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Hispanic link weekly report, July 14, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 14, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin tells a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee that former White House aide Michael Deaver asked him to resign as ambassador last year. He called the request “presumptuous”. . . California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints retired United States Air Force Brigadier General Robert Cardenas of El Cajon, Calif., as chairman of the Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency... Richard Larson, former national staff counsel with the American Civil Liberties Union in New York, will join the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles as vice president for litigation in September... Nicky Carrizales, a 3-year-old from San Antonio who underwent two heart transplants within 24 hours at Loma Linda University Medical Center in Los Angeles last month, dies July 2 of
respiratory difficulty. . . Cuban Juan Gonzalez, 43, goes on a rampage on New York’s Staten Island ferryboat, killing two people and wounding nine others. The man, subdued by retired police officer Edward del Pino, 55, had been recently diagnosed as mentally ill and released by a local hospital. He was sent to another hospital following the incident for 30 days evaluation and ordered held without bail... Three members of the Puerto Rican terrorist group Armed Forces of National Liberation (FALN) are arrested in Chicago by the FBI after an alleged plot by them to use a helicopter to free leader Oscar L6pez from the federal prison at Leavenworth, Kan., was discovered... Puerto Rican jockey Angel Cordero Jr. rides in a public workout at Belmont Park in New York, his first mount since suffering multiple injuries in a race at Aqueduct, also in New York, March 8. Cordero, 43, says he plans to go for an 11 th straight riding title at the one-month meet in Saratoga, N.Y., in August...
v°i«"°^(jHHISPANI^UNK WEEKLYREPORflF^
Affirmative Action Use to Grow
SICC Stations’ Sales May Face Challenge
The Spanish American League Against Discrimination announced July 3 that the organization will lodge a formal complaint with the Federal Communications Commission if five major Spanish-language television stations owned by the Spanish International Communications Corporation are sold to a group of investors not committed to maintaining their Spanish-language format.
Noting that the stations are one of the main sources of Spanish-language television, SALAD Chairman Osvaldo Soto said the elimination of the current format will constitute a threat to the “preservation of the culture and tradition of 20% of the population of the United States.” SICC must submit its proposed sale plan to FCC for approval by Aug. 19.
The SALAD statement came on the day that a group of Hispanic investors from New York, Florida, California and Texas made public their bid of more than $250 million for the stations.
There are at least three other Hispanic partnerships being considered by SICC. They include a group in Washington, D.C., with former U.S. Ambassador Diego Asencio and communications attorney and principal owner of San Antonio’s KRRT-TV Raul Tapia Another group headed by Southern California businessman Enrique Hernandez reportedly made a bid of more than $226 million. And a third group, Boston Ventures Ltd., includes former U.S. Ambassador John Gavin.
- Dora Delgado
Texas Post to Latina
Blandina Cardenas Ramirez, a commissioner of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights since 1980, was unanimously elected as vice chairman of the Texas Democratic Party at its annual convention attended by 8,000 in Austin June 28.
Nominated to that position by the Mexican American Democrats Caucus, C&rdenas Ramirez is the second Latina to hold the two-year post.
The two affirmative action rulings handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court July 3 can serve as an impetus for Hispanics to take greater advantage of the remedial policies, according to Hispanic leaders.
“The court’s decisions clearly state that affirmative action is here to stay,” said Oscar Mor£n, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Acknowledging that affirmative action is viewed by the general public as a black program, Mor6n commented that it “has not yet touched Hispanic America as it has other minority communities.”
In Local 28 vs. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a case involving a New York sheet metal workers union, the court approved by a 5-4 vote a lower court order that called for a membership goal of 29% for Hispanics and blacks. The second case, Local 93 va Cleveland, grew from a job discrimination lawsuit filed by Hispanic and black firefighters against the city of Cleveland. By a vote of 6-3, the Supreme Court upheld a plan arrived at by the firefighters and the city that said that minorities must comprise 50% of all promotions In the New York case, the Supreme Court
Judge Raps NYC Police
The Appellate Division of New York Supreme Court, First Department, on June 26 upheld the conviction of a Hispanic on the basis of evidence found during a search-and-seizure arrest The court’s lone Hispanic, in a dissenting opinion, accused the New York Police Department of engaging in discriminatory search-and-seizure practices against minorities.
The appellate court voted 3-2 that the arrest of Hector Millan, Manhattan, was within the bounds of the law. Millan was convicted last year on firearm-possession charges after the cab he was riding in was stopped by the police department’s taxi robbery squad.
Justice John Carro issued a 22-page dissent He charged that the taxi squad had a policy of “arbitrarily stopping and searching minority passengers of cabs traveling in Harlem or Upper Manhattan.” The evidence seized was inadmissible, he argued.
rejected the Reagan administration’s position that redress should be available only to in-dividuals discriminated against, not an entire class. By approving the consent decree in the Cleveland case, the court rebuked the administration’s argument that federal judges were barred from approving decrees containing racial preferences.
Edward Franco, president of SER- Jobs for Progress, called the court’s decisions “healthy for America.” He said that “employers will be compelled to be more sensitive with their hiring practices.”
Some of the reasons given for Hispanics not availing themselves of affirmative action were the lack of information, reluctance to use what many see as a crutch and dormant Hispanic leadership.
The 29% goal approved by the court in the New York case, which must be attained by August 1987, represented the first time a numerical target was upheld. The court wrote
continued on page 2
Nogales Leaves UPI
Saying his task is “completed,” Luis Nogales* United Press International chairman and president, resigned July 8 from the nation’s second-largest wire service, effective July 11.
Nogales, the chief negotiator in UPl’s sale last month to Mexican media mogul Mario Vazquez-Rana for $41 million, was a vice president at Fleishman*Hillard, Inc., a national public relations firm in Los Angeles. He joined UPI in 1983 and helped to turn around the financially beleaguered agency.
In a statement, Vazquez-Rana said the resignation was accepted with “regret” and he praised Nogales for all his efforts on behalf of UPI.
Nogales, who had two years remaining under his contract with the previous owners, said he would spend the next several months as a volunteer adviser to United Way, where he is a board member, and “relax, unwind and think.”


