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Hispanic link weekly report, July 7, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 7, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Rev. Enrique San Pedro, 60, becomes the first Hispanic to be ordained bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Galveston-Houston. Hispanics make up 60% of the 600,000-member diocese... The National Council of La Raza will honor U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, with its La Raza Award for “promoting the interests of Hispanic Americans” at its annual conference July 13-16 in Los Angeles. Miriam Col6n Edgar, founder and director of the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre Co. in New York City, and Mexican actor/comedian Mario Moreno “Cantinflas” will also be honored... With less than a year to go in his term, Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez announces his resignation,
effective July 15, to campaign full time for the Sept.|2|p^@i|e|m gubernatorial primary... New Progressive Party delegates in Ponce, Puerto Rico, choose San Juan Mayor Baltasar Corcada del Ri2Mb‘ succeed former island Gov. Carlos Romero Barce(M^Lptesident... Rocky Barilla, winner of Oregon’s recent Democratic state primary, would become the first Hispanic in the state Legislature if he wins in the Nov. 4 general election.. .Marta Escutia, legislative director at the National Council of La Raza in Washington, D.C., leaves that post after being chqsen to study and work at the International Court of Justice at The Hague, Netherlands. Following that stint she hopes to return to the West Coast to work. . . Golfer Nancy L6pez, who recently gave birth to her second daughter, announces she will defend her title at the LPGA’s $230,000 Henredon Classic Aug. 7-10 oh the Willow Creek Golf Course in High Point, N.C....
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Hispanic Credit Unions Flourishing Nationwide
The credit union movement is strengthening its presence in Latino communities across the country. Formed as grass roots, cooperatively owned banking institutions, these financial associations of Hispanics totaled 173 of approximately 16,000 credit unions counted last year by the National Credit Union Administration.
Created by a savings pool of practically any group - employees, neighbors, community organizations or associations - that agree to lend to themselves, the unions provide low-interest loans based on more personalized, culturally sensitive lending criteria. Generally, loan interest rates range
Court Upholds Fees Case
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled June27 that plaintiffs’ attorneys in civil rights suits could receive higher fee awards than those received in damages by clients they represent. The ruling stemmed from a case involving eight Mexican Americans and police officers in Riverside, Calif.
Writing the majority opinion, Justice William Brennan said that limiting fees in these cases would make legal defenses difficult in cases with small damage awards. The U.S. Justice Department had argued that the fees should be limited to a one-third-of-the-damages rate applied in personal injury cases.
In a 5-4 vote, the court upheld a 1980 decision awarding $33,350 in damages and $245,456 ($125 per hour) in fees to attorneys Gerald Lopez and Roy C6ceres. Lopez, presently a Stanford Law School professor, and Caceres, now a San Diego judge, represented eight Mexican Americans who in 1975 were attending a party that police broke up by entering without a warrant.
from 12% to 18%.
They are managed as non-profit entities by volunteer boards of directors and offer a substitute for banks and other traditional lending institutions which have abandoned low-income, less profitable areas of the cities.
A case in point: New Yorks Lower East Side People’s Credit Union, formed May 1 by Hispanic and black area residents, started operations in a building formerly occupied by Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. The bank closed its branch there in 1984.
One of the persons attending that union’s
Tax Bill Favorable to 936
Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster said the Senate version of the tax reform bill, passed June 24, contains more favorable provisions on Section 936 of the Internal Revenue Code than its counterpart in the House.
The backbone of Puerto Rico’s current economic development strategy, 936 offers tax exemption to profits made by U.S. industries operating in the island. Local bank deposits of these profits are used by the Puerto Rican government for local economic development projects.
Fuster said the Senate version allows government use of both government and private bank deposits and eliminates a House approved restriction on the amount of funds used. It would also permit long-term loans needed for infrastructure development projects.
A conference hearing to iron out differences between the House and Senate versions is expected when Congress reconvenes July 14.
inauguration was Elizabeth Flores Burkhart, the first Hispanic and woman appointed to the three-member NCUA board. “The word is spreading that credit unions are a good idea. People are beginning to ask more questions on how to start their own associations,” Burkhart says.
A former banker and teacher in Houston,
Burkhart was first appointed by President Reagan in 1982 and reappointed in 1985 for a six-year term.
Funded totally through fees charged to member unions that in fiscal 1985 were$16 million, the NCUA charters, supervises and insures the nation’s 10,125 federal credit unions and insures an additional 4,933 state-chartered unions.
Although primarily offering financial services to small savers and borrowers, Latino credit union membership crosses the community’s economic and social spectrum.
For example, Linda Hanten, board secretary of the 400-member Hispanic First Federal Credit Union in Washington, D.C„ reports that her group recently granted loans to a social science consultant wanting to buy a new computer system; to a
continued on page 2
Munoz Re-elected in Chi.
George Munoz was unanimously re-elected president of the 11-member Chicago Board of Education June 25.
Munoz, 35, was elected as chief of the nation’s third largest school system for his third consecutive one-year term. As of October 1985, Chicago’s public school system had an enrollment of 97,325 students. Its tentative budget for 1986-87 is $1.84 billion.
Munoz had announced in May that he would not seek re-election. He reportedly reconsidered at the urging of colleagues.
STATES WITH HISPANIC CREDIT UNIONS - 1985
Texas 52 New Mexico 14 District of Columbia 3
Puerto Rico 30 Arizona 5 Massachusetts 2
New York 19 Florida 5 Nebraska 1
California 17 Illinois 5 Ohio 1
Colorado 14 New Jersey 4 Pennsylvania 1


Latinos Divided on Increased Immigration
Hispanics polled June 19-23 by two media organizations were evenly divided on whether the United States should welcome more immigrants or slow the flow. The poll showed 49% of all respondents wanted immigration decreased, while 42% said it should be increased.
The three groups polled and their preferences on immigration levels showed:
Raise Keep as is Lower
Hispanic 25% 36% 31%
White 5 34 52
Black 11 41 39
Conducted by The New York Times and CBS News, the poll, results of which were released July 1, asked 1,618 adults nationwide about their views on a variety of issues related to immigration. Hispanics were sampled at a higher rate than others to provide statistical reliability.
A majority of residents in the Northeast favored keeping immigration at the current level (44%), while the majority of individuals
in the Midwest, South and West regions favored decreasing immigration, 51-53%.
Poorer and less educated respondents favored restricting immigration. As both of those levels rose, people were more inclined to support increasing immigration.
On poll questions regarding immigration legislation, Hispanic responses differed widely from those offered by whites and
blacks.
On employer sanctions, a majority of Hispanics (49%) felt employers should not be penalized for hiring undocumented workers. White (73%) and blacks (59%) overwhelmingly felt they should.
Hispanics supported bringing in temporary workers to pick crops (55%). Whites (59%) and blacks (63%) disapproved the idea
1986 NEW YORK TIMES/CBS NEWS POLL QUESTIONS
Hispanic White Black
Compared with people born here, immigrants work harder 52% 44% 46%
immigrants today take jobs from Americans 19 34 44
Most recent immigrants contribute to U.S. 48 32 38
Most cause problems 33 46 41
Most recent arrivals are here illegally Illegal aliens who have lived here several years without 56 47 59
breaking laws should not be deported 79 55 i 65
Army should be used to stop flow of illegal aliens from Mexico Government should not penalize employers for hiring 13 35 27
illegal aliens 49 17 26
Latino Credit Unions Now Flourish
continued from page 1
Resolutions to Stimulate New Citizenship Effort
City councilors in 12 predominantly Hispanic cities were to introduce resolutions last week aimed at promoting U.S. citizenship among Hispanic legal residents in the United States
Coordinated by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, the campaign would stimulate efforts for more citizenship and adult education classes and more accountability of Immigration and Naturalization Service district offices
One out of three, or 3,027,000 U.S. Latino legal residents could not vote in 1984 because of their foreign citizenship, according to NALEO and based on 1980 Census figures Approximately 43% and 36% of Hispanic legal residents in H ialeah, Fla., and Los Angeles, both among the 12 participating cities have not yet applied for U.S. citizenship. The other 10 cities are: New York, Chicago, San Antonio, Corpus Christi, Denver, San Jose, Phoenix, Sacramento, Oxnard and Sunnyvale, Calif.
Sanctuary Probation to 5
Five members of the national Sanctuary Movement, including a Latina, were placed On three to five years probation by a U.S. District Court judge in Tucson, Ariz., July 1 for helping smuggle Central Americans into the Unites States.
Mexican Catholic lay worker Maria Socorro Pardo de Aguilar, 58, was placed on five years probation along with the four others Judge Earl Carroll put off sentencing of the last three of eight total defendants convicted in April because of the length of allowed pre-sentencing speeches
Carroll could have imposed prison terms of five to 25 years.
businessman for improvements in his new restaurant; and to a 19-year-old Salvadoran refugee who needed to send a $500 money order to his ailing mother back home for medical treatment.
