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Hispanic link weekly report, May 26, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 26, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
The national PTA names Alicia Villanueva, 49, a bilingual teacher in Salinas, Calif., as its Outstanding Educator of the Year. The Virginia native has taught English-as-a-second-language classes for 14 years. . . San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will deliver the commencement address at the City College of City University of New York May 30 and also receive an honorary degree.. . New York Gov. Mario Cuomo names three Puerto Ricans - Manuel Diaz Jr., director of New York City’s Progress Inc.; Dr. Maria Jose Facanino,
, Rutgers University professor; and Cesar Perales, commissioner of the State Department of Social Services- to his new Commission on Poverty... Denver Mayor Federico Pena appoints Ruth Rodriguez,
executive deputy manager of the Public Works Dept., as manager of Parks and Recreation... Sam Baca, president of Baca’s Wheeler Funeral Chapels in Deming, N.M., and Jorge Ochoa Bacallao, president of Ochoa Poultry Farms in Saint Just, P.R., are among 58 small-business owners named Business Person of the Year by committees in 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Last week was proclaimed national Small Business Week by President Ronald Reagan ... Walter Martinez, a New Mexico state House representative from Grants and former speaker of the House, dies May 11 of Lou Gehrig’s disease. He was 55... Panamanian jockey Alex Solis rides Snow Chief to victory in the 111 th Preakness at Pimlico race course in Baltimore, Md., May 17. The horse is not likely to run in the Belmont Stakes, final leg of thoroughbred racing’s Triple Crown, its co-owner says...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Bemaldez Says Memorial
Census Advisors Finally Meet
Bemaldez Says Memorial Day Is ‘Disheartening’
The chairman of the largest U.S. Hispanic veteran’s organization told Weekly Report last week that the national observance of Memorial Day is a “disheartening” time “because we are seeing a complete watering-down of benefits that have been promised to all those people who have served this country.”
Eduardo Bemaldez of the San Antonio-based American Gl Forum said plans by the Labor Department to discontinue July 31 its National Veterans Outreach Program because of reduced Hispanic veterans’ unemployment is a mistake.
Figures from a September 1985 report by the Veterans Administration showed 5% (42£00) of the 843,700 total Hispanic veterans in the United States were unemployed The rate is 4% for all veterans. Latina veterans also had a higher unemployment rate (5%), with 2,200 of44,400 out of work as compared to 3% for all female veterans.
The Outreach Program, begun by Labor and implemented by the Forum in 1979 to assist all veterans in obtaining VA and state benefits, resume preparation and job interview skills, was funded at $200,000 for the first year. Funding peaked at $600,000 in 1982 and it was allotted $276,000 for 1985-continuedonpage 2
VA’s Alvarez Leaves Post
Everett Alvarez, Deputy Administrator of the Veterans Administration, quit his position as second in command at the agency May 9.
Alvarez, the first U.S. pilot to be shot down over North Vietnam (1964), held the VA position since 1982, when he was nominated for it by President Ronald Reagan. Prior to that, Alvarez was deputy director of the Peace Corps for a year.
After spending 8 1 /2 years as a prisoner of war and being released in 1973, Alvarez continued on in the Navy. He retired as a commander in 1980. He has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, a master’s in operations research and a law degree.
Alvarez said he plans to pursue a position in the private corporate sector.
The U.S. Census Bureau has decided not to eliminate the question on “national origin” for the count of Hispanics in the 1990 Census as it proposed two years ago. The bureau’s decision was formally made public during discussions with the agency's H ispanic Advisory Committee that, along with three other minority advisory groups, met for the first time May 19-20 in Arlington, Va.
In the meeting, committee member Thomas Rodriguez from Colorado recommended the elimination of the question, suggesting that a Hispanic designation be included in the “race” question. His request met resistance from other members and bureau officials, among them Assistant Division Chief for Ethnic and Racial Statistics Nampeo McKenney. She said that a pretest in Chicago last year showed that the inclusion of “Hispanic” with “black” and “white” in the race category would result in confusion over race and ethnicity and probably cause an undercount.
The agency is now completing analysis of two versions of the national origin question it tested recently in the Los Angeles Hispanic community. One requires all Hispanic groups to write in their national origin. The other asks respondents to check for Mexican, Puerto Rican or Cuban ancestry while requiring a write-in response from other Hispanic groups.
The initial proposal to count Latinos as a
MALDEF Sues Chevron
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a complaint May 12 charging the northern California operations of Chevron USA with discrimination in the promotion, training and assignment of Hispanics and blacks.
The complaint,tiledlbylMALDEF along with the Center for Law in the Public Interest, charged that the almost all-white managerial and supervisory staff used subjective standards to determine job assignment, promotion, compensation and on-the-job training.
The complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District in San Francisco on behalf of two Hispanic and six black oil production employees.
race was advanced by the bureau in 1984 after 40% of Hispanics counted in the 1980 Census wrote in “Hispanic” in the “race” question. Hispanic organizations such as the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, the League of United Latin American Citizens and Image so strongly opposed the change through“the most aggressive campaign ever seen by the bureau,” said McKenney, that agency officials decided it would cause a withdrawal of needed community support.
At last week’s meeting, committee members otherwise agreed on all selected agenda items. Among these: to develop a list of Hispanic advertising agencies that could participate in the census ad campaign; to assure effective distribution of Spanish questionnaires; to monitor changes in the census for Puerto Rico (the bureau is meeting with government officials there next month); and special coverage for hard-to-count groups such as migrant workers, undocumented and the homeless.
Congressman Robert Garcia, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Census and Population, had criticized the Department of Commerce for its delay in forming the committees, which act as community liaison bodies and review the census planning that started in 1984. Although scheduled to be selected by early 1985, the four minority advisory panels were not appointed by the White House until last month.
Results of the Los Angeles area pretests
continued on page 2
Agustin Gonzalez Dies
Agustln Gonzalez, founder and executive director of New York’s Puerto Rican Family Institute, died May 16 after being struck by a car while vacationing in Mexico City. He was 66.
