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Hispanic link weekly report, June 23, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 23, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Cuba-born Otto Reich, former head of the U.S State Department’s Office of Public Diplomacy for Latin America and the Caribbean, becomes U.S. ambassador to Venezuela, presenting his credentials to President Jaime Lusinchi June 6.. .Miami Mayor Xavier Su6rez endorses Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob Martinez, mayor of Tampa, for the Sept. 2 primary.. .University of Arizona President Henry Koffler announces his decision not to reappoint activist Assistant Professor Armando Miguelez, a Chicano literature specialist whose case became a local cause celebre last year when he was told that he would not be retained on the faculty of the school’s Spanish and Portuguese Department A committee chosen to assess Miguelez’s
work called his teaching and research below school standards ..
\ California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Alhambra travel agent J. William Orozco to the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges and Gilbert Avila, a Los Angeles government relations consultant, to the Commission otthe Californias.. .Ramiro Estrada is chosen as the new director of Ohio’s Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs.. .The U.S. Senate passes a resolution, offered by Sen. Pete Domenici(R-N.M.), designating June 13 as New-Mexico-Is-a-State Day. Domenicfs action follows a recent Treasury Department letter to former New Mexico Gov. David Cargo informing him that taxes payable on his Treasury notes would be withheld because “your address is in New Mexico.” Cargo replied that the state is not a foreign country... SHector Hernandez, a Texas native now residing im New York, receives the prestigious menswear design honor, the Cutty Sark Award, as “the up-and-coming new student talent”...
Vol. 4 No. 25
|^HISPANICUNKWEE^^^^^^5|
June 23, 1986
^Experts Rap Latino Alcoholism Care, Research
Despite the prevalence of alcohol abuse among Hispanics, treatment strategies continue Ito alienate Latinos and what research there lis on the problem remains fragmented, incompatible and scarce.
These concerns, among others, were shared by more than 100 Hispanic health-care providers who gathered recently in Washington, D.C., for a one-day conference on Hispanic substance abuse Their concerns were echoed by others in the field.
It is estimated that 10% of Hispanics are “hard-core” alcoholics - those who have a
WEEKLY REPORT TO GROW SOON
On Sept. 1, Hispanic Link Weekly Report will begin its fourth year of publication by expanding to six pages.
This growth will enable us to test some ideas and features we think you'll like, such as -
• Showcasing the talents and views of a guest columnist each week, tapping the expanding pool of Hispanic journalists and creative writers nationwide.
• Expanding our Corporate Classified section to a full page.
• Enlarging our “news hole."
• Inaugurating a "Connections" section to report on how the corporate and public sectors are interacting with the Hispanic community.
This week we have included prototypes of these features for you to assess. We have also enclosed a questionnaire form inviting your thoughts on the "old" Weekly Report, the proposed new one, and any fresh ideas you're willing to contribute on how Weekly Report can serve your needs better.
Please take a moment to fill it out and return it to us. It will help us provide you with more of what you want in the future.
Thank you.
Carlos Morales Editor
Hector Ericksen- Mendoza Publisher
psychological or physical depenaence- ana 5-10% are problem drinkers - those whose drinking creates problems with police, employers or family. This translates roughly to 2.5 to 3.4 million Hispanics who abuse alcohol.
According to the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol Information, Hispanics, while representing 8.6% of the U.S. population, account for 10% of the nation’s alcoholics.
James Hernandez, director of the California Hispanic Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, said alcohol abuse is “the biggest problem facing Hispanics today, not bilingual education, immigrktion or any other problem; it is destroying our fiber.”
Among racial/ethnic groups, Latinos are second only to Native Americans in alcohol abuse, although Hispanic women have higher rates of abstention than any other group of females. However, health care providers are noticing an increase in the number of Hispanas who abuse alcohol. They correlate it with the level of acculturation.
Marilyn Aguirre Molina, an assistant professor at the Medical School of Rutgers University and a researcher for the university’s Center of Alcohol Studies, said that treatment centers too often engage in “victim blaming,” where the Hispanic client is labeled recalcitrant if
Blanket Work Ban Illegal
A federal court of appeals in San Francisco ruled June 13 that immigration officials cannot indiscriminately bar undocumented aliens who are free on bond during deportation proceedings from working.
A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held that the question of working while on bond must be decided on an individual basis. The ruling was in response to a class-action suit filed by the National Center of Immigrants’ Rights and 12 other organizations that provide free legal service to aliens.
The court of appeals upheld a decision by a U.S. district court issued in 1984 which banned the no-work rule.
The ruling affects those people who may wait years on bond pending hearings on deportation, political asylum or permanent residence.
he does not respond to treatment.
Molina is currently conducting research on bow to train Hispanic and black treatment ‘providers to make theft methods more “culturally appropriate.” Her findings are tentatively scheduled to be released this fall.
Angela Caballero de Cordero, executive director of the Latino Family Alcoholism4 Counseling Center in San Francisco, wrote of that city’s Hispanic population: “Lack of or limited English speaking ability has proven a imajor problem in the utilization of.. .residential alcoholism services. On several occasions, ■clients have been refused by these centers, with language being the main barrier for treatment.”
Hernandez added: “The short supply of experienced people (Hispanics) working in the field of alcoholism promises to get even worse in the next ten years.” He attributed this in part to fewer Hispanics choosing health
â–  continued on page 2
P.R. Veterans Win Suit
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional June 17a New York state law that prevented two native Puerto Rican U.S. Army veterans from receiving the preference points given to state veterans who pass New York’s civil service exam.
The Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund filed suit in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in 1982 on behalf of Eduardo Soto-L6pez and Eliezar Baez-jHern&ndez, charging that both men were ibeing discriminated against because they did not enter the service in New York. Both men entered the Army in Puerto Rico and have lived in New York for over 10 years. After both passed the test in 1980, they were denied the five preference points.
The case was lost and subsequently appealed and won in the 2nd U.S. Circuit 'Court of Appeals in Manhattan. The state appealed to the Supreme Court in June 1985.
The high courts decision said U.S. citizens (have the right to travel from one state to 'another and that distinctions based on prior residency can be unconstitutional.


House OKs $16 Billion Omnibus Housing Bill
U.S Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez’s (D-Texas) amendment to the omnibus housing bill, approved 340-36 June 11, will allow His-panics and other disadvantaged groups to continue to obtain adequate housing, according to an aide of the Texas congressman.
The amendment would reauthorize federal spending for most housing and community development programs through fiscal year 1987. The Reagan administration has called for the elimination of such housing programs in its last two budget proposals.
Housing assistance programs, which include low-interest loans and subsidies to low-income families, elderly and handicapped for partial rent payment and modernization, represent
roughly one-eighth of the $16 billion housing bill.
The House also adopted an amendment that would allow undocumented families to continue living in public housing as long as there is a member who is a citizen or a legal U.S resident The amendment virtually nullifies an announced policy by the Department of Housing and Urban Development that calls for the eviction of families living in federally assisted housing that had any undocumented family members living with them. The policy Was to take effect July 31.
Included in the amendment is a provision to protect residents 62 years old and older from eviction. The residents would simply
have to declare their citizenship or legal status. Documentation is not necessary.
Several Hispanic organizations have taken positions against the HUD policy, charging that it would spawn discrimination by landlords against Hispanic housing applicants.
Rep. Robert Garcia’s (D-N.Y.) amendment to the housing bill to authorize HUD to create 100 enterprise zones was approved 366-32. The zones are to be used to lure businesses into economically depressed areas through tax breaks and other financial concessions from the government.
The Senate is expected to take action on its housing bill in July.
- Felix Perez
Calif. Assembly Passes Bilingual Law Extension
The California State Assembly narrowlyi approved June 12 a six-year extension of* that state’s law requiring bilingual instruction in classrooms where 10 or more students use the same native language other than English. The measure is expected to confront Republican opposition in the Senate.
Sponsored by Democrat Assembly Speaker Willie Brown, the bill was approved by the minimum 41-31 majority required in the 80-member body. The present bilingual education law expires June 1987. If passed by the Senate, the bill could be vetoed by Gov. George Deukmejian, who has not yet stated his position on it.
If no action is taken this year, it will require a two-thirds vote for “urgency legislation” next year.
Unemployment Up to 11 %
In a continuing trend, Hispanic civilian unemployment rose from 10,4% to 11% in May, the U.S. Department of Labor reported. The unemployment rate for blacks remained at 14.8% and for whites it increased from 6.1% to 6.2%.
Latino Alcoholism Care Criticized
continued from page 1
professions as a career. Those who do opt for a medical career are turning away from alcohol treatment, a relatively low-paying discipline, he said.
Molina said that “not only are more personnel needed, but those who are trained in a culturally aware.manner as well.”
Jane Delgado, executive director of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, said the major reason there have been no national surveys on the drinking habits of Hispanics is the
Hialeah Leader Kills Self
Gustavo Carbonell, an accountant and former candidate for the Florida state legislature, fatally shot himself in his car June 9, two weeks after he returned from a 41-hour disappearance alleging he was victim of a politically motivated kidnapping. His wife and friends saicLC^rbonell had been depressed because few people, including the police, believed his abduction story.
Carbonell, 48, from Hialeah, was running for District 111 of the Florida House of Representatives when he was allegedly kidnapped May 27.
