Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, June 16, 1986

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, June 16, 1986
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas) is asking former Housing and Urban Development official Kathleen Peroff to appear before his subcommittee July 17 to explain how a 1984 HUD homeless study was conducted. Gonzalez, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development, claims the study, which estimated the homeless numbered 250,000 to350,000, underestimates a “national problem”... United States Treasurer Katherine D. Ortega helps screen applicants in New York that will welcome and escort dignitaries to official Liberty Weekend events in New York City July 3 to 6. Ortega oversees the U nited States Liberty Coin program, which
| H lUHh
expects ro raise $40 million for the restorationof the S>raTue of Liberty ... Ricardo Montero Duque, a Cuban jailed on the island for 25 years for his role in the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, is released by Cuban President Fidel Castro and joins his family in Miami. Some 30 political prisoners have been released from island jails in the last month. . . Joe Coto, acting Oakland schools superintendent, is chosen as superintendent... Nilda and Jos6 Rom6n are the first couple in Puerto Rico to have a test tube baby- Adlin Marie, born May 31... Rudy Ramos Esquivel, 50, is put to death in Texas by lethal injection for the 1978 slaying of a narcotics officer while on parole from a rape conviction. It was the fourth execution in Texas this year, the 14th since Texas resumed executions in 1982, and the eighth in the United States this year...
^no^J^HISPANI^UN^WEEK^^^^^OES!!!
Latinos Advance in Texas Races
Adult Illiterates Targeted in Bill
Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) announced June 11 the introduction by this week of an English Proficiency Act establishing a $10 million fund to create and carry out English-language literacy programs for adults and out-of-school immigrants.
Eligible for funding would be local schools, educational agencies, public libraries, prisons and community-based organizations
Co-sponsored by 13 members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and 17 other House members, the bill would create new English-literacy programs and supplement existing ones. Presently, Martinez §§id, long waiting lists for such programs exist in his home state and elsewhere.
According to the U.S. Department of Education’s 1982 English Language Proficiency Survey, 49% of Hispanics are illiterate compared to only 13% in the total population.
Making reference to proposals by the national organization U.S. English to make English the nation’s official language, Rep. Martinez said: “Passing a resolution and demanding that English be the official language is not enough. If we want them (immigrants) to learn the language, we should provide the way.”
Baby Jesse Gets Heart
Jesse Dean Sepulveda, born in California May 25 with a terminal heart defect, received a heart transplant June 10 from another infant born the same day in Wyoming, Mich.
Doctors at Loma Linda University Medical Center in Los Angeles had originally decided against a transplant operation, saying that the unmarried parents of “Baby Jesse” could not provide adequate post-surgical care. Jesse Sepulveda, 26, and Deana Binkley,
17, then agreed to turn over custody of their child to his paternal grandparents, which satisfied the doctors.
Parents of the heart donor, Frank Clemen-shaw and Deborah Walters- also unmarried - decided to offer their son Frank’s heart after learning of the California couple’s plight on a nationally telecast talkshow. The infant was left brain-dead following a delivery complication that cut his oxygen.
i
Two of three Hispanic candidates won nominations for statewide elected positions in Texas’ Democratic and Republican primary runoffs June 7.
If either wins in that state’s general election this November, he would be the first Hispanic elected to statewide office in Texas’ history.
San Antonio District Judge Roy Barrera Jr., 34, handily outpolled his opponent in the Republican runoff for attorney general. Barrera, a Democrat turned Republican in 1982, took 68.5%, or 102,352, of the vote compared with Ed Walsh, who received 31.5%, or 47,184 votes.
Barrera reportedly spent $750,000 in his primary campaign. Press reports say that he will need at least $3 million for his campaign against Democratic incumbent Jim Mattox Barrera told Weekly Report that he is prepared to raise “whatever is needed to win.”
Mattox won the 1982 attorney general’s race with 54% of the vote. He was indicted and acquitted last year of federal bribery charges. A Southwest Voter Registration Education Project study indicated that nine out of ten Hispanic votes went to Mattox in 1982. An estimated 1 million of Texas’ 7.9 .million voters are Hispanic.
Texas Supreme Court Justice Raul Gonz&lez
Sale of UPI Completed
Sale of United Press International to Mexico media mogul Mario V&zquez Rana for $41 million was completed June 11.
The financially beleaguered news service, the nation’s second largest, was formally sold a day after a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge in Washington, D.C., approved its jfinancial reorganization plan. Judge George Bason approved the plan June 10 after unsecured creditors voted 132-5 in favor of the sale.
The 79-year-old news service filed for bankruptcy in April 1985.
Vazquez Rafta said he planned to retain present staff. UPI Chairman and President Luis Nogales, credited by many as the architect of its turnaround, said he has not conferred with V&zquez Rana on his future role with UPI, but added he would stay if given a “significant policy role.”
won in his bid for his first full six-year term on that judicial body. Appointed to the court in 1984 by Gov. Mark White, Gonzalez beat Jay Gibson in the Democratic runoff forthe Place 4 seat on the Supreme Court. Gonzdlez had 54%, or 248,183, of the vote to Gibson’s 212,784. He faces Republican John Bates in November.
Gonz&lez was appointed to a South Texas appeals court seat in 1981 by then-Gov. Bill Clements. He became the first Hispanic to serve on the Texas Supreme Court three years later.
Dallas attorney George Martinez fell short in his quest for the Democratic nomination for the Place 1 seat on the state Criminal Appeals Court, mustering 43.7% of the vote.
In Texas primaries, voters may ask for either a Republican or Democratic ballot, regardless of their party affiliation. They cannot split their votes among candidates from both parties
Bob Baildn, state director of Jhe Republican National Hispanic Assembly of Texas, said Barrera did not carry a number of Hispanic counties in South Texas in the May 3 primary. A surprising finding, he said, was that Barrera did “remarkably well” among Republicans in Anglo counties.
Seven percent of the state’s 7.9 million
continued on page 2
City Favors English Only
The City Council of Monterey Park, California, passed June 3 a resolution calling for Congress to adopt English as the nation’s official language, for tougher national immigration laws, for condemnation of the sanctuary movement and for more cooperation with immigration officials by the city police. It was approved by a 3-1 vote, with one abstention.
