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Hispanic link weekly report, May 19, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 19, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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thority... Using his tie-breaking vote to secure long-stalled political appointments, Chicago Mayor Harold Washington gains City Council approval of Guadalupe Lozano, widow of slain community activist Rudy Lozano, to the Board of Local Improvements... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Daniel Villanueva, president and general manager of KM EX-TV in Los Angeles, to the board of directors of the California Economic Development Corporation... A Livingston, N.J., doctor, Carlos Hormilla, 23, is fatally stabbed while sunbathing in a local park and manages to write down his assailant1 s license number as he leaves the scene. Hormilla then drives himself to the hospital, but dies shortly thereafter. Police apprehend a suspect within three houra . . MALDEF President and General Counsel Antonia Herndndez returns to work in Los Angelea following the arrival of her third child, Miguel Nicolas, 7 lbs., 8 oz., born on Good Friday...
SIN’s Probable Stations Sale Resolves Dispute
Making The News
Fred Rodriguez, a former first assistant U.S. Attorney, becomes the first Hispanic district attorney in Bexar County, Texas (which includes San Antonio) by defeating incumbent Sam Millsap in recent elections... San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and Harry Pachon, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, announce the inception of atoll-free Citizenship Hotline to assist Hispanics in Texas with questions regarding naturalization. The bilingual service (1-800-44-NALEO, also currently serving Hispanics in Los Angeles, Miami and Chicago) will expand nationwide by the end of the year. . . Denver Mayor Federico Pena appoints Jose Pacheco, youth coordinator at a local community center, as a commissioner of the Denver Housing Au-
Five major Spanish-language television stations, whose license renewals were denied last January by the Federal Communications Commission, have been put on sale following resolution of a ten-year court dispute among the stations’ stockholders. The settlement also includes the sale of five other low-power TV stations.
FCC officials told Hispanic Link Weekly Report that the settlement was reached after several weeks of “shuttle diplomacy” between parties in the West Coast suit and the Washington, D.C., agency, thus rebutting rumors that the stations’ sale would not be an acceptable alternative to the commission.
The settlement, approved by U.S. District Court Judge Mariana Pfaelzer May 12 in Los Angeles, ended a shareholders derivative
Coelho Top Fund-Raiser
Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) topped the other 13 members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in campaign funds raised from Jan. 1, 1985, through March 31,1986, according to records released by the Federal Election Commission May 12.
Coelho easily outdistanced runner-up Rep. Robert Garda (D-N.Y.) $421,754 to $218,635. The four-term California congressman also led the caucus in money raised for the 1983-84 election cycle.
Altogether, caucus members raised $1.6 million, compared with $3.7 million for 1983-84. They spent more than $1 million of the money during this period. The total raised by the other 394 incumbent House candidates running for re-election was $61.3 million. Overall, 1,435 congressional candidates raised $ 167 million.
Subtracting Coehlo, who is the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the lone Portuguese caucus member, the average raised by caucus members was $90,000. The average raised by House incumbents was $155,584.
Coehlo also led the caucus in monies contributed by Political Action Committee, receiving nearly $183,000. E. “Kika” de la Garza (D-Texas) was next with $79,350.
lawsuit filed in 1976 by Frank Fouce, principal stockholder of Spanish International Communications Corporation, the Delaware-based corporate owner, against former company president and stockholder Rene Anselmo and Mexican stockholder Emilio Azcarraga Jr.
The suit charged that Anselmo and Azcarraga, owning 23.9% and 20% respectively, of SICCs stocks, were illegally profiting from deals with Spanish International Network, the chief program supplier for the company’s stations. Anselmo and Azcarraga own 25% and 75% of SI N. The decision to sell followed Anselmo’s resignation May 5 as SICC president at the urging of Judge Pfaelzer.
If approved by FCC, the sale of the ten stations opens the door for U.S. Hispanic ownership Already, Southern California businessman Enrique Hernandez, who owns security-related businesses, made public his group’s bid, which he said was for more than $266 million. Retiring U.S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin is reportedly involved in the group.
Presently owned by Anglo and Mexican interests, the stations include: Los Angeles’ KM EX-TV (Channel 34), Miami’s WLTV-TV
(23), San Antonio’s KWEX-TV(41), Paterson’s W)GV-TV(41) in New Jersey and Fresno’s KFTV-TV(21). Low-power TV stations in Philadelphia, Hartford, Austin, Denver and Bakersfield, Calif., are also for sale.
Ronald Fein, the attorney presiding over the sale, said that SICC will request by contract from any future owner the retention of each station’s Spanish-language format for at least two years. He said he was hopeful the decision to sell would reverse the Jan. 8 FCC denial to license SICC’s ten stations and three other stations owned by Bahia de San Francisco Television Company and The Seven Hills Television Company. Although operating within three separate legal entities, Anselmo and other SICC stockholders (Fouce excluded) are also principals of Bahia and Seven Hills.
The license revocation, now under appeal, was based on the agency’s contention that the stations were indirectly controlled by Mexican interests in violation of Section 310 of the Communications Act of 1934. FCC’s Mass Media Bureau, acting as the case’s prosecutor, was to file May 16 its “reply to exemptions,” which is the federal agency’s
continued on page 2
CONGRESSIONAL CAMPAIGN FINANCES-’85-’86
State U.S. Representative Raised Spent PAC%*
California Tony Coelho (D) $421,754 $290,356 $182,965
Esteban Torres (D) 100,412 38,988 39,600
Matthew Martinez (D) 38,439 17,567 24,950
Edward Roybal (D) 7,225 18,830 4,050
Texas Albert Bustamante (D) 161,052 63,951 33,250
Henry B. Gonzalez (D) 124,244 108,010 17,900
E. “Kika” de la Garza (D) 104,710 72,254 79,350
Solomdn Ortiz (D) 91,483 74,027 45,381
New Mexico Manuel Luj&n (R) 112,665 29,500 43,990
Bill Richardson (D) 88,138 60,363 56,248
New York Robert Garcia (D) 218,635 151,192 65,750
Puerto Rico Jaime Fuster (D) 81,124 81,124 0
Virgin Islands Ron de Lugo (D) 9,200 8,043 7,300
Guam Ben Blaz (R) 42,620 32,981 9,480
** Money contributed to candidates by Political Action Committees Source: Federal Election Commission.
** Funds spent by Roybal include monies raised in previous years.


Sin Pelos en la lengua
BUTTING AND REBUTTING: It was about a year ago when Cuba-born New York Daily News columnist Miguel P6rez returned from a visit to his first U.S. home, Miami, and inquired in print: “Why is it in New York, the world’s seventh largest Spanish-speaking city, we can’t seem to achieve the same political power, economic status and social standing that Cubans have gained in Miami?”