CONGRESSIONAL DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS - 1985
Outside Hono-
STATE U.S. Rep. Income * rariums Assets* Liabilities *
CALIFORNIA Tony Coelho (D) $18,703 $22,467 ** $257,006 $180,004
Matthew Martfnez (D) 10,002 5,625 500,000 15,001
Edward Roybal (D) 35,003 1,650 401,005 230,005
Esteban Torres (D) 404 4,500 52,003 115,002
NEW MEXICO Manuel Lujan (R) 2,002 6,050 630,005 0
Bill Richardson (D) 10,103 2,850 70,003 15,001
NEW YORK Robert Garcia (0) 285 5,500 161,005 130,003
TEXAS Albert Bustamante (D) 5,304 1,550 366,005 175,005
Kika de la Garza (0) 0 22,000 ** 15,001 0
Henry B. Gonzalez (D) 1,490 1,000 0 0
Solomon Ortiz (D) 5,805 0 36,006 0
PUERTO RICO Jaime Fuster (D) 25,004 8,250 452,005 60,003
VIRGIN ISLANDS Ron de Lugo(D) 20,003 0 402,004 65,002
GUAM Ben Blaz(R) 1,001 0 0 30,002
* Forthesecategories, membersare not required to list specific amounts. Instead ranges, such as“notmorethan$5,000" and "over$250,000," are used. Text and chart figures use the lowest possible range figures. A zero means the amount was less than the minimum reporting requirement.
** Both Coelho and de la Garza exceeded the restrictions on honoraria, earning $37,632.51 and $13,000, respectively, over the $22,467.49 limit Both donated those amounts to charity.
Source: 1985 financial disclosure statements. House Office of Records and Registration
prohibitive cost.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey will be the first attempt to gather national statistics on alcohol abuse.
Conducted between 1982 and 1984, the survey interviewed 12,000 Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans on several health indicators. The alcohol consumption part of the survey results for all three groups will be released in December.
Dr. Michael Woodbury with the University of Puerto Rico - and a panelist at last month’s substance abuse conference said: “There is a problem with setting definitional standards to compare data from different studies.” Woodbury is in the final stages of an alcohol abuse study being conducted in Puerto Rico..
The majority of the studies available have been conducted on Mexican Americans in the Southwest. - Felix Perez
Perez to Head College
Antonio Perez was appointed president of' South Central Community College in New Haven, Conn., June 12, thus becoming the first Hispanic to head a college in that state.
Perez, 39, is a native of Aguada, Puerto Rico. He had been serving as vice president for student affairs of the Community Colleges of Rhode Island.
Lujan Has Most Assets
U.S. Rep. Manuel Lujan (R-N.M.) led all 14 members of the Congressional H ispanic Caucus in assets reported on financial disclosure statements recently released. He reported. $630,005. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) was second with $500,000 in assets, followed by Jaime Fuster(D-P.R-), $452,005.
Members, officers and employees of Congress are required by the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 to file the statements by May 15 for the preceding year with the House Clerk and Senate Secretary. The statements were released May 22.
Reporting the most in outside income (which does not include representatives’ $75,100 annual salary) were Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), $35,003, Fuster, $25,004, and Ron de Lugo , (D-Virgin Is.), $20,003.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Achy Obejas
Kay Barbaro
Spanish as ‘Litmus Test’
Sin Pelos en la Lengua
Does language make the Latino?
How often have you heard someone say, “Well, what kind of a Cuban (or Puerto Rican, or Chicano) is he? He doesn’t even speak Spanish.”
Nine times out of ten, these Hispanic linguistic purists don’t even speak English-this after years of residence in the good ol’ U.S.A. Yet theyfeel completely unabashed in their criticism of the language limitations of others- especially young, generally successful, second generation Hispanics. They are even harsher in their judgments of second generation Latinos who are public figures or politicians.
These critics aren’t first generation, older Latinos exclusively. The worst offenders, in fact, seem to be those snappy young latino-americanos, so recently arrived and so eager to teach us U.S.-locked Latins what being Latino is all about.
These folks have their historical dates down pat. They can conjugate the subjunctive tense- and even explain it-and are quick to red-pencil anybody’s grammatical mistakes. They |relish interrupting a conversation to enunciate a verb correctly and ^deliberately. (Never mind that you’re trying to tell these jerks that, in i their imperfect English, they’ve just ordered a “nubile girl” instead of {Shrimp Newberry).
CULTURAL PURITY BAROMETER
The worst part of this attitude from H ispanics is that it gives license to non-Hispanics to use language as a barometer of our cultural “purity” or “expertise.”
I might note here that when people talk about other ethnic groups, language is not a criterion. No one asks what kind of Polish Roman Polanski speaks, and no one doubts his Polishness.
It’s not language that defines us; it’s culture, race and experience, jin Latin America, Spanish is the essential connector, but in the United States, it’s secondary. It may aid in communication, especially with recent immigrants and older Latinos, but among the second generation, it has primarily a symbolic value. Fluency, a large vocabulary or “correctness?’ are incidental.
Second generation Hispanics are schooled in English-language institutions, often with zero or limited bilingual programs; they watch English-language television and engage in social activities both with Latinos and non-Latinos. Opportunities to acquire a large Spanish vocabulary or develop the proper grammatical skills are almost nonexistent.
We are going through a phase of assimilation in which we continue,
; as second, third and subsequent generations, to identify as H ispanic. We are defined as such, without regard to our bilingual abilities, by jthe dominant culture.
We are becoming a group, like the black community here, distinctly (American, yet different.
LANGUAGE NOT ‘INHERITED’
We are distinct from the dominant culture and distinct from the 'native culture of our immigrant generation. We are unique, carrying ‘traits and values from both Latin America and the United States.
Speaking Spanish is wonderful. Knowing how to read and write it correctly is terrific. It’s a great skill for anyone to have, even more so jfor a Latino, because language brings us closer to our roots. It is, ■ihowever, an acquired skill, not an inherent trait. To use it as a litmus test is divisive.
[ A kid with curly hair on the corner of Logan and Milwaukee Avenue in Chicago chewing on some Spanglish and bopping to The Gap Band (is still Latino, although Latino in a uniquely American way.
I What makes us H ispanic is the way we think and feel, the commonality of experience and the way we’re viewed by others.
J (Achy Obejas, a frequent contributor to Hispanic Link News Service, is the recent recipient of a $20,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant for creative writers of exceptional talent to write and travel. A I resident of Chicago, she immigrated to the United States from Cuba at age 6.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Something sad happened in Denver this month. The city's two powerful daily newspapers issued a manifesto to the leaders of varied Hispanic organizations there.
The papers warned that if those Latino leaders want respect from the press, they better keep their mouths shut when white leaders insult and demean their community.
What upset the editors was the reaction by several Latinos
to immigration testimony by Colorado Gov.
Dick Lamm before a congressional committee in Washington, D.C. Lamm, who leaves office this year after 12 years, is co-author of a book titled “The Immigration Time Bomb: The Fragmentation of America”
Lamm’s statements, as reported by correspondents for The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News, were loaded with hyperbole and references to impending Quebec-like “disasters,” a strong tie between immigrants and crime, and even ethnic strife in Lebanon.
The Rocky Mountain News’ Joan Lowy began her report “WASHINGTON - Colorado Gov. Richard D. Lamm told a congressional committee yesterday that the United States is headed toward a ‘deadly disunity' because Hispanic immigrants are not assimilating into society and do not learn English.
“Lamm. .. said, ‘More and more immigrants are living in America separated by language, geography, ethnicity and class. This is a social time bomb.
The Post’s Ann Schmidt began her dispatch:
“WASHINGTON - America could reap a social disaster if immigrants flooding into this country, many of whom speak only Spanish, fail to become part of American life, Gov. Dick Lamm told Congress Thursday...
“Lamm warned that a social disaster is coming in the United States unless immigrants are fully ‘assimilated’ into American society.. " Reported the Posts Neil Westergard on Lamm’s testimony:
“... His assertion that immigrants- especially Hispanic immigrants - are more reluctant to learn English and prefer living in ‘linguistic ghettos’ touched a sensitive nerve among Hispanic leaders...” Lamm’s Latino critics were unanimous in theircondemnation of the governor’s rhetoric. Those in Denver called a press conference to repeat for the thousandth time that Hispanics DO want to learn English and DO want to be part of the nation’s mainstream.
Their criticisms of the governor quoted in the two papers were bland in contrast to what Lamm had charged. Audrey Alvarado, executive director of the Denver-based Latin American Research and Service Agency, said that Lamm’s attacks “encourage and sanction racism. . .” Rich Castro, executive director of the city’s Agency for Human Rights and Community Relations, suggested, “I think the governor is trying to drive a wedge between Hispanics and the majority society and I think he ought to stop.” State Rep. Tony Hernandez called Lamm an “Ugly American.”
The (city's two papers roared back with editorials attacking the city’s Hispanic leadership. Under the heading “Dick Lamm is no racist,” the Post concluded that “The knee-jerk response of some local Hispanics - applying the label of ‘racism’ - was not deserved, nor did it add to the stature of the critics.”
The News led its editorial: “Don’t dare disagree with some local Hispanic leaders. They will declare you immoral.” It quoted Castro and Hernandez and Alvarado and said, “Predictably, (Lamm’s) opponents gathered in line to smear him...
“This sort of reaction has gone on long enough and should be exposed for what it is: a disgraceful form of demagoguery.”