Sin pelos en la lengua
OUR ATHLETIC POLITICOS: In El Paso last April, Orlando Fonseca, county commissioner candidate, volunteered to play matador in a bloodless bullfight in the Lienzo Emiliano Zapata charro ring in what must rank as a highly creative campaign fund-raiser, even for Texas.
On July 16, in the Elizabeth Virrick Gym in Miami, Mayor Xavier Sudrezwill box three 3-minute rounds with Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud. Proceeds go to support the gym..
For the record, Su&rez is 37,6 feet tall and 188 pounds; Daoud is 43,6-feet-4 and 210 pounds. The Miami Herald, which along with local television will be covering the match, couldn’t get an accurate “reach” measurement on the warriors, but did report that Suarez is a 42-regular suit size, with a 34-inch sleeve; Daoud wears a 44-long, with 36 1/2-inch sleeves.
Hialeah City Councilman Julio Martinez (43,5-feet-11,180) has already asked to be Sudrez’s next opponent. Martinez, Suarez should be warned, had 44 amateur fights in the ‘60s, winning 24.
Can we now expect someone to challenge New York Congressman Bobby Garcia at stickball?
WORLD CUP POSTSCRIPT: In covering the World Cup soccer matches in Mexico, NBC-TV regularly cut into the action with its commercials, a sin which Spanish network SIN did not commit
Why hasn’t soccer, the world’s No. 1 sport, caught on better in the
United States? The reason, suggests aficionado Harry Sobacos, is precisely because - unlike football and baseball - soccer action can’t accommodate television commercials.
DISC THROWS JOCKEY: Meanwhile, in San Diego, disc jockey Randy Miller recorded and broadcast a 60-second parody which he titled “The Mexican National Anthem” and sang to the tune of “She’ll Be Coming ‘Round the Mountain.”
Among Randy’s lyrics: “They’ll be coming across the border when they come... They’ll be carrying drugs and handguns so they can have some real fun.. .They will not have a green card but they sure know how to run hard .
Needless to report, the Chicano Federation and other Latino groups there found the recording highly offensive and Randy’s station, KS-103, has dropped it following numerous complaints to the FCC.
NEW EZELL LYRICS: Unfortunately, the FCC has no such juris- ‘ diction over Western Region Immigration Commissioner Harold Ezell.
After the Alabama-based paramilitary group Civilian Materiel Assistance captured 15 undocumented workers this month while on “night maneuvers” along the Arizona border and held them at gunpoint for 90 minutes before turning them over to the Border Patrol, Ezell told the press:
“This is the same as the Sanctuary Movement. Whet her extremists of the Left or Right, they’re still taking the law into their own hands.”
Thafs like packaging Abbu Abbas with Henry David Thoreau.
-Kay Barbaro
Latinos Hail, Harangue ‘Miss Liberty9
Alatorre Offers Dist Plan
Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre introduced July 8 a redistricting plan that would create' an additional, predominantly Hispanic district.
The plan, which has come under fire from Councilman Michael Woo- the lone and first Asian American elected to the Council -would increase Hispanic representation in Woo’s district from 31% to 65%. Hispanics represent 75% of Alatorre’s district and 27.5% of the city’s population.
The Asian-American constituency in Woo’s district would also increase from 11 % to 15%.
As chairman of the Council’s Charter and Elections Committee, Alatorre is charged with redrawing the lines for the city’s 15 districts. The Council agreed to devise the new plan in response to a lawsuit filed in November by the U.S. Department of Justice, which charged the city with diluting the voting strength of Latinos. The federal judge overseeing the case said a new plan must be submitted by July 31.
Alatorre’s plan was considered July 10 by his committee and will be put before the full Council July 15. The proposal must receive eight votes to be adopted. It then goes to Mayor Tom Bradley for his signature.
Court Decisions Lauded
continued from page 1
that such a remedy is appropriate in instances of “persistent or egregious discrimination.”
Fernando de Baca, national chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, called the rulings a “landmark” He added that Hispanics have not taken advantage of affirmative action "primarily because blacks have occupied the decision-making positiona
The Supreme Court has agreed to hear two affirmative action cases during its next term.
- Felix Perez
The Statue of Liberty centennial celebrations found Hispanics across the country participating and reacting in a variety of waya Here are some of the eventa
• Of 38,000 immigrants who were sworn in as U.S. citizens in July 3 ceremonies spread among 46 citiea 14,183 were naturalized in Miami’s Orange Bowl. Eighty percent of those were of Cuban and Colombian origin.
• Approximately 50 Puerto Rico independence supporters staged a protest in Chicago July .4 calling for a change in U.S. policy toward Puerto Rico. The protest was provoked by the July 3 incarceration of three Puerto Rican activists. The arrests followed an FBI investigation which linked them to a plot to help Oscar Lopez Rivera, leader of the Puerto
MALDEF Starts ‘ Leaders’
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund launched July 10 a three-year Leadership Development Program in Chicago geared to identify and place Latino leaders in private and government policymaking positions.
The program, funded with an annual $68,000 from corporate and foundation donors, will select 60 Hispanics per year and train them in 20-week courses that include time management, political advocacy and media relations. The first class of 30 selected participants will start July 12; the next one begins Jan. 10.
Enrique Valenzuela, MALDEFs national director of Leadership Programs, said the program has the support of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington and state officials. The program’s corporate sponsors are Anheuser-Busch Companies, Sara-Lee, Walgreens and Allstate Foundations, among others.
MALDEF has conducted the program in five other cities- San Francisco, Los Angeles, Denver, Dallas and San Antonio.
Rican independence group FALN, escape from a federal prison in Kansas.
• Two national Hispanic organizations took the opportunity to educate on immigration issues. On July 3, the National Council of La Raza released the report Beyond Ellis Island, which recounts the contributions of Hispanic immigrants. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials spearheaded a move to introduce resolutions in 12 city councils aimed at promoting U.S. citizenship among Hispanics.
• In San Ysidro, Calif., some 1,500 Hispanics marched 1 1/2 miles along the border in support of immigrant and refugee rights. Leo Chavez, a member of the San Diego Committee for a National Day of Justice, which organized the event, said the march was a counter celebration to New York’s Miss Liberty festivities that “did not deal with the realities of the immigrants’ lives.”