Another credit union, the 996-member Weslaco Catholic FCU in Weslaco, Texas,
'English Only’ on Ballot
A coalition of civil rights organizations that includes the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund vowed last week to fight a California “English Only” initiative that qualified June 25 for the November ballot The “English as the Official Language of California” initiative gathered 815,521 signatures from registered voters, more than the 630,136 required to qualify.
Sponsored by the California English Campaign, the initiative proposes to amend the state’s co'nstitution to declare English the official language and to bar laws that diminish “the role of English as the common language.” The California English Campaign is the state’s arm of U.S. English, a national organization founded by former U.S. Senator S.I. Hayakawa
Coalition representatives contend that the initiative would eliminate all forms of government-sponsored bilingual services such as bilingual education, ballots, social services and emergency 911 calls. The coalition plans to conduct opposition campaigns around the state and enlist support of elected officials. It also plans to examine legal action against the resolution.
California cities that have passed “English Only” initiatives include Fillmore and Los Altos. Similar initiatives have been sponsored in Monterey Park, South Gate and Alhambra.
primarily serves farm workers in the southern part of the state.
The nation’s first credit unions were formed in the ’20s. The first Hispanic credit union, Caballeros de San Juan of Chicago, was created in 1957.
With some mergers and liquidations of unions with under $1 million in assets, the number of Hispanic credit unions dropped from 201 in December 1982 to 173 - 32 state and 141 federal - in 1985. However, unions with over $5 million in assets jumped from 10 to 20. Average assets swelled from $1.5 to $ 2.8 million - with the smallest union maintaining $31,800 in assets; the biggest, $63.9 million. NCUA figures show:
Assets Dec. 1982 Dec 1985
Under $500,000 115 81
$500,000 -$1 million 35 29
$1 million - $5 million 41 43
Over $5 million 10 20
“Our people are getting their MBA’s (Master of Business Administration degrees). They are getting more banking experience and bringing that back to the community,” Burkhart says.
The concept of cooperative financing has long been popular in Puerto Rico and other parts of Latin America, claims Jose Velasco, a NCUA examiner for the New York region. He says that the Roberto Clemente Union, one of 19 Hispanic unions there, was set up by recent arrivals from Puerto Rico. It offers full services in Spanish and English, which makes it even more attractive to Latinos in the area, he says.
- Dora Delgado Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


Doug Martinez, guest columnist
M|fiNew American Wife
My wife Elsie became a United States citizen last month after certifying that she had not become a Communist in the six months since Christmas.
At an oral examination by immigration officials in December, she had also disavowed any association or connection With the Communist Party - truthfully, I might add.
The follow-up written question came in the mail with her "Notice of Final Naturalization Hearing," Along with telling her where and when she would stand to be sworn In with other newly minted Americans, the letter demanded information on a number of other touchy subjects:
Was she an alcoholic? Had she trafficked in Illicit drugs. Been arrested or convicted of any crime?
Elsie is from the village of El Roble - The Oak Tree - located near the city of Mazatlin on Mexico's Pacific Coast. She’s one of nine brothers and sisters who grew up in a strict but caring environment-the traditional Mexican family.
She and her sisters were permitted to go on dates only when accompanied by chaperones, for example, That's a practice which I, as a second-generation Chicane, find very un-American, but It raised no suspicions whatsoever with the U,S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. At least, it wasn't on Elsie’s questionnaire,
DIO SHE PRACTICE POLYGAMY?
The INS did probe as to whether my wife practiced polygamy or prostitution. How someone so modest that she showers with the lights off- as my wife does-could relate to such uncouth bureaucratic sneopiness, I don't know.
There may be good reason for asking some people such questions. But I find It hard to picture anyone who has gone through the arduous naturalization process, memorizing presidents' names, counting the stars on our flag and the like, who would sour his or her chances of becoming a citizen with a candid last-minute confession.
Yes, I already have seven wives.,, Yes when the rent was overdue, I've been known to turn a trick or two... Yes I've grown a little pot for tun and profit,.,
I will concede that there may be individual instances in which circumstances compel an applicant to divulge the absolute, awful truth:
“,,, I cannot tell a lie. I have been arrested and convicted of a crime. That's why this letter is being sent to you from Sing Sing state prison. Could I please reschedule my naturalisation hearing date to Nov. 3,1998? That's assuming I get credit for good behavior, which I certainly intend to da"
Or,
“It was the waiting. Lonely days Lonely nights Waiting, waiting for the 'Notice of Final Naturalization Hearing’ to arrive To relieve my tensions I took a drink. And another. And another, I have become a habitual drunkard,
“But I can change. Once I'm a citizen, I promise to apply to the clinic that did such a wonderful job rehabilitating President Ford’s wife. (See how well I know my U.S history) If you'll just give me a chance. ”:
In fact, the notice of naturalization does not allow for much expository writing. It instructs firmly: "Answer each of the questions below‘Yes' or‘No’ without giving any further explanation.”
lisle took the completed form, along with “ immigration documents and children if any (there aren't any) to her final hearing.
She was well prepared to elaborate on a few of her answers if the judge asked.
But no one there was looking for speeches. They knew, as we all do, that the bottom-line question can be answered with a simple “Yes”
Sin pelos en la lengua
DARTMOUTH’S TIGHT-LI PS: Between 1932 and 1934, Mexican master Jos6 Clemente Orozco painted a series of frescoes depicting “The Epic of American Civilization" along the walls of Dartmouth College’s library.
Panel No. 10 he devoted to “Anglo America." (See our back page.)
in It, observes Denver writer Walt Young, is a special message for Richard Lamm, who has been hired to teach at the Hanover, N.H., Institution next January after he completes his final term as governor of Colorado and- hopefully- fades away as head guru of this nation’s nativists.
Critic Young describes the mural:
“In it, we see ourselves through the eyes of a Mexican artist as a rigid and conformist society. The children in the foreground, their stern, tight-lipped teacher, the combination schoolhouse and meeting house, the neatly arranged, identical looking adults (Orozco includes a pair of identical twins to make his point), emphasize the role of our educational system in cloning our children Into socially regimented citizens.
“Before we dismiss Orozco's painting as the prejudiced view of a foreigner," Young writes in the Rocky Mountain News, “we should look carefully at two paintings: American Gothic and Daughters of the American Revolution, by American artist Grant Wood. Both portray the same tight-mouthed resistance to all things foreign.
"Lamm’s warning of a "developing pattern of linguistic ghetto concentration" of Spanish-speaking immigrants.. .attests to the correctness of Orozco's perceptions. It is one thing to be concerned about illegal immigration but another to make a fuss over Spanish-language radio and TV stations and the use of Spanish by the Hispanic people..."
HOW AM I DOIN’, MA? Noting ’85-'86 school year improvements in reading and math scores (up 13%) and school safety (up 30%), New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones graded himself a solid ‘B’ for his second year heading the nation's largest school system.
After his first year, he gave himself a B-minus.
HEADLINE OF THE WEEK: Dominating page 1 of The Washington Post’s Outlook section Sunday, June 29, was a commentary (with an appropriately stereotyping cartoon) headed, “We Don’t Cause Latin America's Troubles- Latin Culture Does,"
The author is an ex-Agency for International Development bureaucrat, Lawrence Harrison, who, of course, wrote a book.
' “Latin underdevelopment is largely a state of mind: the Latin mind,” diagnoses Harrison for Post readers.
Heck, Jesse Helms knew that all along.
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
ROY BARRERA Jr., Republican candidate to unseat Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox, responding to Democratic statements that Hispanics won't support him because he's not a “real Mexican”: "Come November, this jalapeho is going to burn (Mattox's) buns"
TONY BONILLA, chairman of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, in a telegram to Sen. Jesse Helms, chastizing the North Carolina Republican for labeling Latinos “volatile:''
“Stereotypes of this form are based on misunderstanding and ignorance Are all tobacco chewers hillbillies?"
MARIO ARANDA, director of Chicago's Latino Institute, on recent Latino election excitement in the Windy City:
“We have candidates for the state legislature, county board, committeemen and aldermen. This adds up to more Mexican candidates than in Los Angeles County and more Puerto Ricans than in New York,"
Is the United States, with all Its warts, still the best place on earth? (Doug Martinez, of Arlington, Va, is assistant editor of Farmline magazine, a publication of the US, Department of Agriculture). Hispanic Link Weakly Report ^


COLLECTABLES
CREDIT UNIONS: The brochure “Federal Credit Unions” and its Spanish translation "Las Cooperatives Federates de Ahorro y Credito” provide background information on the credit union movement. For free copies, contact National Credit Union Administration, Public Affairs Office, 1776 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20456 (202) 357-1050.