It's sad when newspaper editors won’t read their own reporters’ stories carefully enough to pass fair judgment on who are the demagogues.
It’s sadder still that some newspapers continue, in the 1980s, to peer at Hispanics through 1930 and 1940 lenses.
Saddest of all is the reality that the editors’ board room-window wisdom is creating yet another painful postponement of what U.S. Hispanics, like all immigrants to our nation, want the opportunity to be full participants
June 23,1986


COLLECTABLES
HISPANIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT: The 81-page “Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol Abuse: An Hispanic Assessment of Present and Future Challenges,” (Order No. 387), is available by sending $7 to: National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, 1030 15th St NW, Suite 537, Washington, D.C. 20015 (202) 371-2100.
ALCOHOL RESEARCH: For a listing of materials available on Hispanic alcohol abuse, write to: National Clearinghouse forAlcohol Abuse, P.O. Box 2345, Rockville, Md. 20852 (301) 468-2600.
CONTROLLING SCHOOL DROPOUTS: The 58-page “School Dropouts: Everybody’s Problem” summarizes current dropout data and demographic trends and provides ideas for model programs and policies. For a copy, send $5, plus $1 for postage, to: Publications Department The Institute for Educational Leadership, 1001 Connecticut ^ve- NV^ Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-8405.
BILINGUAL LIBRARIANS: The Queens College Graduate School of Library and Information Studies is offering three free-tuition minority fellowships, each carrying an additional $4,000 annual stipend. Bilingual students expecting to work in multi-ethnic libraries are encouraged to apply. Deadline to request application forms: June 25. Contact Prof. David Cohen, Library School, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, N.Y. 11367 (718) 520-7194.
FIGHTING UNEMPLOYMENT: The 19-page “Jobs for the Disadvantaged: Local Programs that Work” lists “rear unemployment rates for ail states and 40 metropolitan areas and describes case studies and practices of successful state and local programs. For free Single copies send self-addressed 9-inch x 12-inch envelope to: National Committee for Full Employment, Job Creation Education Project, 815 16th St. NW, Suite 301, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 393-7415.
MEXICAN AMERICANS IN MATH AND SCIENCE: The U.S. Department of Education’s report “Improving Math and Science Achievement of Mexican Americans” reviews existing improvement programs and gives suggestions on how to set up successful ones Price: $5. Order from: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, New Mexico State University, Box 31AP, Las Cruces, N.M. 88003 (505) 646-2623.
CONNECTIONS
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U. S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
FORUM GAINS MCDONALD’S RECRUITMENT GRANT The National Puerto Rican Forum accepted a $10,000 contribution from McDonald's Corporation June 13 to initiate a professional recruitment program for the national chain.
Forum President Hector Velazquez said the New York-based agency will use the donation to recruit and train Hispanics in New York, Hartford, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, Miami and Chicago.
FREE LISTINGS IN NATIONAL DIRECTORY The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is inviting Hispanic firms wanting to reach new markets to list themselves, free of charge, in USHCC’s new National Hispanic Business Directory.
Forms may be obtained by contacting: USHCC, Board of Trade Center, 4900 Main, Kansas City, Mo. 64112. Phone: (816) 842-2228. They must be completed and returned by July 1.
RAIDERS COACH JOINS COORS DISTRIBUTORSHIP Los Angeles Raiders football coach Tom Flores has teamed with Tommy Mason, former all-pro running back for the Minnesota Vikings, in a newly expanded Adolph Coors Company distributorship covering Ban Bernardino and Riverside counties in Southern California.
Flores is the first Latino distributor named since Coors signed its 1984 national agreement with a coalition of Hispanic organizations. His is the company’s eighth Hispanic-owned distributorship, highest in the industry.
NEW PACIFIC BELL PAGINAS AMARILLAS Pacific Bell, which has already distributed Spanish-language Yellow Pages for Los Angeles and California’s San Gabriel Valley, is passing out 104,000 directories for Orange County this month. With 431 pages of listings and ads, it's the largest Hispanic Yellow Pages in Southern California. Some 60,000 more are available to requesting businesses and consumers.
OTHER NAMES, OTHER PLACES Lionel Sosa, president of San Antonio-based Sosa & Associates, was honored June 17 by the San Antonio Advertising Federation with its Silver Medal Award for outstanding service in advertising... In a ceremony at the Nebraskaland Days Mexican Fiesta in North Platte, Neb,, June 15, Josephine Carranza of the State Department of Social Services and Jim Ramirez of the Omaha Public Schools were feted as Nebraska's Hispanic Woman and Man of the Year...
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Calendar
THIS WEEK
STATE ENCUENTRO
St. Paul, Minn. June 27-29
The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis will
conduct the first state encuentro with forums on
increasing Hispanic participation within the church
and building its Hispanic pool of leaders.
Claudia Eguia-Jaime (612) 291-4480
DIRECTIONS FOR MINORITIES AND WOMEN Louisville, Ky. June 28, 29 The theme of this conference by the National Education Association will be how women and minorities will be affected by developments and trends in education. Nancy Kochuk (202) 822-7200
AWARDS AND INSTALLATION BANQUET Los Angeles June 28
The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold its 12th annual banquet to announce new members of its national board of directors and to hand out awards.
Lourdes Arce (219) 725-9970
COMING SQON
MARCH FOR IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES San Diego Committee for a National Day of Justice San Ysidro, Calif. July A David Valladolid (619) 267-9891
HISPANIC PASTORAL STUDY WEEK Northeast Hispanic Catholic Center Weston, Mass. Jqly 7-11 Father Roberto Gonzalez (212) 751-7045
57TH ANNUAL LULAC CONVENTION League of United Latin American Citizens Las Vegas, Nev. July 9-19 Robert Rivan (702) 984-3290
HISPANICS AND EDUCATION
Texas Association of Chicanes in Higher Education
Houston July 16-16
Mary Helen Padilla (713) 792-4776
CHICANA SCHOLARS
Mujeres Activaa en Letraa y Cambio Social
Davis, Calif. July 24-26
Linda Facio(916) 752-2421
_________ June 23,1986_________________
HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Chicago July 25 Cindy Hall (812) 842-2228
SANTIAGO APOSTOL PUERTO RICAN
CELEBRATION
New York Historical Society
New York July 27
Nancy Donner(212) 873-3400
SPOTLIGHT
NATIONALCOUNCILOF LA RAZA: "Hispanics: Architects in America’s Future” is the title of NCLRs 1986 convention to be held in Los Angeles July 13-16. There will be workshops on immigration, bilingual education, media coverage of Hispanics, health care and other topics. For further information, contact Marialba Martinez at (202) 628-9600.
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community, Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number, Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW. Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
ACADEMIC 1986/87 ADJUNCT POSITIONS
Applications invited for the anticipated adjunct faculty positions described below. Unless otherwise stated, the procedure for all applications is as follows: 1. Send letter of application and resume by December 31,1986 to: Personnel Office, Room 3 c/o department specified. 2. Specify clearly the position for which candidacy is offered. 3. Rank and salary will be commensurate with qualifications.
• Accounting/Managerial Studies: MBA and/ or CPA, PhD preferred. Courses include accounting and business administration.
• Communication Skills: Strong background and teaching reading to non-traditional students at the secondary or college level. Hours from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. (specify availability).
• Continuing Education: Experience essential. Openings anticipated in English as a Second Language, Adult Basic Education, High School Equivalency, Word Processing, Typing, Shorthand, Telecommunications, Real Estate, Computer Programming, Accounting,Bookkeeping, Small Business Management, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning.
• English: Master's degree, experience teaching writing. Courses include Basic Writing and Freshman Composition.
HUMANITIES Openings anticipated in:
• Bilingual Education: Earned doctorate, or master's in Bilingual Education with three years experience in a public school setting; fluency in Spanish and English; professional or scholarly activity. Contact: Jesus Fuentes, Director of Bilingual Education Associate Program.
• Critical Thinking: Master’s or doctorate in Philosophy, Psychology, or English; special experience teaching critical thinking and cognitive skills.
• Performing Arts: Minimum BA with extensive college teaching and performance experience; MA in music education, musicology, music theory, applied piano, guitar, stage craft, acting and stage direction, or choreography and dance class instruction preferred.
• Philosophy: MA or PhD; if no doctorate, enrollment in a doctoral program. Teaching experience; ability to tie conceptual analysis to concrete life experience.
• Speech Communication: MA or PhD in Linguistics, Speech Pathology, or Communication Theory. Courses include Basic Communication Strategies, Oral Communication and Communication and the Non- Native Speaker. Send letter and vitae to: Dr. Sandra Dickinson-Card, Coordinator, Speech Communication.
• Library: Minimum ALA accredited MLS; experience in public service in an academic library desirable. Perform reference and bibliographic instruction duties in a busy public service environment; evening/Saturday schedule.
• Social Science: Minimum master's degree, doctorate preferred. Courses include multidisciplinary Introduction to Social Science course, and/or specific electives in Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.
LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31 -10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
INSTRUCTOR or ASSISTANT PROFESSOR in Foreign Languages Teaching Spanish courses at various levels; administration of a small program. Qualifications: PhD or ABD in Spanish, Latin American studies or related area, plus two years of college teaching experience. Knowledge of French desirable. Rank: Commensurate with qualifications and experience. (Substitute one-year appointment) May lead to tenure track.