- Dora Delgado
Sanctuarians Rap INS
The general counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Maurice Inman Jr., announced July 2 that his office will investigate charges that Border Patrol agents are illegally obstructing political asylum applications of Central American refugees.
The charges were made in court proceedings in Tucson, Ariz., by the eight members of the Sanctuary Movement found guilty May 1 of transporting and harboring undocumented persons. The defendants told U.S. District Judge Earl Carroll that INS agents often destroy applications for asylum and, at gunpoint, oblige applicants to withdraw their requests.
Two Catholic priests and one Presbyterian minister were sentenced to three to five years probation July 2. The other five members were given similar sentences July 1.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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COLLECTABLES
CHICAGO HISPANIC LEADERS: Individuals interested in participating in the second cycle of MALDEFs Chicago Leadership Development Program must send applications before Dec. 5. For information, contact Carmen Lomellin, Chicago Program Director, 343 South Dearborn St., Suite 910, Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 427-9363.
THE STATUE OF LIBERTY ALSO FOR LATINOS: The 42-page booklet “Beyond Ellis Island: Hispanics - Immigrants and Americans” provides a historical account and analysis of the Puerto Rican, Mexican, Cuban and Latin American immigration to the United States. For copies, send a $5 prepaid order to: Rosemary Aguilar, Office of Research Advocacy and Legislation, National Council of La Raza, 20 F Street NW,2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
TEENS’ PREGNANCY PREVENTION: High school girls attending school pregnancy prevention programs tend to delay sexual intercourse and show a decreased pregnancy rate, according to a three-year study featured in the May-June Family Planning Perspectives magazine. For free reprints of the article, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Jane Murray, The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 111 Fifth Ave., New York., N.Y. 10003 (212) 264-6656.
WRITING ABOUT THE CARIBBEAN: The Association of Caribbean Studies is soliciting 200-300 word papers on the theme “International Dimensions to the Caribbean Vision” The papers, which can be approached from any perspective, will be included in a booklet of abstracts and compete for publication in the Journal of Caribbean Studies. Deadline: July 21. The association’s conference is July 29-31 in Brazil. For more information, contact Association of Caribbean Studies, P.O. Box 248231, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124 (305) 284-6340.
ESSAY CONTEST: “October 12th, 1492: A Meeting of Two Worlds” will be this year's theme for the Spanish and English essay competition among 6th to 12th grade students in Southern California schools. The winner of the contest, sponsored by the Los Angeles Consulate General of Spain and the Spanish National Commission for the Fifth Centenary of the Discovery of America, will receive a paid round-trip to Spain; other winners receive $100 cash prize. Deadline: Oct. 12. For information, contact: Dr. Samuel Mark, L.A.S. Hispanic Programs, University of Southern California,727 West 27th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90007(213)743-0977.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N W, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Send responses to: LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM DIRECTOR
Duties: Overall direction and coordination of program, including administration, budget, staffing, scheduling, equipment, instruction, curriculum development and student advisement Qualifications: Master's degree in Physical Therapy, Ph.D. preferred. Five years teaching and clinical experience necessary; administrative experience preferred. Rank and Salary Commensurate with qualifications. Full-time tenure track line. Send resume and letter by August 22 nd to: Physical Therapy Search Committee, Room 3.
NURSING FACULTY Full-time tenure track positions in new associate degree nursing program. Unique opportunity forcreative teaching and curriculum development Duties: Classroom and laboratory instruction as well as clinical supervision and curriculum enhancement Qualifications: Master's degree with a major in Nursing is required. All clinical specialties are needed. Ability to teach in more than one area is highly desirable. Recent clinical and/or teaching experience is necessary. Rank and Salary Commensurate with qualifications. Send resume and letter by August 22 nd to: Margaret Kinsella, Chairperson, Search Committee for Nursing, Room 3.
BIOLOGY FACULTY Duties: Teaching general biology and
anatomy and physiology sequences, student advisement and curriculum development. Qualifications: Doctorate preferred; minimum of three years teaching experience necessary. Rank and Salary Commensurate with qualifications. Full-time track line. Send resume and letter by August 22 nd to Science Search Committee, Room 3.
CHEMISTRY FACULTY Duties: Teaching general chemistry and chemistry for allied health students, student advisement and curriculum development. Qualifications: Doctorate preferred; minimum of three years teaching experience necessary. Rank and Salary Commensurate with qualifications. Full-time tenure track line. Send resume and letter by August 22nd to: Department of Natural and Applied Science, Science Search Committee, Room 3.
PRODUCER
NATIONAL NEWS operation seeks applicants for senior producer position. Must be fully bilingual in English and Spanish. Have ample experience producing live news telecasts and specials. Experience in the field as well as writing skills in Spanish. Confidential. Deadline: Aug.4,1986. Please send resume to: NEWS, P.O. Box 350776, Miami, Florida 33135-0776.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. The Father Moriarty Central American Refugee Program, San Francisco Calif., provides legal and social services. Responsibilities: fund-raising, administration, public relations Call Libby (415) 824-1830. Application deadline: July 31.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANAS AND THE ARTS Immaculata, Pa. July 16
“The Arts: A Shining Field for Latin American Women” will be the title of Immaculata College’s final in a series of colloquia.
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400.
HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Houston July 16-18
Tomas Arciniega, president of California State University at Bakersfield, will keynote this 12th annual conference by the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education.
Mary Helen Padilla (713) 792-4776
MEDICAL INTERPRETERS La Jolla, Calif. July 19
The Interpreters Institute of La Jolla will conduct this symposium to address legal, ethical and linguistic concerns facing health-care providers, social workers and medical interpreters.
Dr. Jos6 Varela-lbarra (213) 820-1639 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
PUBLIC RADIO PROGRAMMING Bellingham, Wash. July 20-24 Elisabeth Perez-Luna, a member of the Radio Advisory Service of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, will conduct a production session at this event by the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. Pat Watkins (202) 797-8911
COMING SOON
HISPANA SCHOLARS
Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social
Davis, Calif. July 24-26
Linda Facio(916) 752-2421
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET
American Gl Forum Southern California Scholarship
Foundation
Montebello, Calif. July 25 Ben Rodriguez (213) 921-4945
HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Chicago July 25 Sonia Rosario (816) 531-6363
FIESTA PUERTORRIQUENA DE SANTIAGO APOSTOL
New York Historical Society
New York July 27
Nancy Donner (212) 873-3400
HISPANIC DEACONS Di&conos Permanentes Hispanos San Antonio July 25-28 Maria Montoya (512) 732-2156
HISPANIC BUSINESS ISSUES CONFERENCE Latin American Manufacturers Association Washington, D.C. July 28, 29 Steve Denlinger (202) 546-3803
SPOTLIGHT
YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE: A wide range of topics, including substance abuse, teen pregnancy, educational opportunities, careers, volunteerism and politics, will be covered at this f irst such conference by LULACof Texas, District IV. For further information on the Aug. 9 event in El Paso, Texas, contact Mary Yanez at (915) 598-0333.