FORMING YOUR OWN CREDIT UNION: The 32-page booklet “Volunteer Organizers’ Guide” reviews the initial steps to organize a credit union. It can be obtained free from a regional National Credit Union Administration Office or from: NCUA, Public Affairs Office, 1776 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20456 (202) 357-1050.
| HISPANIC CREDIT UNIONS: A 19-page list of the 173 “Credit | Unions Serving Predominantly Hispanic Members” with addresses,
’ telephone numbers, managers’ names, assets and lending levels is available free from: National Credit Union Administration, Office of Elizabeth Flores Burkhart, 6th Floor, 1776 G Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20456 (202) 357-1100.
ALL ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: The 6-page “NALEO Naturalization Quarterly” provides updates on citizenship services throughout the nation and other events in the naturalization field. For free single copies contact Joan Anzalone, National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
TOLL-FREE CITIZENSHIP HOTLINE: The 1-800-44-NALEO free telephone line isopen Monday through Friday from 9 am.-5:30 p.m. to answer questions on U.S. citizenship benefits and requirements and make referrals to citizenship classes and counselors.
CALIFORNIA SUPREME COURT ELECTIONS: An eight-page pamphlet published by the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California analyzes the court’s limitations to respond to unfounded criticisms and provides information on the justices’ retention elections slated for November. As part of its educational program, ACLU is also providing speakers on the subject of judicial independence. For more information on the program or the free single copies of “Setting the Record Straight: The Independence of the Judiciary,” contact: Independent Judiciary Committee, ACLU-NC, 1663 Mission St., San Francisco, Calif. 94103 (415) 621-2578.
CONNECTIONS
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
OLYMPIC SURPLUS GOES TO YOUTH SOCCER The Southern California-based Amateur Athletic Foundation, charged with selecting grantees to share in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics profits, has announced a contribution of $200,000 to recreation groups - mostly in East and South-Central Los Angeles - for youth soccer programs.
Some 5,700 youngsters, 5 through 19, will benefit. A major youth soccer festival will inaugurate an expanded Los Angeles County parks program for 700 boys and girls 5 to 8 years old in September.
LATINO MUSEUM GIVEN GRANT The Atlantic Richfield Foundation announced a $7,500 grant to the California Museum of Latino History June 24. The museum, created by the state Legislature, is now in its development stage.
U.S. HI SPAN ICS’ ROLE DEBATED With funding support from the Rockefeller Foundation, the League of United Latin American Citizens will team with the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., to present a panel debate on “The Role of Hispanics in U.S. Foreign Policy in Latin America” at the National Press Club Aug. 7.
Participating as panelists: retired U.S. Ambassador Diego Asencio (who was held hostage by M19 guerrillas for 61 days in Bogota six years ago), ex-Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre and U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.); HNMA questioners include Ricardo Chavira, Time magazine, and Juan Waite, USA Today, both of whom served as correspondents in Latin America.
OTHER NAMES, OTHER PLACES'
Denver businessman Gil Cisneros, 42, was named June 9 as Region VIII director of the U.S. Small Business Administration. The region includes Colorado, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, and North and South Dakota. . . Joseph Pefta, 55-year-old Houston investment banker, was selected as regional administrator for the SBA’s Dallas office, which serves Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Arkansas and Oklahoma.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC PASTORAL STUDY WEEK Weston, Mass. July 7-11
Pastoral ministry among U.S. Hispanics, with special attention to sociological and theological perspectives, is the focus of this gathering.
Father Roberto Gonzalez (212) 751-7045
LULAC NATIONAL CONVENTION Las Vegas, Nev. July 9-13
The League of United Latin American Citizens’ 57th annual convention will feature a debate on the English-only movement and New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya on Hispanics in politics.
Robert Rivan (702) 384-3290
HISPANIC ADVERTISING AND MARKETING EXPO Anaheim, Calif. July 11,12
The Continental Broadcasting Co. is sponsoring this 2nd annual event thatfeatures seminars on marketing to Hispanic children, defining the Hispanic market and effective communication, among others. Fernando Favela (213) 466-8462
NCLR ANNUAL CONFERENCE Los Angeles July 13-16
‘‘Hispanics: Architects in America’s Future” is the> 4
theme of the National Council of La Raza’s 9th annual meeting.
Marialba Martinez (202) 628-9600
COMING SOON
HISPANICS AND EDUCATION
Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education
Houston July 16-18
Mary Helen Padilla (713) 792-4776
SPANISH-LANGUAGE RADIO PROGRAMMING National Federation of Community Broadcasters Bellingham, Wash. July 20-24 Pat Watkins (202) 797-8911
CHICANA SCHOLARS
Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social
Davis, Calif. July 24-26
Linda Facio (916) 752-2421
HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Chicago July 25 Cindy Hall (812) 842-2228
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET American Gl Forum Montebello, Calif. July 25 Ben Rodriguez (213) 921-4945
SANTIAGO APOSTOL PUERTO RICAN FESTIVAL July 7,1986
New York City Historical Society
New York July 27
Nancy Donner (212) 873-3400
HISPANIC ISSUES CONFERENCE Latin American Manufacturers Association Washington, D.C. July 28, 29 Luz Hopewell (202) 546-3803
HISPANIC BUSINESS CONVENTION
Texas Association of Mexican-American Chambers
of Commerce
Waco, Texas July 31-Aug. 2 Elena de la Garza (512) 447-9821
HISPANICS IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY American Gl Forum San Jose, Calif. Aug. 6-10 Daniel Campos (408) 554-7552
HISPANIC YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE League of United Latin American Citizens El Paso, Texas Aug. 9 Mary Y£fiez (915) 598-0333
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


STANFORD UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Stanford University, one of the nation’s premier universities, located on the San Francisco Peninsula, has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diversity. In that spirit, we welcome applications from a broad spectrum of people, including women, members of ethnic minorities and disabled individuals The Affirmative Action Office is establishing a resume bank for the recruitment of individuals in the following professions:
Administrators/Managers Senior Librarians Systems Programmers Scientific Programmers Fund Raisers ,
Writers/Editors Nurses
Life Science Professionals R & D Engineer Associates Financial Analysts The receipt of your resume will be acknowledged by letter and added to our resume bank Please send your resume to: Affirmative Action Office, Dept HNL, P.O. BoxR, Stanford University, Stanford Calif. 94305-0263.
STANFORD
UNIVERSITY
IBERO-AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SEEKS EXECUTIVE
The Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce seeks a Chief Executive Officer to direct, manage and promote the institution, and to supervise technical assistance programs funded through government and private grants.
The Ibero-American Chamber is a Hispanic-American trade association dedicated to the economic and business development of Hispanic businesses in the Washington, D.G, metropolitan area
Applicants must be fully bilingual in both Spanish and English and have a thorough understanding of the Hispanic culture, as well as U.S. business mores. A business background is preferred, with experience in association management and government consulting. Individual should also display strong management and public relations skills.
Qualified persons should mail resume and cover letter to the Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce, 2100 M Street NW, Suite 607, Washington, D.C. 20037. Please send material to the attention of Linda Rentz.
INVEST IN YOUR OWN FUTURE
HISPANIC FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION of Washington, D.C. Savings accounts, certificates of deposit, IRA’s, secured and unsecured loans. For membership information contact: Linda Hanten, Hispanic First Federal Credit Union, 1815 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 466-2252.
LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
(Send all responses by dates indicated to person and department listed on individual announcements to: LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, New York 11101. EOE/AA Employer.)
TECHNICAL COORDINATOR Duties: Develop non-credit courses and certificate programs for adults in an array of technical areas (electronics, machine tool, transportation, computer systems). Management and supervision of forthcoming programs. Qualifications: BA; at least five years administrative and program development experience. Prior adult teaching and curriculum development experience highly desirable. Candidate must have strong communication skills and capacity to work effectively with diverse groups. Salary: Mid 30’s, depending on qualifications. Send resume and letter by July 22nd to: Shirley Sauisburry, Coordinator, Administrative Resources, Room 3.
COORDINATOR
NON-INTENSIVE ESL PROGRAM Duties: Administer afternoon, evening and Saturday part-time, non-credit ESL programs with average 800 student quarterly enrollment and 50 part-time faculty. Responsible for recruitment registration, placement interviewing, hiring, scheduling and teacher supervisioa Qualifications: MA in ESL or Applied Linguistics with experience in classroom teaching, program administration, and program/curriculum development. Good supervisory skills essential. Grant writing experience useful. Salary: Mid 20’s depending on qualifications. (Full-time grant funded position). Send resume and letter by July 22nd to: Shirley Miller, Director, Special Projects, Room 3.
