places a heavy burden of proof on prosecutors to show that their reason for excluding a juror is not racially motivated. The ruling rejected a 21-year-old precedent that held the defendant had to prove there was a pattern of discrimination that extended beyond the case. The case, Batson vs. Kentucky, stems from a burglary conviction in 1981 by an all-white jury. The prosecution removed all four black prospective jurors through peremptory challenge -a tool to remove jury candidates whom a trial lawyer feels would not be impartial. No reason had to be given. The number of chal lenges differs according to jurisdiction. Steering away from whether the decision applies retroactively, Associate Justice Byron White wrote in a separate concurring opinion that there will have to be" much litigation" to shape the scope of the decision. The Batson case was remanded to the lower court to determine whether jury selection was racially motivated. Peabody to Sl N Station The SIN Television Network's San Francisco affiliate station, KDTV, won the 1985 George F. Peabody award May 7 in the news and community service category. The award was given for its extensive, fast coverage of the 1985 Mexico City earthquake and KDTVs follow-up relief efforts. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS .HISPANIC FEDERAL CONTRACT PROCUREMENT: For a free copy of the Nationa(Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials' audit of the minority set-aside program, write to NALEO, 420 S. Capitol St. NE, Washington, D .C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. OPPORTUNITY FOR ORGANI2!ATIONS: Key members of Hispanic organizations may be able to receive Hispanic Link Weekly Report regularly through a "networking" agreement developed by the organization, Hispanic Link and a sponsoring corporation. For information on developing such agreements, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. BASEBALL (ANNOUNCER) SCOUTS: How well do Major League baseball announcers pronounce the names of Spanish-surnamed ballplayers? Hispanic Link is looking for "scouts" in each Major League city to assess who's the best and the worst. If you would like to participate in the survey, please contact Felix Perez, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 237-0737 ALL YOU WANT TO KNOW: "'86 Facts About Newspapers," a/25page brochure with easy-to-read charts and graphs, covers all aspects of the newspaper business . For a free copy, contact Public Affairs Dept., American Newspaper Publishers Assn., Box 17407 Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041. Phone (703) 648-1000. RIGHTS OF AIDS VICTIMS: The American Civil Liberties Union has published a four-page policy guide listing areas such as mandatory testing, education, health care and employment in which people with AIDS are discriminated against. Copies of"AIDS and Civil Liberties" are available free from: ACLU-NC AIDS Policy, 1663 Mission St.,# 460, San Francisco, Calif. 941 03 (415) 621-2493. LATIN AMERICAN SPECIALISTS: The Library of Congress' Hispanic Division has published the 1,011-page "National Directory of Latin Americanists," which lists data on 4,915 experts. Price : $34. Request Stock No . 030-013-00009-3 from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. (202) 783-3238. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals . Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per words. Display rates: $35 per column inch. SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST for a national association in downtown Wash ington, D.C. Skills: 1 yrs. secretarial experience, 50 wpm typing, computer experience desirable , fluency in Spanish/ English essential. Duties : handle phone calls, light typing and filing, photocopying , prepare mailings, maintain office supplies. Salary range : S 15,00Q-S 17,000. Contact Frank Newton, Ph.D., National Association of Hispanic Journalists, (202) 783. CORONADO FOURCOUNTY BROADCASTING, INC. HISPANICOWNED media company in California seeks individuals for radio sales , on-air (Spanish-language news) and manage ment Contact RosarioLeal(714)981. RECEPTIONIST, Washington, D .C. S 11 ,000 $12,000. Resumes to: American Society for Public Administration , 1120 G St. NW , Wash ington, D.C. 20005. THE CHICAGO REPORTER , an award winning, investigative monthly , has an opening for a reporter. Two years daily newspaper experience required . Bilingual preferred. Knowledge of Chicago area a plus. Send resume, clips to : Managing Editor, The Chicago Reporter , 18 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill . 60603. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952. HISPANIC ENGINEER MAGAZINE seekS editorial assistant $16,000$20,000. Send resume and salary history to: Career Com munications Group, 1007 North Calvert St., Baltimore , Md. 21202. -MINNESOTA HISPANIC WOMEN'S De velopment Corporation seeks EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Must have strong management , business and program background BilinguaV THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media bicultural preferred. Salary negotiable . Deadhas a natoonal JObcleannghouse line : May 15. Phone(612) 641•1619. for Hospanics in the media. For onformatoon _ call Magdalena Beltran (213) 7 43 7158. REPORTERS/COPY EDITORS Detroit Free Press, Michigal\ seeks reporters, co py editors. Openings exist in local , features and business departments. Send a resume, cover ietter and clips to: Charles Fancher, Assistant Editor , Detroit Free Press . 321 W. Lafayett, Detroit, Mich . 48231 or call (313) 222. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES . GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides : • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and e Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW. Washington ,'D.C. 20010 (202) 483. Calendar Hispanic business owners looking to do business with this federal agency . CELEBRATION AND FUND-RAISER Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund New York May 20 THIS WEEK SUBSTANCE ABUSE Washington, D.C. May 13 Andromeda Hispano Mental Health Center will co sponsor its first Atlantic regional conference on substance abuse among Hispanics, including work shops on the educational, legal and medical aspects. Clotilde Benitez (202) 483-8548 COMMUNITY LEADER AWARDS Brooklyn, N . Y . May 14 The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families will hold its spring gala to recognize leaders' butions to the Hispanic community and hold its annual fund-raiser . .Helene Carr(718) 596-1800 CENTRAL AMERICAN POLICY Washington , D . C . May 15 . Elliott Abrams, assistant secretary of state for Inter American Affairs, will discuss U.S. policy in Central . America at a luncheon sponsored by the lbero American Chamber of Commerce. Linda Rentz (202) 296-0335 TRANSPORTATlON BUSINESS OPPORTUNmES Los Angeles May 15,16 The Department of Transportation will sponsor this symposium to provide information and resources to Hispanic Link Weekly Report Clara Ruiz Engel (602) 268-5803 HISPANIC CIVIC LEADERSHIP Las Vegas , Nev. May 15-18 U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (DCalif.) and Antonia Hernandez, president and general counsel of Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, will be among the panelists at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials' 4th annual conference . Roger Rivera (202) 546-2536 WRITING FICTION Washington, D . C . May 16, 17 Hispanic novelist Rudolfo Anaya will give a reading and conduct a fiction-writing workshop in this event sponsored by the Washington School. Ellen Nagle (202) 234-9382 HISPANAS UNIDAS San Antonio May 16-18 The conference • Hispanas Unidas II : Tejana Heroines of Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow" will examine health, education and economic issues and how they affect Hispanas and their families . Choco Meza (512) 434-9056 COMING SOON 'TRAINING CONFERENCE Image Atlanta May 19 Franklyn Hernandez (404) 522-3055 Judy Ramos (212) 219-3368 PUERTO RICO'S ECONOMY U.S. House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs Washington , D . C . May 20 and 22 Gail Mukaihata (202) 225-9297 HISPANIC BUSINESS Hispanic Chamber of Commerce ' -os Angeles May 23 Cindy Hall (816) 842 4DELANTE MUJER HISPANA CONFERENCE El Paso Community College El Paso, Texas May 24 Lucy Calderon (915) 541 7650 SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING SYMPOSIUM Association for Puerto Ricans in Science and Engi neering . Philadelphia May 28 Pablo Clemente-Colon (301) 763-8092 SPOTLIGHT NATIONAL COUNCIL OF HISPANIC WOMEN: Sens. Nancy Kassebaum (R-Kan.) and John Warner (R-Va.) will address the 2nd annual conference conducted by NCHW June 2, 3 in Washington, D . C . For more information on this which will cover business development, U .S. policy in Latin America and tax reform , contact Alba Moesser at (202) 639 8823. 3

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Arts & Entertainment HISPANICS RECEIVE TONY NOMINATIO,I'Jolp in several major categories for Tony Mayo for the 1 985-86 season. ' ( CUBAN PLAYWRIGHT STIRS CONTROVERSY: Objections to the political affiliation of a Cuban playwright has led to the elimination of her play from the first Hispanic Theater Festival that continues this week in Miami. Last year's hit Tango Argentino was nominated for "best a category for which no winner was announced in 1985. The show, currently on tour, also received nominations for" best choreography" . for its Tango Argentino Dancers and "best direction of a musical" for Claudio Segovia and Hector Orezzoli. Coser y cantar, a play by New York resident Dolores Prida, was scheduled for performances May 9-11 at Miami's Science Museum as part of the festival. The play, which was to have been staged along with two