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. N W, Washington, D.C. 20005.
3


Arts & Entertainment
COUNTY UNDERWRITES SHOW: Next month’s live broadcast from Miami of one of Latin America’s highest rated television shows will be partially underwritten bythe DadeCountyTourism Counciland the Greater Miami Host Committee.
Siempre en Domingo, produced weekly by Televisa in Mexico and carried live by SIN~in the United States, will air on three consecutive Sundays in August live from the James L Knight Center in Miami SIN’s Miami affiliate, WLTV, will be the technical producer of the show.
Hosted by Raul Velasco Siempre en Domingo reportedly is the top-rated show in Mexico and most of Central America. The Tourism Council and Host Committee have paid$50,000 and$25,000, respectively, in exchange for 25 minutes of promotional footage on each five-hour broadcast.
The three Miami specials will air August 17,24 and31 from 8 p.m.to 1 a.m. EDT.
Among confirmed guests for the show are Tina Turner, Barry Manilow, The Miami Sound Machine, George Benson, Vikki Carr, Tito
HR/Ch
Puente, Lucia Mendez, Lola Beltran, Jos§ FelictiUJ-ar^l Er^mS
The 16-year-old Siempre en Domingo, seen live in various Latin American countries, airs on the SIN Television Network every Sunday. According to SIN, the show has an audience of 1.7 million households weekly.
Another SIN special, taped last month in Venezuela, airs this week over the network. The annual Miss South America Beauty Pageant, held at the Teatro del Circulo Militar in Caracas and produced by Venevision, airs July 19 at 8 p.m. EDT.
CRACKDOWN CONTINUES: Three major record companies are suing a Los Angeles record distributor for copyright infringement in a continuing industry effort to eliminate pirate discs from the market.
The Recording Industry Association of America filed the lawsuit June 18 on behalf of CBS Records, RCA/Ariola International and A&M Records. This is the fifth parallel import case filed bythe RIAA on behalf of its member companies in the past seven months.
The defendants- Jose Ceballos and Libreria y Discoteca Mexico -are charged with willful copyright infringement for selling unauthorized copies of Spanish-language recordings.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SUMMER READING: Following is a list of recent, or soon-to-be-released, books by Hispanic authors and on topics relating to His-panics:
AGAINST ALL HOPE, by Armando Valla-dares (Alfred Knopf, 201 E 50th St., New York, N.Y. 10022), 381 pp., $18.95 hardback.
The book chronicles the Cuba-born Valla-dares’ 22 years in that country’s prison system for his rejection of Communist tenets. It was translated by Andrew Hurley.
AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF MEXICAN LOS ANGELES, 1781-1985, by Antonio Rioa-Bustamante and Pedro Castillo (Chicano Studies Research Center Publications, University of California at Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024), 188 pp., $15 paperback
The monograph offers a detailed, chronological account of the tribes that founded Los Angeles, profiles early, prominent Mexican
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen*Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26;
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include; the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your next conference or convention. For details contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
families and explains the importance of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
ACT OF BIRDS by Chilean Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 87 pp., $14.95 hardcover.
Translated by Jack Schmitt, this is a book of verse, accompanied by line drawings, celebrating the birds of Chile.
BENEVOLENT MASTERS, by Enrique Laguerre (Waterfront Press, 52 Maple Ave., Maplewood, N.J. 07040), 237 pp., $18.95 hardcover, $8.95 paperback
The 10th book by this Puerto Rican author is based on the life of a fictional Puerto Rican dignitary, his professional ascension and his struggle to integrate his past with his present.
HISPANIC FIRST NAMES: A COMPREHENSIVE DICTIONARY 0F250 YEARS OF MEXICAN-AMERICAN USAGE, by Richard Woods (Greenwood Press, 88 Post Road West, Box5007, Westport,Conn. 06881),224 pp., $35 hardcover.
The reference guide examines in great detail the historical origins of Hispanic first
names, drawing from baptismal records, archives, telephone directories and census reports. It also cites accentuation and biblical origins.
LATINO COLLEGE STUDENTS, edited by Michael Olivas (Teachers College Press, Columbia University, New York N.Y. 10027), 384 pp., $24.95 hardcover.
The book is a collection of essays by educators, legal scholars, psychologists, sociologists and economistsforthose concerned with making and influencing Hispanic education issues.
MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS AND MEXICAN AMERICANS: AN EVOLVING RELATION, edited by Rodolfo de la Garza and Harley Browning (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 264 pp., $12.95 paperback.