INSTRUCTOR or ASSISTANT PROFESSOR in Speech Communications Teach courses such as Basic Communication Strategies, Oral Communications, Voice and Diction, Group Communication and Public Speaking. Qualifications: MA or PhD in Linguistics, Speech Pathology, Industrial Psychology, or Communication Theory, plus two years of college teaching experience. Rank: Commensurate with qualifications. (Substitute one-year appointment.) May lead to tenure track. Send resume and letter indicating position desired by August 16 ta Chairperson, Humanities Department, Room 3.
READING FACULTY TENURE TRACK
. Minimum MA or Professional Certificate in Reading or related field. PhD preferred. Strong theoretical background and experience in teaching reading to non-traditional students at the secondary or college level a must Experience in computer-assisted instruction and software evaluation applied to reading and language arts required. Experience in research and evaluation desirable. Rank: Commensurate with qualifications. Send resume and letter by August 15 to: Search Committee, Communication Skills Department Room 3, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
CLINICAL THERAPIST for Hispanic Mental Health Services. To provide mental health services td general and Hispanic adults, families and childrea Minimum requirements: fluency in Spanish and a master’s degree in psychology, social work, counseling for nursing and one-year experience counseling adults, families or children. Salary range: $21,700 to $28,751. Application deadline: July 31, 1986, 5 p.m. Contact: Genesee County Community Mental Health Services, Personnel Department 420 W. 5th Ave., Flint, Michigan 48503 (313) 257-3709. EOE/MF.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
Seeks an individual to perform duties of a job analyst and other activities related to Personnel Administration. Qualifications: Bachelor's degree, preferably Business Administration or related field, emphasis in Personnel Administration. Prefer two years experience in Personnel or related field. Excellent oral/written communication skills, strong analytical ability necessary. Computer applications knowledge desirable. Position requires travel around University Campus. POSITION MAY BE FILLED AS PERSONNEL TRAINEE IF A QUALIFIED POOL OF EXPERIENCED CANDIDATES IS NOT OBTAINED. ALL OTHER QUALIFICATIONS REMAIN THE SAME Send resume and cover letter by July 7, 1986, to the University of Vermont, 237 Watermen Building, Burlington, Vt 05405. Please include Social Security number when applying. AA/EOE.
DESIGN ER sought by PBS, Alexandria, Virginia College degree in art liberal arts or desiga Minimum two years graphic design experience in private industry, preferably a television station. Qualified candidate must possess design and illustration skills, as well as a knowledge of photography and photographic techniques Salary: Open.
Persons interested should submit resume to: PBS, Attn. Sheila E. Humphrey, 1320 Braddock Place, Alexandria, Va 22314 (703) 739-5235.
PROFESSIONAL services
EAST COAST BOOKINGS? Culture Clash, from San Francisco, the only Chicano/Latino comedy troupe in the universe, will perform at the New York Joseph Papp Theater Festival Aug. 21-28. The troupe is interested in touring East Coast after Aug. 28. Call Mauricio at Aviles Productions (415) 647-6141.
VICTOR ROMERO, Producer/Director, Documentary and training videos for target audience. Call WEST END VIDEO (202) 775-8551.
GRAPHIC DESIGNER sdeks entry level position in the Washington, D.C. area Bilingual (English/Spanish). Call Heriberto Quiftones (202) 255-1223.
CORPORATIONS & NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS: Established Washington Hispanic firm is ready to assist you with your training, ADPservices, research& evaluation, management consulting, and representation needs. For more information or employment opportunities, contact Business Information & Services Corp., 2025 Eye St NW, Suite 1115, Washington, D.C.20006 (202) 223-6100.
Ordered by__________
Title ______________
Area Code & Phone Advertiser Name _
Bill To ____________
Address_____________
City, State & Zip _
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C.' 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
5
OOQCO.OOC< t- U1 0-1 «0 <0 — 11. —Ill Q(0


Arts & Entertainment
IMAGEN AWARDS GIVEN: Winners of three /magen awards were announced June 19 by the National Conference of Christians and Jews. The awards are shared by producers, actors and writers -winning productions were selected by a panel of media professionals The Winners are:
An episode of Cagney and Lacey titled Ordinary Hero that featured Tony Acierto as an undocumented Chilean waiter who witnesses a stabbing and rescues the victim. He is picked up by immigration officials, and the title characters face the dilemma of “their legal responsibilities” Ordinary Hero aired Oct. 7,1985, on CBS.
Maricela, a Richard Soto Production that aired on the PBS network Jan. 27 on the Wonderworks Family Entertainment Series. Qarlina Cruz portrayed a young immigrant whose mother takes a job as a live-in maid. The program starred Linda Lavin as the mother’s employer. The program was produced for KCET in Los Angeles by Phyllis Geller.
• The Mr. Quiet episode of The Cosby Show, starring Tony Orlando, Ida Maris and Alexis Cruz, that aired on NBC May 2, 1985. The Cosby/Warner Production program was a Dilot for a Cosby spin-off
starring Orlando. Emily Tray produced, Caryn Sneider wrote the episode.
FROM NEW MEXICO TO D.C.: Two Hispanic families from New Mexico will demonstrate traditional crafts from that state at the Smithsonian Institution’s 20th annual Festival of American Folklife to, be staged this week in the nation’s capital.
Demonstrating the carving of santos- wooden religious images of saints or the Virgin Mary - will be George L6pez and family. The Cordova, N.M., wood-carver won a National Heritage Award from the National Endowment of the Arts in 1982 for his efforts to preserve the wood carving tradition. Joining him in D.C. will be his wife Silvianita Lopez and three other members of his family.
Four generations of Agueda Martinez’s family from Medanales, N.M., will also participate in the festival. Agueda Martinez is the matriarch of the large family of traditional weavers. She will be joined by a daughter, Eppie Archuleta, who lives in Alamosa, Colo., a granddaughter and great-granddaughter.
Agueda, who has a reputation for growing some of the best chiles fn northern New Mexico, will also have a chile garden at the festival.
Held at the National Mall June 25-29 and July 2-6, the demonstrations are part of the festivafs program titled Cultural Conservation:'
Traditional Crafts in a Post-Industrial Age . ..... „ __
- Antonio Me/ias-Rentas
Media Report
NAHJ ELECTIONS: Regional election results for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists are in for all but one of the regions.
The regional representatives are: Region I', ChristopherCrommett, WKAQ- Radio, Puerto Rico; Region 2, Evido de la Cruz, El Diario-La Prensa, New York; Region4, Cecilia Hernandez, I^VNrTV, Miami; Region 5, Rosalind Soliz, kfeRA-TV, Dallas; Region 6, Elisa Alfonso^ WBBM-Radio, Chicago; Region 7, Elaine; Ayala, The Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Ariz.;, and Region 8, Bob Alaniz, KCBS-TV, Losi Angeles.
In Region 3, Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, publisher of Hispanic Link Weekly Report, j and Patrisia Gonzales, reporter with The Philadelphia Inquirer, polled the same number of votes. There will be a runoff this month to determine the winner.
WORLDCUPSOCCERHOTLINE: TheSIN
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
^Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza . Editor. Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permissions
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
television network - in conjunction with Budweiser- has established a toll-free, Spanish-language hot line for World Cup soccer fans in the United States.
The hotline, which began June 16 and will end June 30 (the day after the championship game), offers highlights and insights as well as up-to-the-minute scores. It will be open daily from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. (CDT). The number is 1 -800-225-6712.
BROADCASTING AND ADVERTISING: Three Latinas were among the 16 candidates chosen for public television and radio training grants offered by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
Gabriel Martinez, a broadcast engineer with KDNA-Radio in Granger, Wash., Cassandra Ortega, a broadcast technician with KUAC-TV in Fairbanks, Alaska, and Marta Patifto, a producer with KRCB-TV in Rohnert Park, Calif., will share, along with the other 13 recipients, a $180,304 grant pool. The grants are distributed among television and radio stations to provide on-the-job training.
The deadline for next year is tentatively
scheduled for January. For further information, write to CPB, Minorities’/Women’s Training Grants, 111116th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 293-6160.
Sammy Lugo was one of five people selected for an advertising internship offered by the UniWorld Group, New York’s largest minority advertising firm.
The six-month internship guarantees placement in a participating agency at the junior copywriter level. Those who complete the program are paid$10,000 plusa$1,000 cash incentive. The primary requisite is that applicants possess creative writing skills.
For further information, contact Valerie Graves, UniWorld, 1250 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10001 (212)564-0066.
MEDIA MOVE: The Washington Times Buenos Aires correspondent Timothy O’Leary, a Chicano and son of veteran White House correspondent Jeremiah OLeary, rejoins the Times’ Washington, D.C., office this month as an assistant foreign editor.