Enumerating a broad canvas of Hispanic accomplishments in Dade County, he answered himself that in Miami, “los cubanos stick together like glue” and there, “it is the Latinos who are gentrifying other people.”
He drew the contrast: “In New York, the Hispanic community is a mixture of many nationalities who share the same language and culture but can’t seem to unite to make an impact for the goals and aspirations that we all share.”
This month, Philadelphia Daily News columnist Juan Gonzdlez, born in Puerto Rico and raised in New York, offered a different comparison. Returning from the national Hispanic media conference in Miami, he described that city as“the most atypical Hispanic community in the nation. Largely well-to-do, economically aggressive, socially satisfied, politically conservative, Miamfs Cuban-dominated Hispanic community is the antithesis of Philadelphia’s or New Yorks or Camden’s (N.J.) Puerto Rican barrios.
“Watching dozens of Hispanic women with dyed-blond hair, parading in the latest of fashions, trying to emulate Anglo-American ideals of beauty made me suddenly homesick...
“Dominated as it is by exiles from the Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, Miami is the type of town where balanced discussions on issues such as (U.S. intervention in Central America) are not permitted. No, they are not censored. In America, after all, we don’t have censorship. Things are merely not discussed...”
PESTERING LESTER: Attempting to explain the relative economic successes of U.S. cubanos, chicanos and boricuas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Lester Thu row twirled his number-machines a few months ago and concluded from what they blinked back to him that Puerto Ricans are “less inclined to make the personal sacrifices that one generation has to make if a group is to be successful in America...”
That’s a little bit of what he said in a March 16 Los Angeles Times opinion piece.
Angelo Falcdn, director of the New York-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, prepared a strong response which was ignored by the Times but published widely elsewhere. Falcon challenged the professor’s simplistic approach to a complex issue and his inference that Puerto Ricans were spoiled brats for not putting up with the initiation rites which nativists perform on so many other newcomers to Mainland USA
Now New York Gov. Mario Cuomo has - innocently? - joined the battle by naming Thurow to serve on a prestigous state “Commission on Poverty” to assess its causes and make recommendations.
Fearful that Mr. Thurow has already concluded that Puerto Ricans are poor because they’re a bunch of shiftless ingrates, Falcon has written the governor asking him to remove Lester before he starts to fester.
SIN Stations Up for Sale
continued from page 1
response to the three companies’ appeal for reconsideration.
Communications law experts, surveyed by HLWR, questioned FCC’s approval of any proposal involving only one of the three companies affected by FCCs January actioa However, Charles Kelley, chief of the FCCs Enforcement Division, pointed out that in this particular situation “almost anything is possible.
“We are looking at a somewhat unusual case. Normally, once designated for hearing, stations cannot be sold. But in here (the first FCC ruling on “alien controf’) the commission has insisted that the Mass Media Bureau be open to any proposals that might eliminate the problem.”
Kelley further indicated that such proposals are normally delineated with some assurances as to their legal validity.
“It would not be worth it for both the sellers and buyers to spend time and money negotiating conditions and sale prices just to find that the federal agency that must approve everything would not allow the sale,” he said.
If the proposal is not accepted and the companies lose their appeal, the stations must stop operations and the FCC will resell their licenses. In that scenario, an unlikely
ne according to most experts, a Hispanic buyer could take advantage of an FCC preference allotted to minorities in comparative hearings
-Dora Delgado
CORRECTION
Last week’s Weekly Report story on Rene Anselmo’s resignation as president of SICC said his departure was “involuntary.” The action was voluntary, an SICC spokesperson says.)
2
NCLR Joins Coalition
The National Council of La Raza joined April 28 a coalition of organizations opposing the establishment of the death penalty for federal crimes, proposed in a bill pending before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre said the organization opposes the bill based on evidence suggesting that Hispanic offenders are punished more severely than whites and persons who kill Hispanics almost never receive the death penalty.
Because most murders occur among persons of the same race, the report said that the relatively low percentage of Latinos on death row - 5.88% of all the inmates - could be attributed to the infrequent application of the death sentence in murders involving Hispanic victims.
There are 99 Hispanics presently on death row in 14 of the 37 states that currently have capital punishment statutes, according to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Number of Latino inmates by state are:
Texas 31, California 25, Florida 11, Illinois 10, Arizona 7, Nevada 3, New Mexico 2, Indiana 2, Pennsylvania 2, Ohio 2, Arkansas 1, Idaho 1, Mississippi 1, North Carolina 1.
NASA Rejects Hispanics
The two Hispanics included initially among 100 persons being considered for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's journal-ists-in-space project were eliminated by NASA last week as the candidate field was trimmed to 40.
Dropped from further consideration were broadcast journalists Geraldo Rivera and Maximo Gomez, health/science editor for KYW-TV in Philadelphia.
Ransom Plot Backfires
Nine suspected smugglers were arrested in Los Angeles May 1 by the FBI and Riverside police for holding 22 undocumented workers prisoner and attempting to extort money from their relatives for their release.
The undocumented Mexicans and Guatemalans, smuggled two weeks ago across the U.S.-Mexico border, were kept in rooms secured with steel bars. They were freeo when a relative of three of the aliens notified police after being contacted by the smugglers demanding $1,000 for each captive’s release
The aliens were turned over to the Immigration and Naturalization Service for deportation. The nine suspects, also believed to be aliens, were charged with kidnapping and extortion.
Night Stalker Trial Is Set
Night Stalker suspect Richard Ramirez was ordered May 6 to stand trial this summer for a series of murders, rapes and other crimes occurring in the Los Angeles area from June 1984 to August 1985. Arraignment was set for May 21.
