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Hispanic link weekly report, July 21, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 21, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
Making The News This Week
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros receives the League-of United Latin American Citizens’ Presidential Award Medal for“service to the Hispanic community and serving as a role model for youth” at LULAC’s 57th annual convention held July 9-13 in Las Vegas, Nev. Cisneros is the 10th recipient of the medal.. .Tampa, Fla, Mayor Bob Martinez leads all Republican candidates for governor with $2.3 million raised, recent campaign finance reports show. The primary is Sept. 2... Linda Chdvez, former White House aide running for the seat of retiring Sen. Charles McC. Mathias Jr. (R-Md.), is second among Republican candidates in funds raised there with $269,920. Baltimore businessman Richard Sullivan leads GOP candidates
with $309,014 raised, $200,000 of which he himself contributed... Florida Gov. Bob Graham designates Miami’s Calle Ocho- a symbol of that city’s Cuban community - as a highway... San
Diego City Councilor Uvaldo Martinez if’QfcMwSy* MunicipakCourt Judge Joseph Davis to standlfcal on 24 counts pprof^ating
and falsely accounting for piBc funds.. M^rtmg:|C^feharge^ with illegally using a city-issued cr«t card wpiirbhase $1,840 in meals and drinks... One of Puerto Rico’s most famous folkloric singers, Pedro Ortiz D&vila- known a9“Davilita” - dies in Bayamdn, P.R., July 8. He was 74. . . Jessie M. Gonzales, New Mexico state secretary from 1939-42, dies in Las Vegas, N.M., July 12 at age 82... Tony Casillas, a nose tackle from Oklahoma who last year won the Lombardi Award as the nation’s top defensive college lineman, signs for four years with the Atlanta Falcons in a deal reportedly valued at $2.35 million...
y°“No.a9{^HjsPANj^UNK WEEKLY REPORT
Latinos Mount Countermoves Against Nativists
Paramilitary activities in Arizona, an initiative in California to make English the official language there and a new national effort to pass an amendment declaring English the United States’ official language have prompted Hispanic organizations across the country to mount counteroffensives.
On a national level, six-month-old English First is steadily gaining ground in its effort to persuade the U.S. Congress to pass a 27th amendment to the constitution.
At the state level, Latinos in Tucson, Ariz., enraged over the actions of what they called “domestic terrorists,” have threatened to take up arms themselves. They formed the Coalition for Justice, which has called for a grand jury investigation into charges that a paramilitary group ventured into Mexico and illegally detained a group of undocumented aliens, including women and children.
On July 5, the Alabama-based paramilitary group - Civilian Materiel Assistance- allegedly
Medicaid OK for Aliens
Finding that the 1986 statute authorizing Medicaid contained “no express restrictions on alien eligibility,” a federal judge in New YorkCity ruled July 14 that undocumented immigrants living in New York state cannot be denied Medicaid assistance.
The ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Charles Sifton applies to an estimated
234,000 undocumented persons in the state, most of whom live in New York City. The decision could lead to lawsuits in other states challenging federal restrictions on Medicaid.
The suit was begun in 1981 by nine undocumented immigrants against the city and state and the Federal Department of Health and Human Services.
Judge Sifton said in his decision that those “colloquially referred to as ‘illegal aliens’ ” were, more accurately, people who had established permanent residence who had not been granted legal permanent resident status. He also found that federal authorities improperly denied aliens Medicaid in 1973. _______________
held 16 persons at gunpoint for 90 minutes. Nineteen CM A members from the Tucson area were patrolling Arizona’s Lochiel Valley, reportedly searching for drug runners.
Antonio Bustamante, a coalition organizer and attorney in Tucson, said he has been receiving conflicting signals from state and federal authorities as to who has jurisdiction.
“There has been less talk of taking up arms, but it’s because people are waiting to see what comes of the investigations,” Bustamante said
CMA has promised to continue its patrols, with the possibility of expanding to the Texas and California borders.
The FBI and the U.S. Attorney General’s office are conducting investigations.