Felix Perez
6
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Making The News This Week Cuba born Otto Reich, former head of the U.S. State Departmenfs Office of Public Diplomacy for Latin America and the Caribbean , becomes U . S . ambassador to Venezuela, presenting h i s credentials to President Jaime Lusinchi June 6 ... Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez endorses Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob Martinez, mayor of Tampa, for the Sept. 2 primary ... University of Arizona President Henry Koffler announces his decision not to reappoint activist Assistant Professor Armando Miguelez, a Chicano literature specialist whose case became a local cause celebre last yearwtien he was told that he would not be retained on the faculty of the school's Spanish and Portuguese Department A committee chosen to assess Migueleis work called his teaching and research below school standards ... • California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints Alhambra travel agent J. William Orozco to the Board of Governors of the Californ i a Community Colleges and Gilbert Avila, a Los Angeles government relations consultant, to the Commission ott he Californias .. . Ramiro Estrada is , chosen as the new director of Ohio' s Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs ... The U . S . Senate passes a resolution , offered by Sen . Pete Domenici (RN.M .), designating June 13 as NewMexico Is-a-State Day. Domenicrs action follows a recent Treasury Department letter to former N 'ew Mexico Gov . David Cargo informing him that taxes payable on his Treasury notes would be withheld because "your address is in New Mexico." Cargo replied that the state is not a foreign country ... I Hector Hernandez, a Texas native now residing in 1 New York, receives the prestigious menswear design honor, the Gutty Sark Award1 as "the up-and-coming talenf' ... HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT *Ex_ perts Rap Latino Alcoholism Care, Research Despite the prevalence of alcohol abuse psychological or physical depenaenceana he does not respond to treatment. Vol. 4 No. 251 : among Hispanics, treatment strategies continue 5 1 0% are problem drinkers those whose Molina is currentiy conducting research on :to alienate Latinos and what research there dri nking creates problems with police, em now to train Hispanic and black treatmen-t i is on the problem remains fragmented, incom players or family . This translates roughly to providers to make theit methodsmore "culpatible and scarce . 2.5 to 3.4 million Hispanics who abuse alcohol. turally appropriate. " Her findings are tenta . These concerns, am ong others, were shared According to the National Clearinghouse tively scheduled to be released this fall. by more tha n 100 Hispanic health-care profor Alcohol Information, Hispanics ; while repAngela Caballero de Cordero, executive viders who gathered recently in Washington, resenting 8.6% of the U .S. population, account director of the Latino Family Alcoholism' D .C., for a one-day conference on Hispanic for 10% of the nation's alcoholics . Counseling Center in San Francisco, wrote of substance abuse. Their concerns were echoed James Hernandez, director of the California that city's Hispanic population: "Lack of or by others in the field . Hispanic Commission on Alcohol and Drug limited English speaking ability has proven a It is estimated that 10% of Hispanics are Abuse, said alcohol abuse is "the biggest major problem in the utilization of ... residential :'hard--core" alcoholics-those who have a problem facing Hispanics today, not bilingual alcoholism services. On several occasions, education , immigrat i on or any other problem; t:lients have been refused by these centers, WEEKLY REPORT it is destroying our fiber." with language being the main barrier for Among racial/ethnic groups, Latinos are TO GROW SOON second only to Native Americans in alcohol Hernandez added : "The short supply of abuse, although Hispanic women have higher 'experienced people (Hispanics) working in rates of abstention than any other group of the field of alcoholism promises to get even females. However, health care providers are ,worse i n the next ten years." He attributed noticing an increase in the number of Hispanas this in part to fewer Hispanics .choosing health who abuse alcohol. They correlate it with the continued on page :i On Sept. 1, Hispanic Link Weekly Report will begin its fourth year of publication by expanding to six pages. This growth will enable us to test some ideas and features we think you'll/ike, such as• Showcasing the talents and views of a guest columnist each week, tapping the expanding pooi of Hispanic journalists and creative writers nationwide. level of acculturation. Marilyn Aguirre Molina, an assistant professor at the Medical School of Rutgers University and a researcher for the university's Center of Alcohol Studies, said that treatment centers too often engage in " victim blaming," where • Expanding our Corporate section to a full page. Classified the Hispanic client is labeled recalcitrant if • Enlarging our "news hole. " • Inaugurating a "Connections" section to report on how the corporate and public sectors are interacting with the Hispanic community. This week we have included prototypes of these features for you to assess. We have also enclosed a questionnaire form inviting your thoughts on the "old" Weekly Report the proposed new one, and any fresh ideas you're willing to contribute on how Weekly Report can serve your needs better. . Please take a moment to fill it out and return it to us. It will help us provide you with more of what you want in the future . Thank you . Carlos Morales Editor Hector Ericksen Mendoza Publisher Blanket Work Ban Illegal A federal court of appeals in San Francisco ruled June 13 that immigration officials cannot indiscriminately bar undocumented aliens who are free on bond during deportation proceedings from working. A threejudge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held that the question of working while on bond must be decided on an individual basis. The ruling was in response to a class-action suit filed by the National Center of Immigrants' Rights and 12 other organizations that provide free legal service to aliens. The court of appeals upheld a decision by a U.S. district COl!rt issued in 1984 which banned the no-work rule. The ruling affects those people who may wait . years on bond pending hearings on depbrtation, political asylum or permanent residence. P.R. Veterans Win Suit The U . S . Supreme Court ruled unconsti tutional June 17 a New York state law that prevented two native Puerto Rican U.S. Army veterans from receiving the preference points given to state veterans who pass New York's civil service exam. The Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund file<:! suit in u .s. District Court in Manhattan in 1982 on behalf of Eduardo Soto-L6pez and Eliezar Baez i Hernandez, charging that both men were 1being discriminated against because they• .did not enter the service in New York. Both men entered the Army in Puerto Rico and have lived in New York for over 10 years. Wter both passed the test in 1980, they were denied the five preference points. The case was lost and subsequently ; appealed and won in the 2nd U.S . Circuit .Court of Appeals in Manhattan. The state appealed to the Supreme Court in June 1985. The high courfs decision said U . S . citizens , have the right to travel from one state to 1another and that distinctions based on prior reside_!lcy can be unconstitutional.

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House OKs $16 Billion Omnibus Housing Bill • 1 • '' • U.S Rep. Henry B . Gonzalez's (DTexas) roughly one-eighth of the $16 billion housing amendment to the omnibus housing bill, bill. approved 340-36 June 11. will allow His-The House also adopted an amendment panics and other disadvantaged groups to that would allow undocumented families to continue to obtain adequate housing, accordcontinue living in public housing as long as ing to an aide of the Texas congressman. there is a member who is a citizen or a legal The amendment would reauthorize federal U . S resident The amendment virtually nullifies spending for most housing and community an announced policy by the Department of development programs through fiscal year Housing and Urban Development that calls 1987. The Reagan administration has called for the eviction of families living in federally for the elimination of such housing programs assisted housi ng th . at had any undocumented in its last two budget prOposals. .. fa mily members living with them. The policy Housing assistance programs, which include . was to take effect July 31. low-interest loans and subsidies to low-income Included in the amendment is a provision families, elderly and handicapped for partial to protect residents 62 years old and older .rent payment and modernization, represent from eviction. The residents would simply have to declare their citizenship o r legal s tatus. Documentation is not necessary. Several Hispanic organizations have taken positions against the HUD policy, charging that it would spawn discrimination by landlords against Hispanic housing applicants. Rep. Robert Garcia' s (D-N.Y.) amendment to the housing bill to authorize HUD to create 1 00 enterprise zones was approved 366-32. The zones are to be used to lure bus ine s s es into economically depressed th roug h tax breaks and other financial con cessions from the government. The Senate is expected to take action on its housing bill in July. Felix Perei Calif. Assembly Passes Latino Alcoholism Care Criti_cized Bilingual Law Extension The California State Assembly approved June 12 a six-year extension of that state's law requiring bilingual instruction in classrooms where 1 0 or more students use the same native language other than English . The measure is expected to confront Republi can opposition in the Senate. Sponsored by Democrat Assembly Speaker Willie Brown, the bill was approved by the minimum 41-31 majority required in the so member body . The present bilingual education law expires June 1987. If passed by the Senate, the bill could be vetoed by Gov . George Deukmejian, who has not yet stated his position on it. If no action is taken this year, it will require a two-thirds vote for "urgency legislation" next year. UnemploymentUpto11/o In a continuing trend, Hispanic civilian unemployment rose from 1 0.4o/o to 11 o/o in May, the U.S. Department of Labor reported. The unemployment rate for blacks remained at 14.8o/o and for whites it increased from 6 . 