Ramirez, a 26-year-old drifter from El Paso, Texas, will be tried for 14 murders, five attempted murders, 15 burglaries, five robberies, four rapes, three acts of oral copulation and four acts of sodomy. Los Angeles Municipal Judge James Nelson ordered Ramirez to remain in jail without bail.
Police arrested Ramirez Aug. 31 after a group of East Los Angeles residents captured the first published photo of the suspect.
Six surviving victims testified against Ramirez in the nine-week preliminary court hearing that drew 143 prosecution witnesses. If convicted, Ramirez could face the death penalty.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
HISPANICSON DEATH ROW: The 13-page“The Death Rowand Hispanics” isavailablebysending$2to: National Council of La Raza. Twenty F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
INMATES ON DEATH ROW: Statistics on the number of death row inmates by race, national origin and state where sentenced are included in the 20-page report “Death Row, U.S.A.” available free i from: NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, 99 Hudson St,
| New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 219-1900.
CREDIT UNIONS: The brochures “Federal Credit Union” and j “Las Cooperativas Federates de Ahorro y Credito” explain the credit | union movement. For a free copy of either or both, contact: National j Credit Union Administration, Public Affairs Office, 1776 G St NW,
I Washington, D.C. 20456 (202)357-1050.
FORMING YOUR OWN CREDIT UNION: The 32-page booklet j “Volunteer Organizers’ Guide” reviews the initial process in organizing a credit union. Contact your regional National Credit Union Administration j office or write to: NCUA, Public Affairs Office, 1776 G St NW, j Washington, D.C. 20456 (202)357-1050.
HISPANIC HERITAGE POSTER COMPETITION: The 1986 National l Hispanic Heritage Week Poster Competition, sponsored by Anheuser-j Busch Companies, is open to Hispanics 21 years of age or older, i There is a $5,000 grand prize and an all-expenses-paid trip to j Washington, D.C., and a $250 prize for each of 24 finalists. Up to three entries per person are allowed and should be sent before May •31. For more information, write to: Kathy Pena, National Hispanic j Heritage Week Poster Competition, Sosa & Associates, 321 Alamo j Plaza #300, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 227-2013.
i HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK CHILDREN’S COMPETITION: I “What My Hispanic Heritage Means To Me” will be the theme of this | year's contest sponsored by McDonald’s for children in grades 1 through 6. Deadline: June 30. Winners (one from grades 1 to 3 and I another from grades 4 to 6) will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to the j National Hispanic Heritage Week art exhibition in Washington, i; D.C. Obtain the Emerging Artists Rules from: P.O. Box 11189,
)| Chicago, III. 60611 (312)836-7133.
m
I MEXICAN VIEW ON IMMIGRATION REFORM: The League of If United Latin American Citizens has issued the 20-page “U.S. Immigration
II Reform: The View From Across the Border,” the third in a series of II booklets on Latin America. Send a self-addressed 7 1/2 X 10 1/2 if inch envelope with 39 cents postage to: LULAC, 400 First St. NW, l\ Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202)628-8516.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washignton, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (E7) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column
LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE - OPENINGS
LABOR RELATIONS ASSISTANT The Office of Labor Relations and Personnel seeks a talented professional to assist the director in implementing the instructional and support staff collective bargaining agreements; responsible for monitoring appeal and grievance processes and researching and preparing documents for internal and formal hearings at every step of the grievance process, including arbitration. Qualifications: B.A. required, preferably in labor relations or related field; M.A or J.D. with emphasis in labor relations desirable (equivalencies will be considered); two years of experience, preferably in higher education; and a demonstrable ability to solve problems creatively. Excellent writing, speaking and interpersonal skills a must Salary: To mid-twenties, commensurate with qualifications. Excellent fringe benefits. Minorities and women encouraged to apply. Send letter and resume by June 13 to: Dr. Marcia Keizs, director of Labor Relations and Personnel, Room 1.
INSTRUCTOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
PSYCHOLOGY-TENURE TRACK
Duties: Teach a wide range of psychology courses and a multidisciplinary introductory social science course at a cooperative education college Qualifications: Minimum masters degree, doctorate and background in developmental psychology and teaching experience preferred. Program development and grant experience desirable. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications. Send letter and resume by July 11 to: Chairperson, Social Science Department, Room 1.
MEDIA LIBRARIAN Duties: Manage Media Services unit of the Library including a Media Center, classroom delivery of equipment and software, and a small video production unit The development of the Media Center, the integration of media into specific courses and planning for media services in a new facility will be the major areas of activity. Qualifications: Knowledge of broad range of media formats and software sources including the instructional use of microcomputers. Excellent administrative and communication skills essential. Minimum of ALA accredited master's degree in library science and three years experience in library media serivices, preferably in an academic setting. Second master's degree desirable. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications. Send letter, resume with three references and salary history by July 11 toe Library Search Committe, Rooml.
INSTRUCTOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
Duties: Teaching and coordinating clinical education in the Physical Therapist Assistant Program. Qualifications: Master'S degree in physical therapy; Ph.D. preferred. Teaching and clinical experience. Salary Commensurate with qualifications Tenure track line anticipated for September 1986. Send letter and resume by July 11 to: Search Committee. Room 3 Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Department of Natural and Applied Science.
Send resumes for desired position to: LaGuardia Community College,] 31 -10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 EOE/AA Employer.
Calendar .. 1111 r ............
THIS WEEK
j TRAINING CONFERENCE M Atlanta May 19-24
4;[ National Image will have its annual conference with 8 [ seminars on Gramm-Rudman, comparable worth, m the Justice Dept, under Atty. Gen. Edwin Meeseand d I workshops devoted tocareer advancement for Latinas. T jFranklyn Hernandez (404) 522-3055
A] AWARDS DINNER A j Albany, N.Y. May 20
7} The Hispanic Political Coalition of New York State w|^will conduct its 4th annual dinner honoring two H Hispanics.