In California, a coalition of civil rights groups, inuluding the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil
LULAC Re-elects Moran
Oscar Moran, elected last year as national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, was re-elected by acclamation to a second one-year term at the organization’s 57th annual convention held July9-13 in Las Vegas, Nev.
Tony Bonilla, LULAC president from 1981 to 1983, declined a nomination from the floor that would have pitted him against Mor&n. Instead, Bonilla threw his support to the incumbent.
Approximately3,000 attended the convention, iwith some 900 delegates voting for officers and oh resolutions.
Re-elected as regional vice presidents were: Andres Tobar, Washington, D.C., Northeast; Robert Canino, Miami, Southeast; Frank Ortiz, Houston, Southwest; Robert Rivas, Las Vegas, Nev., Far West; and Gil Serrano, Anchorage, Alaska, Northwest. Midwest Vice President Ricardo Correa of Omaha, Neb., was defeated by lla Plasencia of Des Moines, Iowa
Among the 20 resolutions passed were ones supporting affirmative action programs, bilingual education and English Plus. Others were passed opposing U.S. House and Senate immigration bills and the English Only movement
Liberties Union, have united against an initiative introduced June 25 to make English that state’s official language.
The initiative, titled English as the Official Language of California, is sponsored by the California arm of the U.S. English movement. Francisco Garcia, an attorney with MALDEF, said that the vague and broad wording of the initiative would create a “plethora of lawsuit^ pitting community against community.
Garcia said the proponents of the initiative are well organized and well financed. “Looking at state history, the chances are good it (the initiative) will pass... We definitely have an uphill battle,” he said.
Among the steps to be undertaken by the coalition are to form a political action committee to raise $300,000 to $500,000 for a direct-mail campaign and to distribute information brochures to citizens on the initiative. The group will also have its argument against the initiative printed on the November ballot.
The Falls Church, Va.-based English First organization differs very little from its older
continued on page 2
Cuba-U.S. Talks Halted
Attempts to revive a 1984 Cuba-U.S. immigration agreement broke down in Mexico City July 10 following Cuba’s proposal to broadcast to the United States through an AM “clear channel” radio signal. No further talks were scheduled.
U.S. State Department officials said the Cuban request was rejected because it would have involved “major and disruptive changes” in U.S. stations’ operations.
A “clear channel” is protected from interference from other signals and would give Cuba the same reach the U.S.-beamed Radio Marti has in the island.
The immigration pact, suspended by Cuba May 20, 1985, in protest to Radio Marti, stipulated the return to Cuba of 2,700 former criminals and mental patients. In return, the United States was to allow entry to
3.000 Cuban political prisoners and up to
20.000 immigrants a year.


Sin pelos en la lengua
CLEANING MY CLOSET: Everyday I reach for the sunshine. Clouds I stick in my closet. But as anybody who ever owned one knows, even the capacity of a closet is not without limits.
F6lix Perez’s lead story this week reminds me that my closet is getting full. For too long now, I have been stuffing it with repulsive little items I wanted to pretend didn’t exist One was a commentary, “ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, THE TRUTH,” printed in a Florida publication. It attacked an immigration reform proposal supported by U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez(D-Texas) as an ‘Alice in Wonderland bank" which “ultimately would permit hordes of non-Hispanic red and/or mestizo race Mexicans to enter the U.SA...
“There is no doubt” wrote the author, “that the best interests of the U.S. are served and protected by the immediate and complete sealing off of the US/Mexican border, specifically, with mined fields, machine gun emplacements (and) K-9 dog patrols...”
The author?
Anthony Francis Gonzalez, described as a New York lawyer and chairman of the American Spanish Committee, an organization founded in 1962 to “protect the civil and Christian religious rights of Spanish surnamed white American citizens.”
EXHIBIT NO. 2: Next was a state-of-the-art fund-raising mailer
with “yes” and “no” contribution stickers and a Mexican one-peso bill attached. A quarter-million copies of this appeal were produced by Richard Viguerie for a group calling itself “Save Our Schools.”