Councilman Barry Hatch, a 49-year-old teacher elected to the body in April, said he introduced the resolution because undocumenteds were taking jobs from citizens, crowding schools, using tax-subsidized apartments and medical services and bringing diseases into the country. A
Monterey Park, a Los Angeles suburb, is 40% Asian and 37% Hispanic..
Last year, Hatch sponsored an English-only initiative which was rejected.on a legal technicality.


S/'n pelos en la. lengua
TEXAS TURNABOUT: About a year ago, Texas House Speaker Pro Tem Hugo Berlanga considered, then rejected, the thought of running for the Texas Railroad Commission. He told reporters in Austin that his decision was based, in part, on his belief that a Latino couldn’t win a statewide election.
“We may be just a little bit too early to spring a candidate for one of the top positions,” he said. The Corpus Christi Democrat added: “More important to me than electing a Hispanic is re-electing the entire Democratic ticket that is currently holding statewide office.”
It obviously wasn’t more important to the state's Hispanic Republicans With their prodding, the stdte GOP now has a strong candidate for attorney general next November in 34-year-old Roy Barrera.
While in “progressive” California, with its 4.5 million Hispanics neither party is willing to give a Hispanic serious support for statewide office, Texas, with 3 million Hispanics, now has TWO Latino naturals whom political powerbrokers cannot ignore. The other, of course, is ■San Antonio’s Democratic Mayor Henry Cisneros.
Texas! That’s the state where a couple decades ago Latinos were so disenfranchised that they went out and created their own political party - La Raza Unida
That Barrera used to be- until just a few years ago- a Democrat is
something that Bob Baildn, Texas director of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, is not likely to let us forget
“A lot of conservative Hispanic Democrats here are now going to see- as we’ve been telling them all along- that the way to November is through Us, the Republican Party, instead of getting bumped off in the Democratic primary.”
Baildn makes a prediction that you may want to cut out and pin on your political bulletin board.
Inspired by Barrera’s success, he says we’re going to see a lot of Texas Latino politicos, including “some very big names,” switching from the burro to the elefante in the next year.
If his promise turns out to be just a/'re, you can always send it back to him wrapped in a tortilla.
ANOTHER CHEERY NOTE FROM CALIFORNIA: The Los Angeles Times reports that in suburban Irwindale the 27-member police department is torn between Anglo and Latino factions. It wrote May 30:
“Several of the dozen officers interviewed forTheTimes article said the feud had split the department into a largely Anglo“A Team” and a largely Latino“BTeam.” A handful of “BTeam” officers said they had received death threats after they reported assaults on Latino prisoners and incidents of police misconductto(City Manager Charles) Martin
and Chief (Julian) Miranda.” . -.......... .. . . *■- ■rr
- Kay Barbaro
P.R. Early Growth Tests Are Disputed
A U.S. government study that found no trace of synthetic estrogen hormones in the meat and poultry supply in Puerto Rico was improperly conducted, an island physician charged June 4. Residues of the hormone were believed to have caused the high case incidence of premature sexual development, or thelarche, involving breast development in thousands,of Puerto Rican girls as young as one year old.
Dr. Carmen Saenz de Rodriguez, one of two pediatricians whose charges of food contamination four years ago initiated three U.S. Department of Agriculture special investigations, told Weekly Report that the 1985 study released May 29 was compromised when agency officials announced in advance its intention to collect samples from slaughter plants and local markets.
Saenz de Rodriguez pointed out that on March 13, a month before the test, Dr. Lester Crawford, associate administrator of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, met with Puerto Rican farmers to inform them of the test The disclosure, Saenz contends, gave farmers ample time to diminish or suppress the use of synthetic estrogen as an animal growth stimulant.
Dr. Crawford said, however, that announcement of sample collections are necessary to prevent work disruption in slaughter and market outlets. Based on previous FSIS random tests, Crawford said that the agency feels assured that there is no estrogen contamination in Puerto Rico.
After the first rush of reported cases in 1982, the government of Puerto Rico appointed a special commission to investigate the problem. Saenz de Rodriguez said that with no funds allocated by the government, the commission’s effectiveness has been curtailed.
Latinos, Bennett Clash
Representatives from national Hispanic organizations assailed June 5 a bill by U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett that would lift the 4% cap on federal spending for alternative bilingual instruction methods.
The National Council of La Raza, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Association for Bilingual Education and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund charged at a Senate hearing that the bill was a ruse to put more discretionary power in the hands of Bennett so that he can dismantle the program. Bennett, also at the hearing, denied the charge, saying that removal of the cap would allow school districts to choose which instruction method is best.
Currently, three-quarters of 60% of the total bilingual education funds must be spent on the transitional method, which teaches core classes in the student’s native language until he acquires competency with English. The remaining 36% of all funds is divided among several programs, including research, evaluation assistance, training and fellowships.
Bill opponents fear that school districts would revert to teaching limited-English-proficient students with the immersion method, where instruction is in English.
The Senate version of the bill was introduced by Sen. Dan Quayle (R-Ind.) March 27. The House version was introduced April 9 by Rep. Jim Jeffords (R-Vt.)
Committee mark-up of the Senate bill is expected this summer. No hearings have been held in the House.
Immigration Panel Meets
The House Judiciary Committee convened June 11 for a general debate session on the Simpson-Rodino immigration bill.
The committee, chaired by Peter Rodino (D-N.J.), is expected to meet again this week to begin the mark-up process on specific amendments to the bill.
Bilingual Graduation
Imperial College’s 292 graduates participated in bilingual commencement exercises June 7, the first such full college ceremony in California.
The bilingual graduation rites were requested by the Latino student group MEChA to allow Spanish-speaking parents to share in their children’s achievement The city of Imperial and the college student body are both 60% Hispanic.