Gonzalez founded the Institute in 1965 to provide counseling and other services to Puerto Rican families during their first three years in New York.
He was credited with organizing the first conference on the human rights of Puerto *n ^ovemt3er 1^83.

MAY 2 71986


Sin Pelos en la lengua
MEXICO BASHES BACK: “While the United States criticizes the narcotics traffic and corruption in other countries, it takes a different stance on whaf s happened at home. Yet -^Illegal drugs are a $110 billion business in the United States...
“Some 60 million norteamericanos have tried marijuana; 30 million use it regularly...
“A reported 21.6 million U.S. residents have tried cocaine; a quarter of a million are addicts- 60,000 of them between 13 and 17 years old
“Cocaine is served as an hors d’oeuvre at congressional staff parties...
“From 1983 to 1985, about 300 U.S. drug agents, officials, politicians and even judges were arrested for corruption in their drug enforcement activities...”
That’s part of the laundry list of shameless U.S. hypocrisy which Josd Carreno, Washington correspondent for the Mexican national news service, Notimex, attacks in a Hispanic Link commentary,,
His commentary repeats what his news service has been writing, what leading Mexico City newspapers and electronic media are shouting, and what an enraged Mexican people are painting on banners of protest since U.S. Customs Service Commissioner William von Raab and Senator Jesse Helms stepped up Washington’s war of words against Mexico- accusing that country, as Jorge Castaneda described it, “of every vice under the sun.”
Castaneda, National University of Mexico professor and eloquent chronicler of that country’s needs and moods, uses a May 21 New York Times commentary to point out that" If s Mexico-bashing time in Washington again.” He adds:
“In truth, the Reagan administration has no Mexico policy. Either it is only able to focus on one issue at a time - drugs, Central America, immigration issues. Or it is unable to unify separate federal agencies’ policies into a coherent whole...
“If Mexico is indeed suffering the equivalent of retaliation forwhat it has not done, {hen it might as well go ahead and do it..”
If s not polity-or smart- to call your neighbor names. Or, as an old campesino once warned me, “Never urinate on an electric fence.”
- Kay Barbaro
Bernaldez Protests Cut
continued from page 1
86. From March 1979 to April 1986 the program helped 12,985 veterans (61% of whom were Hispanic) and placed 6,982,, Forum figures showed.
Threatened with closure are Outreach Program offices in San Antonio, Los Angeles, Brownsvile and McAllen, Texas. Program offices in Denver and Chicago will continue to operate after receiving local and state funding, said the program’s executive director,' Carlos Martinez.
Bernaldez said he hoped to meet with Vice President George Bush within the next two weeks to gain his support in reviving a program he claims Bush already supports.
Other statistics from the VA report showed the Hispanic veteran:
• Was younger (56% under age 45) compared to non-Hispanic veterans (36% under 45).
• Earned less than non-Hispanics, with median income for males peaking at$17,600 vs. $20,900 for non-Hispanics. Latinas’ median income peaked at $6,800; non-Latinas, $9,800.
• Was greatest in numbers in the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, Nevada, Utah and New York.
U.S. HISPANIC VETERANS BY WAR ERA (as of 1980)
Male Female
Vietnam 312,200 12,400
Korea 118,100 2,200
WWII 227,800 5,300
WWI 8,400 500
Peacetime 177,200 24,000
Total 843,700 44,400
Jobless Rate Up Slightly
The Hispanic civilian unemployment rose slightly from 10.3%B March to 10.4% in April, the U.S. Department of Labor reported.
2
Census Advisors Meet
continued from page 1
will be released this summer. The bureau has also scheduled for 1987 “focus group interviews" in the New York and Miami areas and a National Content Test on the national origin question. The committee recommended that a border area town be included in these tests.
In addition to Rodriguez, an accountant from Aurora, Colo., the other four committee members attending last weeks meeting were: Leobardo Estrada, a Los Angeles demographer who was elected as chairman; Bebe Zuniga, a businesswoman from Laredo; Carmen Junco, general manager of Puerto Rico’s Centro de Bellas Artes; and John Lasseville, a Spanish International Network polling expert from Miami. Four other committee members, Oscar Moran of San Antonio, national president of LULAC; Manuel Casiano, newspaper publisher from Puerto Rico; Maria Ward, a businesswoman from New Orleans, La., and Eduardo Bernaldez, of El Paso and chairman of the American Gl Forum, were not present at the meetings.
Also recommended by the committee was the appointment of New York and Chicago representatives. In both cities, the bureau has lawsuits pending that charge a 1980 Census undercount of the cities’ minority populations.
- Dora Delgado
NHSF Starts Fund Drive
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund launched its fund-raising campaign this month to raise $1 million for more than 1,000 Hispanic college students in the 1986-87 school year.
The goal is almost a 50% increase from the $589,000 released in April to 857 students for 1985-86.
San Antonio Archbishop Patricio Flores started NHSFin 1976 with $30,000 fori 15students.
The Fund has secured $1 million from Anheuser-Busch Cos, with $400,000 earmarked for scholarships, $400,000 for promotion and $200,000 for program development.
Supreme Court’s Civil Rights Decision Lauded
The Supreme Court’s decision on May 19 to strike down an affirmative action plan in Jackson, Mich., bodes well for the advances made by Hispanics and other groups in civil rights, according to representatives of two national Hispanic organizations.
“Every member of the court rejected, either implicitly or explicitly, the Justice Department’s philosophy that affirmative action plans based on class-specific remedies are unconstitutional,” said John Trasvina, a legislative attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. The Justice Department contends that remedies should be directed only to proven victims of discrimination, not classes.
Charles Kamasaki, legislative analyst with the National Council of La Raza, said the decision will help dispel the notion that affirmative action plans using goals are the same as quotas. The 5-4 ruling rejected the position that hiring goals were unconstitutional.