A compilation of papers presented at a conference on Mexican immigration, this book puts forth the view that Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans are distinct communities by documenting their evolving re-'ationship. _ Fe\ix Perez
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION - TWO VIEWS
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Making The News This Week respiratory difficulty. . . Cuban Juan Gonzalez, 43, goes on a rampage on New York's Staten Island ferryboat, killing two people and wounding nine others. The man, subdued by retired police officer Edward del Pino, 55, had been recently diagnosed as mentally ill and released by a local hospital. He was sent to another hospital following the incident for 30 days evaluation and ordered held without bail ... Three members of the Puerto Rican terrorist group Armed Forces of National Liberation (FALN) are arrested in Chicago by the FBI after an alleged plot by them to use a helicopter to free leader Oscar L6pez from the federal prison at Leavenworth, Kan., was discovered. . . Puerto Rican jockey Angel Cordero Jr. rides in a public workout at Belmont Park in New York , his first mount since suffering multiple injuries in a race at Aqueduct, also jn New York, March 8 . Cordero, 43, says he plans to go for an 11th straight riding title at the one-month meet in Saratoga , N .Y., in August. . . Former U .S. Ambassador to Mexico John Gavin tells a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee that former White House aide Michael Deaver asked him to resign as ambassador last year. He called the request "presumptuous" ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints retired United States Air Force Brigadier General Robert Cardenas of El Cajon, Calif., as chairman of the Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency ... Richard Larson, former national staff counsel with the American Civil Liberties Union in New York, will join the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles as vice president for litigation in September ... Nicky Carrizales, a 3-year-old from San Antonio who underwent two heart transplants within 24 hours at Loma Linda University Medical Center in Los Angeles last month, dies July 2 of ...... , HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1 J•ly 14. 1 ••• SICC Stations' Sales May Face Challenge The Spanish American League Against Dis crimination announced July 3 that the organi zation will lodge a formal complaint with the Federal Communications Commission if five major Spanish-language television stations owned by the Spanish International Com munications Corporation are sold to a group of investors not committed to maintaining their Spanish-language format. Noting that the stations are one of the main sources of Spanish-language television, SALAD Chairman Osvaldo Soto said the elimination of the current format will constitute a threat to the "preservation of the culture and tra dition of 20% of the population of the United States. " SICC must submit its proposed sale plan to FCC for approval by Aug. 19. The SALAD statement came on the day that a group of Hispanic investors from New York, Florida, California and Texas made public their bid of more than $250 million for the stations. There are at least three other Hispanic partnerships being considered by SICC . They include a group in Washington, D.C., with former U . S . Ambassador Diego Asencio and communications attorney and principal owner of San Antonids KRRT-lV Raul Tapia Another group headed by Southern California business man Enrique Hernandez reportedly made a bid of more than $226 million. And a third group, Boston Ventures Ltd. , includes former U.S . Ambassador John Gavin. Dora Delgado Texas Post to Latina Bland ina Cardenas Ramirez, a commissioner of the U . S . Commission on Civil Rights since 1980, was unanimously elected as vice chairman of the Texas Democratic Party at its annual convention attended by 8,000 in Austin June 28. Nominated to that position by the Mexican American Democrats Caucus, Cardenas Ramirez is the second Latina to hold the two-year post. Affirmative Action Use to Grow The two affirmative action rulings handed down by the U .S. Supreme Court July 3 can serve as an impetus for Hispanics to take greater advantage of the remedial policies, according to Hispanic leaders . "The courfs decisions clearly state that affirmative action is here to stay , " said Oscar Moran, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Acknowledging that affirmative action is viewed by the general public as a black program, Moran commented that it"has not yet touched Hispanic America as it has other minority communities." In Local 28 vs. Equal Employment Oppor tunity Commission, a case involving a New York sheet metal workers union, the court approved by a 5-4 vote a lower court order that called for a membership goal of 29% for Hispanics and blacks. The second case, Local 93 vs. Cleveland, grew from a job discrimination lawsuit filed by Hispanic and black firefighters againstthecityofCieveland. By a vote of6-3, the Supreme Court upheld a plan arrived at by the firefighters and the city that said that minorities must comprise 50% of all promotions. In the New York case, the Supreme Court Judge Raps NYC Police The Appellate Divis i on of New York Supreme Court, First Department, on June 26 upheld the conviction of a Hispanic on the basis of evidence found during a search-and-seizure arrest. The courfs lone Hispanic, in a dissenting opinion, accused the New York Police Department of engaging in discriminatory search and-seizure . practices against minorities. The appellate court voted 3-2 that the arrest of Hector Millan, Manhattan, was within the bounds of the law . Millan was convicted last year on firearm-possession charges after the cab he was riding in was stopped by the police departmenfs taxi robbery squad. Justice John Carro issued a 22-page dissent He charged that the taxi squad had a policy of "arbitrarily stopping and searching minority passengers of cabs traveling in Harlem or Upper Manhattan. " The evidence seized was inadmissible, he argued. rejected the Reagan administration ' s position that redress should be available only to in dividuals discriminated against, not an entire class. By approving the consent decree in the Cleveland case, the court rebuked the administration's argument that federal judges were barred from approving decrees containing racial pre.ferences . Edward Franco, president of SER-Jobs for Progress, called the courfs decisions "healthy for America." He said that"employers will be compelled to be more sensitive with their hiring practices." Some of the reasons given for Hispanics not availing themselves of affirmative action were the lack of information, reluctance to use what many see as a crutch and dormant Hispanic leadership. The 29% goal approved by the court in the New York case, which must be attained by Aug!Jst 1987, represented the first time a numerical target was upheld. The court wrote continued on page 2 Nogales Leaves UPI Saying his task is "completed," Luis Nogales, United Press International chairman and president, resigned July 8 from the nation's second-largest wire service, effective July 11. Nogales, the chief negotiator in UPI's sale last month to Mexican media mogul Mario Vazquez-Rana for $41 million, was a vice president at Fleishman-Hillard, Inc., a national public relations firm in Los Angeles. He joined UPI in 1983 and helped to turn around the financially beleaguered agency. In a statement, Vazquez-Raiia said the resignation was accepted with" reg ref' and he praised Nogales for all his efforts on behalf of UPI. Nogales, who had two years remaining under his contract with the previous owners, said he would spend the next several months as a volunteer adviser to United Way, where he is a board member, and "relax, unwind and think."