FINANCIAL AID COUNSELORS Demanding, fast-paced Financial Aid Office seeks a Bilingual (English/Spanish) Counselor to start September 1 st. Additional substitute, one-year positions anticipated (May lead to permanent lines). Duties: Provide counseling and advisement to students on various financial aid programs; advise students on how to complete applications correctly; participate in various
investigative processes required by the state and federal governments; and work with the delivery systems for securing financial aid monies. Qualifications: For Bilingual Counselor BA 2 years experience and bilingual ability (English/ Spanish) required; MA preferred. For Substitute Counselors: BA and 2 years experience required; MA preferred; bilingual ability desirable but not required. Some evening hours and Saturdays necessary for all positions. Rank and Salary: Commensurate with qualifications. Send letter and resume by August 1 st to: Director, Financial Aid Office/Division of Student Services, Rm 3.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
Duties: Teach a variety of political science courses and an introductory, multidisciplinary social science course, work on curriculum and program development. Qualifications: PhD in Political Science with a Third World or International Relations emphasis and teaching experience required. Grant program experience desirable. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. (Substitute, one year appointment). Send letter and resume by August 8th to: Chairperson, Social Science Department, Room 3.
DIRECTOR, ADULT LEARNING CENTER ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, TENURE TRACK
Duties: Manage growing learning center serving over 1,500 adults annually in literacy, high school equivalency and college preparation programs Responsible for staff hiring and supervision, fiscal administration, proposal development program research and evaluatioa Qualifications Doctorate in related field (English, Reading, Adult Learning), at least three years administrative experience with adult programs, preferably in a higher education setting. Strong communication and management skills Salary: Mid 20’s to low 30’s depending on qualifications Send letter and resume by August 22 nd to: Assistant Dean, Division of Continuing Education, Rm 3.
C LI N 1C AL TH E RA PI ST f or H is pa n ic Mental Health Services. To provide mental health services to general and Hispanic adults, families and children. Minimum requirements fluency in Spanish and a master’s degree in psychology, social work, counseling for nursing and one-year experience counseling adults families or children. Salary range: $21,700 to $28,751. Application deadline: July 31, 1986, 5 p.m. Contact: Genesee County Community Mental Health Services, Personnel Department, 420 W. 5th Ave., Flint, Michigan 48503 (313) 257-3709. EOE/MF.
MALDEF OPENING
Civil rights organization seeks DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION to oversee financial, personnel, purchasing, insurance and administrative functions. Required: M.A, 10 years financial/administrative experience (multistate, non-profit preferred). Resumes with references and salary history to Ms A Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 So. Spring St, 11th FI., Los Angeles Calif. 90014, by July 14.
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists Washington, D.C., seeks a MANAGER OF NAHJ EDUCATIONAL AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS. Salary is $22,000 -$25,000. Duties: Establish working relationships with journalism schools and organizations that offer media training for,students or professionals. Develop and implement outreach plan to inform Hispanics nationwide about educational and training opportunities in the media. Requirements: Demonstrated experience teaching or counseling students; 2+ years media experience; public speaking ability; good writing skills; fluency in English and Spanish; demonstrated interest in the Hispanic community; must be willing to travel. Persons wishing to apply for this position should submit a resume and letter of interest to Frank Newton, NAHJ Executive Director, 529 14th St NW, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045, or phone (202) 783-6228.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY-ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. Type 70-90 wpm, bilingual. For more information call (202) 543-1771.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts & Entertainment
PLAYS TO BE READ: Staged readings of three winning plays this week culminate the South Coast Repertory’s Hispanic Playwright’s Project in Costa Mesa, Calif.
The three plays - Arthur Giron’s Charley Bacon and His Family, Lisa Loomer’s Birds and Eduardo Machado’s Once Removed -were chosen from some 80 scripts submitted for the week of workshops, rehearsals and readings by professional actors and directors.
Besides the three winning playwrights, five applicants will be in Costa Mesa this week to serve as writers/observers. They are Javier Bonafont of Los Angeles, Ruben Gonzalez of New Jersey, Carlos Morton of Laredo, Texas, William Reyes of West Hollywood, Calif., and Dalt Wonk of New Orleans.
Jos6 Cruz Gonzalez, a National Endowment for the Arts director/fellow at South Coast Repertory, directs the Hispanic Playwright’s Project, which was created this year with a $10,000 grant from the Pacific Telesis Foundation.
The readings will be staged July 11 %nS v2:“Gonz6lez will direct Once Removed. Birds will be directed by Jose|Q@fe)Yalenzuela> a director at the Los Angeles Theatre Qeht^ Jorge Huerta, the co-artistic director of San Diego’s TealnnlvTfefa and an NEA panelist, will direct Charley Bacon and His Family.
Carlos Morton’s Las Many Muertes de Danny Rosales has won the New York Shakespeare FestivaPs National Contest for Latino Plays Morton will receive a $5,000 award; his play will get a staged reading in August during New York’s Festival Latino.
ONE LINERS: The Spanish and Portuguese Department at the University of California at Irvine has begun publication of Jestos a semiannual magazine on Hispanic theater.. .The new Asociacion de Compositores y Artistas has been established in Salinas, Calif. As an initial goal, the group plans to produce long-playing albums with members’ songs. . .Celia Cruz leaves July 8 on a European tour that will include Germany, England, France and Belgium. . .Chicago’s Latino community celebrates the Feria de San Marcos July 10-13. . .Ray Bradbury’s The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit opens July 12 at Los Angeles’ Plaza de la Raza with a largely Hispanic cast...
- Antonio Meiias-Rentas
Media Report
REPORT QUESTIONED: Jerry Apodaca, president of the University of New Mexico Board of Regents and a former governor of that state, told Weekly Report recently that a New York Times article claiming the May 1 resignation of the university’s president had ethnic overtones is a conclusion of the story’s reporter.
Tom Farer, a former law professor at Rutgers University in New Jersey, was appointed president at the school’s main campus in Albuquerque in 1984. His resignation came the same day the regents decided to extend his contract through the end of this year.
A May 12 article in the Times said Parer’s decision to leave the university “came after several years in which state leaders sought a Hispanic American from within the state.”
“I'm very provincial,” Apodaca said. “As a Hispanic, any time that we can select a
Hispanic, I am overwhelmed."
Farer told a television interviewer recently that Apodaca had expressed his intention to drive him off the campus and that the regents had overturned decisions of his on key issues and undermined his authority.
On May 8, the faculty approved a resolution of no confidence in the regents and called on all five (three, including Apodaca, comprise the anti-Farer bloc) to resign.
No Hispanic has ever been appointed president of the university in a city that is 36% Hispanic.
Apodaca said he was not sure when a search for a new president would begin as Farer could decide to leave earlier.
SETTLEMENT REACHED: Journalist Roberto Rodriguez, who was awarded $204,000 by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury Feb. 18 for a beating he suffered at the hands of Los Angeles County sheriffs in 1979, settled with the county last week for $150,000.
Following the verdict, the county had threatened to prolong the court battle with an appeal over the size of the jury’s award. Rodriguez, now 31 and a reporter with
Eastern Group Publications in Los Angeles, was beaten while photographing the officers beating another man. He worked for Low Rider magazine at the time.
BOARD MEETS: The Board of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists meets in Washington, D.C., Saturday, July 12. The editors of The Washington Times will host a reception for it at The Times that evening...
‘WORLDNET LAUNCHED: The United States Information Agency expanded its Worldnet service to Central and South America July 1. The satellite television network will offer weekly discussions between U.S. policymakers and foreign journalists, followed by regular news and feature programs when daily service starts in October.
Immigration and Naturalization Service spokesman Verne Jervis appeared in the inaugural program with Dominican Republic journalists. The second program on July 3 featured; Attorney General Edwin Meese discussing U.S.-Mexico border issues and . law enforcement. .
- Carlos Morales and Charlie Ericksen
WELCOMING COMMITTEE: Ready to welcome Colorado Gov. Richard Lammlwhen he takes a teaching position at Dartmouth College next year are these folks in the Jose Clemente Orozco fresco, “Anglo America,” on the school library walL (See Sin pelos en la lengua, page 3.)
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericsen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias*Rentas.