The court found unconstitutional an affirmative action plan by the Jackson Board of Education that laid off white teachers with more seniority in order to preserve the existing percentage of blacks. Laying off employees, unlike giving hiring preference to minorities, places too great a burden on whites, held the court. In the case, Wygant v. Jackson Board of Education, the court stopped short, however, of supporting the Reagan administration philosophy that affirmative action remedies should apply only to those victims directly affected.
Trasvina said the decision and the rejection May 20 by a Senate committee of the nomination of Jeffrey Zuckerman- a proponent of victim-specific remedies - as general counsel of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission indicates a healthy future for civil rights and affirmative action.
The court is expected to hear two affirmative action cases in July. -Felix Perez
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
U.S. HISPANIC VETERANS: The Veterans Administration published in September 1985 a Chart Book on Black and Hispanic Veterans with statistics on the number of veterans from various war eras, education attained, employment levels and other information. For a free copy of the 53-page book, contact: Veterans Administration, Research Division 711, 810 Vermont Ave. NW, Washington, D.C 20420 (202) 389-2625.
BILINGUAL STORYBOOKS: Well-known children’s stories such as “Cinderella” and “Bambi” and other educational materials are available in bilingual texts. Individuals who cannot find them in local bookstores can write to: Western Publishing Co., Department M, P.O. Box 700, Racine, Wis. 53401 (414) 633-2431.
PUERTO RICANS IN LITERATURE: The 322-page reference book “Imageries e Identidades: El Puertorriqueho en la Literaturan includes essays from Puerto Rican writers (from the island and the U.S.) and from other Hispanic and non-Hispanic scholars examining topics such as images of Puerto Ricans in popular U.S. novels to problems in literature translations. Send $12.95 plus $1.50 for postage to: GPC, P.O. Box 4387, Union City, N.J. 07087 (201) 648-5594.
CUBAN PRISONERS: The 44-page “Atlanta Federal Penitentiary” report by the House Judiciary Subcommittee describes prison conditions for the 1,869 Mariel Cubans incarcerated there. For a copy, send $1.50 to U.S. Government Printing Office, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, D.C. 20402-9315 (202) 275-3030.
AID TO SMALL BUSINESSES: The 57-page “The Small Business Handbook’ outlines a wide range of government procurement programs, grants, marketing assistance plans and other programs available from federal agencies. To order, send $14.50 to: Federal Reprints, P.O. Box 15301, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 543-1826.
LEADERSHIP: The 27-page “The Tasks of Leadership” is the second of a series of papers on the subject which describes nine leadership responsibilities such as envisioning goals, motivating and managing groups and serving as a model. For a copy send $1 to: Independent Sector, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-8100.
MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD IN CONGRESS: The National Council of La Raza is inviting individuals and organizations to join its Advocacy Bank, a pool of monies financing messages to Congress on key issues affecting the Hispanic community. Authorizations can be given for ten ($22.25) to 20 ($44.50) mailgram messages per year on seven issues pre-selected by NCLR. To obtain authorization forms, write to: NCLR, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, 20 F Street NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202)628-9600.
CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report pays $25 for political or humorous cartoons. Submit to Carlos Morales, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
STUDENT SERVICES Bilingual Counselor - 2
Master's in counseling, student services or appropriate behavioral science specialization, plus fluency in Spanish required. Positions available July 1,1986.
• 11 month faculty position requires 2 years counseling experience, preferably at a community college.
• Grant position to recruit and counsel disadvantaged students and coordinate tutorial activities in Educational Opportunity Fund Program. Two years related higher education experience required.
NO TELEPHONE INQUIRIES Send complete resume and 3 letters of reference of each position by June 4,1986.
Prior applicants need not re-apply.
Office of The Dean of Student Services Bergen Community College 400 Paramus Road Paramus, N.J. 07652-1595 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
EDITOR/WRITER to research write and edit news stories for the newspaper of the National Association of Social Workers. Looking for self-motivator who can initiate story ideas as well as research and write articles. Experience in headline writing, proofreading, wordprocessing and photography preferred.
Degree in English or Journalism (or the equivalent experience) and two years experience as a reporter required. Starting salary to $21,500 plus excellent benefits. Resume to Employment Specialist, NASW, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910. EOE.
NUESTRAS NOTICIAS, Washington, D.C.-based Spanish-language radio network is seeking network quality anchor. Five years or more broadcast experience a must. No phone calls please. Send tape and resume to: Luis Covarrubias, Nuestras Noticias, UPI, 1400 I St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
ADMISSIONS DIRECTOR
With the support of an award-winning publications program and building upon the institution’s excellent track record in attracting applicants, plan and direct all activities related to student recruitment and admission. We are an innovative, cooperative education community college of 7,800 FTFs. Qualifications: Bachelor's degree, experience in admissions or a related field, creativity. Salary: Highly competitive, based upon qualifications and experience. Send cover letter and resume by June 20 to: Dean Susan Armiger, Room 4, Division of External Affairs, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY,31 -1 0 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
CAPITAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR Salary: $25,317 Ann. # 36146EPRC
Professional position in the Parks Division. Initiates, plans and supervises construction of all departmental capital projects which will include preparing bid specifications, ensuring contract compliance gathering information for bid packages, working with blueprints, monitoring capital budget and other duties as assigned.
Requires bachelor's degree supplemented by a master's in business, public administration or related field and one-year experience in contract maintenance, capital planning, budgetary work or related fields. Preference may be given to applicants with years of experience beyond the minimum and/or experience in a local government or similar setting.
Official Arlington County application form required. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 weekdays between 8 am. and 5 p.m. All applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 p.m. on May 29,1986.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESI) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Philadelphia May 28
The Association of Puerto Ricans in Science and Engineering will convene with representatives of other science organizations to discuss attracting minorities to these fields.
Eric Muftoz (718) 470-2968
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
IMMIGRATION Washington, D.C. May 29
A subcommittee of the Congressional Joint Economic Committee will conduct its last of three hearings with testimony on the demographic and economic consequences of immigration.