Rafael Morales (518) 382-0950 I -PRLDEF CELEBRATION AND FUND-RAISER Mj New York May 20
; Judge John Carro of the New York State Supreme CjjCourt Appellate Division will be the host at this
event by the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund to honor Aspira of New York Judy Ramos (212) 219-3368
PUERTO RICO’S ECONOMY
Washington, D.C. May 20 and 22
The U.S. House Committee on Interior and Insular
Affairs will conduct hearings on the economic problems
of the island and how federal policy affects them.
Gail Mukaihata (202) 225-9297
LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN Immaculata, Pa. May 21
The executive director of the Pennsylvania Council on the Hispanic community, Min de Collingwood, will chair this symposium tittled “The Women of Latin America A Changing Role?’ by Immaculata Colleqe. Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400
HISPANIC BUSINESS Los Angeles May 23
The U.S Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will sponsor this conference to address issues affecting Hispanic business owners.
Cindy Hall (816)842-2228
EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION Dallas May 23, 24
The effect of discrimination on Hispanics will be one of the workshops offered by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
Joanne Liebeskind (202) 634-6036
HISPANIC WOMEN AND CHANGE El Paso, Texas May 24
The El Paso Community College Women’s Center will sponsor its 4th annual Adelante Mujer Hispana conference,looking at health, media, business, politics
COMING SOON
LATINO ATHLETE OF THE YEAR AWARD California Association of Latinos in Broadcasting Los Angeles June 6 Jay Rodriguez (818)840-3842
HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM Columbia University in New York City New York June 9-13 Andrea Gambino (212) 280-2479
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
ARTISTS TO ILLUSTRATE HERITAGE: Two corporations have announced sponsorship of separate contests to select artwork for this year’s celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Week.
Herencia- El Derecho al Futuro is the theme of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute’s 1986 National Hispanic Heritage Week Poster Competition, which seeks an “official” poster for the Sept 14-20 celebration. Funded by a$75,000 grant from the Anheuser-Busch Cos., the contest will award $11,000 in cash prizes.
The designer of the winning poster - which will be reprinted and distributed nationally-will receive a $5,000 grand prize and a trip to Washington, D.C., to be honored at the Institute’s annual dinner in September. The contest is open to Hispanic artists 21 yearsorolder living in the United States.
A second contest-sponsored by the McDonald’s Corp.- isopen to school children in grades 1-6. The Emerging Hispanic Artists Contest asks children to depict the theme “what my Hispanic heritage means to me.”
Two winning entries will be displayed with the work of established
adult artists at a company-sponsored exhibit in the nation’s capital during Hispanic Heritage Week
“McDonald’s art exhibit will include artwork by some of the most expressive professional Hispanic artists in the United States,” the company’s art curator, Susan Pertl, said.
The two winning artists, their teacher and one parent or guardian, will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington for a special viewing of their artwork at the exhibit.
RECORD COMPANIES SUE: The nation’s largest distributors of Spanish-language recordings are suing a Miami retailer in a continuing industry battle against the importation of “pirated” discs.
The companies - RCA/Ariola International, A&M Records and CBS- charge in the April 18 suit filed in U.S. District Court in Miami that Daniel Santana, of Santana Record Shop, infringed on their copyright by selling unauthorized recordings by Placido Domingo, Elio Roca and Marla Conchita Alonso.
Earlier this year the same companies won a similar lawsuit against Los Angeles retailer Crystal Promotions. In a campaign initiated by the Recording Industry Association of America, cease and desist notices have been mailed to some 40 distributors and/or retailers of
known “pirated” products. . . ..... _ .
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
UPI FINAL SALE NEAR: The optimistic portrayal of the future of United Press International offered by its president, Luis Nogales, at the national Hispanic media conference last month in Miami appears justified by current developments.
The news agency overcame two major hurdles to its final $41 million purchase by Mexico media magnate Mario Vazquez Rana when on May 12 it 1) reached an “agreement in principle” with unsuccessful bidder Financial News Network, which had been challenging the sale in court, and 2) reported that concerns of the holding company for UPl’s chief stockholders, Media News Corp., were simultaneously resolved.
In April of 1985, Nogales had to cancel out as a scheduled speaker at the annual Hispanic media conference in Tucson when UPI filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the federal
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H&ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
bankruptcy code on the day he was scheduled to speak But he kept his word to return “with better news” this year. At the Miami conference, the 41-year-old former migrant farm worker from Calexico, Calif., not only demonstrated his skills as an orator/prophet, but for those who stayed up late, as an individual with some talent with a guitar.
UPI could emerge from its bankruptcy status by mid-June, its spokespersons now say.
PUBLISHERS ELECT OFFICERS: Zeke Montes, publisher of Tele Guia de Chicago, was elected president of the National Association of Hispanic Publishers at the group’s Miami meeting last month. He replaces Kirk Whisler, former publisher of Caminos magazine. The NAHP board then hired Whisler as its executive director to pursue a trio of projects this year
1) Develop its group sales program through Entrada advertising representatives of New York 2) prepare NAHPs second readership study, and 3) pursue its plan for group circulation audits for Hispanic publications.
Other officers elected were: vice president Jose Lozano, asst, publisher. La Opinion, Los Angeles; secretary, Carlos Carillo, publisher, Impacto/The Latin News, New York City, and treasurer, Alejandro Aguirre, publisher, Diario Las Americas, Miami.
CINCO DE MAYO ORATORY: Harold Ezell, Western regional commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, used the occasion of Cinco de Mayo to announce to the press that INS apprehended 103,594 illegal aliens- 98% of them Mexican- on the U.S.-Mexico border last month, upfrom67,853 in April ’85.
ALSO OF NOTE: The American Diabetes Association salutes long-time California Spanish-language broadcast leader Jaime Jarrin as “Man of the Year” at a$100-a-plate banquet in Los Angeles May 19... Linda Rios Brook president and general manager of KENS-TV in San Antonio, makes her station the first in that city to require drug testing for all job applicants...
-Charlie Ericksen
'Xhere is ho energy tax crediT for thaT kind of insulation .