College President John DePaoli ordered the ceremony although the student council twice refused to endorse the concept. The faculty senate supported DePaoli by a 4-3 vote.________________________________
Latinos Advance in Texas
continued from page 1
voters went to the polls for the runoff; 430,000 of these were Democrats and 130,000 were Republicans.
In a state where more than three out of four voters and more than nine out of ten Hispanic voters in the primary were Democrats, Barrera sees himself as an underdog but expects considerable Latino crossover support.
In the 1982 election, he outpolled Democratic Gov. White by more than 11,000 votes in Bexar County, which is nearly 50% Hispanic. “We don’t have to theorize about whaf s going to happen- it (Hispanic ticket-splitting) already has happened. And it will happen again,” Barrera said.
William Velasquez, executive director of the non-partisan SVREP, said: “Barrera will probably get more (Hispanic) votes than any other Republican candidate in the state’s history.” He added, however, that the primary was a poor indicator because previous Hispanic crossover patterns were not recorded, making comparisons difficult.
Ruben Bonilla, chairman of the Mexican American Democrats of Texas, said “there will be moderate crossover but largely among upper income Hispanics.” - Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
ENGLISH PROFICIENCY: Copies of the English Proficiency Act introduced in Congress by Rep. Matthew Martinez are available from: Congressional Hispanic Caucus, House Annex 2, Rm. 557, Washington, D.C. 20515(202)226-3430.
ENGLISH PROFICIENCY SURVEY: The U.S. Department of Education has collected a computerized data file of200 items testing the English proficiency of8,800 school age children and 3,400 adults About two-thirds of the surveyed population is Hispanic. The 1982 English Language Proficiency Survey is available to non-government researchers for $90 from: Ann Milne, DRC, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223-5555.
BILINGUAL STUDENTS WANTED: Information about Pennsylvania’s higher education institutions and federal assistance programs is included in three Spanish brochures designed to promote recruitment of bilingual and international students. Request the free brochures from: Scott Shewell, assistant to the director of communication, State System of Higher Education, Box 809,301 Market St, Harrisburg, Pa. 17108(717)783-8887.
STUDIES ON REFUGEE AND UNDOCUMENTED LABOR: A study suggesting that undocumenteds are displacing native workers and another recommending improvement of refugee employment programs were published in April by the U.S. General Accounting Office. First five copies are free, additional ones are $2 each. Request study Nos. 129697 and 129532 from: U.S. Central General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
BILINGUAL EDUCATION: The National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education issued March 31 its tenth annual report to Congress. Free single copies of the 90-page report are available from: U.S. Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Reporters’ Building, Rm. 421, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 245-2609.
SPANISH FOR JOURNALISTS: The deadline for working journalists and photographers interested in applying to the 1986 three-month Spanish language program in Cuernavaca, Mexico, has been extended to July 1. The fellowship pays for tuition and transportation. A letter stating purpose and benefits derived from learning the language, written permission from editor, work samples and letters of recommendation should be sent to: Spanish Language Program, National Press Foundation, Rm. 1282, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 662-7350.
THE NICARAGUAN CONFLICT: The 66-page report “The U.S. and Nicaragua, Eighteen Experts Speak” is a transcript of a day-long seminar held by The Heritage Foundation. For a copy, send $3 to: Publications Office, Tho Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 546-4400.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
The following two positions are with LaGuardia Community College.
DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE & COMMUNITY RELATIONS We seek a highly creative and energetic person to coordinate the College’s outreach to a variety of constituencies including alumni, legislators, public officials community agencies and others Supervise staff who administer the following College operations Alumni, Events Speakers Bureau and Legislative Affairs Represent the College at various events. Re* quirements B.A, M.A preferred; experience in community relations preferably in a college setting; ability to solve problems creatively, excellent writing, speaking and interpersonal skills Salary commensurate with qualifications excellent fringe benefits Women and minorities encouraged to apply. Send letter and resume by July 11 toe College and Community Relations Room 4.
REGISTRAR’S OFFICE ANTICIPATED VACANCIES Responsibilities include providing direct counter services to students and staff; gathering, analyzing, and disseminating data related to enrollment placement testing and grading; assisting in preparation of class schedule, assignment of classrooms on-line registration (on and off campus) and grade entry, assisting in certification of graduates and evaluation of transfer credit Candidates should be articulate, attentive to detail, able to thrive in a busy, high-pressure environment Prior experience with (or willingness to learn) microcomputer operation; bachelor's degree (or associate degree and four years related experience) required; bilinguality (English/Spanish and/or American Sign) a plus Salary. $17,514+, based on qualifications Registrar's Office, Room4, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31* 10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101, EOE/AA Employer.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234*0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display rates $35 per column inch.
REGION DIRECTOR
Camp Fire Inc., a national voluntary youth agency, is seeking qualified candidates for the position of region director.
This position is part of Camp Fire’s field service system which provides technical assis* tance and management support to local units (Camp Fire councils) throughout the country. Incumbent will develop and implement region plans to promote membership growth and excellence of management deploy and supervise paid and volunteer staff and provide management consulting service to councils within the South-South Central region of the United States This position reports to the director of council services
We are seeking candidates with the appropriate combination of education, hands-on management and not-for-profit experience with an emphasis on financial and asset management Candidates must possess effective interpersonal communication, consulting and negotiation skills and analytical abilities. This position requires extensive travel.
Camp Fire Inc. provides competitive salary and an outstandingbenefii package. Interested applicants must send a resume and salary history to Mr. Rick Williams, assistant director, Human Resources Management, Camp Fire Inc., 4601 Madison Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 64112. Deadline for application is July 1.
CUNICAL THERAPIST for Hispanic Mental Health Services. To provide mental health services to general and Hispanic adults, families andchildren. Minimum requirements: fluency in Spanish and a master's degree in psychology, social work, counseling for nursing and one-year experience counseling adults, families or children. Salary range: $21,700 to$28,751. Application deadline: July 31, 1986, 5 p.m. Contact Genesee County Community Mental Health Services, Personnel Department 420 W. 5th Ave., Flint Michigan 48503 (313) 257-. 3709. EOE/MF.
PRINCEGEORGESCOUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotiine (301) 952-3408.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
EAST COAST BOOKINGS? Culture Clash, from San Francisco, the only Chicano/Latino comedy troupe in the universe, will “perform (at the New York Joseph Papp Theater Festival Aug 21-28. The troupe is interested in touring East Coast after Aug. 28. Call Mauricio at Aviles Productions (415) 647*6141.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN Immaculata, Pa. June 18
Immaculata College will stage the third in its series of colloquiums on the changing role of Latin American women in the community.
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400
IMAGEN AWARDS
Beverly Hills, Calif. June 19
The Hispanic Media-Image Task Force of the National
Conference of Christians and Jews will conduct its
2nd annual awards luncheon for people in film and
television who portray H ispanics in an accurate and
positive manner.
Mark Siegel (213) 385-0491 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
GALA ANNIVERSARY FIESTA Washington, D.C. June 19
El Centro Wilson, serving the Washington-area Hispanic community since 1971 with services ranging from English lessons to job placement, will celebrate its 15th anniversary.
Steve Ramirez (202) 483-8548
Miami June 20
The Camara de Comercio Latina de los Estados Unidos will have Alicia Conill, president of Conill Advertising, as the keynote speaker at this event honoring Hispanasfortheirachievementsin business Orlando Naranjo (305) 642-3870
CENTRO DEL BARRIO San Antonio June 20
U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) will keynote this awards banquet of the Centro del Barrio, a social service agency in San Antonio serving Hispanics and other low-income groups.
Ernesto G6mez (512) 924-5148
COMING SOON
FIRST STATE ENCUENTRO Archdiocese of St Paul and Minneapolis St. Paul, Minn. June 27-29 Claudia Eguia-Jaime (61‘2) 291-4480
AWARDS AND INSTALLATION BANQUET Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles June 28 Lourdes Arce (213) 725-3970
SPOTLIGHT
LULACS NATIONAL CONVENTION: The League of United Latin American Citizens will hold its 57th annual convention July 9-13 in Las Vegas, Nev., titled “Building Bridges for Education.” The event will feature a debate on the U.S. English movement, with former California Sen. S.I. Hayakawa debating Sarah Melendez of the American Council on Education and Tony Bonilla, former president of LULAC. For further information, contact Robert Rivan at (702) 384*3290.
HISPANA AWARDS BANQUET


Arts & Entertainment
IMAGEN AWARDS RETURN: For the second year in a row, the National Conference of Christians and Jews hands out its Imagen awards in Los Angeles this week.
A total of 21 television and film program entries compete this year for the Cartier-designed crystal trophy - down from last year's 28. ,The purpose of the awards, which are to be given at a Beverly Hills luncheon June 19, is to “encouragethe portrayal of Hispanifcs in a positive and more accurate manner in television-and motion pictures.”
Imagen awards are not given out in predetermined categories. Last year's winners were the film El norte, the El capitan episode of Hill Strejet Blues and the NBC network itself for having positive roles for Latinos in four series.
Television series on NBC and CBS dominate this year’s entries. Among them: Cagney and Lacey, Miami Vice, Falcon Crest, Santa Barbara and The Cosby Show. A strong contender is Thef House of Ramon Iglesia, a film produced by Laura Mola and directed by Luis Soto that aired on the PBS series American Playhouse this year.
One of the Imagen entries is also among 206 nominees for this fc year's daytime Emmy Awards. The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Television Arts and j Sciences will give out the awards July 17. Babies Having Babies-which starred Renee Estevez and was directed by her father, Martin j! Sheen - is nominated in the “best children’s special” category.
Sheen has completed work on another CBS Schoolbreak Special. He will star in My Dissident Mom this fall. Also to air this fall will be the j CBS movie Murder in Three Acts, which has completed shooting in Acapulco with Fernando Allende in a lead role.
ONE LINERS: Jesus Cardona, poetry editor of ViAztlan, has received a National Endowment for the Humanities summer fellowship to Boston University. Cardona is one of 15 instructors from across the country to participate in the graduate seminar on American lyric poetry... Burning Patients, a play by Chilean exile Antonio Skarmeta, opened at New York’s INTAR Theater on June 8...
A Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble is scheduled for three shovvs^ June 20-22 at Los Angeles’ Plaza de la Raza. . . Two exhibits by Puerto Rican photographers-one by Luis D. Vega at Congressman Robert Garcia’s New York district office and the other by Agustin Rivera at St. Pious V Church in the Bronx-continue through July 25...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HISPANIC MEDIA DIRECTORY: The Media Institute of Washington, D.C., has commissioned Ana Veciana-Su4rez, a reporter with the Living Today section of the Miami Herald, to compile and write a national directory of Hispanic print and electronic media
Veciana started work this month and will visit Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, New York, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., to gather information.
The fact-book, tentatively scheduled to be published this December, is being designed to serve as a guide for corporate representatives interested in gaining access to Spanish- and English-language Hispanic media. It will also provide marketers with a central source for advertising outlets.
MIAMI’S STARMAKER: Chin Martinez, editor and publisher of Todo Miami, has provided entry for many Hispanic entertainers
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 *N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias*Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your ne#t conference or convention For details, contact Hector Ericksen*Mendoza (202) 234*0737.
into the Miami market for several years through his Chin de Plata awards.
This year's awards ceremony, staged in April by the Cuba-bprn Martinez, will be aired on Miami station WSCV-TV next month. This was the 14th year that he presented the awards.
Martinez began publishing the Spanish-language Todo Miami in 1977. The monthly magazine is devoted almost entirely to Latino show business.
He arrived in Miami in 1960 from Cuba A self-made celebrity, Martinez did not go beyond the second grade and has never learned to speak English* Known as a personaje in Miami, he shares the spotlight with a son who has madejiis name in the political arena-Hialeah, Fla., M'ayor Raul Martinez.
IN THE NEWS: Eleven-year-old Alicia Hernandez, of Point Reyes, Calif., was honored in the special 1986 summer edition of News-weekfor her newspaper column aimed at the state’s Mexicans The special edition, available as of June 2, profiled 100 “unsung heroes”
from across the nation.