1 o/o to 6.2o/o. continued from page 1 professions as a career. Those who do opt for a medical career are turning awai from alcohol treatment, a relatively low-paying disci pline, he said . Molina said that" not only are more person nel needed, but those who are trained in a culturally aware.manner as well." Jane Delgado, e xe cu ti ve director of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, said the major reason there have been no national surveys on the drinking habits of Hispanics is the Hialeah Leader Kills Self Gustavo Carbonell , an accountant and former candidate for the Florida state legislature, fatally shot himself in his car June 9, two weeks after he returned from a 41-hour dis appearance alleging he was victim of a politically motivated kidnapping. His wife and friends had been depressed because fe w people, including the police, believed his abduction story. Carbonell, 48, f ro m Hialeah, was running for District 111 of the Florida House of Rep resentatives when he was allegedly kidnapped May 27. CONGRESSIONAL DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS.:... 1985 Outside HonoSTATE U.S. Rep . Income • rariums Assets• Liabilities • CALIFORNIA Tony Coelho (D) $18,703 $22,467 •• $257,006 $180,004 Matthew Martinez (D) 10,002 5,625 500,000 15,001 Edward Roybal (D) 35,003 1,650 401,005 230,005 Esteban Torres (D) 404 4,500 52,003 115,002 NEW MEXICO Manuel Lujan (R) 2,002 6,050 630,005 0 Bill Richardson (D) 10,103 2,850 70,003 15,001 NEW YORK Robert Garcia (D) 285 5 ,500 161 ,005 130,003 TEXAS Albert Bustamante (D) 5,304 1,550 366,005 175,005 Kika de Ia Garza (D) 0 22,000 •• 15,001 0 Henry B. Gonzalez (D) 1,490 1,000 0 0 Solom6n Ortiz (D) 5 ,805 0 36,006 0 PUERTO RICO Jaime Fuster (D) 25,004 8 ,250 452,005 60,003 VIRGIN ISLANDS Ron de Lugo (D) 20,003 0 402,004 65,002 GUAM Ben Blaz(R} 1,001 0 0 30,002 • For these categories. members are not required to list specifi c a mounts. Instead ranges , such as "not more than$5,000" and "over$250,000," are used . Text and chart figures use the lowe s t possible range figures. A zero means the amount was less than the minimum reporting requirement. •• Both Coelho and de Ia Garza exceeded the restrictions on honoraria. earning $37,632.51 and $13,000, respectively, over the $22.467. 49 limit. Both donated those amounts to c harity. source: 7985 financial disclosure statements, House Office of Records and Registration 2 prohibitive cost. The U . S . Department of Health and Human Services' Hispanic Health and Nutrition Ex-. amination Survey wi ll be the first attempt to gather national statistics on alcohol abuse . Conducted between 1982 and 1984, the survey interviewed 12 ,000 Me x ican Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans on several health indicators. The alcohol consumption part of the survey results for all three groups will be released in December. Dr . Michael Woodbury with th e University o f Puerto Rico and a panelist at last month's substance abuse conference said : "There is a problem with setting definiti onal standards to compare data from different studies." Woodbury is in the final stages of an alcohol abuse study being conducted in Puerto Rico .. The majority of the studies available have been conducted on Mexican Americans in the Southwest. -Felix Perez Perez to Head College Antonio Perez was appointed president of South Central Community College in New' Haven, Conn., JuAe 12, thus becoming the first Hispanic to head a college in that state. Perez, 39, is a native of Aguada, Puerto Rico. He had been serving as vice president for student affairs of the Community Colleges of Rhode Island . Lujan Has Most Ass ets U . S . Rep . Manuel Luj a n (R-N.M . ) led all 14 members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in ass ets reported on financial disclosure statements recently released. He reported $630 ,005. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) was second with $500,000 in assets, followed by Jaime Fuster (D P .R.), $452,005. Members, officers and employees of Con gress are required by the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 to file the statements by May 15 for the preceding year with the House Clerk and Senate Secretary. The statements were released May 22. Reporting the most in outside income (which does not include representatives' $75,100 annual salary) were Edward Roybai(D-Calif.), $35,003, Fuster, $25,004, and Ron de Lugo , (D-Virgin Is.), $20,003. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Achy Obejas Spanish as' Litmus Test' Does language make the Latino? How often have you heard someone say, "Well, what kind of a Cuban (or Puerto Rican, or Chicano) is he? He doesn't even speak Spanish." Nine times out of ten, these Hispanic linguistic purists don't even speak English-this after years of residence in the good ol' U.S.A Yet they feel completely unabashed in their criticism of the language limitations of othersespecially young, generally successful , second generation Hispanics. They are even harsher in their judgments of second generation Latinos who are public figures or politicians. These critics aren ' t first generation, older Latinos exclusively. The worst offenders, in fact, seem to be those snappy young latino americanos, so recently arrived and so eager to teach us U . S .-Iocked Latins what being l Latino is all about. These folks have their historical_ dates down ] pat. They can conjugate the subjunctive tense-and even explain it-1and are quick to red-pencil anybody's grammatical mistakes. They i relish interrupting a conversation to enunciate a verb correctly and 1 deliberately. (Never mind that you ' re trying to tell these jerks that, in ltheir imperfect English, they've just ordered a "nubile girl" instead of 'Shrimp Newberry) . CULTURAL PURITY BAROMETER The worst part of this attitude from His panics is that it gives license :to non-Hispanics to use language as a barometer of our cultural " purity'' or "expertise." I might note here that when people talk about other ethnic ;; groups, language is not a criterion. N . o one asks what kind of Polish l Roman Polanski speaks, and no one doubts his Polish ness . Something sad happened in Denver this month. The qity's two powerful daily newspapers issued a manifesto t _ o 'the leaders of varied Hispanic organization' s there: .. The papers warned that if tho$e. Latino leade.rs : ':"'ant respect from the press, they better keep their mouths $hut when white leaders insult and demean their community. What upset the editors was the reaction by several Latinos to immigration testimony by Colorado Gov . . Dick Lamm before a congressional committee in Washington, D.C . Lamm, who leaves office this year after 12 years, is co-author of a book t i tled " The Immigration Tim e Bomb : The Frag mentation of America." Lamm's statements, as reported by correspondents for The Denver Post and the Ro cky Mountain News, were loaded with hyperbole and references to impending Quebec-like "disasters," a strong tie between immigrants and crime, and even ethnic strife in Lebanon. The Rock y Mountain News' Joan Lowy began her report: "WASHINGTONColorado Gov. Richard D . Lamm told a congres sional committee yesterday that the United States is headed toward a 'deadly disunity' because Hispanic immigrants are not assimilating into society and do not learn English. " L amm. .. said, 'More and more immigrants are living in America separated b y l anguage, geography, ethnicity and class. This is a social time bomb . . .' " Th e Post's Ann Schmidt began her dispatch: "WASHINGTONAmerica could reap a social disaster if immigrants flooding into this country, many of whom speak only Spanish, fail to becom e part of American life, Gov. Dick Lamm told Congress Thursday. . . "Lamm warned that a social disaster is coming in the United Stat. es unless immigrants are fully 'assimilated' into American society . . . " It's not language that defines us; it's culture, race and experience. Reported the Post's Neil Westergard on Lamm' s testimony: ' In Latin America, Spanish is the essential connector, but in the United " . . . His assertion that immigrantsespecially Hispanic immigrants :,States, it's secondary. It may aid in communication, especially with -are more reluctant to learn English and prefer living in 'linguistic recent immigrants and older Latinos , but among the second generation, it ghettos' touched a sensitive nerve among Hispanic leaders ... " .; has primarily a symbolic value . Fluency, a large vocabulary or"correctness" Lamm' s Latino critics were unanimous in thei r condemnation of the ::are incidental. governor's rhetoric. Those in Denver called a press conference to Second generation Hispanics are schooled in English-language repeat fo r the thousandth time that Hispanics DO want to learn 1 institutions, often with zero or limited bilingual programs; they watch English and DO want to be part of the nation's mainstream. =English-language television and engage in social activities both with Their criticisms of the governor quoted in the two papers were Latinos and nonLatinos. Opportunities to acquire a large Spanish bland in contrast to what Lamm had charged. Audrey Alvarado, \vocabulary or develop the proper grammatical skills are almost executive director of the Denver-based Latin American Research ::existent. ... and Service Agency, said .that Lamm's attacks "encourage and We are going through a phase of assimilation in which we continue, sanction racism . . . " Rich Castro, executive d irector of the city's •as second, third and subsequent generations, to identify as Hispanic. Agency for Human Rights and Community Relations, suggested, "I \!We are defined as such, without regard to our bilingual abilities, by think th e governor is trying to drive a wedge between Hispanicsand )the dominant culture. the majority society and I think he ought to stop." State Rep. Tony ' We are becoming a group, like the black community here, distinctly Herna11dez called Lamm an "Ugly American." yet different. The 'ciiy' s two papers roared back with editorials attacking the 1 LANGUAGE NOT' INHERITED' city's Hispan ic leadership. Under the heading "Dick Lamm is no 1 We are distinct from the dominant culture and distinct from the racist," the Post concluded that "The knee-jerk response of some :native culture of our immigrant generation. We are unique, carrying local Hispanicsapplying the label of 'racism'-was not deserved, !traits and values from both Latin America and the United States. nor did it add to the stature of the critics." Speaking Spanish is wonderful. Knowing how to read and write it The News led its editorial: "Don't dare disagree with some local :correctly is terrific. It's a great skill for anyone to have, even more so Hispani c leaders. They will declare you immoral. " It quoted Castro , 1for a Latino, because language brings us closer to our roots. It is, and Hernimdez and Alvarado and said, "PrediCtably, (Lamm's) opponents rlhowever, an acquired skill, not an inherent trait. To use it as a litmus gathered in line to smear him... 1test is divisive. "This sort of reaction has gone on long enough and should be , A kid with curly hair on the corner of Logan and Milwaukee Avenue exposed for what it is : a disgraceful form of demagoguery." j in Chicago chewing on some Spanglish and bopping to The Gap Band It's sad when newspaper editors won't read their own reporters' ' is still Latino, although Latino in a uniquely American way. stories carefully enough to pass fair judgment on who are the 1 What makes us Hispanic is the way we think and feel, the commonality of demagogues. experience and the way we' re viewed by others. It's sadder still that some newspapers continue, in the 1980s, to I (Achy Obejas, a frequent contributor to Hispanic Link News Service, peer at Hispanics through 1930 and 1940 lenses. • li s the recent recipient of a $20,000 National Endowment for the Arts Saddest of all is the reality that the editors' boardroom-window ; grant for creative writers of exceptional talent to write and travel. A wisdom is creating yet another painful postponement of what U . S . 1iresident of Chicago, she immigrated to the United States from Cuba Hispanics, like all immigrants to our nation, want: the opportunity to age_6.) pe full participants. " Hispanic Link Weekly Report June 23, 1986