other works by exiled writers, was cancelled because of protests received by festival organizers. Protesters objected to Prida's stand in favor of normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. Nominated as best" director of a play'' was Jose Quintero, for his revival of Eugene O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh Actress Chita Rivera, who starred in the recently cancelled Jerry's Girls, received a "best actress in a musical" nomination-a category in which she picked up a Tony in 1984 for The Rink At press time, Prida was scheduled to appear in Miami at one of the educational workshops being held as part of the festi v al. She was also expected to participate in readings from Coser y cantar at the May 8 workshop. John Herrera picked up a "featured actor in a musical" nomination for his role in The Mystery of Edwin Drood. The show led all musicals with 11 nominations. The 40th annual awards will be televised live June 1 by CBS at 9 p.in. EDT from the Minskoff Theater in New York. The Hispanic Theater Festival is being held May 2-25 by Acting Together Inc., a grouping of south Florida theater organizations . -Antoilio Mejias-Rentas Media Report 1 fhis "Media Repqrt" abridges a column from El Miami Herald written by its executive editor; Roberto Fabricia) I first saw Geraldo Rivera on television when I was in graduate school in N e w Y ork City about 17 years ago. It was unusual to see a Hispanic reporter on a major-market news show. I liked his bouncy, flashy style, even after he was criticized for being more entertainer than newsman And later I thought he was one of the better reporters on ABC's 20/20 news magazine. I was disappointed when Rivera was fired by ABC. Network President Roone Arledge had killed a story dealing with Presiqent Kennedy's personal life and possible links with Marilyn Monroe, and Rivera criticized Arledge in public. But, then I heard Rivera speak about his ABC departure last month at a meeting of the National Association of Hispanic . Journalists attended by 1 ,000 news people. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW D.C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or 234-o737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Flllix Perez. Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejlae-Rentas. Noporlion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual aubacrlptlon (52 lnuea) S9fl. Trial aubacrlptlon (13 laauea) S2fl. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksert-Mendoza (202) 234. 4 Rivera called for a boycott of television 'letwork and major-market stations that have no His panics as anchors. He specifically named Miami, Los Angeles and New York. "I can assure you that executives of those networks and stations would tremble if they heard that a boycott was being organized," he said . But I wonder why Rivera wasn't speaking about Hispanic issues all those years he was collecting superstar salaries at ABC. The National Association of Hispanic Jour nalists was formed three years ago. Rivera never joined . There are Hispanic media groups on both the East and West coasts and Rivera belongs to none of them. Rivera shed his Latino coat when he became a N ew York City reporter for WNBC in 1969. He has never identified with minority issues. His one claim to being sensitive to ethnic issues was that he represented the Young Lords , a militant Hispanic group, when he was a practicing lawyer in the Bronx. Rivera's argument for a boycott was flawed from the begi n n ing. He claimed that his firing by ABC was a matter of "censorship," not discrimination. The NAHJ has been working hard to build minority representation in the nation's newsro oms by instituting scholarships, seminars, job fairs and placement computer banks. Manuel Galvan, the new president of the NAHJ, is a reporter for The Chicago Tribune. He covers City Hall and represents what the up-and-coming minority journalist is all about professional excellence and hard work. In his inaugural speech, Galvan said, "The answer to our struggle for professional recog nition has been working harder than someone else to prove that we are just as good or better . .. and to any editor who would dare tell me' show me a good minority reporter and I'll hire him,' I say, just look around this room." It is a shame that a guy like Rivera has become, if somewhat belatedly, an ethnic advocate now that professionalism is fashion able . I suggest that in his job quest he call upon some of his old qualities-working hard and being good at what he does. Or he could go back to representing the Young Lords. HENRY B.'s BIRTHDAY: Rep . Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas), along Y"ith wife Bertha, thank young mariachis from the San Antonio Independent School District for helping him celebrate his 70th birthday at a party attended by 2,000 on Capitol Hill . Hispanic Link Weekly Report