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CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericsen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week effective July 15, to campaign full time for the gubernatorial primary ... New Progressive Party delegates in Ponce, Puerto Rico, choose San Juan Mayor Baltasar ,clel RilHb ' succeed former island Gov. Carlos Romero BarceOOlPtilsident. Rocky Barilla, winner of Oregon's recent Democratic state primary, would become the first Hispanic in the state Legislature if he wins in the Nov . 4 general election ... Marta legislative at the National Council of La Raza in Washington, D.C., leaves that post after being chqsen to study and work at the International Court of Justice at The Hague, Netherlands. Following that stint she hopes to return to the West Coast. to work . . Golfer Nancy L6pez, who recently gave birth to her second daughter, announces she will defend her title at the LPGA's$230,000 Henredon Classic Aug. 7 0 ori the Willow Creek Golf Course in High Point, N . C ... . Rev. Enrique San Pedro, 60, becomes the first Hispanic to be ordained bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Galveston Houston. Hispanics make up 50% of the 600,000-member diocese ... The National Council of La Raza will honor U .S. Rep. Matthew Martinez(DCalif. ) , chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, with its La Raza Award for "promoting the interests of Hispanic Americans'' at its annual conference July 13-16 in Los Angeles. Miriam Col6n Edgar, founder and director of the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre Co. in New York City, and Mexican actor/come-dian Mario Moreno "Cantinflas" will also be honored . . . With less than a year to go in his term, Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez announces his resignation, vo'-4 "0 271 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I July7, 1988 Hispanic Credit Unions Flourishing Nationwide The credit union movement is strength ening its presence in Latino communities across the country. Formed as grass roots , cooperatively owned banking institutions, these financial associations of Hispanics totaled 173 of approximately 15,000 credit unions counted last year by the National Credit Union Administration . Created by a savings pool of practically any group employees, neighbors, com munity organizations or associations-that agree to lend to themselves , the unions provide low-interest loans based on more personalized, culturally sensitive lending criteria. Generally, loan interest rates range from 1 2% to 18% . They are managed as non-profit entities by volunteer boards of directors and offer a substitute for banks and other traditional lending institutions which have abandoned low-income, less profitable areas of the cities. A case in point: New York's Lower East Side People's Credit Union, formed May 1 by Hispanic and black area residents , started operations in a building formerly occupied by Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. The bank closed its branch there in 1984. One of the persons attending that union's STATES WITH HISPANIC CREDIT UNIONS1985 Texas 52 New Mexico Puerto Rico 30 Arizona New York 19 Florida California 17 Illinois Colorado 14 New Jersey Court Upholds Fees Case The U.S. Supreme Court ruled June 27 that plaintiffs' attorneys in civil rights suits could receive higher fee awards than those received in damages by clients they represent. The ruling stemmed from a case involving eight Mexican Americans and police officers in Riverside, Calif . Writing the majority opinion , Justice William Brennan said that limiting fees in these cases would make legal defenses difficult in cases with small damage awards. The U.S . Justice Department had argued that the fees should be limited to a one-third-of-the-damages rate applied in personal injury cases. In a 5 vote, the court upheld a 1980 decision awarding $33,350 in damages and $245,456 ($125 per hour) in fees to attorneys Gerald Lopez and Roy Caceres. Lopez, presentlY a Stanford Law School professor, and Caceres , now a San Diego judge, represented . eight Mexican Americans who in 1975 were attending a party that police b roke up by entering without a warrant. 14 District of Columbia 3 5 Massachusetts 2 5 Nebraska 1 5 Ohio 1 4 Pennsylvania 1 Tax Bill Favorable to 936 Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster said the Senate version of the tax reform bill , passed June 24, contains more favorable provisions on Section 936 of the Internal Revenue Code than its counterpart in the House. The backbone of Puerto Rico's current economic development strategy, 936 offers tax exemption to profits made by U.S. industries operating in the island . Local bank deposits of these profits are used by the Puerto Rican government for local economic development projects. Fuster said the Senate version allows govern ment use of both government and private bank deposits and eliminates a House approved restriction on the amount of funds used. It would also permit long-term loans needed for infrastructure development projects. A conference hearing to iron out differences between the House and Senate vers ions is expected when Congress reconvenes July 14. inauguration was Elizabeth Flores Burkhart, the first Hispanic and woman appointed to the three-member NCUA board. " The word is spreading that credit unions are a good idea . People are beginning to ask more questions on how to start their own as sociations," Burkhart says . A former banker and teacher in Houston, Burkhart was first appointed by President Reagan in 1982 and reappointed in 1985 for a six-year term . Funded totally through fees charged to mem ' ber unions that in fiscal 1985were$16 m i llion, the NCUA charters, supervises and insures BURKHART the nation's 10,125 federal credit unions and insures an additional 4 ,933 state chartered unions. Although primarily offering financial ser vices to small savers and borrowers, Latino credit union membership crosses the com munity's economic and social spectrum. For example, Linda Hanten, board secre tary of the 400-member Hispanic First Federal Credit Union in Washington, D.C., Feports that her group recently granted loans to a social science consultant wanting to buy a new computer system; to a continued on page 2 Munoz Re-elected in Chi. George Munoz was unanimously re-elected president of the 11-member Chicago Board of Education June 25. Munoz, 35, was elected as chief of the nation's third largest school system for his third consecutive one-year term. As of October 1985, Chicago's public school system had an enrollment of 97,325 students. Its tentative budget for 1986 is $1.84 billion. Munoz had announced in May that he would not seek re-election. He reportedly reconsidered at the urging of colleagues.

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Latinos Divided on Increased Immigration Hispanics polled June 19-23 by two media organizations were evenly divided on whether the United States should welcome more immigrants or slow the flow. The poll showed 49% of all respondents wanted immigration decreased, while 42% said it should be increased. . The three groups polled and their pre on immigration levels s .howed: f'/aise Keep as is Lower Hispanic 25% 36% 31% White 5 34 52 Black 11 41 39 C _ond.ucted by The New York Times and CBS News, thepoll, results of which were released July 1, .asked 1,618 adults nationwide abot.Jt their views on a variety of issues related to immigratipn : Hispanics were sampled at a higher rate than others to provide statistical reliability. A majority of residents in the Northeast favored keeping immigration at the current level (44%), while the majority of individuals in the Midwest, South and West regions favored decreasing immigration, 51-53%. Poorer and less educated respondents favored restricting immigration. As both of those levels rose, people were more inclined to support increasing immigration. On poll questions regarding immigration legislation, Hispanic responses differed widely from those offered by whites and blacks. On employer sanctions, a majority of Hispanics (49%) felt employers should not be penalized for hiring undocumented workers. White (73%) and blacks (59%) overwhelmingly felt they should. Hispanics supported bringing in temporary workers to pick crops (55%). Whites (59%) and blacks (63%) disapproved the idea. 1986 NEW YORK TIMES/CBS NEWS POLL QUESTIONS Hispanic White Black Compared with people born here, immigrants work harder 52% 44% 46% Immigrants today take jobs from Americans 19 34 44 Most recent immigrants contribute to U . S . 48 32 38 Most cause problems 33 46 41 Most recent arrivals are here illegally 56 47 59 Illegal aliens who have lived here several years without breaki"ng laws sh 'ould not be deported 79 55' I 65 Army should be used to stop flow of illegal aliens from Mexico 13 35 27 Government should not penalize employers for hiring illegal aliens 49 17 26 ResolutionstoStimulate Latino Credit Unions Now Flourish New Citizenship Effort City -councilors in 12 predominantly His panic cities were to introduce resolutions lasfweekaimed at promoting U.S . citizenship amongHispanic residents in the United States. Coordinated by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, the campaign would stimulate efforts for more citizenship and adult education classes and more accountability of Immigration and Naturalization Service district offices. One out of three, or 3,027,000 U.S. Latino legal residents, could not vote in 1984 because of their foreign citizenship, according to NALEO and based on 1 980 Census figures. Approxi mately43% and36% of Hispanic legal residents in Hialeah, Fla., and Los Angeles, both among the 1 2 participating cities, have not yet applied for U.S. citizenship. The other 10 cities are: New York, Chicago, San Antonio, Corpus Christi, Denver, San Jose, Phoenix, Sacramento, Oxnard and Sunnyvale, Calif. Sanctuary Probation to 5 Five . members of the national Sanctuary Movement, including a Latina, were placed on three to five years probation by a U.S. District Court judge in Tucson, Ariz., July 1 for h 'elping smuggle Central Americans into the Unites $tates. Mexican Catholic lay worker Maria Socorro Pardo de Aguilar, q8, was placed on five years probation along with the four others. Judge Earl Carroll put off sentencing of the last three of eight' total defendants convicted in April because of the length