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CQLLECTABLES HISPANIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT: The 81page"Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol Abuse: An Hispanic Assessment of Present and Future Challenges," (Order No. 387), is available by sending S7 to: National Coalition of Hispanic Health and H1,1man l;)ervices Organizations, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 537, Washington, D.C. 20015 (202) 371. ' ' ALCOHOL RESEARCH: For a listing of materials avaftable on His panic alcohol abuse, write to: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol P.O. Box 2345, Rockville, Md. 20852 (301) 468. -CONTROLLING SCHOOL DROPOUTS: The 58-page "School 'Dropouts: Everybody's Problem" summarizes current dropout data and demographic trends and provides ideas for model programs and policies. For a copy, send $5, plus $1 for postage, to: Publications Depa_rtment, The Institute for Educational Leadership, 1001 ConnE!cticut Ave. NW; Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822. BILINGUAL LIBRARIANS: The Queens College Graduate School of Library and Information Studies is offering three free-tuition minority fellowships , each carrying an additional $4,000 annual stipend Bilingual students expecting to work in multi-ethnic libraries are encouraged to apply. Deadline to request application forms: June 25. Contact: Prof . David Cohen , Library School, Queens College, 65 30 Kissena Blvd . , Flushing, N .Y. 11367 (718) 520. FIGHTING UNEMPLOYMENT: The 19page "Jobs for the Dis advantaged : Local Programs that Work" lists "real" unemployment rates for all states and 40 metropolitan areas and describes case studies and practices of successful state and local . programs . For free single copies send self-addressed 9inch x 12inch envelope to: National Committee for Full Employment, Job Creation Educatiol'l Project, 815 16th St. NW, Suite 301, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 393. MEXICAN AMERICANS IN MATH AND The U.S. Department of Education's report "Improving Math and Science Achievement of Mexican Americans" reviews existing improveiT!ent programs and gives suggestions on how to set uP successful ones. Price: $5. Order from: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, New Mexico State University, Box 31 AP, Las Cruces, N.M. 88003 (505) 646. CONNECTIONS (Late news on what's occurring within the U . S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it. ) FORUM GAINS McDONALD'S RECRUITMENT GRANT The National Puerto Rican Forum accepted a $10,000 contribution from McOonalds Corporation June 13 to initiate a professional recruitment program for the national chain. Forum President Hector Velazquez said the New York-based agency will use the donation to recruit and train Hispanics in New York, Hartford, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, Miami and Chicago. FREE LISTINGS IN NATIONAL DIRECTORY The l)nited States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is inviting Hispanic firms wanting to reach new markets to list themselves, free of charge, in USHCC's new National Hi"S.panic Business Directory. Forms may be obtained by contacting: USHCC, Board of Trade Center, 4900 Main, Kansas City, Mo. 64112. Phone: (81 6) 842 2228. They must be completed and returned 1:1Y July 1. RAIDERS COACH JOINS COORS DISTRIBUTORSHIP Los Angeles Raiders football coach Tom Flores has teamed with Tommy Mason, former all-pro running back for the Minnesota Vikings, in a newly expanded Adolph Coors Company distributorship covering Bernardino and Riverside counties in Southern California. Flores is the first Latino distributor named since Coors signed its 1984 national agreement with a coalition of Hispanic organizations . His is the company's eighth Hispanic-owned distributorship, highest in the industry. NEW PACIFIC BELL PAGINAS AMARILLAS Pacific Bell, which has already distributed Spanish-language Yellow Pages for Los Angeles and California's San Gabriel Valley, is passing out 104,000 directories for Orange County this month. With 431 pages of listings and ads, it's the largest Hispanic Yellow Pages in Southern California. Some 60,000 more are available to requesting businesses and consumers . OTHER NAMES, OTHER PLACES Lionel Sosa. president of San Antonio-based Sosa & Associates, was honored June 17 by the San Antonio Advertising Federation with its Silver Medal Award for outstanding service in advertising ... In a ceremony at the Nebraska land Days Mexican Fiesta in North Platte, Neb., June 15, Josephine Carranza of the State Department of Social Services and Jim Ramirez of the Omaha Public Schools were feted as Nebraska's Hispanic Woman and Man of the Year . . . Calendar lourdes Arce (213) 725 HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Chicago July 25 THIS WEEK STATE ENCUENTRO St. Paul, Minn . June 27 The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis will conduct the first state encuentro with forums on increasing Hispanic participation within the church and building its Hispanic pool of leaders. Claudia Eguia-Jaime (612) 291 FOR MINORITIES AND WOMEN Louisville, Ky. June 28, 29 The theme of this conference by the National Education Association will be how women and minorities will be affected by developments and trends in education . Nancy Kochuk (202) 822 AWARDS AND INSTALLATION BANQUET Los Angeles June 28 The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold its 12th annual banquet to announce new members of its national board of directors and to hand out awards . A COMING SQON MARCH F9R IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES San Diego Committee for a National Day of Justice San Ysidro, Calif. July 4 David Valladolid (619) 267 . HISPANIC PASTORAL STUDY WEEK Northeast Hispanic Catholic Weston, Mass. J4ly 7 Father Roberto Gonzalez (21 751 57Ttt ANNUAL LULAC CONVENTION of United Lat!n American Citizens Vegas. Nev. July 9-13 Robert Rivan (702) 384 HISPANICS AND EDUCATION Texas AssoCiation of Chicanos in Higher Education Houston July Mary Helen Padilla (713) 792-4776 CttiCANA ICtt()LARS Mujeres Activaa en Letras y Cambio Social Davis. Calif. July 24 Linda Facio (918) 752 -June 19ss Cindy Hall (812) 842 SANTIAGO APOSTOL PUERTO RICAN CELEBRATION New York Historical Society New York July 27 Nancy Donner (212) 873 SPOTLIGHT NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA: "Hispanics: Architects in America's Future" is the title of NCLR's 1986 convention to be held in los Angeles July 13 16. There will be workshops on immigration , bilinguai education, media coverage of Hispanics , health care and other topics. For further information, con tact Marialba Martinez at (202) 628. Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number , Address items to : Calendar editor . Hispanic link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW. Washington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic link Weekly Report I

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LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES UNIVERSI"N OF VERMONT PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT Seeks an individual to perform duties of a job analyst and other activities related to Personnel Administration . Qualifications: ACADEMIC 1986/87 ADJUNCT POSITIONS Applications invited for the anticipated adjunct faculty positions described below. Unless other wise stated, the procedure for all applications is as follows : 1 . Send letter of application and resume by Decembe r 31, 1986 to: Personnel Office , Room 3 c/o department specified. 2. Specify clearly the position forwhich candidacy is offered. 3. Rank and salary will be commen surate with qualifications. • Accounting/Managerial Studies: MBA and/ or CPA, PhD preferred. Cou rses includ e acc ount ing and business administration. e Communication Skills: Strong background and teachin g re ad i ng to non-t r aditional students at the secondar y or college level. Hours from 8 a .m. to 10:3 0 p.m. (specify availability). • Continuing Education: E x perience essential. Openings anticipated in English as a Second Language, Adult Basic Edu c ation , High School Equivalency , Word P roce ssing, Typing, Shorthand, Telecommunications, Real Estate , Computer Programming , Accounting , Bookkeeping, Small Business Managem ent, Refr igerat ion and Air Conditioning. • Engl is h : Ma ste(s degree, experience teach i ng writing. Courses include Basic Writing and Freshman Composition. HUMANITI ES Openings anticipated in: • Bilingual Education: Earned doctorate, or maste(s in Bilingual Education with three years experience in a public school setting; fluency in Spanish and English ; professional or scholarly activity . Contact: Jesus Fuentes, Director of Bilingual Education Associate Program . • Critical Thinking : Maste(s or doctorate in Philosophy , Psychology , or English ; special e x perience teaching critical thinking and cog nitive skills. e Performing Arts: Minimum BA with extensive college teaching and performance e x perience ; MAin music education, musico l ogy , music theory, applied piano , guitar, stage c raft , acting and stage directi on, or choreography and dance cl ass instruction preferred . • Philosophy: MA or PhD; if no doctorate, enrollment in a doctoral prog ram. Teaching e x perience ; ability to tie conceptual analysis to concrete life experience. e Speech Communication : MA or PhD in Ling uistics, Speech Pathology , or Communication Theory. Courses i nc lude Basi c Communication Strategies, Oral Communication and Com munication and the NonNative Speaker. Send letter and vitae to: Dr . Sandra Dickinson-Card , Coordinator , Speech Communication . • Library: Minimum ALA accredited MLS; experience in public serv ic e in an academic library desirable . Perform reference and biblio graphic instruction duties in a busy public serv ice environment; evening/Saturday schedule. e Social Science: Minimum maste(s degree , doctorate preferred . Courses include multi disciplinary Introduction to Social Science course, and/or specific electives in Anthropology, Eco nomics, History, Political Science, Psychology , and Sociology. LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31 0 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y . 