Nancy McConnell (202) 546-5030
HISPANIC LEADERSHIP
Merrillville, Ind. May 30,31
The Midwest Voter Registration and Education Project
will have its third of nine training seminars on
organizing effective voter registration campaigns
and leadership development programs.
Maria Elena Molina (614) 464-1116
COMING SOON
BUSINESS, TAXES AND BALANCED BUDGET National Council of Hispanic Women Washington, D.C. June 2,3 Alba Moesser (202) 639-8823
MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING
National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering
St Louis June 3-5
Beverly Schwartz (212) 279-2626
RAUL YZAGUIRRE ROAST American Gl Forum Washington, D.C. June 4 Alex Armendaris (202) 296-2346
3


Arts & Entertainment
FALL SEASON UNVEILED: The three major television networks have announced their schedules for the 1986-87 season, and Hispanic talent is featured in three of the 24 new prime time programs scheduled.
Five out of six programs from the ’85-’86 season with Hispanics in lead, regular or recurring roles will be back this fall.
CBS, with second-place ratings in the just-ended season, was first to announce its fall plans May 7. Among seven new series given the green light, Kay O’Brien, Surgeon features Tony-winner Priscilla Lopez. She plays Rosa Villanueva, the head emergency room nurse in the hospital where the drama is set. The show is scheduled for Thursdays at 10 p.m. (all times are PT).
Unchanged at the 10 p.m. Friday slot is Falcon Crest - with the largest Hispanic cast on prime time network TV. It returns for a sixth season in the fall. The show features Lorenzo Lamas, Ana Alicia and Cesar Romero as leads.
Third place ABC announced its fall lineup May 12. Its nine new prime time programs include the only new show with a Hispanic
lead. Ernie Reyes Jr. (of Asian/Hispanic heritage) will play a young martial arts expert on The Last Electric Knight, to air on Fridays from 9 to 9:30 p.m.
ABC will return The Colbys at its 9 p.m. Thursday spot. Ricardo Montalban is a regular in the serial.
NBC, first in the season’s ratings race, has the largest number of returning shows with Hispanic cast members. This fall, the network will premiere LA Lawwith Hispanic actor Jimmy Smits in the “key role” of Victor Sifuentes. With Hill Street Blues co-creator Steven Bochco as executive producer, LA Law will air Fridays at 10 p.m. (following the returning Miami Vice, moved up to the 9 p.m. slot).
Rene Enriquez will continue making irregular and less frequent appearances on Hill Street. Blues - reportedly because the actor wishes to pursue other artistic interests. Other returning actors on N BC are Saundra Santiago and Edward James Olmos, on Miami Vice, and Tina Yothers on Family Ties (which remains on Thursdays at 8:30 p.m.).
Another NBC show with a Hispanic regular was dropped. Dancer/ actor Alfonso Ribeiro joined the cast of Silver Spoons two seasons ago. The network announced fall plans May 14.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
RADIO MARTI MARKS FIRST YEAR: Radio Marti celebrated its first full year of broadcasting May 20.
A service of the Voice of America, Radio Marti allots 40% of its broadcasting to news-related programming. The rest of its 17 1/2 hour schedule (it was 14 hours until this February) is composed of a soup opera, features and commentaries.
A spokeswoman with VOA said there are no firm figures on audience growth, but feedback from Cubans arriving in Miami and mail from Cubans to their relatives on the U.S. mainland indicate the station is picking up new listeners. She also credits a revamp of news programming in Cuba to competition from Marti.
The staff at the station has grown from 130 to 164.
BUDDING HISPANIC JOURNALISTS: Five of the 16 candidates chosen for the 11 -week
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 '
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include- the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants^! packets at your next conference or convention. For details, j contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Summer Program for Minority Journalists at the University of California, Berkeley, are Hispanic.
They are Adam Gettinger-Brizuela from San Diego, Joseph Gutierrez from Torrance, Calif., Beatriz Johnston-Hernandez from Los Angeles, Yleana Martinez from Austin, Texas, and Luis Monteagudo from El Cajon, Calif.
Of the remaining 11 participants, eight are black, two are Asian American and one is Native American.
The program, which runs from June 1 through Aug. 15, lines up graduates with jobs, normally before the session begins. This year only one of the Hispanics, Martinez, has been paired with a daily, the Dallas Times Herald. A spokeswoman with the Institute for Journalism Education, the non-profit body that administers the program, said they will all be placed no later than midway through the session.
Five Hispanics will be on the program’s 27-member faculty this summer, each putting in a two-week stint on a rotational basis. The
five are Maggie Rivas and John Gonzalez, both with the Dallas Morning News; Patrisia Gonzales, The Philadelphia Inquirer; Elaine Rivera, The Washington Times; and Frank delOlmo, Los Angeles Times. Another Times newsman, Frank Soto mayor, is the program’s co-director.
HISPANIC EDITORS: Two New York Hispanics made the final cut for IJE’s Editing Program for Minority Journalists at the University of Arizona in Tucson June 9 through Aug. 1.
Maria Fugate with the Daily News and Conrado Hernandez with El Diario/La Prensa join six black and two Asian American participants.
The five Hispanics on faculty, which totals 23, will be rotated, with their stays ranging from one to two weeks. They are Frank Soto-mayor, Fernando Dovalina and Meriemel Rodriguez of the Houston Chronicle; Guillermo Torres, Dallas Morning News; and John Gomes, The Seattle Times.