of allowed pre-sentencing speeches. Carroll could have imposed prison terms of five to 25 years; 2 continued from page 1 businessman for improvements in his new restaurant; and to a 19-year-old Salvadoran refugee who needed to send a $500 .. money order to his ailing mother back home for medical treatment. Another credit union, the 996-member Weslaco Catholic FCU in Weslaco, Texas, 'English Only' on Ballot A coalition of civil rights organizations that includes the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund vowed last week to fight a California" English Only" initiative that qualified June 25 for the November ballot. The "English as the Official Language of California" initiative gathered 815,521 signatures from registered voters, more than the 630,136 required to qualify. Sponsored by the California English Cam paign, the initiative proposes to amend the state's constitution to declare English the official language and to bar laws that diminish "the rol . e of English as the common language." The California English Campaign is the state's arm of U .S. English, a national organization founded by former U.S. Senator S.l. Hayakawa Coalition representatives contend that the initiative would eliminate all forms of government-sponsored bilingual services such as bilingual education, ballots, social services and emergency 911 callS. The coalition plans to conduct opposition campaigns around the state and enlist support of elected officials. It also plans to examine legal action against the resolution. California cities that have passed "English Only" initiatives include Fillmore and Los Altos. Similar initiatives have been sponsored in Monterey Park, South Gate and Alhambra. primarily serves farm workers in the southern part of the state. The nation's first credit unions were formed in the '20s. The first Hispanic credit union, Caballeros de San Juan of Chicago, was created in 1957. With some mergers and liquidations of unions with under $1 million in assets, the number of Hispanic credit unions dropped from 201 in December 1982 to 173 -32 state and 141 federal in 1985. However, unions with over $5 million in assets jumped from 10 to 20. Average assets swelled from $1.5 to $ 2.8 millionwith the smallest union maintaining $31,800 in assets; the biggest, $63.9 million. NCUA figures show: Assets Dec . 1982 Dec 1985 Under $500,000 $500,000-$1 million $1 million -$5 million Over $5 million 115 81 35 29 41 43 10 2o "Our people are getting their MBA's (Master of Business Administration degrees). They are getting more banking experience and bringing that back to the community," Burkhart says. The concept of cooperative financing has long been popular in Puerto Rico and other paf1s of Latin America , claims Jose Velasco, a NCUA examiner for the New York region. He says that the Roberto Clemente Union, one of 19 Hispanic unions there, was set up by recent arrivals from Puerto Rico. It offers full services in Spanish and English, which makes it even more attractive to Latinos in the area, he says. Dora Delgado Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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columnist -American Wife My wife Elsie became a United States citizen last month after certifying that she had not become a Communist in the six months since Christmas. At an oral examination by immigration officials in December, she had also disavowed any association or connection With the Communist Party truthfully, I might add . The follow-up written question came in the mail 'with h er " Notice of Final Naturalization Hearing'' Along with telling her where and when she would stand to be sworn in with other newly minted Americans, the letter demanded information on a number of other tou chy subjects: Was she an a lc o holic? Had she trafficked in illicit drugs. Been arrested or convic ted of any crirn!? Elsie is from the village of 1 Roble-Tile Oak Tree-located near the cit y of Ma?;atliw on Mexico's Pacific Coast. She's one of nine brothers a nd sisters who grew up in a s t rict but caring environment the traditional Mexican f ami ly . She and her sisters were permitt e d to go on dates only when accompanied by chaperones. for examp le. That's a practice which I, as a second generation Chicano , tind very un Amerlcan, but it raised no suspicions whatsoever with the U.S. I mmigratio n and Naturalization Service. At least, it wasn't on Elsie's Questionnaire. DID SHE PRACTICE POlYGAMY? T h e INS did probe as to whether my wife practiced polygamy or prostitution. How someone so modest that she s how ers w it h th.e lights off as my wife does could relate to suc h uncouth bureawcrat1c snooplness, I don't know . T h ere may be good reason f or asking some people such questions. But 1 find It hard t o picture an y one who has gone through the arduous naturalization pro cess. m emorizing president:>' names . co unting th e stars on our flag and the like, who would sour his or her c h ances of becoming a citizen with a cand i d last minute confession. Yes, 1 already have seven wives . . . Yes. when the rent was overdue , I 've been known t o turn a trick or two ... Yes, I've grown a little pot tor tun and profit ... 1 will concede that there may be indi vidual instances in which c ircumstances compe l an applicant to divulge the abso lut e . a wful truth : " . . • 1 canno t tell a /1@. 1 have been arrested and convic t ed of a crime. That's why this letter Is being sent to you from Sing Sing state prison. Could 1 please resch@dule my naturalization hearing date t o Nov. 3, 199{l ? /hat' s I get c redit tor good behavior, whi ch I certainly intlimd to do .' ' Or: " It was the waiting . Lonely days. Lonely nights. Waiting, waiting for the ' Notice of Final Naturalilation Hearing' to arrive . To relieve my tMslons, 1 took a drink. And another. And another. I have become a Sin. pelos en Ia lengua DARTMOUTH'S TIGHTLIPS: Between 1932 and 1934, Mexican master Jose Clemente Orozco painted a series of frescoes depicting "The Epic of American Civ i lization" along the walls of Dartmouth College's library . Panel No. 10 he devoted to "Anglo America . " (See our back page.) In it, observes Denver writer Walt Young, is a special message for Richard Lamm, who has been hired to teach at the Hanover, N.H. , institution ne x ! January after he completes his final term as governor of Colorado andhopefullyfades away as head guru of this nation's nativists . Critic Young describes the mural : "In it , we see ourselves through the eyes of a Mexican artist as a rigid and conformist society. The children in the foreground, their stern, tightlipped teacher, the combination schoolhouse and meeting house , the neatl y arranged , identical looking adults (Orozco includes a pair of identical twins to make his point), emphasize the role of our educational system in cloning our children into socially regimented citizens. " Before we dismiss Orozco's painting as the prejudiced view of a foreigner," Young writes in the Rocky Mountain News, "we should look carefully at tw o paintings: American Gothic and Daughters of the American Revolution, by American artist Grant Wood. Both portray the same tight-mouthed resistanco to all things foreign. "Lamm ' s warning of a "develo ping pattern of linguistic ghet, to concentration" of Spanish-speaking immigrants ... attests to the correctness of Orozco's per ce ptions. It is one thing to be concerned about illegal immigration but another to make a fuss over Spanish language radio and TV stations and the use of Spanish by the Hispanic peopl e ... " HOW AM I DOIN ', MA? Noting '85'86 school year improvements in reading and math scores (up 13% ) and school safety (up 30%), N ew York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quli'\ones graded himself a solid ' B ' for his sec ond year heading the nation's largest school system. After his first year. he gave himself a Bminus. HEADLINE OF THE WEEK: Dominating page 1 otTtie Washington Post's Outlook section Sunday, Jun e 29, was a commentary(with an appropriately ster e otypin g cartoon) headed , " We Don't Cause Latin America 's TroublesL a tin Culture Does." The author is an exAge n cy for International Development bureaucrat , Lawrence Harrison, who , of course, wrote a bool<. ' ' Latin underdev e lopm ent is largely a state of mind: the Latin mind," diagnos es Harrison for Post readers . Heck. Jesse Helms kne w that a ll.along . Kay Barbaro Quoting . . habitual drunkard. ROY BARRERA Jr., Republican candidate to unseat Texas Attorney "But/ can change . Once I'm a c itizen , I promise to apply to the clinic General Jim Mattox , r esponding to Democratic statements that that did such a wonderful Job rehabilitating President Ford's wife . Hispanics won't support him because he's not a "real Mexican" : (Soo hQW well/ know my I.!.S. history.) If YOIJ'II Jvst give me a chance." "Come November , this jalapel\o is going to burn (Mattox's) buns." In fact , the notice of naturalization does not allow for much TONY BONILLA, chairman of the National Hispanic Leadership expository writing . It instructs firmly; "Ans we r each of the questions Conference , in a telegram to Sen . Jesse Helms, chastizing the North below or 'No' without gilling any further explanation." Carolina Republican for labeling L a tinos "volatile :" Elsletookthecompletedform,alongwith"immigrationdocuments "Stereotypes of this form are based on misunderstanding and and childre n if any" (theni} aren ' t any) to her final hearing . She was well prepared to elaborate on a few of her answers if the ignorance.. Are a// tobacco chewers hillbillies?" judge asked , MARIO ARANDA , director of Chicago ' s Latino Institute , on recent But no one there was looking for speeches . They knew, as we all Latino election excitement in the Windy City. do, tha.t the oottofl'l"llne question can be answered with a simple "Yes." "We have candidates for the state legislature, county board, comIs the United States, with a lilts warts, still the best place on earth? mitteemen and aldermen. This adds up to more Mexican candidates (Doug Martinez, of Arlington, Va., is assistant editor. of Farmllne than .!n Los Angeles County and more Puerto Ricans than in New magazine, a publication of the U .S. Department of Agnculture.J, York July 7', 1986 l.lnk W<}ekly Report 3