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Sin"J)elos en Ia lengua United States? The reason, suggests aficionado Harry Sobacos, is precisely because unlike football and baseball -soccer action can't accommodate television commercials. OUR ATHLETIC POLITICOS: In El Paso last April, Orlando Fonseca, county commissioner candidate, volunteered to play matador in a bloodless bullfight in the Lienzo Emiliano Zapata charro ring in what must rank as a highly creative campaign fund-raiser, even for Texas. DISC THROWS JOCKEY: Meanwhile, in San Diego, disc jockey Randy Miller recorded and broadcast a 60-second parody which he titled "The Mexican National Anthem" and sang to the tune of"She'll Be Coming 'Round the Mountain." Among Randy's lyrics: "They'll be coming across the border when ; they come ... They'll be carrying drugs and handguns so they can have some real fun. . . They will not have a green card but they sure know , how to run hard ... " On July 16, in the Elizabeth Virrick Gym in Miami, Mayor Xavier Suarez will box three 3-minute rounds with Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud. Proceeds go to support the gym .. For the record, Suarez is 37,6 feet tall and 188 pounds; Daoud is 43, a_nd 210 pounds. The Miami Herald, which along with local telev1s1on will be covering the match, couldn't get an accurate "reach" measurement on the warriors, but did report that Suarez is a 42-regular suit size, with a 34-inch sleeve; Daoud wears a 44-long with 36 1/2-inch sleeves. ' Needless to report, the Chicano Federation and other Latino groups there found the recording highly offensive and Randy's station, KS-1 03, has dropped it following numerous complaints to the FCC. Hialeah City Councilman Julio Martinez (43, 5-feet-11, 180) has already asked to be Suarez's next opponent. Martinez, Suarez should be warned, had 44 amateur fights in the '60s, winning 24. NEW EZELL LYRICS: Unfortunately, the FCC has no such juris' diction over Western Region Immigration Commissioner Harold Ezell. After the Alabama-based paramilitary group Civilian Materiel As-sistance captured 15 undocumented workers this month while on "night maneuvers" along the Arizona border and held them at gunpoint for 90 minutes before turning them over to the Border Patrol, Ezell told the press : Can we now expect someone to challenge New York Congressman Bobby Garcia at stickball? WORLD CUP POSTSCRIPT: .In covering the World Cup soccer matches in Mexico, NBCTV regularly cut into the action with its commercials, a sin which Spanish network SIN did not commit. "This is the same as the Sanctuary Movement. Whether extremists of the Left or Right, they're still taking the law into their own hands." Why hasn't soccer, the world's No. 1 sport, caught on better in the That's like packaging Abbu Abbas with Henry David Thoreau. -Kay Barbaro Alatorre Offers Dist Plan Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre introduced July 8 a redistricting plan that would create an additional, predominantly Hispanic district. The plan, which has come under fire from Councilman Michael Woo-the lone and first Asian American elected to the Council would increase Hispanic representation in Woo's district from 31% to 65%. Hispanics represent 75% of Alatorre's district and 27.5% of the city's population. The Asian-American constituency in Woo's district would also increase from 11% to 15%. As chairman of the Council's Charter and Elections Committee, Alatorre is charged with redrawing the lines for the city's 15 districts. The Council agreed to devise the new plan in response to a lawsuit filed in November by the U.S. Department of Justice, which charged the city with diluting the voting strength of Latinos. The federal judge overseeing the case said a new plan must be submitted by July 31. Alatorre's plan was considered July 10 by his committee and will be put before the full Council July 15. The proposal must receive eight votes to be adopted. It then goes to Mayor Tom Bradley for his signature. Court Decisions Lauded continued from page 1 that such a remedy is appropriate in instances of "persistent or egregious discrimination." Fernando de Baca, national chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, called the rulings a "landmark." He added that Hispanics have not taken advantage of affirmative action 'J)rimarily because blacks have occupied the decision-making positions. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear two affirmative action cases during its next term. Felix Perez 2 Latinos Hail, Harangue 'Miss Liberty' The Statue of Liberty centennial celebrations found Hispanics across the country participating and reacting in a variety of ways. Here are some of the events. • Of 38,000 immigrants who were sworn in as U.S. citizens in July 3 ceremonies spread among46 cities, 14,183 were naturalized in Miami's Orange Bowl. Eighty percent of those were of Cuban and Colombian origin. • Approximately 50 Puerto Rico indepen dence supporters staged a protest in Chicago July . 4 calling for a change in U.S. policy toward Puerto Rico. The protest was provoked by the July 3 incarceration of three Puerto Rican activists. The arrests followed an FBI investigation which linked them to a plot to help Oscar Lopez Rivera, leader of the Puerto MALDEF Starts' Leaders' The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund launched July 10 a three year Leadership Development Program in Chicago geared to identify and place Latino leaders in private and government policy making positions. The program, funded with an annual $68,000 from corporate and fout:ldation donors, will select 60 Hispanics per year and train them in 20-week courses that include time manage ment, political advocacy and media relations. The first class of 30 selected participants will start July 12; the next one begins Jan. 1 o . Enrique Valenzuela, MALDEPs national director of Leadership Programs, said the program has the support of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington and state officials. The program's corporate sponsors are Anheuser Busch Companies, SaraLee, Walgreens and Allstate Foundations, among others. MALDEF has conducted the program in five other citiesSan Francisco, Los Angeles, Denver, Dallas and San Antonio. Rican independence group FALN, escape from a federal prison in Kansas. • Two national Hispanic organizations took the opportunity to educate on immigration issues. On July 3, the National Council of La Raza released the report Beyond Ellis Island, which recounts the contributions of Hispanic immigrants. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials spearheaded a move to introduce resolutions in 12 city councils aimed at promoting U.S. citizenship among Hispanics. • In San Ysidro, Calif., some 1,500 Hispanics marched 1 1/2 miles along the border in support of immigrant and refugee rights. Leo Chavez, a member of the San Diego Com mittee for a National Day of Justice, which organized the event, said the march was a counter celebration to New York's Miss Liberty festivities that "did not deal with the realities of the immigrants' lives." Dora Delgado Sanctuarians Rap INS The general counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Maurice Inman Jr., announced July 2 that his office will investigate charges that Border Patrol agents are illegally obstructing political asylum appli cations of Central American refugees. The charges were made in court proceedings in Tucson, Ariz., by the eight members of the Sanctuary Movement found guilty May 1 of transporting and harboring undocumented persons. The defendants told U .S. District Judge Earl Carroll that INS agents often destroy applications for asylum and, at gunpoint, oblige applicants to withdraw their requests. Two Catholic priests and one Presbyterian minister were sentenced to three to five years probation July 2. The other five members were given similar sentences July 1. Hispanic Link Weekly Rep01t