- Felix Perez
MEMORIAL DAY OBSERVANCE: The names of 110 Vietnam veterans were recently added to the black polished granite walls of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. They were service members who died in war-related duty outside of the war zone. Included in the names added were Joseph Stephan Henriquez of Long Island, N.Y., and Miguel A. Hernandez-Diaz of New York City. There are now 58,132 names on the walls, 8-10% of whom are Hispanic. Double-exposure photograph of the memorial wall and statue is by Hector Ericksen-Mendoza.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week executive deputy manager of the Public Works Dept., as manager of Parks and Recreation ... Sam Baca, president of Baca's Wheeler Funeral Chapels in Deming, N.M., and Jorge Ochoa Bacallao, president of Ochoa Poultry Farms in Saint Just, P.R., are among 58 small-business owners named Business Person of the Year by committees in 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Last week was proclaimed national Small Business Week by President Ronald Reagan . . . Walter Martinez, a New Mexico state House representative from Grants and former speaker of the House, dies May 11 of Lou Gehrig ' s disease. He was 55 ... Panamanian jockey Alex Solis rides Snow Chief to victory in the 111 th Preakness at Pimlico race course in Baltimore, Md . , May 17. The horse is not likely to run in the Belmont Stakes, final leg of thoroughbred racing's Triple Crown , its co-owner says ... Vol. 4 No. 21 HlSPANIC LINK WEE , May 26, 1986i Bernaldez Says Memorial Day Is 'Disheartening' The chairman of the largest U.S. Hispanic veteran's organization told Weekly Report last week that the national observance of Memorial Day is a "disheartening" time "because we are seeing a complete watering down of benefits that have been promised to all those people who have served this country." Eduardo Bernaldez of the San Antonio based American Gl Forum said plans by the Labor Department to discontinue July 31 its National Veterans Outreach Program because of reduced Hispanic veterans' unem ployment is a mistake. Figures from a September 1985 report by the Veterans Administration showed 5o/a (42,200) of the 843,700 total Hispanic veterans in the United States were unemployed. The rate is 4o/o for all veterans. Latina veterans also had a higher unemployment rate (5o/a), with 2,200 of 44,400 out of work as compared to 3o/o for all female veterans. The Outreach Program, begun by Labor and implemented by the Forum in 1979 to assist all veterans in obtaining VA and state benefits, resume preparation and job interview skills, was funded at $200,000 for the first year. Funding peaked at$600,000 in 1982 and it was allotted $276,000 for 1985-continued on page 2 VA' s Alvarez Leaves Post Everett Alvarez, Deputy Administrator of the Veterans Administration, quit his position as second in command at the agency May9. Alvarez, the first U.S. pilot to be shot down over North Vietnam(1964) , held the VA position since 1982, when he was nominated for it by President Ronald Reagan. Prior to that Alvarez was deputy director of the Peace Corps for a year. After spending 8 1/2 years as a prisoner of war and being released in 1973, Alvarez continued on in the Navy. He retired as a commander in 1980. He has a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, a master's in operations research and a law degree. Alvarez said he plans to pursue a position in the private corporate sector. nsusAdvisors Finally Meet The U.S. Census Bureau has decided not to eliminate the question on "national origin" for the count of Hispanics in the 1990 Census as it proposed two years ago. The bu r eau ' s decision was formally made public during discussions with the agency's Hispanic Advisory Committee that along with three other minority advisory groups, met for the first time May 1920 in Arlington, Va. In the meeting, committee member Thomas Rodriguez from Colorado recommended the elimination of the question, suggesting that a Hispanic designation be included in the " race " question. His request met resistance from other members and bureau officials, among them Assistant Division Chief for Ethnic and Racial Statistics Nampeo McKenney. She said that a pretest in Chicago last year showed that the inclusion of " Hispanic" with "black" and "white" in the race category would result in confusion over race and ethnicity and probably cause an undercount. The agency is now completing analysis of two versions of the national origin question it tested recently in the Los Angeles Hispanic community . One requires all Hispanic groups to write in their national origin. The other asks respondents to check for Mexican, Puerto Rican or Cuban ancestry while requiring a write-in response from other Hispanic groups. The initial proposal to count Latinos as a MALDEF Sues Chevron The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a complaint May 12 charging the northern California operations of Chevron USA with discrimination in the promotion, training and assignment of Hispanics and blacks. The complaint,f.iledi byiMALDEF along with the Center for Law in the Public Interest, charged that the almost all-white managerial and supervisory staff used subjective standards to determine job assignment promotion, com ;pensation and on-the-job training. The complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District in San Francisco on behalf of two Hispanic and six black oil production employees. race was advanced by the bureau i n 1984 after 40o/o of Hispanics counted in the 1980 Census wrote in "Hispanic" in the "race" question . Hispanic organizations such as the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, the League of United Latin American Citizens and Image so strongly opposed the change through"the most aggressive campaign ever seen by the bureau, " said McKenney, that agency officials decided it would cause a withdrawal of needed community support. At last week's meeting, committee mem bers otherwise agreed on all selected agenda items. Among these: to develop a list of His panic advertising agencies that could partici pate in the census ad campaign; to assure effective distribution of Spanish questionnaires; to monitor changes in the census for Puerto Rico (the bureau is meeting with government officials there next month) ; and special coverage for hard-to-count groups such as migrant workers, undocumented and the homeless. Congressman Robert Garcia, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Census and Population, had criticized the Department of Commerce for its delay in forming the com mittees, which act as community liaison bodies and. review the census planning that started in 1984. Although scheduled to be selected by early 1985, the four minority advisory panels were not appointed by the White House until last month. Results of the Los Angeles area pretests continued on page 2 Agustin Gonzalez Dies Agustin Gonzalez, founder and executive directortof New York's Puerto Rican Family Institute, died May 16 after being struck by a car while vacationing in Mexico City. He was 66. Gonzalez founded the Institute in 1965 to provide counseling and other services to Puerto Rican families during their first three years in New York. He was credited with organizing the first conference on the human rights of Puerto Ric . i rants in November 1983. > MAY 2 ?1986