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COLLECTABLES CREDIT UNIONS: The brochure "Federal Credit Unions" and its Spanish translation " Las Cooperativas Federates de Ahorro y Credito" provide background information on the credit union movement. For free copies, contact: National Credit Union Administration, Public Affairs Office, 17.76 G St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20456 (202) 357-1050. . FORMING YOUR OWN CREDIT UNION: The 32-page booklet "Volunteer Organizers' Guide" reviews the initial steps to organize a credit union. It can be obtained free from a regional Nati onal Credit Union Administration Office or from : NCUA, Public Affairs Office, 1776 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20456 (202) 357-1050. HISPANIC CREDIT UNIONS: A 19-page list of the 173 "Credit Unions Serving Predominantly Hispanic Members " with addresses, telephone numbers, managers' names, assets and lending levels is available free from : National Credit Union Administration, Office of Elizabeth Flores Burkhart, 6th Floor, 1776 G Street NW , Washington, D .C. 20456 (202) 357-1100. ALL ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: The 6-page "NALEO Naturalization Quarterly'' provides updates on citizenship services throughout the nation and other events in the naturalization field . For free single copies contact Joan Anzalone , National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, 708 G St. SE , Washington, D . C . 20003 (202) 546-2536. TOLL-FREE CITIZENSHIP HOTLINE: The 1-800-44-NALEO free telephone line is open Monday through Friday from 9 am. -5 :30p. m . to answer questions on U.S. citizenship benefits and requirements and make referrals to citizenship classes and counselors. CALIFORNIA SUPREME COURT ELECTIONS: An eight-page pamphlet published by the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California analyzes the courfs limitations to respond to unfounded criticisms and provides information on the justices' retention elections slated for November. As part of its educational program , ACLU is also providing speakers on the subject of judicial independence. For more information on the program or the free single copies of "Setting the Record Straight: The Independence of the Judiciary, " contact: Independent Judiciary Committee, ACLU-NC , 1663 Mission St. , San Francisco, Calif . 94103 (415) 621-2578. CONNECTIONS, (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S Hispani c community and those agencies and corporations that work with OLYMPIC SURPLUS GOES TO YOU:rH . SOCCER The Southern California-based Amateur Athletic Foundation, charged with selecting grantees to share in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics profits, has announced a contribution of $200,000 to recreation groupsmostly in East and South-Central Los Angeles-for youth soccer programs. Some 5,700 youngsters, 5 through 19, will benefit. A major youth soccer festival will inaugurate an expanded Los Angeles County parks program for 700 boys and girls 5 to 8 years old in September. LATINO MUSEUM GIVEN GRANT The Atlantic Richfield Foundation announced a$7,500 grant to the California Museum of Latino History June 24. The museum, created by the state Legislature, is now in its development stage. U.S. HISPANICS' ROLE DEBATED With funding support from the Rockefeller Foundation, the League of United Latin American Citizens will team with the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D .C., to present a panel debate on " The Role of Hispanics i n U . S . Foreign Policy in Latin America" at the National Press Club Aug. 7 . Participating as panelists: retired U . S . Ambassador Diego Asencio (who was held hostage by M19 guerrillas for 61 days in Bogota six years ago), ex-Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre and U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif . ) ; HNMA questioners include Ricardo Chavira, Time magazine, and Juan Waite, USA Today, both of whom served as correspondents in Latin America . OTHER NAMES, OTHER PLACESDenver businessman Gil Cisneros, 42, was named June 9 as Region VIII director of the U . S . Small Business Administration. The region includes Colorado, Montana, Utah , Wyoming, and North and South Dakota ... Joseph Pena , 55-year-old Houston investment banker, was selected as regional administrator for the SBA ' s Dallas office, which serves Texas , Louisiana, New Mexico, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Calendar theme of the National Council of La Raza ' s 9th annual meeting. New York City Historical Society New York July 27 THIS WEEK HISPANIC PASTORAL STUDY WI;EK Weston, Mass. July 7-11 Pastoral ministry among U.S. Hispanics, with spec i al attention to sociological and theological perspectives, is the focus of this gathering. Father Roberto Gonzalez (212) 751-7045 LULAC NATIONAL CONVENTION Las Vegas, Nev. July 9-13 The League of United Latin American Citizens' 57th annual convention will feature a debate on the English-only movement and New Mexico Gov . Toney Anaya on Hispanics in politics. Robert A ivan (702) 384-3290 HISPANIC AQVERTlSING AND MARKETING EXPO Anaheim, Calif . July 11,12 The Continental Broadcasting Co . is sponsor i ng this 2nd annual event that features seminars on market ing to Hispan i c children, defining the Hispanic market and effecti ve communication, among others. Fernando Favela (213) 466-8462 NCLRANNUALCONFERENCE Los Angeles July 13 "Hispanics: Arch itects in America's Future" is the, 4 Marialba Martinez (202) 628-9600 COMING SOON HISPANICS AND EDUCATION Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education Houston July 1 6 -18 Mary Helen Padilla (713) 792-4 776 SPANISH-LANGUAGE RADIO PROGRAMMING National Federation of Community Broadcasters Bellingham, Wash . July 20-24 Pat Watkins (202) 7978911 CHICANA SCHOLARS Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social Davis, Cal if. July 24-26 Linda Facio (916) 752-2421 HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE U . S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Chicago July 25 Cindy Hall (812) 842-2228 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET American Gl Forum Montebello, Calif. July 25 Ben Rodriguez (213) 921-4945 SANTIAGO APOSTOL PUERTO RICAN FESTIVAL July7,1986 Nancy Donner (212) 873-3400 HISPANIC ISSUES CONFERENCE Latin Ameri c an Manufacturers Association Washin gton, D . C.' July 28, 29 Luz Hopewell (202) 546-3803 HISPANIC BUSINESS CONVENTION Te x as Association of Mexican-American Chambers of Commerce Wa co, Te x as July 31Aug . 2 Elena de Ia Garza (512) 447-9821 HISPANICS IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY American Gl Forum San Jose, Calif . Aug. 6 -10 Daniel Campos (408) 554-7552 HISPANIC YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE League of United Latin American Citizens El Paso , Texas Aug. 9 Mary Yaiiez (915) 598-0333 Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be re ceived two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Wash ington, D . C . 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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STANFORD UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Stanford University, one of the nation's premier universities, located on the San Francisco Peninsula, has a strong institutional commitment to the principle 1 of diversity. In that spirit, we welcome applications from a broad spectrum of people, including women, members of ethnic minorities and disabled individuals The Affirmative Action Office is es tablishing a resume bank for the re cruitment of individuals in the following professions: Administrators/Managers Senior Librarians Systems Programmers Scientific Programmers Fund Raisers Writers/Editors Nurses Life Science Professionals R & D Engineer Associates Financial Analysts The receipt of your resume will be acknowledged by letter and added to our resume bank. Please send your resume to: Affirmative Action Office, Dept HNL. P.O. BoxR, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. 94305. STANFORD UNIVERSITY IBEROAMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SEEKS EXECUTIVE The lbero-American Chamber of Commerce seeks a Chief Executive Officer to direct, manage and promote the institution, and to supervise technical assistance programs funded through government and private grants. The lbero-American Chamber is a Hispanic American trade association dedicated to the economic and business development of Hispanic businesses in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. Applicants must be fully bilingual in both Spanish and English and have a thorough under standing of the Hispanic culture, as well as U.S. business mores. A business background is preferred, with experience in association manage ment and government consulting. Individual should also display strong management and public relations skills. Qualified persons should mail resume and cover letter to the lbero-American Chamber of Commerce, 2100 M Street NW, Suite 607, Washington, D.C. 20037. Please send material to the attention of Linda Rentz. INVEST IN YOUR OWN FUTURE HISPANIC FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION of Washington, D.C. Savings accounts, certificates of deposit, IRA 's, secured and unsecured loans. For membership information contact: Linda Hanten, Hispanic First Federal Credit Union, 1815 H St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20006 (202) 466-2252. Hispanic Link Weekly Report LaGUARDIA COM'MUNITY COLLEGE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES (Send all responses by dates indicated to person and department listed on individual announcements to: LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, New York 11101. EOE/ AA Employer.) TECHNICAL COORDINATOR Duties: Develop non-credit courses and certificate programs for adults in an array of technical areas(electronics, machine tool, trans portation, computer systems). Management and supervision of forthcoming programs. Quali fications: BA; at least five years administrative and program development experience. Prior adult teaching and curriculum development experience highly desirable. Candidate must have strong communication skills and capacity to work effectively with diverse groups. Salary: Mid 30's, depending on qualifications. Send resume and letter by July 22nd to: Shirley Saulsburry, Coordinator, Administrative Resources, Room 3. COORDINATOR NON-INTENSIVE ESL PROGRAM Duties: Administer afternoon, evening and Saturday part-time, non-credit ESL programs with average 800 student quarterly enrollment and 50 part-time