6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week thority ... Using his tie-breaking vote to secure long-stalled political appointments, Chicago Mayor Harold Washington gains City Council approval of Guadalupe Lozano, widow of slain community activist Rudy Lozano, to the Board of Local Improvements ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Daniel Villanueva, president and general manager of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles, to the board of directors of the California Economic Development Corporation ... A Livingston, N . J., doctor, Carlos Hormilla, 23, is fatally stabbed while sunbathing in a local park and manages to write down his assailanfs license number as he leaves the scene. Hormilla then drives himself to the hospital , but dies shortly thereafter. Police apprehend a suspect within three hours ... MALDEF President and General Counsel Antonia Hernandez returns to work in Los Angeles, following the arrival of her third child, Miguel Nicolas, 7 lbs., 8 oz., born on Good Friday ... Fred Rodriguez, a former first assistant U.S. Attorney, becomes the first Hispanic district attorney in Bexar County, Texas (which includes San Antonio) by defeating incumbent Sam Millsap in recent elections ... San Antonio Mayor Hen ry Cisneros and Harry Pach6n, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, announce the inception of a toll-free Citizenship Hotline to assist Hispani c s in Texas with question s regarding naturalization. The bilingual serv ic e (1-800-44-NALEO, also currently serving Hispanics in Los Angeles, Miami and Chicago) will expand nationwide by the end of the year ... Denver Mayor Federico Peiia appoints Jose Pacheco, youth coordinator at a local community center, as a commissioner of the Denver Housing AuVoi.•No:•ol HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT May 19, 1986 Sl N' s Probable Stations Sale Resolves Dispute Five major Spanish-language television stations , whose l ice nse renewals were denied last January by the Federal Communications Commission, have been put on sale following resolution of a ten-year court dispute among the stations' stockholders. The settlement also includes the sale of five other low-power TV stations. FCC officials told Hispanic Link Weekly Report that the settlement was reached after several weeks of " shuttle diplomacy'' between parties in the West Coast suit and the Washing ton, D.C., agency, thus rebutting rumors that the stations' sale would not be an acceptable alternative to the commission. The settlement, approved by U .S. District Court Judge Mariana Pfaelzer May 12 in Los Angeles, ended a shareholders derivati ve Coelho Top Fund-Raiser Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calil.) topped the other 13 members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in campaign funds raised from Jan. 1, 1985, through March 31, 1986, according to records released by the Federal Election Commission May 12. Coelho easily outdistanced runner-up Rep . Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) $421,754 to $218,635 . The four-term California congressman also led the caucus in money raised for the 1983-84 election cycle. Altogether, caucus members raised $1.6 million, compared with $3.7 million for 1983-84. They spent more than $1 million of the money during this period. The total raised by the other 394 incumbent House candidates running for re-election . was $61.3 million . Overall, 1 ,435 congressional candidates raised $167 million. Subtracting Coehlo, who is the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Com mittee and the lone Portuguese caucus member, the average raised by caucus members was $90,000. The average raised by House in cumbents was $155,584. Coehlo also led the caucus m 111onies con tributed by Political Action Committee , receiving nearly $183,000. E. "Kika" de Ia Garza (D Texas) was next with $79,350. la wsuit fil ed in 1976 by Frank Fouce, principal stockholder of Spanish International Com munications Corporation , the Delawarebased corporat e owner, against former company president and stockholder Rene Anselmo and Mexican stockholder Emilio Azcarraga Jr. The suit charged that Anselmo and Azcarraga, owning 23.9% and 20% respectively, of SICC's stocks, were illegally profiting from deals with Spanish International Network, the chief program supplier for the company's stations. Anselmo and Azcarraga own 25% and 75% of SIN. The decision to sell followed Anselmo's resignation May 5 as SICC president at the urging of Judge Pfaelz er. If approved by FCC, the sale of the ten stations opens the door for U.S. Hispanic ownership. Already, Southern California business man Enrique Hernandez, who owns security re lated businesses, made pu blic his group' s bid , which he said was for more than $266 million. Retir i ng U.S . Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin is reportedly involved in the group. Presently owned by Anglo and Mexican interests, the stations include: Los Angeles' KMEX -TV (Channel 34), Miami's WL TV-TV (23), San Antonio's KWEX-TV(41), Paterson's WXTV-TV(41) in NewJerseyandFresndsKFTVTV (21 ) . Low-power TV stations in Philadelphia, Hartford , Austin, Denver and Bakersfield, Calif., are also for sale . Ronald Fein, the attorney presiding over the sale, said that SICC will request by contract from any future owner the retention of each station's Spanish-language format for at least two years. He said he was hopeful the decision to sell would reverse the Jan. 8 FCC denial to license SICC's ten stations and three other stations owned by Bahia de San Francisco Television Company and The Seven Hills Television Company. Although operating within three separate legal entities, Anselmo and other SICC stockholders (Fouce excluded) are also principals of Bahia and Seven Hills. The license revocation, now under appeal, was based on the agency's contention that the stations were indirectly controlled by Mexican interests in violation of Section 310 of the Communications Act of 1934. FCC's Mass Media Bureau, acting as the case's prosecutor, was to file May 16 its "reply to exemptions," which is the federal agency's continued on page 2 CONGRESSIONAL CAMPAIGN FINANCES'85-'86 State California rexas New Mexico New York Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Guam U.S. Representative Tony Coelho (D) Esteban Torres (D) Matthew Martinez (D) Edward Roybal (D) Albert Bustamante (D) Henry B. Gonzalez (D) E. "Kika" de Ia Garza (D ; Solom6n Ortiz (D) Manuel Lujan (R) Bill Richardson (D) Robert Garcia (D) Jaime Fuster (D) Ron de Lugo (D) Ben Blaz (R) " Money contributed to candidates by Political Ac tion Committees. Raised $421,754 100,412 38,439 7,225 161,052 124,244 104,710 91,483 112,665 88,138 218,635 81,124 9,200 42,620 ** Furlds spent by R oy bal include monies r aise d in previous years. Spent $290,356 38,988 17,567 18,830 63, 951 108,010 72,254 74,027 29,500 60,363 151,192 81,124 8,043 32, 981 PAC$* $182,965 39,600 24,950 4,050 33,250 17,900 79,350 45,381 43,990 56,248 65,750 0 7,300 9,480 Sour ce: F ederal Election Commission.