Also included in Newsweeks list were Chester Kolmodin, 75, a Chicago resident who provides free legal service to Hispanic families; New Yorker Marta Moreno Vargas, 44, the founder of museums celebrating the black and Caribbean cultures; and Roberto Guerra, 37, from Alice, Texas, who overcame an impoverished background to graduate from Harvard Law School and became the first Mexican American judge in Jim Weels County Texas.
Michael Hernandez, 38, a public finance executive with the First Boston investment firm, was named to an “all-star brokerage firm” in the May 26 issue of Investment Dealers’ Digest, a New York weekly.
The publisher of Miami’s oldest Spanish language newspaper, Patria, was sentenced May 30 to four years in prison for selling cocaine to an undercover federal agent Alberto Rodriguez, 64, had been publishing the weekly for the last 26 years. He founded the newspaper Sn 1959, shortly after leaving Cuba. The newspaper continues publication.
- Felix Perez
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

, .. ". Making The News This Week . JdN h '1Qtlh . expects ro raise$40 million for the restoration of the SlatM of Liberty . . . Ricardo Montero Duque, a Cuban jailed on the island for 25 years for his role in the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, is released by Cuban President Fidel Castro and joins his family in Miami. Some 30 political prisoners have been released from island jails in the last month . . . Joe Coto, acting Oakland schools superintendent, is chosen as superintendent. .. Nilda and Jose Roman are the first couple in Puerto Rico to nave a test tube baby-Adlin Marie, born May 31 ... Rudy Ramos Esquivel, 50, is put to death in Texas by lethal injection for the 1978 slaying of a narcotics officer while on parole from a rape conviction. It was the fourth execution in Texas this year, the 14th since Texas resumed executions in 1982, and the eighth in the United States this year ... U . S . Rep . Henry B. Gonzalez (DTexas) is asking former Housing and Urban Development official Kathleen Peroff to appear before his subcommittee July 17 to explain how a 1984 HUD homeless study was conducted . Gonzalez , chairman of the House Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development, claims the study, which estimated the homeless numbered 250,000 to350,000, underestimates a "national proble. n" ... United States Treasurer Katherine D. Ortega helps screen applicants in New York that will welcome and escort dignitaries to official Liberty Weekend events in New York City July3 to6. Ortega oversees the United States Liberty Coin program, which ,,"•'•No.2• I , HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT ll June 16,1986 Adult I Hiterates Targeted in Bill Rep . Matthew Martinez (D-Calif . ) announced June 11 the introduction by this week of an English Proficiency Act establishing a $10 million fund to create and carry out English language literacy programs for adults and outofschool immigrants . Eligible for funding would be local schools, educational agencies, public libraries , prisons and community-based organizations. Co-sponsored by 13 members of the Con gressional Hispanic Caucus and 17 other House members, the bill would create new English-literacy programs and supplement existing ones. Presently, Martinez long waiting lists for such programs efist in his home state and elsewhere. According to the U.S . Department of Edu cation ' s 1982 English Language Proficiency Survey , 49% of Hispanics are illiterate com pared to only 13 % in the total population. Making reference to proposals by the national organization U .S. English to make English the nation's official language, Rep. Martinez said : " Passing a resolution and demanding that English be the official language is not enough. If we want them (immigrants) to learn the language, we should provide the way. " Baby Gets Heart Jesse Dean Sepulveda, born in California May25 with a terminal heart defect, received a heart transplant June 10 from another infant born the same day in Wyoming , Mich. Doctors at Lorna Linda University Medical Center in Los Angeles had originally decided against a transplant operation, saying that the unmarried parents of"Baby Jesse" could not provide adequate post-surgical care. Jesse Sepulveda, 26, and Deana Binkley, 17, then agreed to turn overcustodyof their child to his paternal grandparents, which satisfied the doctors. Parents of the heart donor, Frank Clemen shaw and Deborah Waltersalso unmarried -decided to offer their son Frank ' s heart after learning of the California couple's plight on a nationally telecast talk show. The infant was left brain dead following a delivery complication that cut his oxygen . Latinos Advance in Texas Races I . Two of three Hispanic. candidates won nominations for elected positions in Texas' Democratic and Republican primary runoffs June 7. If either wins in that state's general election this November, he would be the first Hispanic elected to statewide office in Texas' history. San Antonio District Judge Roy Barrera Jr., 34, handily outpolled his opponent in the Republican runoff for attorney general. Ba rrera, a Democrat turned Republican in 1982, took 68.5%, or 1 02,352, of the vote compared with Ed Walsh, who received 31.5%, or 4 7,184 votes. Barrera reportedly spent $750,000 in his primary campaign. Press reports say that he will need at least $3 million for his campaign against Democratic incumbent Jim Mattox. Barrera told Weekly Report that he is prepared to raise "whatever is needed to win." Mattox won the 1982 attorney general's race with 54% of the vote. He was indicted and acquitted last year of federal bribery charges. A Southwest Voter Registration Education Project study indicated that nine out of ten Hispanic votes went to Mattox in 1982. An estimated 1 million of Texas' 7.9 . million voters are Hispanic . Tex_as Supreme Court Justice Raul Gonzalez ! Sale of UPI Completed Sale of United Press International to 'Mexico media mogul Mario Vazquez Rana for $41 million was completed June 11. The financially beleaguered news service, ,the nation ' s second largest, was formally . sold a day after a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge in Washington, D.C. , approved its 'financial reorganization plan. Judge George ; Bason approved the plan June 10 after un secured creditors voted 132 in favor of the sale . The 79-yearold news service filed for ;bankruptcy in April 1985. , Vazquez Rana said he planned to retain :present staff . UPI Chairman and President Luis Nogales, credited by many as the architect of its turnaround, said he has not conferred with Vazquez Rana on his future role with UPI, but added he would stay if given a "significant policy role . " won in his bid for his first full six-year term on that judicial body. Appointed to the court in 1984 by Gov . Mark White, Gonzalez beat Jay Gibson in the Democratic runoff fort he Place 4 seat on the Supreme Court. Gonzalez had 54%, or 248,183, of the vote to Gibson's 212,784. He faces Republican John Bates in November. Gonzalez was appointed to a South Texas appeals court seat in 1981 by thenGov. Bill Clements. He became the first Hispanic to serve on the Texas Supreme Court three years later. Dallas attorney George Martinez fell short in his quest for the Democratic nomination for the Place 1 seat on the $tate Criminal Appeals Court, mustering 43.7% of the vote. In Texas primaries, voters may ask for either a Republican or Democratic ballot , regardless of their party affiliation . They cannot split ' their votes among candidates from both parties. Bob Bailon , state director of Republican National Hispanic Assembly of Texas, said Barrera did not carry a number of Hispanic counties in South Texas in the May3 primary. A surprising finding, he said, was that Barrera did "remarkably well" among Republicans in Anglo counties . Seven percent of the state' s 7 . 9 million conlinued on page 2 City Favors English Only The City Council of Monterey Park, California, passed June 3 a resolution calling for Congress to adopt English as the nation's official lan guage, for tougher national immigration laws , for condemnation of the sanctuary movement and for more cooperation with immigration officials by the city police. It was approved by a 3 vote, with one abstention. Councilman Barry Hatch, a 49yearold teacher elected to the body in April, said he intro duced the resolution because undocumenteds were taking jobs from citizens, crowding schools, using tax-subsidized apartments and medical services and bringing diseases into the country. \ Monterey Park, a Los Angeles suburb, is 40o/o Asian and 37% Hispanic. Last year, Hatch sponsored an English only initiative which was rejected. on a leg a l technicality.