faculty. Responsible for re registration, placement, interviewing, hiring, scheduling and teacher supervision . Qualifications: MAin ESL or Applied Linguistics with experience in classroom teaching, program administration, and program/curriculum develop ment. Good supervisory skills essential. Grant writing experience useful. Salary: Mid 20's depending on qualifications. (FuiHime grant funded position). Send resume and letter by July 22nd to: Shirley Miller, Director, Special Projects, Room 3. FINANCIAL AID COUNSELORS Demanding, fast-paced Financial Aid Office seeks a Bilingual (English/Spanish) Counselor to start September 1st. Additional substitute, one-year positions anticipated (May lead to permanent lines). Duties: Provide counseling and advisement to students on various financial aid programs; advise students on how to com plete applications correctly; participate in various CLINICAL THERAPIST for Hispanic Mental Health Services. To provide mental health ser vices to general and Hispanic adults, families and children. Minimum requirements: fluency in Spanish and a maste(s degree in psychology, social work, counseling for nursing and one year experience counseling adults, families or children. Salary range: $21,700 to $28,751. Application deadline: July 31, 1986, 5 p.m. Contact: Genesee County Community Mental Health Services, Personnel Department, 420 W. 5th Ave., Flint, Michigan 48503 (313) 257 3709. EOE!MF. MALDEF OPENING Civil rights organization seeks DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION to oversee financial, personnel, purchasing, insurance and administrative functions. Required: M.A., 10 years financiaVadministrative experience state, non-profit preferred) . Resumes with refer ences and salary history to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 So. Spring St., 11th Fl., Los Angeles, Calif. 90014, by July 14. investigative processes required by the state and federal governments; and work with the delivery systems for securing financial aid monies Qualifications: For Bilingual Counselor: BA, 2 years experience and bilingual ability(English/ Spanish) required; MA preferred. For Substitute Counselors: BA and 2 years experience required; MA preferred; bilingual ability desirable but not required . Some evening hours and Saturdays necessary for all positions Rank and Salary: Commensurate with qualifications. Send letter and resume by August 1st to: Director, Financial Aid Office/Division of Student Services, Rm 3. . ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Duties: Teach a variety of political science courses and an introductory, multidisciplinary social science course, work on curriculum and program development. Qualifications: PhD in Political Science with a Third World or International Relations emphasis and teaching experience required . Grant program experience desirable. Salary: Commensurate with qualifications. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. (Substitute, one year appointment). Send letter and resume by August 8th to: Chairperson, Social Science Department, Room 3. DIRECTOR, ADULT LEARNING CENTER ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, TENURE TRACK Duties: Manage growing learning center ser ving over 1,500 adults annually in literacy, high school equivalency and college preparation programs Responsible for staff hiring and super vision, fiscal administration, proposal program research and evaluation. Qualifications: Doctorate in related field (English, Reading, Adult Learning), at least three years administrative experience with adult programs, preferably in a higher education setting. Strong communication and management skills. Salary: Mid 20's to low 30's, depending on qualifications. Send letter and resume by August 22 nd to: Assistant Dean, Division of Continuing Education, Rm 3. The National Association of Hispanic ists, Washington, D.C., seeks a MANAGER OF NAHJ EDUCATIONAL AND SPECIAL PRO GRAMS. Salary is $22,000-$25,000. Duties: Establish working relationships with journalism schools and organizations that offer media training for.students or professionals. Develop and implement outreach plan to inform Hispanics nationwide about educational and training opportunities in the media. Requirements: Demonstrated experience teaching or counseling students; 2 + years media experience; public speaking ability; good writing skills; fluency in English and Spanish; demonstrated interest in the Hispanic community; must be willing to travel. Persons wishing to apply for this position should submit a resume and letter of interest to Frank Newton, NAHJ Executive Director, 529 14th St. NW, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045, or phone (202) 783. EXECUTIVE SECRETARY-ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. Type 70 wpm, bilingual. For more information call (202) 543. , 5

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Arts & Entertainment The readings will be staged July 11 will direct Once Removed. Birds will be directed by a director at the Los Angeles Theatre Jo'rge Huerta, the artistic director of San Diego's TeaM::PAlreta and an NEA panelist, will direct Charley Bacon and His Family. PLAYS TO BE READ: Staged readings of three winning plays this week culminate the South Coast Repertory's Hispanic Playwright's Project in Costa Mesa, Calif. Carlos Morton's Las Many Muertes de Danny Rosales has won the New York Shakespeare Festival's National Contest for Latino Plays. Morton will receive a $5,000 award; his play will get a staged reading in August during New York's Festival Latino. The three plays -Arthur Charley Bac:;on and His F:amil_y,. Lisa Loomer's Birds and Eduardo Machado's Once Removed -were chosen from some 80 scripts submitted for the week of workshops, rehearsals and readings by professional actors and directors. Besides the three winning playwrights, five applicants will be in Costa Mesa this week to serve as writers/observers. They are Javier Bonafont of Los Angeles, Ruben Gonzalez of New Jersey, Carlos Morton of Laredo, Texas, William Reyes of West Hollywood, Calif., and Dalt Wonk of New Orleans. ONE LINERS: The Spanish and Portuguese Department at the University of California at Irvine has begun publication of Jestos, a semiannual magazine on Hispanic theater ... The new Asociaci6n de Compositores y Artistas has been established in Salinas, Calif. As an initial goal, the group plans to produce long-playing albums with members' songs ... Celia Cruz leaves July 8 on a European tour that will include Germany, England, France and Belgium ... Chicago's Latino community celebrates the Feria de San Marcos July 10-13 ... Ray Bradbury's The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit opens July 12 at Los Angeles' Plaza de Ia Raza with a largely Hispanic cast. .. Jose Cruz Gonzalez, a National Endowment for the Arts director/fellow at South Coast Repertory, directs the Hispanic Playwright's Project, which was created this year with a S 10,000 grant from the Pacific Telesis Foundation. Media Report REPORT QUESTIONED: Jerry Apodaca, president of the University of New Mexico Board of Regents and a former governor of that state, told Weekly Report recently that a New York Times article claiming the May 1 resignation of the university's president had ethnic overtones is a conclusion of the story's reporter. Tom Farer, a former law professor at Rutgers University in New Jersey, was appointed president at the school's main campus in Albuquerque in 1984. His re signation came the same day the regents decided to extend his contract through the end of this year. A May 12 article in the Times said Farer's decision to leave the university "came after several years in which state leaders sought a Hispanic American from within the state." "I'm very provincial," Apodaca said. "As a Hispanic, any time that we can select a HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher. Hector EricsenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. Hispanic, I am overwhelmed." Farer told a television interviewer recently that Apodaca had expressed his intention to drive him off the campus and that the regents had overturned decisions of his on key issues and undermined his authority. On May 8, the faculty approved a resolution of no confidence in the regents and called on all five (three, including Apodaca, com prise the antiFarer bloc) to resign . No Hispanic has ever been appointed presi dent of the university in a city that is 36% Hispanic . Apodaca said he was not sure when a search for a new president would begin as Farer could decide to leave earlier. SETTLEMENT REACHED: Journalist Roberto Rodriguez, who was awarded $204,000 by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury Feb. 18 for a beating he suffered at the hands of Los Angeles County sheriffs in 1979, settled with the county last week for $150,000. Following the verdict, the county had threat ened to prolong the court battle with an appeal over the size of the jury's award. Rodriguez, now 31 and a reporter with -Antonio Meiias-Rentas Eastern Group Publications in Los Angeles, was beaten while photographing the officers beating another man . He worked for Low Rider magazine at the time. BOARD MEETS: The Board of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists meets in Washington, D.C . , Saturday, July 12. The editors of The Washington Times will host a reception for it at The Times that evening ... 'WORLDNET' LAUNCHED: The United States Information Agency expanded its Worldnet service to Central and South America July 1. The satellite television network will offer weekly discussions between U.S . policy makers and foreign journalists, followed by regular news and feature programs when daily service starts in October. Immigration and Naturalization Service spokesman Verne Jervis appeared in the inaugural program with Dominican Republic journalists. The second program on July 3 featuredAttorneyGeneral Edwin Meese discuss ing U.S.-Mexico border issues and . law enforcement. Carlos Morales and Charlie Ericksen CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your next conference or convention. For details. contact Hector Eric senMendoza (202) 234-0737. Ready to welcome Colorado Gov . Richard Lam'm\when he takes a teaching position at Dartmouth College next year are these folks in the Jose Clemente Orozco fresco, "Anglo America," on the school library wall . (See Sin pelos en Ia leng!}a, page 3.) 6 Hispanic Link Weekly Report