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Sin Pelos en Ia lengua "Dominated as it is by exiles from the Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions Miami is the type of town where balanced discussions on issues such' as (U.S. intervention in Central America) are not permitted. No, they are not censored. In after .. all, we don't have censorship . Things are merely not discussed ... BUTTING AND REBUTTING: It was about a year aqo when Cuba-born New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez returned from a visit to his first U .S. home, Miami, and inquired in print: "Why is it in New York, the world's seventh largest Spariish-speakinQ_ we can't seem to achieve the same political power, economic status and social standing that Cubans have gained in Miami?" Enumerating a broad canvas of Hispanic accomplishments in Dade County, he answered himself that in Miam[, "los cubanos stick together like glue" and there, "it is the Latinos who are gentrifying other people." PESTERING LESTER: Attempting to explain the relative economic successes of U.S. cubanos, chicanos and boricuas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Lester Thurow twirled his number machines a few months ago and concluded from what they blinked back to him that Puerto Ricans are "less inclined to make the personal sacrifices that one generation has to make if a group is to be successful in America ... " That's a little bit of what he said in a March 16 Los Angeles Times He drew the contrast: "In New Yo.rk, the Hispanic community is a mixture .. of many nationalities who share the same language and culture but can't seem to unite to make an impact for the goals and aspirations that we all share." opinion piece . . Angelo Falc6n, director of the New York-based lnst1tute for Puerto Rican Policy, prepared a strong response which was ignored by the Times but published widely elsewhere . Falcon challenged the professor's simplistic approach to a complex issue his that Puerto Ricans were spoiled brats for not puttmg up w1th the initiation rites which nativists perform on so many other newcomers to Mainland USA This month, Philadelphia Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez, born in Puerto Rico and raised in New York, offered a d i fferent comparison. Returning from the national Hispanic media conference in Miami, he described that city as "the most atypical Hispanic community in the nation . Largely well-to-do, economically aggressive, socially satisfied, politically conservative, Miamrs Cuban-dominated Hispanic community is the antithesis of Philadelphia's or New York's or Camden's (N.J.) Puerto Rican barrios . Now New York Gov. Mario Cuomo has-innocently?-joined the battle by naming Thurow to serve on a prestigous state "Commission on Poverty" to assess its causes and make recommendations. "Watching dozens of Hispanic women with dyed-blond hair, parading in the latest of fashions, trying to emulate Anglo-American ideals of beauty made me suddenly homesick. .. Fearful that Mr. Thurow has already concluded that Puerto Ricans are poor because they're a bunch of shiftless ingrates, Falcon has written the governor asking him to remove Lester before he starts to fester. SIN Stations Up for Sale continued from page 1 respo.nseto the three companies' appeal for reconsideration. Communications law experts, surveyed by HLWR, questioned FCC's approval of any proposal involving only one of the three compa nies affected by FCC s January action However, Charles Kelley, chief of the FCC s Enforcement Division, pointed out that in this particular situation "almost anything is possible . "We are looking at a somewhat unusual case. Normally, once designated for hearing , stations cannot be sold . But in here (the first FCC ruling on "alien control") the commission has insisted that the Mass Media Bureau be open to any proposals that might eliminate the problem." Keliey further indicated that such proposals are normally delineated with some assurances as to their legal validity. "It would not be worth it for both the sellers and buyers to spend time and money negotiating conditions and sale prices just to find that the federal agency that must approve everything would not allow the sale," he said. If the proposal is not accepted and the companies lose their appeal, the stations must stop operations and the FCC will resell their licenses. In that scenario, an unlikely ne according to most experts, a Hispanic buyer could take advantage of an FCC preference allotted to minorities in comparative hearings . -Dora Delgado CORRECTION Last week's Weekly Report story on Rene Anselmo's resignation as president of SICC said his departure was "involuntary." The action was voluntary, an SICCspokesperson says.) 2 NCi..R Joins Coalition The National Council of La Raza joined April28 a coalition of organizations opposing the establishment of the death penalty for federal crimes, proposed in a bill pending before the Senate Judiciary Committee. La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre said the organization opposes the bill based on evidence suggesting that Hispanic offenders are punished more severely than whites and persons who kill Hispanics almost never receive the death penalty. Because most murders occur among persons of the same race, the report said that the relatively low percentage of Latinos on death row 5.88% of all the inmates could be attributed to the infrequent application of the death sentence in murders involving Hispanic victims. There are 99 Hispanics presently on death row in 14 of the 37 states that currently have capital punishment statutes , according to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Number of Latino inmates by state are: Texas 31, California 25, Florida 11, Illinois 10, Arizona 7, Nevada 3, New Mexico 2, Indiana 2, Pennsylvania 2, Ohio 2, Arkansas 1, Idaho 1, Mississippi 1, North Carolina 1. NASA Rejects Hispanics The two Hispanics included initially among 1 00 persons being considered for the National Aeronautics and Space Administrat i on's journal ists-in-space project were eliminated by NASA last week as the candidate field was trimmed to40. Dropped from further consideration were broadcast journalists Geraldo Rivera and Maximo Gomez, health/science editor for KYW-TV in Philadelphia. Ransom Plot Backfires Nine suspected smugglers were arrested in Los Angeles May 1 by the FBI and Riverside police for holding 22 undocumented workers prisoner and attempting to extort money from their relatives for their release . The undocumented Mexicans and Guate malans, smuggled two weeks ago across the U.S.Mexico border , were kept in rooms secured with steel bars . They were freeo when a relative of three of the aliens notified police after being contacted by the smugglers demanding $1 ,000 for each captive's release. The aliens were turned over to the Im migration and Naturalization Service for deportation. The nine suspects, also beiieved to be aliens, were charged with kidnapping and extortion. Night Stalker Trial Is Set Night Stalker suspect Richard Ramirez was ordered May6 to stand trial this summe r for a series of murders, rapes and other crimes occurring in the Los Angeles area from June 1984 to August 1985. Arraignment was set for May 21. Ramirez, a 26-year-old drifter from El Paso, Texas, will be tried for 14 murders, five at tempted murders, 15 burgla ries, five robberies, four rapes , three acts of oral copulation and four acts of sodomy. Los Angeles Municipal Judge James Nelson ordered Ramirez to remain in jail without bail. Police arrested Ramirez Aug . 