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Sin Pelos en Ia lengua His commentary repeats what h i s news service has been writing , what leading Mexico City newspapers and electronic media are shouting, and what an enraged Mexican people are painting on banners of protest since U . S . Customs Service Commissioner William von Raab and Senator Jesse Helms stepped up Washington' s war of words against Mexico-accusing that country, as Jorge Castaneda . MEXICO BASHES B A CK : " Wh i le the Uni t ed States criticizes the narcotics traffic and corrupti on i n other countr ies , it takes a different stance on what's happened at home. Yet"Illegal drugs are a $110 billion b u s i nes s in the United Sta t es ... "Some 60 million nor teamericanos have tried marijuana; 30 million use it regularly ... described it , "of every vice under the sun." "A reported21. 6 mill i on U.S . residents have tried cocaine; a quarter of a million are addicts60,000 o f them between 1 3 and 1 7 years o l d Castaneda, National University of Mexico professor and eloquent chronicler of that country's needs and moods , uses a May 21 New York Times commentary to point out that" It's Mexico-bashing time in Washington again." He adds: ''In truth, the Reagan administration has no Mexico policy. Either it is only able to focus on one issue at a time-drugs, Central America , immigration issues . O r it is unable to unify separate federal agencies ' policies into a coherent whole ... "Cocaine is served as an hors d ' oeu vr e at congressional staff parties ... " From 1983 to 1985, about 300 U . S . d r ug agents, off i cials , polit i cians and even judges were arr ested for corrupt i on in their drug enforcement activities . . . " " If Mexico is indeed suffering the equivalent of retaliat i on for what it has not done, t h . en i t might as well go ahead and do it. . . " That's part of the laundry list of shameless U.S. hypocrisy which Jose Carreno. Washington correspondent for the Mexican national news service, N6timex , attacks in a Hispanic Link commentary, . It's not smart-to call your neighbor names . Or, as an old campesino me , "Never urinate on an electric -Kay Barbaro Bernaldez Protests Cut continued f r om p a g e 1 86. From . March 1979 to Apri l 1986 J he program helped 1 2 ,985 veterans (61% of whom were Hispanic) and placed 6 ,982, . Forum figures showed. Threatened with closure are Outr each Program offices in San Anto nio, Los Angeles, Brownsvile and McAllen, Te x as . Prog r am offices in Denver and Chicago w i ll continue to operate after receiving local and state funding, said the program's e x ecutive director , Carlos Martinez. Berm'ildez said he hoped to meet with Vice President George Bush within the n e x t two weeks to gain his support i n reviv i ng a program he claims Bush already supports. Other statistics from the VA report showed the Hispan i c veteran: e Was younger (56% under age 45) compared to non-Hispanic veteran s (36 % under45). e Earned less than non Hispan i cs, with media n income for males peak i ng at $17 ,600 vs. $20,900 for non-Hispanics . Latinas ' median income peaked at $6,800; non Latinas, $9,800. e Was greatest in numbers in the states of California, Arizona, New Mex ico, Texas, Colorado, Nevada. Utah and New York U.S. HISPANIC VETERANS BY WAR ERA (as of 1980) Male Female Vietnam 312,200 12 ,400 Korea 118,100 2 ,200 WWII 227,800 5 ,300 WWI 8,400 500 Peacetime 177,200 24,000 Total 843,700 44,400 Jobless Rate Up Slightly The Hispanic civi lian unemployment rose slightly from 1 0.3% in March to 1 0.4% in April , the U.S. Department of Labor reported. 2 Census Advisors Meet conti nu e d from p age 1 will be released this summer. The bureau has also scheduled for 1987 " focus group interviews" in the New York and Miami areas and a National Content Test on the national or i gin question . The committee r ecommended that a border area town be included in these tests. In addition to Rodriguez , an accountant from Aurora , Colo., the other four committee members attending las t week's meeting were : Leobardo Estr ada, a Los Angeles demog r apher who was elected as chairman ; Bebe Zuniga , a businesswoman f rom Laredo ; Carmen Junco , general manager of Puerto Rico ' s Centro de Bellas Artes ; and John Lasseville, a Spanish International Network polling expert from Miami. Four other comm i ttee members, Oscar Mor an of San Antonio, national president of LULAC ; Manuel Casiano , newspaper publisher from Puerto Rico; Maria Ward , a business woman from New Orleans, La., and Eduardo Bernaldez, of El Paso and chairman of the American G l Forum, were not present at the meetings. Also recommended by the committee was the appointment of New York and Chicago representatives . In both citi es , t he bureau has lawsuits pendi ng that charge a 1980 Census undercount of the cities' minority popu lations. Dora Delgado NHSF Starts Fund Drive The Nati onal Hispanic Scholarship Fund launched its fund-rais i ng campa i gn this month to raise $1 m ill ion for more than 1 , 000 Hispani c college students in t he 1986-87 school year . The goal is almost a 50% increase from the $589,000 released in April to 857 student& for 1985-86. San Antonio Archbishop Patricio Flores started NHSF i n 1976 with $30,000 for 115 students. The Fund has secured $1 million from Anheuser-Busch Cos., with $400 ,000 earmarked for scholarships, $400,000 for promotion and $200,000 for program development. Supreme Court's Civil Rights Decision Lauded The Supreme Court's decision on May 19 to strike down an affirmative action plan in Jackson , Mich., bodes well for the advances made by Hispanics and other groups in c i vil rights , accord i ng to representatives of two national Hispanic organizations. "Every member of the court rejected, either implicitly or explicitly, the Justice Department's philosophy that affirmative action plans based on class-specific remedies are unconstitutional, " said John Trasvina , a legislative attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund . The Justice Department con t ends that remedies should be directed only to proven victims of discrimination, not classes. Charles Kamasaki, legislative analyst with the National Council of La Raza , said the decision will help dispel the notion that affirmative action plans using goals are the same as quotas. The 5-4 ruling rejected the position that hiring goals were unconsti tutional. The court found unconstitutional an af firmative action plan by the Jackson Board of Education that laid off white teachers with more seniority in order to preserve the existing percentage of blacks. Laying off employees, unlike giving hiring preference to minor i t i es, places too great a burden on whites, held the court. In the case, Wygant v . Jackson Boa r d of Education , the court stopped short, however, of supporting the Reagan administration philosophy that af firmative action remedies should apply only to those victims directly affected. Trasvina said the decision and the rejection May 20 by a Senate committee of the nom i nat i on of Jeffrey Zuckermana proponent of victim-specific remedies -as general counsel of the Equal Employment Oppor tunity Commission indicates a healthy future for civil rights and affirmative action. The court is expected to hear two affirmative action cases i n July. -Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report I i