PAGE 2

Sin pelos en Ja leng .ua something that Bob Bailon, Texas director of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly , is not likely to let us forget. "A lot of conservative Hispanic Democrats here are now going to see-as we've been telling them all alongthat the way to November is through us, the Republican Party, instead of getting bumped off in the Democratic primary ." TEXAS TURNABOUT: About a year ago, Texas House Speaker Pro :em Hugo Berlanga considered, then rejected, the thought of runnmg for the Texas Railroad Commission. He told reporters in Austin that his decision was based, in part, on his belief that a Latino couldn't win a statewide election. Bailon makes a prediction that you may want to cut out and pin on your political bulletin board. "We may be just a little bit too early to spring a candidate for one of the top positions," he said. The Corpus Christi Democrat added: "More important to me than electing a Hispanic is re-electing the entire Democratic ticket that is currently holding statewide office." Inspired by Barrera's success, he says we're going to see a lot of Texas Latino politicos, including "some very big names," switching from the burro to the elefante in the next year. If his promise turns out to be just a ire , you can always send it back to him wrapped in a tortilla. It obviously wasn't more important to the state's Hispanic Republicans. With their prodding, the st_ate (,lOP now has a strong candidate for attorney general next November in 34year-old Roy Barrera. While in "progressive" California, with its 4.5 million Hispanics, neither party is willing to give a Hispanic serious support for statewide office, Texas, with 3 million Hispanics, now has TWO Latino naturals ,whom political powerbrokers cannot ignore . . The other, of course, is San Antonio's Democratic Mayor Henry Cisneros. ANOTHER CHEERY NOTE FROM CALIFORNIA: The Los Angeles Times reports that in suburban Irwindale the 27-member police department is torn between Anglo and Latino factions. It wrote May 30: Texas! That's the state where a couple decades ago Latinos were so disenfranchised that they went out and created their own political party-La Raza Unida That Barrera used to beuntil just a few years agoa Democrat is "Several of the dozen officers interviewed for The Times article said the feud had split the department into a largely Anglo" A Team" and a largely Latino" B Team." A handful of" B Team" off icers said they had received death threats after they reported assaults on Latino prisoners and incidents of police misconduct to(City Manager Charles) Martin and Chief (Julian) Miranda." 2 P.R-. Early Growth Tests Are Disputed A U .S. government study that found no trace of synthetic estrogen hormones in the meat and poultry supply in Puerto Rico lwas improperly conducted, an island physician charged June 4. Residues of the hormone were believed to have caused the high case incidence of premature sexual development, or thelarche, involving breast development in thousands .of Puerto Rican girls as young as one year old. Dr. Carmen Saenz de Rodriguez , one of two pediatricians wh . ose charges of food contamination four years ago initiated three U.S. Department of Agriculture special inves tigations, told Weekly Report that the 1985 study released May 2 . 9 was compromised when agency officials announced in advance its intention tocollect samples from slaughter plants and local markets . Saenz de Rodriguez pointed out that on March 13, a month before the test, Dr. Lester Crawford , associate administrator of USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service, met with Puerto Rican farmers to inform them of the test. The disclosure , Saenz contends, gave . farmers ample time to diminish or suppress the use of synthetic estrogen , as an animal growth stimulant. Dr. Crawford said, however, that announcement of sample collections are necessary to prevent. work disruption in slaughter and market outlets. Based on previous FSIS random tests, Crawford said that the agency feels assured that there is no estrogen contamination in Puerto Rico. After the first rush of reported cases in 1982, the government of Puerto Rico appointed a special commission to investigate the problem. Saenz de Rodriguez said that with no funds allocated by the government, the commission's . effectiveness has been curtailed. . , Latinos, Bennett Clash Representatives from national Hispanic organizations assailed June 5 a bill by U . S . Secretary of Education William Bennett that would lift the 4% cap on federal spending for alternative bilingual instruction methods. The National Council of La Raza, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Association for Bilingual Education and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Edu cational Fund charged at a Senate hearing that the bill was a ruse to put more discretionary power in the hands of.Bennett so that he can dismantle the program. Bennett, also at the hearing , denied the charge , saying that removal of the cap would allow school districts to choose which instruction method is best. Currently, three-quarters of 60% of the total bilingual education funds must be spent on the transitional method, which teaches core classes in the student's native language until he acquires competency with English . The remaining 36% of all funds is divided among several programs, including research, evaluation ass i stance, training and fellowships . Bill opponents fear that school districts would revert to teaching limited-English-proficient students with the immersion method, where instruction is in English . The Senate version of the bill was introduced by Sen. Dan Quayle (R-Ind.) March 27. The House version was introduced April9 by Rep . Jim Jeffords (R-Vt.) Committee mark-up of the Senate bill is expected this summer. No hearings have been held in the House. Immigration Panel Meets The House Judiciary Committee convened June 11 for a general debate session on the Simpson-Rodino immigration bill. The committee, chaired by Peter Rodino (D-N.J .), is expected to meet again this week to begin the mark-up process on specific amendments to the bill. -Kay Barbaro Bilingual Graduation Imperial College ' s 292 graduates partici pated in bilingual commencement exercises June 7, the first such full college ceremony in California . The bilingual graduation rites were re quested by the Latino student group M EChA to allow Spanish-speaking parents to share in their children ' s achievement. The city of Imperial and the college student body are both 60% Hispanic . College President John DePaoli ordered the ceremony although the student