11101 . EOE/AA Employer. Hispanic Link Weekly Report INSTRUCTOR or ASSISTANT PROFESSOR in Foreign Languages Teaching Spanish courses at various levels; administration of a . small program. Qualifications: PhD or ABD in Spanish, Latin American studies . or related area. plus two years of college teaching experience . Knowledge of French desirable. Rank: Commensurate with qualifications and experience. (Substitute one-year appointment) May lead to tenure track. INSTRUCTOR or ASSISTANT PROFESSOR in Speech Communications Teach courses such as Basic Communication Strategies, Oral Communications , Voice and Diction, Group Communication and Public Speaking . Qualifications: MA or PhD in Lin guistics, Speech Pathology, Industrial Psychology, or Communication Theory, plus two years of college teaching experience. Rank: Com mensurate with qualifications. (Substitute one year appointment.) May lead to tenure track. Send resume and letter indicating position desired by August 1 5 to: Chairperson, Humanities Department , Room 3 . READING FACULTY TENURE TRACK Minimum MA or Professional Certificate in Reading or related field . PhD preferred Strong theoretical background and experience in teaching reading to non-traditional students at the sec ondary or college level a must. Experience in computer-assisted instruction and software evaluation applied to reading and language arts required . Experience in research and uation desirable . Rank: Commensurate with qualifications. Send resume and letter by August 15 to: Search Committee , Communication Skills Department , Room 3, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N .Y. 11101. EOE/ AA Employer . CLINICAL THERAPIST for Hispanic Mental Health Services. To provide mental health ser vices to general and Hispanic adults, families and children. Minimum requirements: fluency in Spanish and a maste(sdegree in psychology, social work, counseling for nursing and one year experience counseling adults, families or children . Salary range : $21 ,700 to $28,751. Application deadline : July 31, 1986, 5 p.m. Contact: Genesee County Community Mental Health Services, Personnel Department, 420 W. 5th Ave . , Flint, Michigan 48503 (313) 257 3709. EOE/MF. Bachelor's degree, preferably Business Administration or related field , emphasis in Personnel Administration . Prefer two years experience in Personnel or related field. Excellent oraVwritten communication skills, strong analytical ability necessary . Computer applications knowledge desirable . Position requires travel around University Campus. POSITION MAY BE FILLED AS PERSONNEL TRAINEE IF A QUALIFIED POOL OF EXPERIENCED CANDIDATES IS NOT OB TAINED. ALL OTHER QUALIFICATIONS REMAIN THE SAME. Send resume and cover letter by July 7, 1986, to the University o f Vermont, 237 Watermen Building, Burlington, Vt 05405. Please include Social Security number when applying. ANEOE. DESIGNER sought by PBS, Alexandria, Virg inia College degree in art, liberal arts or des i gn. mum two years graphic design experience in private industry, preferably a television station. Qualified candidate must possess design and illusfration skills, as well as a knowledge of photography and photographic techniques. Salary: Open . Persons interested shou l d submit resume to: PBS, Attn. Sheila E. Humphrey, 1320 Braddock Place, Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 739. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES EAST COAST BOOKINGS? Culture Clash, from San Francisco, the only Chicano/Latino comedy troupe in the universe, will perform at the New York Joseph Papp Theater Festival Aug. 21. The troupe is interested in touring East Coast after Aug. 28 . Call Mauricio at Aviles Productions(415) 647 . VICTOR ROMERO , Producer/Director, Docu mentary and training videos for target audience. Call WEST END VIDEO (202) 775. GRAPHIC DESIGNER seeks entry leve'i position in the Washington, D . C . area. Bilingual (English/Spanish) . Call Heriberto Quillones (202) 255-1223. CORPORATIONS & NON-PROFIT ORGAN I ZATIONS : Established Washington Hispanic firm is ready to assist you with your training, ADPservices, research& evaluation, management consulting , and representation needs. For more information or emploYment opportunities, contact Business Information & Services Corp.,.2025 Eye St. NW, Suite 1115, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-6100. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . c : 20005 or phone(202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by __________ _ Title Area Code & Phone _______ _ Advertiser Name Bill To Address City, State & Zip 5

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Arts & Entertainment starring Orlando . Emily Tray produced, Caryn Sneider wrote the episode. IMAGEN AWARDS GIVEN: Winners of three Imagen awards were annoi:mced June 19 by the National Conference of Christians and Jews. The awards are shared by producers, actors and writers winning productions were selected by a panel of media professionals. The winners are: FROM NEW MEXICO TO D.C.: Two Hispanic families from New Mexico will demonstrate traditional crafts from that state at the Smithsonian Institution's 20th annual Festival of American Folk/ife to, be staged this week in the nation ' s capital. . . . Demonstrating the carving of santos-wooden rellg1ous 1mages of saints or the Virgin Marywill be George Lopez and family. The Cordova , N.M., woodcarver won a National Heritage Award from the National Endowment of the Arts in 1982 for his efforts to preserve the wood carving tradition. Joining him in D.C. will be his wife Silvia nita Lopez. and three other members of his family. An episode of Cagney and Lacey titled Ordinary Hero that featured Tony Acierto as an undocumented Chilean waiter who witnesses a stabbing and rescues the victim. He is picked up by immigration officials, and the title characters face the dilemma of "their legal responsibilities." Ordinary Hero aired Oct. 7, 1985, on CBS. Four generations of Agueda Martinez ' s family from Medanales! Maricela. a Richard Soto Production that aired on .the PBS network Jan. 27 on the Wonderworks Family Entertainment Series. portrayed a young immigrant whose mother takes a job as a livi:Hn maid. The program starred Linda Lavin as the mother's employer. The program was produced for KCET in Los Angeles by Pl)yllis Geller. N . M . , will also participate in the festival. Agueda Martinez is the matriarch of the large family of traditional weavers . She will be joined by a daughter, Eppie Archuleta, who lives in Alamosa, Colo., a granddaughter and great-granddaughter. . Agueda , who has a reputation for growing some of the best If'! . northern New Mexico, will also have a chile garden at the festival. Held at the National Mall June 25-29 and July 2-6, the demonstrations are part of the festivars program titled Cultural Conservation: -;The Mr. Quiet episode of The Cosby Show, starring Tony Orlando, Ida Maris and Alexis Cruz , that aired on NBC May 2 , 1985. The Cosby/W;uner Prod!JC::tion program was a oilot for a Cosby spin-off Traditional Crafts in a Post-Industrial Age . _Antonio Mejias-Rentas . l\lledia Report . NAHJ ELECTIONS: Regional election -for the National Association of His panic Journalists are in for all but one of the : regions. The regional representatives are: Region _1, ChristopherCrommetiWKAQ-Radlo, Puerto : Rico; Region2, Evidode Ia Cruz, El Region4 , Cecilia Hernandez, WSVN-TV, Miami; Region 5 , Rosalind Soliz, Dallas; Region 6, Elisa Alfonso, WBBM-Radio, Chicago; Region 7, Elaine [ AYala, The Arizona Daily Star, Tucson , Ariz.; an ' d Region 8, Bob Alaniz , KCB5-TV, Los : Angeles. _ 'In Region 3, Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, publisher of Hispanic Link Weekly Report, I an d Patrisia Gonzales, reporter with The Philadelphia Inquirer, polled the same nJmber of votes . There will be a runoff this month to determine the winner. WORLDCUPSOCCERHOTLINE: TheSIN. I_' HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of -,Hispanic Link News Service Inc. '1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 _ (202) 234-Q280 or 234-Q737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza ,' Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Feli x Perez , Charlie Ericksen , Anton_io Mejias Rentas. wrtidn of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduc , ed , or broadcast in any form without advance permtsston • . -Annual--subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26 . .. CON . FERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest ediiion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' Packets at your next conference or convention. For details, Contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. 6 [ television -network in conjunction with Budweiserhas established a toiHree, Spanish language hot line for World Cup soccer fans in the United States . The hotline, which began June 16 and will end June 30 (the day after the championship game) , offers highlights and insights as well as scores . It will be open daily from 10 a . m . to 10 p .m. (COT). The number is 1-800-225-6712. BROADCASTING AND ADVERTISING: Three Latinas were among the 16 candidates chosen for public television and radio training grants offered by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Gabriel Martinez , a broadcast engineer with KDNA-Radio in Granger, Wash., Cassandra Ortega, a broadcast technician with KUAC TV in Fairbanks, Alaska, and Marta Patino, a producer with KRCB-TV in Rohnert Park, Calif., will share, along with the other 13 recipients, a $180,304 grant pool. The grants are distributed among television and radio stations to provide on-th&-job training. The deadline for next year is tentatively scheduled for January. For further information, write to CPB, Minorities'/Women's Training Grants, 1111 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 293-6160. Sammy Lugo was one of five people selected for an advertising internship offered by the UniWorld Group, New York's largest minority advertising firm. The six-month internship guarantees placer ment in a participating agency at the junior copywriter level. Those who complete the program are paid$1 0,000 plusa$1 ,000 cash incentive . The primary requisite is that appli cants possess creative writing skills. For further information, contact Valerie Graves, UniWorld, 1250 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 564-0066. MEDIA MOVE: The Washington Times Buenos Aires correspondent Timothy O'Leary , a Chicano and son of veteran White House correspondent Jeremiah O'Leary, rejoins the Times' Washington, D.C., office this month as an assistant foreign editor. Felix Perez i yotL fAe section -lhe non-5paru'sh-spea!Jimj section ?11 or Hispanic Link Weekly Report ' i