31 after a group of East Los Angeles residents captured the first published photo of the suspect. Six surviving victims testified against Ramirez in the nine-week preliminary court hearing that drew 143 prosecution witnesses. If con victed, Ramirez could face the death penalty . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS HISPANICS ON DEATH ROW: The 13-page"The Death Rowand His panics" is available by sending $2 to: National Council of La Raza. Twenty F St. NW , Washington, D .C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS INMATES ON DEATH ROW: Statistics on the number of death row inmates by race , national origin and state where sentenced are included in the 20-page report "Death Row, U.S.A." available free from: NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, 99 Hudson St., New York, N . Y . 10013 (212) 219-1900. PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispa nic Link help you in your search f or executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N.W., Washignton, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates : 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column CREDIT UNIONS: The brochures "Federal Credit Union" and "Las Cooperativas Federates de Ahorro y Credito" explain the credit union movement. For a free copy of either or both, contact: National Credit Union Administration, Public Affairs Office, 1776 G St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20456 (202) 357-1050. FORMING YOUR OWN CREDIT UNION: The 32-page booklet "Volunteer Organizers' Guide' ' reviews the initial process in organizing a credit union. Contact your regional National Credit Union Administration office or write to: NCUA, Public Affairs Office, 1776 G St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20456 (202) 357-1050. HISPANIC HERITAGE POSTER COMPETITION: The 1986 National Hispanic Heritage Week Poster Competi tion, sponsored by Anheuser! Busch Companies, is open to Hispanics 21 years of age or older. I There is a $5,000 grand p rize and an all-expensespaid trip to \ Washington, D.C., and a $250 prize for each of 24 fina lists. Up to l three entries per person are allowed and should be sent before May 1 31. For more information, write to: Kathy Peiia, National Hispanic . 1 Heritage Week Poster Competition, Sosa & Associates, 321 Alamo Plaza #300, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 227-2013. l HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK CHILDREN'S COMPETITION: • 1 "What My Hispanic Heritage Means To Me" will be the theme of this j year's contest sponsored by McDonald's for children in grades 1 1 through 6. Deadline: June 30. Winners (one from grades 1 to 3 and ( another from grades 4 to 6) will receiv e an trip to the It National Hispanic Heritage Week art exhibition in Washington, J . D.C . Obtain the Eme rg ing Art ists Rules from : P.O. Box 11189, l! Chicago, Ill . 60611 (312) 836-7133. I MEXICAN VIEW ON IMMIGRATION REFORM: The League of J l United Latin American Cit izens has issued the 20-page "U.S. Immigration 1! Reform : The View From Across the Border, " the third in a series of lJ booklets on Latin America. Send a self-addressed 7 1/2 X 10 1/2 i i inch envelope with 39 cents postage to: LULAC, 400 Firs t St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8516. 1 LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGEOPENINGS LABOR RELATIONS ASSISTANT The Off ice of Labor Relations and Persor>nel seeks a talented profession a l to assist the director in implementing the instructional and support staff collective bargaining agreements; resp o nsibl e for monitoring appe al and grievance processes andresearching and preparing documents for internal and formal hearings at every step of the grievance process, including arbi tration. Qualifications: B.A. required, preferably in labo r re lations or related fi e ld ; M.A or J .D. with emphasis in labor relations desirab l e (equiva lenci es will be considered); two ye ars of experience, preferably in higher ed u c ation; a nd a demonstrable ab ility to solve problems creatively. lent w r iting, speaking and interpersonal ski ll s a must. Salary: To mid-twenties, commens urate with qualifications. Excel lent fringe benefits. Minorities and wo men encouraged to apply. Send letter and r esume by June 13 to: Dr. Marcia Keizs, director of Labor Relations and Person nel, Room 1. INSTRUCTOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PSYCHOLOGY TENURE TRACK Duties: Teach a wide range of psychology course s a nd a multidisciplinary introduc tory social scie n ce cours e a t a cooperative education college. Qualifications: Minimum maste( s degree, doctorate and background in developmental psychology and teaching exper ie nce preferred. Program vel opment and grant experience desirable . Salary: Commensurate with qualifi ca tions. Send letter and resume by July 11 to : Cha i rperson, Social Science Department, Room 1. MEDIA LIBRARIAN Duties: Manage Media Services unit of the Library including a Media Center, c lassro o m delivery of equipment and soft ware, and a small video production unit The development of the Media Center, the integration of media into specific courses and planning for media services in a new facility will be the major areas of activity. Qualifications: Knowledge of broad rang e of media formats and soft ware sources including the instructional use of microcomputers. Excellent ad ministrative and communication skills es sential. Minimum of ALA accredited maste(s degree in library science and three ye ars experience in library med i a serivices, preferably in an acade mic setting. Second mastMs degree desi rab le. Salary: Com men sura te with qualifications. Send let ter, resume with three references and salary history by July 11 to: Library Search Committe, Room1. INSTRUCTOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Duties: Teac hing and coordinating clir>ical education in the Physical Therapist Assistant Program. Qualifications: Mas le ( s degree in physical therapy; Ph.D. p referred. T eac hing and clinical experience. Salary: Commensurate with Tenure track line anticipated for Sep tember 1986. Send letter and resume by July 11 to: Search Committee. Room :1 Ph ys ical Therapist Assistant Program , De partment o f Natural and Applied Science. Send resum es tor desired position to : LaGuardia Community College, ; 31-10 Thom son Ave nue, Long Island City, N.Y. 1 1101 EOE/AA Employer. EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION Dallas May 23, 24 1Calendar yl--------1 THIS WEEK event by the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund to honor Aspira of New York. Judy Ramos (212) 219-3368 PUERTO RICO'S ECONOMY Washington, D.C. May 20 and 22 The effect o f discrimination on Hispanics will be one of the workshops offered by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. I fi TRAINING CONFERENCE Atlanta May 19-24 National Image will have its annual conference with aj seminars on Gramm-Rudman , comparable worth, If the Justice Dept. under Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese and 11 workshops devoted to career advancement for Latinas. 