council twice refused to endorse the concept. The faculty senate supported DePaoli by a 4-3 vote. Latinos Advance in Texas continued..from pag e 1 voters went to the polls for the runoff; 430,000 of these were Democrats and 130,000 were Republicans. In a state where more than three out of four voters and more than nine out of ten Hispanic voters in the primary were Democrats, Barrera sees himself as an underdog but expects considerable Latino crossover support. In the 1982 election, he outpolled Demo cratic Gov. White by more than 11,000 votes in Bexar County, which is nearly 50% Hispanic . "We don't have to theorize about what's going to happen-it (Hispanic ticket-splitting) already has happened. And it will happen again," Barrera said . William Velasquez, executive director of the non-partisan SVREP, said : "Barrera will probably get more (Hispanic) votes than any other Republican candidate in the state's history." He added, however, that the primary was a poor indicator because previous His panic crossover patterns were not recorded, making comparisons difficult. Ruben Bonilla, chairman of the Mexican American Democrats of Texas, said "there will be moderate crossover but largely among :upper inconle Hispanics." Felix Perez Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

THE GOOD NEWS ENGLISH PROFICIENCY: Copies of the English Proficiency Act introduced in Congress by Rep. Matthew Martinezareavailablefrom: Congressional Hispanic Caucus, House Annex 2, Rm. 557, Washington, D .C. 20515 (202) 226. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY SURVEY: The U.S. Department of Edu cation has collected a computerized data file of 200 items testing the English proficiency of 8,800 school age children and 3,400 adults. About two-thirds of the surveyed population is Hispanic. The 1982 English Language Proficiency Survey is available to non-government researchers for $90 from: Ann Milne, DRC, 1828 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 223. BILINGUAL STUDENTS WANTED: Information about higher education institutions and federal assistance programs is included in three Spanish brochures designed to promote recruitment of bilingual and international students. Request the free brochures from: Scott Shewell, assistant to the director of communication, State System of Higher Education, Box 809,301 Market St, Harrisburg, Pa. 17108. (717) 783. STUDIES ON REFUGEE AND UNDOCUMENTED LAj;IOR: A study suggesting that undocumenteds are displacing native workers and another recommending improvement of refugee employment programs were published in April by the U.S. General Accounting Office. First five copies are free, additional ones are $2 each. Request study Nos. 129697 and 129532 from: U.S. Central General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 601 5, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275. BILINGUAL EDUCATION: The National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education issued March 31 its tenth annual report to Congress. Free single copies of the 90-page report are available from: U . S . Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Reporters' Building, Rm. 421, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 245. SPAN ISH FOR JOURNALISTS: The deadline for working journalists and photographers interested in applying to the 1986 three-month Spanish language program in Cuernavaca, Mexico, has been extended to July 1 . The fellowship pays for tuition and transportation. A letter stating purpose and benefits derived from learning the language, written permission from editor, work samples and letters of re commendation should be sent to: Spanish Language Program, National Press Foundation, Rm. 1 282, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 662. THE NICARAGUAN CONFLICT: The 66-page report "The U.S. and Nicaragua, Eighteen Experts Speak" is a transcript of a day-long seminar held by The Heritage Foundation. For a copy, send $3 to: Publications Office, Tho Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 546. C ORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS The following two positions are with LaGuardia Community College. DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE & COMMUNITY RELATIOI\IS We seek a highly creative and energetic person to coordinale the College's outreach loa of constituencies including alumni legislators. public officials. community agencies and others. Supervise staff who administer the following College operations: Alumni, Events. Speakers Bureau and Legislative Affairs. Represent the College at various events. Re quirements: B.A., M.A preferred; experience in community relations. preferably in a college setting; ability to solve problems creatively; excellent writing, speaking and interpersonal skills Salary: commensurate with qualifications; excellent fringe benefits Women and minorities encoJraged to aRply. Send letter and resume byJuly11 to: College and Community Relations. Room4. REGISTRAR'S OFFICE ANTICIPATED VACANCIES Responsipilities include providing direct counter services to students and staff; gathering, and disseminating data related to enrollment, placement testing and grading; assisting in preparation of class schedule, assignment of classrooms. on-line registration (on and oft campus) and grade entry; assisting in certification of graduates and evaluation of transfer credit Candidates should be articulate. attentive to detail, able to thrive in a busy. high-pressure environment. Prior experience with (or willingness to learn) microcomputer operalion; bachelo(s degree (or associate degree and four years experience) required; bilinguality (English/Spanish and/or American Sign) a plus Salary: $17,514 +, based on qualifications. Registra(s Office. Room4. LaGuardia Community College/CUNY. 31 1 0 Thomson Avenue. Long Island City, N.Y. 11101, EOE/AA Employer. REGION DIRECTOR Camp Fire Inc .• a national voluntary youth agency, is seeking qualified candidates for the position of region director. This position is part of Camp Fire's field service system which provides technical assis tance and managemeAt support to local units (Camp Fire councils) lhroughout the country. Incumbent will develop and implement region plans to promote membership growth and excellence of management deploy and super vise paid and volunteer staff and provide management consulting service to councils wilhin lhe South-South Cenlral region of lhe United States. This position reports to the director of counc.il services. We are seeking candidales with the appro priate combination of education, hands-on management and not-for-profit experience with an emphasis on financial and asset management Candidates must possess effeC"" tive interpersonal communication, consulting and negotiation skills and analytical abililies. This position requires e ' xtensive travel. Camp Fire Inc. provides <;:9mpelitive salary and an outstanding benefit Interested applicants must send a resume and salary history to: Mr. Rick Williams. aSsistant director, Human Resources Management. Camp Fire Inc., 4601 Madison Ave.., Kansas City. Mo. 64112. Deadline for appfication . is Ju.ly 1 , t CLINICAL THERAPIST for Hispanic Mentai , Health Services. To provide mental health services to general and Hispanic !;idults. families and children. Minimum requirements: fluency in Spanish and a maste( s degree in psychology, social work. counseling for nu