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THE GOOD NEWS U.S. HISPANIC VETERANS: The Veterans Administration published in September 1985 a Chart Book on Black and Hispanic Veterans with statistics on the number of veterans from various war eras, education attained, employment levels and other information. For a free copy of the 53-page book, contact: Veterans Administration, Research Division 711,810 Vermont Ave. NW, Washington, D . C 20420 (202) 389-2625. BILINGUAL STORYBOOKS: Well-known children's stories such as "Cinderella" and "Bambi" and other educational materials are available in bilingual texts. Individuals who cannot find them in local bookstores can write to: Western Publishing Co . , Department M, P .O. Box 700, Racine, Wis . 53401 (414) 633. PUERTO RICANS IN LITERATURE: The 322-page reference book "lmagenes e ldentidades: El Puertorriqueiio en Ia Literatura" includes. essays from Puerto Rican writers (from the island and the U . S . ) and from other Hispanic and non-Hispanic scholars examining topics such as images of Puerto Ricans in popular U .S. novels to problems in literature translations. Send $12.95 plus $1.50 for postage to: GPC, P.O. Box 4387, Union City, N.J. 07087 (201) 6485594. CUBAN PRISONERS: The 44-page " Atlanta Federal Penitentiary" report by the House Judiciary Subcommittee describes prison conditions for the 1,869 Marie! Cubans incarcerated there. For a copy, send $1.50 to U .S. Government Printing Office, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, D . C . 20402-9315 (202) 275-3030. AID TO SMALL BUSINESSES: The57-page"TheSmall Business Handbook" outlines a wide range of government procurement programs, grants, marketing assistance plans and other programs available from federal agencies. To order, send $14.50 to: Federal Reprints, P.O . Box 15301, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 543-1826. LEADERSHIP: The 27-page "The Tasks of Leadership" is the second of a series of papers on the subject which describes nine leadership responsibilities such as envisioning goals, motivating and managing groups and serving as a model. For a copy send $1 to: Independent Sector, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 223-8100. MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD IN CONGRESS: The National Council of La Raza is inviting individuals and organizations to join its Advocacy Bank, a pool of monies financing messages to Congress on key issues affecting the Hispanic community. Authorizations can be given for ten ($22.25) to 20 ($44.50) mailgram messages per year on seven issues pre-selected by NCLR. To obtain authorization forms, write to: NCLR, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, 20 F Street NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D . C . 20001 (202) 628-9600. CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report pays $25 for political or humorous cartoons. Submit to Carlos Morales, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. Calendar IMMIGRATION Washington, D .C. May 29 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS STUDENT SERVICES Bilingual Counselor2 Master's in counseling, student services or appropriate behavioral science specialization, plus fluency in Spanish required . Positions available July 1, 1986. • 11 month faculty position requires 2 years counseling experience, preferably at a community college. e Grant position to recruit and counsel disadvantaged students and coordinate tutorial activities in Educational Opportunity Fund Program. Two years related higher education experience required. NO TELEPHONE INQUIRIES Send complete resume and 3 letters of reference of each position by June 4, 1986. Prior applicants need not re-apply . Office of The Dean of Student Services Bergen Community College 400 Paramus Road Paramus, N.J. 07652-1595 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER CAPITAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR Salary: $25,317 Ann. # 36146EPRC Professional position in the Parks Division. fnitiates , plans and supervises construction ol all departmental capital projects which will include preparing bid specifications, ensuring contract compliance gathering information for bid packages, working with blueprints, monitoring capital budget and other duties as assigned. Requires ba c helor' s degree supplemented by a master's in business. public administration or related field and one-year experience in contract maintenance , capital planning , budg etary work or related fie lds . Preference may be given to applicants with yea rs of experience bey o nd the minimum and/or experience i n a local government or similar setting. Official Arlington County application form required To request application material please call (703) 558 weekdays between 8 arn and 5 p . m . All applications must be rece ived into the Personnel D epartment no later than 5 p.m. on May 29, 1986. PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to : Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p .m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word Display rates: $35 per column inch. EDITOR/WRITER to research wri te and edit news stories for the newspaper of the National Association of Social Workers. Look ing for self-motivator who can initiate story ideas as well as research and write articles. Experience in headline writing, proofreading, wordprocessing and photography preferred. Degree in English or Journalism (or the equivalent experience) and two years experi ence as a reporter required. Starting salary to $21 ;500 plus excellent benefits. Resume to Employment Specialist, NASW, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910. EO E. NUESTRAS NOTICIAS, Washington, D.C. base d Spanishlanguage radio network is seeking network quality anchor. Five years or more broadcast experience a must. No . phone calls please. Send tape and resume to : Luis Covarrubias, Nuestras Noticias, UPI, 1400 I St. NW , Washington, D.C . 