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COLLECTABLES CHICAGO HISPANIC LEADERS: Individuals interested in participating in the second cycle of MALDEPs Chicago Leadership Development Program must send applications before Dec. 5 . For information, contact Carmen Lomellin, Chicago Program Director, 343 South Dearborn St. , Suite 910, Chicago, Ill . 60604 (312) 427-9363. THE STATUE OF LIBERTY ALSO FOR LATINOS: The 42-page booklet " Beyond Ellis Island: HispanicsImmigrants and Americans" provides a historical account and analysis of the Puerto Rican, Mexican, Cuban and Latin American immigration to the United States. For copies, send a $5 prepaid order to: Rosemary Aguilar, Office of Research Advocacy and Legislation, National Cou neil of La Raza , 20 F Street NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. TEENS' PREGNANCY PREVENTION: High school girls attending school pregnancy prevention programs tend to delay sexual inter course and show a decreased pregnancy rate, according to a three year study featured in the May-June Family Planning Perspectives magazine. For free reprints of the article, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Jane Murray, The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 111 Fifth Ave. , New York. , N.Y. 10003 (212) 254-5656. WRITING ABOUT THE CARIBBEAN: The Associat i on of Caribbean Studies is soliciting 200-300 word papers on the theme " International Dimensions to the Caribbean Vision." The papers, which can be approached from any perspective, will be included in a booklet of abstracts and compete for publication in the Journal of Caribbean Studies. Deadline: July 21. The association' s conference isJuly2931 in Brazil . For more information , contact Association of Caribbean Studies, P . O . Box 248231, Cor al Gables, Fla. 33124 (305) 284-6340. ESSAY CONTEST: "October 12th, 1492: A Meeting of Two Worlds " will be this year's th e m e for the Spanish and English essay competition among 6th to 12th grade students in Southern California schools. The winner of the contest, sponsored by the Los Angeles Consulate General of Spain and the Spanish National Commission for the Fifth C entenary of the D iscovery of America, will receive a pai d round-trip to Spain; other winners receive $100 cash prize. Deadline: Oct. 12 . For information, contact: Dr. Samuel Mark, L.A.S . Hispanic Programs, University of Southern California, 727 West 27th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90007 (213) 743-0977. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N W , Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. -LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Send response s to : LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 3110 Thomson Avenue, Long Island C i ty , N .Y. 11101 . EOE/AA Employer . PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM DIRECTOR Duties: Overall direction and coordination o f program , including administration , budget, staffing , scheduli ng , equi pment, instru c t i on , curriculum development and student advisement Qualifications: Maste(s degree in P h ysi c al Therapy , Ph.D. preferred Five years tea c h i ng and cl i nical experienc e ne c essary; adminis trative experience preferr e d Rank and Salary. Commensurat e with qualifications. Full time tenure track line . Send resume and letter b y August 22 nd to: Physical Therapy Search Committee, Room 3 . NURSING FACULTY Full-time tenure track positions in new as sociate degree nursi ng program . Unique opportunity for creative teach i ng and curri c ulum deve l opment Dut ies: Classroom and laboratory instruction as w e ll as clinical supervision and curriculum _enhancement Qualificati ons : Maste(s degree with a major in Nursing is required. All clinical specialties are needed. Ability to teach in more than one area is highly desirable . Recent clinical and/or tea c hing e xperience is necessary. Rank and Salary. Commensurate with qualifications. Send resume and letter by August 22 nd to: Margaret Kinsella, Chai r person , Search Comm ittee for Nursing, Room 3 . BIOLOGY FACULTY Duties: Teaching general biology and anatom y and ph ysiology sequences . s tud e n l advisement and c urri c ulum deve l o pment. Qualifications: D oc t o rate preferred; minimum of three year s te ac hing e xperience n ecessary. Rank and Salary: C ommensurate w ith qua li fi cations. F ull-time trac k line. S e nd r esume and letter b y Aug u s t 2 2 nd to : S c ience S ea rch C ommittee, Room 3 . CHEMISTRY FACULTY Duti es: Te ac hin g general c h e mistr y a nd chemistry for a lli e d h e alth students. s tud ent advisement a nd c u r riculum d e v e l o pm e nt . Qualifications: Doctorate preferr e d ; minimum of three y ear s t eac hing e x perience n ec e ssa ry . Rank and Sal a ry: C ommensurate with qua li fication s . Full-t i m e t enure t r a c k line. Send re s ume and l etter by August 22 nd t o : D e p art men! of Na t ur a l and Applied S c ience, Sc i e nce Search Committe e , Room 3. PRODUCER NATIONAL NEWS operation see k s ap plicants for senio r producer positi o n . Mus t be fully bilingual in English and Spani s h . H a ve ample e x perience producing live news telecasts and spec ials . E xperience in the fi e ld a s well as writing skills in Spanish . Confid e ntial. Deadline: Aug . 4, 1986. Please send re s ume to: NEWS , P .O. Bo x 350776, Miami , Florida 3 31 35. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. The Father Moriarty C entraiAmerican Refugee Progra m , San Franc i sco, C a lif., pro v ides legal a nd soc ia! services. Re sponsibilities: fundr ai s ing, administration, public relations. C all Libby (415) 824 1 830. Application deadline: July 31. Calendar PUBLIC RADIO PROGRAMMING Bellingham, Wash. July 20-24 HISPANIC DEACONS Diaconos Permanentes Hispanos San Antonio July 25 28 THIS WEEK HISPAI'IIAS AND THE ARTS Immaculata , Pa. July 16 "The Arts: A Shining Field for Latin American Women" will be the title of Immaculata College ' s final in a series of colloquia. Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647. HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Houston July 16-18 Tomas Arciniega , president of California State University at Bakersfield , will keynote this 12th annual conference by the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education . Mary Helen Padilla (713) 792 4 776 MEDICAL INTERPRETERS La Jolla , Calif . July 19 The Interpreters Institute of La Jolla will conduct this symposium to address ethical and linguistic concerns facing health-care providers, social workers and medical interpreters. Dr. Jose Varela-Ibarra (213) 820 Hispanic Link _ Weekly Report Elisabeth Perez-Luna, a member of the Radio Advisory Service of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting , will conduct a production session at this event by the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. Pat Watkins (202) 797-8911 COMING SOON HISPANA SCHOLARS Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social Davis, Calif . July 24 Linda Facio (916) 752 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET American Gl Forum Southern California Scholarship Foundation Montebello, Calif. July 25 Ben Rodriguez (213) 921-4945 HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Chicago July 25 Sonia Rosario (816) 531 FIESTA PUERTORRIQUENA DE SANTIAGO APOSTOL New York Historical Society New York July 27 Nancy Donner (212) 873-3400 Maria Montoya (512) 732 HISPANIC BUSINESS ISSUES CONFERENCE Latin American Manufacturers Association Washington , D . C . July 28, 29 Steve Denlinger (202) 546 SPOTLIGHT YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE : A wide range of topics, inciuding substance abuse , teen pregnancy , educational opportunities , careers , volunteerism and politics , will be covered at this first such conference by LULACofTe xas, District IV. For further information on the Aug. 9 eveht in El Paso, Texas, contact Mary Yanez at (915) 598-0333 . Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community . Items should be re ceived two Fridays before publication date . Please include name , date , location , contact name and phone number . Address items to : Calendar editor. Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW. Wash ington , D.C. 20005 . 3

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HH/C.. Arts & Entertainment Puente, Lucia Mendez, Lola Beltran , Jose FeliJUf.a,.t The 16-year-old Siempre en Domingo, seen live in var ious Latin American countries, airs on the SIN Television Network every Sunday. According to SIN, the show has an audience of 1 . 7 million households weekly. COUNTY UNDERWRITES SHOW: Next month ' s live broadcastfrom Miami of one of Latin America's highest rated television shows w i ll be partially underwritten by the Dade County Tourism Council and the Greater Miami Host Committee. Siempre en Domingo, produced weekly by Televisa in Mexico and carried live by SINi n the United States, will air on three consecutive Sundays in August live from the James L Knight Center in Miaml SIN's Miami affiliate, WL TV, will be the technical 'producer of the show . Another SIN special , taped last month in Venezuela , airs this week over the network. The annual M i ss South America Beauty Pageant , held at the Teatro del Circulo Militar in Caracas and produced by Venevision, airs July 19 at 8 p.m. EDT. Hosted by Raul Velasco, Siempre en Domingo reportedly is the top-rated show in Mexico and most of Central America . The Tourism Council and Host Committee have paid$50,000 and$25,000, respectively, in exchange for 25 minutes of promotional footage on each five-hour broadcast. CRACKDOWN CONTINUES: Three major record companies are suing a Los Angeles record distributor for copyright infringement in a continuing industry effort to eliminate pirate discs from the market. The Recording Industry Association of America filed the lawsuit June 18 on behalf of CBS Records, RCA/ Ariola International and A&M Records. This is the fifth parallel import case f i led by the RIAA on behalf of i ts member companies i n the past seven months. The three Miami spec i als w i ll air August 17 , 24 and31 from8 p . m . to 1 a.m. EDT. The defendantsJose Ceballos and Libreria y Discoteca Mexicoare charged with willful copyright infringement for sell ing unauthor i zed copies of Spanish language recordings . Among confirmed guests for the show are Tina Turner , Barry Manilow, The Miami Sound Machine, George Benson, Vikki Carr, Tito Media Report SUMMER READING: Following is a list of recent, or soon-tobe-released , books by His panic authors and on topics relating to His panics: AGAINST ALL HOPE, by Armando Valla dares (Alfred Knopf, 201 E. 50th St., New York, N.Y. 100e2), 381 pp.,$18.95 hardback. The book chronicles the Cuba-born Valla dares' 22 years in that country's prison system for his rejection of Communist tenets. It was translated by Andrew Hurley. AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF MEXICAN LOS ANGELES, 1781-1985, by Antonio Rio& Bustamante and Pedro Castillo (Chicano Studies Research Center Publications , Uni versity of California at Los Angeles , 405 Hilgard, Los Angeles , Calif . 90024), 188 pp., $15 paperback. The monograph offers a detailed , chrono logical account of the tribes that founded Los Angeles, profiles early , prominent Mexican families and explains the importance of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo . ACT OF BIRDS, by Chilean Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda (University of Texas Press , P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 87 pp. , $14.95 hardcover . Translated by Jack Schmitt, this is a book of verse, accompanied by line drawings, celebrating the birds of Chile. BENEVOLENT MASTERS, by Enrique Laguerre (Waterfront Press , 52 Maple Ave., Maplewood, N . J . 07040), 237 pp., $18.95 hardcover , $8.95 paperback. The 1Oth book by this Puerto Rican author is based on the life of a fictional Puerto Rican dignitary, his professional ascension and his struggle to integrate his past with his present. HISPANIC FIRST NAMES: A COMPREHENSIVE DICTIONARY OF250 YEARS OF MEXICAN-AMERICAN USAGE, by Richard Woods (Greenwood Press , 88 Post Road West , Box5007, Westport , Conn .06881),224 pp., $35 hardcover . The reference guide examines in great detail the historical origins of Hispanic first -Antonio Mejias Rentas names , drawing from baptismal records , ar chives , telephone directories and census reports . It also cites accentuation and biblical origins . LATINO COLLEGE STUDENTS, edited by Michael Olivas (Teachers College Press , Columbia University , New York, N.Y . 1 0027), 384 pp . , $24.95 hardcover . The book is a collection of essays by edu cators, legal scholars, psychologists , soci ologists and economists for those concerned with making and influencing Hispanic education issues. MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS AND MEXICAN AMERICANS: AN EVOLVING RELATION, edited by Rodolfo de Ia Garza and Harley Browning (University of Texas Press , P . O . Box 7819, Austin, Te x as 78713), 264 pp., $12.95 paperback. A compilation of papers presented at a conference on Mexican immigration, this book puts forth the v i ew that Mexican imm igrants and Mexican Amer i cans are distinct com munities by documenting their evolving relationship . Fel i x Perez HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT AFFIRMATIVE ACTION-TWO VIEWS A nati o n a l publication o f Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hec t o r Ericksen-Mendoza E di t or. Carlos M o r a l es Reporting: D o r a Del gado, F e l ix P erez, C harlie E ricksen. Anto nio Meji as-Re n tas. No portion of H ispanic Link Weekly R eport rPay be reproduced o r b roadcast in any f o rm without advance permissi on. A'lnual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26: CONFEREN C E COORDII;JAT O RS: In c l ude : t he l a t es t edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in par ticipants packet s . at your next conf e r e nce or convention . F o r d e tails, contact H ec t o r Eri cks enM e nd oza (202) 234737. 4 Hi s p a ni c Lin k Weekl y Report