PAGE 4

Arts & Entertainment One of the Imagen entries is also among 206 nominees for this year's daytime Em my Awards. The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences will give out the awards July 17. Babies Having Babieswhich starred Renee Estevez and was directed by her father, Martin Sheenis nominated in the "best children's special" category. . IMAGEN AWARDS RETURN: For the seco'nd year in row, the ':'lational Conference of Christians and Jews han(:ls out its Imagen awards in Los Angeles this week. A total of 21 te[evision and .film program entries compete this year for the Cartier-designed crystal trophy -down from last 28. , The purpose of the awards, which are to be gfven • at a Beverly Hills luncheon June 19, is to"encouragethe po. rtrayal of H ' ispanifus i n a positive and more acc1.1rate manner in television and motion Sheen has completed work on another CBS School break Special He •will star in My Dissident Mom this fall . Also to air this fall will be the CBS movie Murder in Three Acts, which has completed shooting in Acapulco with Fernando Allende in a lead role. pictures." ' ' ' • ONE LINERS: Jesus Cardona, poetry editor of ViAztltm, has received a National Endowment for the Humanities summer fellowship to Boston University. Ca rdona is one of 15 instructors from across the country to participate in the graduate seminar on American lyric poetry. . . Burning Patients , a play by Chilean exile Anto ni o Skarmeta, opened at NewYork' s INTARTheater on June 8 ... A Rudy . Perez Pe rformance. Ensemble is scheduled fo r three shows" June 20-22 at Los Angeles' Plaza de Ia Raza . . . Two exhibits by Puerto Rican photographers-one by Luis D. Vega at Congressman. Imagen awards are not given out in predetermined categories. Last year's winners were the film El norte, the El capitan episode of Hill Blues and the NBC network itself for having positive roles for Latinos in four series. Television series on NBC and CBS dominate this year's entries. Among them: Cagney and Lacey, Miami Vice, Falcon Crest, Santa Barbara and The Cosby Show. A strong contender is The of Ramon Iglesia; a film produced by Laura Mola and by Luis Soto that aired on the PBS series American Playhouse this year. . 1 . Robert Garcia's New York district office and the other by Agustin Rivera at St. Pious V Church in the Bronx-continue through July 25 ... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report HISPANIC MEDIA DIRECTORY: The Institute of Washington, D.C., has commissioned Ana Veciana-Suarez, a reporter with the Living Today section of the Miami Herald, to compile and write a national directory of Hispanic print and electronic media. Veciana started work this month and will visit Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, New York, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. , to gather information. The fact-book, tentatively scheduled to be published this December, is being designed to serve as a guide for corporate representatives interested in gaining access to Spanish-and English-language Hispanic media. It will also provide marketers with a central source for advertising outlets. MIAMI'S STARMAKER: Chin Martinez, editor and publisher of Todo Miami, has provided entry for many Hispanic entertainers HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News SerVIce Inc, 1420 'N' Street N W Washington, O,C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. !'iector Eric . ksenMendoz . a Editor. Carlos Morales ' Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez , Charlie E,ricksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission t Annual subscription (52 lasue .i ) $98. I Trtal aubticrlptlon (13 Issues) $28. l. CONFERENCE COOROINATQRS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Week . ly Report in participants' packets at your ne\(1 conference or c.onvention. For details. contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. 4 into the Miami market for several years t hrough his Chin de Plata awards . This year's awards ceremony,. staged in April by the Cuba-born Martir-1ez , will be aired on Miami station WSCV-TV ne xt month. This was the 14th year that he presented the awards , Martinez began publishing the Spanish language Todo Miami in 1977. The monthly magazine is devoted almost entirely to Latino show He arrived in Miami in 1960 from Cuba. A self-made celebrity , Martinez did not go beyond the second grade and has .never learned to speak English , Known as a personaje in Miami , he shares the spotlight with a son who has . made his name in the political a rena-Hialeah, Fla.", M'1wor flaul Martinez. IN THE NEWS: . Eleven-year-old Alicia Hernandez, of Point Reyes, Calif., was honored in the special1986 summe' r edition of News week for her newspaper column aimed at the state's Mexicans. The special edition, available as of 2, profiled 100 "unsung heroes" from across the nation. Also included in Newsweek's list were Chest9r Kolmodin , 75, a Chicago resident who provides free legal service to Hispanic families; New Yorker Marta Moreno Vargas , 44, the founder of museums celebrating the black and Caribbean cultwes; and Roberto Guerra, 37, from Alice, Texas , who overcame an impoverished back ground to graduate from Harvard Law School and became the first Mexican American judge in Jim Weels County Texas . Michael Hernandez, 38, a public finance executive with the First Boston investment firm , was named to an "all-star brokerage firm" in the May 26 issue of lnv .estment Dealers' Digest, a New York weekfy. The publisher of Miami's oldest Spanish language newspaper, Pat ria, was sentenced May 30 to four years in prison for selling cocaine to an undercover federal agent. Alberto Rodriguez, 64, had been publishing the weekly for the last 26 years. He founded the news paper in 1959, shortly after leaving Cuba . The newspaper continues publication. Felix Perez H ispa nic Link Weekly Report