20005. ADMISSIONS DIRECTOR With the support of an publi cations program and building upon the tution's excellent track record in attracting applicants, plan and direct all activities related to student recruitment and admission. We are an innovative , cooperative education com munity college of 7,800 FTE's. Qualifications: Bachelor's degree, experience in admissions or a related field , creativity. Salary: Highly competitive, based upon qualifications and experience. SenO cover letter and resume by June 20 to: Dean Susan Armiger, Room 4, Division of External Affairs, LaGuardia Com munityCollege/CUNY, 31 0 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 . EOE/AAEmployer . . . COMING SOON THIS WEEK A subcommittee of the Congressional Joint Economic Committee will conduct its last of three hearings with testimony on the demographic and economic consequences of immigration. BUSINESS, TAXES AND BALANCED BUDGET National Council of Hispanic Women Washington, D.C. June 2, 3 Alba Moesser (202) 639-8823 SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Philadelphia May 28 The Association of Puerto Ricans in Science and Engineering will convene with representatives of other science organizations to discuss attracting minorities to these fields. Eric Munoz (718) 470-2968 Hispanic Link Weekly Report Nancy McConnell (202) 546-5030 HISPANIC LEADERSHIP Merrillville , Ind. May 30,31 The Midwest Voter Registration and Education Project will have its third of nine training seminars on organizing effective voter registration campaigns and leadership development programs. Maria Elena Molina (614) 464-1116 MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering St. Louis June 3-5 Beverly Schwartz (21 2) 279-2626 RAUL YZAGUIRRE ROAST American Gl Forum Washington, D .C. June 4 Alex Armendaris (202) 296-2346 3

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Arts & Entertainment lead . Ernie Reyes Jr. (of Asian/Hispanic heritage) will play a young martial arts expert on The Last Electric Knight, to air on Fridays from 9 to 9:30 p.m. FALL SEASON UNVEILED: The three major television networks have announced their schedules for the 1986-87 season, and Hispanic talent is featured in three of the 24 new prime time programs scheduled. ABC will return The Colbys at its 9 p.m. Thursday spot. Ricardo Montalbc'm is a regular in the serial. NBC, first in the season's ratings race , has the largest number of returning shows with Hispanic cast members. This fall, the network will premiere LA Law with Hispanic actor Jimmy Smits in the "key role " of Victor Sifuentes. With Hill Street Blues co-creator Steven Bochco as executive producer, LA Law will air Fridays at 10 p.m. (following the returning Miami Vice, moved up to the 9 p.m. slot). Five out of six programs from the '85-'86 season with Hispanics in lead, regular or recurring roles will be back this fall. CBS, with second-place ratings in the just-ended season, was first to announce its fall plans May 7 . Among seven new series given the green light, Kay O'Brien, Surgeon features Tony-winner Priscilla lopez. She plays Rosa Villanueva, the head emergency room nurse in the hospital where the drama is set. The show is scheduled for Thursdays at 10 p.m. (all times are PI). Rene Enriquez will continue making irregular and less frequent appearances on Hill Street Blues-reportedly because the actor wishes to pursue other artistic interests. Other returning actors on NBC are Saundra Santiago and Edward James Olmos, on Miami Vice, and Tina Yothers on Family Ties(which remains on Thursdays at 8:30 p .m.). Unchanged at the 10 p.m. Friday slot is Falcon Crest-with the largest Hispanic cast on prime time network TV. It returns for a sixth season in the fall. The show features lorenzo lamas, Ana Alicia and Cesar Romero as leads. Another NBC show with a Hispanic regular was dropped. Dancer/ actor Alfonso Ribeiro joined the cast of Silver Spoons two seasons ago. The network announced fall plans May 14. Third place ABC announced its fall lineup May 12. Its nine new prime time programs include the only new show with a Hispanic -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report RADIO MARTI MARKS FIRST YEAR: Radio Marti celebrated its first full year of broadcast ing May 20. A service of the Voice of America, Radio Marti allots 40% of its broadcasting to news related programming. The rest of its 17 1/2 hour schedule (it was 14 hours until this February) is composed of a soup opera, features and commentaries. A spokeswoman with VOA said there are no firm figures on audience growth, but feedback from Cubans arriving in Miami and mail from Cubans to their relatives on the U .S. mainland indicate the station is picking up new listeners . She also credits a revamp of news programming in Cuba to competition from Marti. The staff at the station has grown from 130 to 164. BUDDING HISPANIC JOURNALISTS: Five. of the 16 candidates chosen for the 11-week HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 / Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Mora les Reporting : Dora Delgado, Feli x Perez , Charlie Erick sen, Antonio MejiasRentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' i packets at your next conference or convention . For details, ' contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. 1 4 Summer Program for Minority Journalists at the University of California , Berkeley, are Hispanic. They are Adam Gettinger-Brizuela from San Diego, Joseph Gutierrez from Torrance, Calif., Beatriz Johnston-Hernandez from los Angeles, . Yleana Martinez from Austin, Texas, and luis Monteagudo from El Cajon, Calif. Of the remaining 11 participants, eight are black, two are Asian American and one is Native American . The program, which runs from June 1 through Aug. 15, lines up graduates with jobs, normally before the session begins. This year only one of the Hispani cs, Martinez, has been paired with a daily, the Dallas Times Herald. A spokeswoman with the Institute for Jour nalism Education, the non-profit body that administers the program, said they will all be placed no later than midway through the session . Five Hispanics will be on the p r ogram ' s 27-member faculty this summer, each putting in a two-week stint on a rotational basis . The five are Maggie Rivas and John Gonzalez, both with the Dallas Morning News; Patrisia Gonzales , The Philadelphia Inquirer; Elaine Rivera, The Washington Times; and Frank del Olmo, Los Angeles Times. Another Times newsman, Frank Sotomayor, is the program's co-director . HISPANIC EDITORS: Two New York His panics made the final cut for IJE's Editing Program for Minority Journalists at the Univer sity of Arizona in Tucson June 9 through Aug. 1. Maria Fugate with the Daily News and Conrado Hernandez with El Diario/La Prensa join six black and two Asian American partici pants. The five Hispanics on faculty, which totals 23, will be rotated, with their stays ranging from one to two weeks. They are Frank Soto mayor, Fernando Dovalina and Meriemel Rodriguez of the Houston Chronicle; Guillermo Torres, Dallas Morning News; and John Gomes, The Seattle Times. Felix Perez MEMORIAL DAY OBSERVANCE: The names of 110 Vietnam veterans were recently added to the black polished granite walls of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington , D.C. They were service members who died in war related duty outside of the war zone. Included in the names added were Joseph Stephan Henriquez of Long Island , N.Y., and Miguel A. Hernandez-Diaz of New York City . There are now 58,132 names on the walls , 8 10% of whom are Hispanic. Double-exposure photograph of the memorial wall and statue is by Hector Ericksen Mendoza. Hispanic Link Weekly Report