'I Franklyn Hernandez (404) 522-3055 A! AWARDS DINNER A Albany , N.Y . May 20 1t The Hispanic Political Coalition of New York State 1/11 will conduct its 4th annual dinner honoring two Hi Hispanics. f'i Rafael Morales (518) 382-0950 I l'iPRLOEF CELEBRATION AND FUND-RAISER IAJ New York May 20 •L/Judge John Carro of the New York State Supreme :' Court Appellate Division will be the host at this 1Hispanic Link Weekly Report The U.S. House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will conduct hearings on the economic problems of the island and how federal policy affects them. Gail Mukaihata (202) 225-9297 LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN Immaculata, Pa. May 21 The executive director of the Pennsylvania Council on the Hispanic community, Min de Collingwood, will chair this symposium tittled " The Women of L atin America: A Changing Role!' by Immaculata Colleqe. Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647 HISPANIC BUSINESS Los Angeles May 23 The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will sponsor this conference to address issues affecting ' Hispanic . business owners. Cindy Hall (816)842-2228 Joanne Liebeskind (202) 634-6036 HISPANIC WOMEN AND CHANGE E! Paso , Texas May 24 TheEl Paso Community College Women's Center will sponsor its 4th annual A de/ante Mujer Hispana conference , look i ng at he a lth, media, business, politics COMING SOON ATHLETE OF THE YEAR AWARD California Association of Latinos in Broadcasting Los Angeles June 6 Jay Rodriguez (818) 840-3842 HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM Columbia. University in New York City New York June 9-13 Andrea Gambino (212) 280-24 79 5

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Arts & Entertainment adult artists at a company-sponsored exhibit in the nation's capital during Hispanic Heritage Week "McDonald's art exhibit will include artwork by some of the most expressive professional Hispanic artists in the United States," the company's art curator, Susan Pertl, said. ARTISTS TO ILLUSTRATE HERITAGE: Two corporations have announced sponsorship of separate contests to select artwork for this year's celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Week. Herencia-El Derecho a/ Futuro is the theme of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's 1986 National Hispanic Heritage Week Poster Competition, which seeks an "official" poster for the Sept 14-20 celebration Funded by a $75,000 grant from the Anheuser Busch Cos., the contest will award $11,000 in cash prizes. The two winninq artists, their teacher and one parent or guardian, will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington for a special viewing of their artwork at the exhibit. RECORD COMPANIES SUE: The nation's largest distributors of Spanish-language recordings are suing a Miami retailer in a continuing industry battle against the importation of "pirated" discs . The designer of the winning poster-which will be reprinted and distributed nationallywill receive a $5,000 grand prize and a trip to Washington, D.C., to be honored at the Institute's annual dinner in September. The contest is open to Hispanic artists 21 years or older living in the United States. The companies-RCA/ Ariola International, A&M Records and CBScharge in the April18 suit filed in U . S . District Court in Miami that Daniel Santana, of Santana Record Shop, infringed on their copyright by selling unauthorized recordings by Placido Domingo, Elio Roca and Maria Conchita Alonso . Earlier this year the same companies won a similar lawsuit against Los Angeles retailer Crystal Promotions. In a campaign initiated by the Recording Industry Association of America, cease and desist notices have been mailed to some 40 distributors and/ or retailers of A second contest-sponsored by the McDonald's Corp.-is open to school children in grades 1. The Emerging Hispanic Artists Contest asks children to depict the theme "what my Hispanic heritage means to me." Two winning entries will be displayed with the work of established known "pirated" products . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report UPI FINAL SALE NEAR: The optimistic portrayal of the future of United Press International offered by its president, Luis Nogales, at the national Hispanic media conference last month in Miami appears justified by cur rent developments. The news agency overcame two major hurdles to its final $41 million purchase by Mexico media magnate Mario Vazquez Rana when on May 12 it 1) reached an "agreement in principle" with unsuccessful bidder Financial News Network, which had been challenging the sale in court, and 2) reported that concerns of the holding company for UPI's chief stock holders, Media News Corp., were simul taneously resolved. In April of 1985, Nogales had to cancel out as a scheduled speaker at the annual His panic media conference in Tucson when UPI filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the federal HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005. (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 6 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado . Feli x Perez, Charlie Er icks en , Antonio Mejias-Rentas . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen -Mendoza (202) 234-0737. bankruptcy code on the day he was scheduled to speak But he kept his word to return "with better news'' this year. At the Miami conference, the 41-year-old former migrant farm worker from Calexico, Calif., not only demonstrated his skills as an orator/prophet, but for those who stayed up late , as an individual with some talent with a guitar. UPI could emerge from its bankruptcy status by mid-June, its spokespersons now say . PUBLISHERS ELECT OFFICERS: Zeke Montes, publisher of Tele Guia de Chicago, was elected president of the National A& sociation of Hispanic Publishers at the group's Miami meeting last month. He replaces Kirk Whisler, former publisher of Caminos magazine. The NAHP board then hired Whisler as its executive director to pursue a trio of projects this year. 1) Develop its group sales program through Entrada advertising representatives of New York, 2) prepare NAH P's second readership study, and 3) pursue its plan for group circulation audits for Hispanic publications. Other officers elected were: vice president, Jose Lozano. asst. oublisher. La Opinion, Los Angeles; secretary, Carlos Carillo, pub lisher, /mpacto/The Latin News, New York City; and treasurer, Alejandro Aguirre, pub lisher, Diario Las Americas, Miami. CINCO DE MAYO ORATORY: Harold Western regional commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, used the occasion of Cinco de Mayo to announce to the press that INS apprehended 103,594 illegal aliens-98% of them Mexican-on the U.S. Mexico border last month , up from 67,853 in April '85. ALSO OF NOTE: The American Diabetes Association salutes long-time California Spanish-language broadcast leader Jaime Jarrin as" Man of the Year'' at a $1 00-a-plate banquet in Los Angeles May 1 9 ... Linda Rios Brook, president and general manager of KENs-TV in San Antonio, makes her station the first in that city to require drug testing for all job applicants ... -Charlie Ericksen There is no y tax for that kind of 1n sula1ioh . Hispanic Link Weekly Report