The pitch letter's message: “I know the Peso on the enclosed ballot is worthless in the U.S. But I enclosed it to make an important point about a billion dollar U.S. government program that’s worthless, too...”
The offending program, of course, was bilingual education. “Many of these foreign students will end upon welfare. So will their children. And their grandchildren...”
EXHIBIT NO. 3: There was also a March 19, 1986, Education Week article describing other such groups, like the Council for Inter-American Security, which “links bilingual education to Hispanic ‘separatism,’ ‘cultural apartheid,’ and the potential for'terrorism in the
U.a’ ”
EXHIBIT NO. 4: And an April 28,1986, article clipped from the Los Angeles Times describing the “key role” which Harold Ezell, Western regional commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Natural-, ization Service played in uniting an Orange County group of his friends into “Americans for Border Control,” an INS support organization! which warns in its brochures of the “appalling legacy which will be left-to our children” if we don’t watch out.
Obviously, my closet needs a dicho on the door. Something like: Al bien buscarlo, y al mal, esperarlo. Good things, look for; bad things, wait for. _ g^r^aro
Pendleton Wants Party Caucuses Cut
Latinos Counter Nativists
continued from page 1
prototype, U.S. English. According to Larry Pratt, president of English First and a former Virginia state legislator, the organization hopes to surpass its’86 fund-raising goal of $235,000 within the month. U.S. English has an operating budget this year of slightly less than $4 million.
Pratt said his group has between 10,000 and 15,000 followers; U.S. English claims 2 million members.
English First is currently conducting a national mail campaign to raise funds.
“If (bilingualism) would become prevalent, then the politics of guilt and envy can take over. People who want to exploit that can begin to try to divide the country, working to get people to dislike each other... rather than work together as a single nation,” Pratt told Weekly Report
Joe Trevino, executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizen’s Foundation, said such an amendment“would disenfranchise people who are not English proficient."
LULAC, in conjunction with the National Council of La Raza and the American Gl Forum, announced July 12 a national campaign to persuade city councils to declare themselves in favor of English Plus and multilingualism.
The English Plus movement was introduced in December by LULAC and the Miami-based Spanish American League Against Discrimination. The campaign was founded to counter what was seen as a philosophy within the Reagan administration todismantle bilingual education. - Felix Perez
Latino Jobless Declines
The Hispanic civilian unemployment rate dropped from 1.1 % to 10.6% in June, the U.S. Department of Labor reported. The unemployment rate for blacks rose from 14.8% to 15.1%, and for whites it declined from 6.2% to 6.1%.
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Hispanic representatives in the Republican and Democratic parties reacted strongly against a recommendation by U.S. Civil Rights Commission Chairman Clarence Pendleton to dismantle the parties’ minority caucuses and auxiliaries.
The suggestion, to Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahrenkopf, was made public July 14. Democratic party officials have not been contacted by Pendleton.
“Mr. Pendleton’s recommendation is completely out of line,” said Colorado State Sen. Polly Baca, vice chair of the Democratic National Committee and of its Hispanic Caucus. The caucus was established in 1972.
Fernando De Baca, chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, said: “I don’t know why Chairman Pendleton has brought up this matter without checking the facts and effectiveness of the Hispanic auxiliaries.” De Baca has requested to meet with Pendleton this week
The Republican National Committee’s minority participation advisory group, created during the committee’s semi-annual meeting June 25-27 in St Louis, has agreed to review the issue. Edward Luj£n, chair of the New Mexico Republican Party, is its chairman. De Baca added that the 10-year-old assembly
Interns Learn D.C. Ways
Twelve Hispanic college-bound students are participating in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute’s summer intership program in Washington, D.C., that runs through Aug. 3.
This year’s interns are: Lenny Lugo, Brooklyn; John Elizondo, San Antonio; Rodolfo Ruiz, Brownsville, Texas; Eleanor Gallegos, Albuquerque; Carmen Posada, Mt. Vernon, Ohio; Jesus Acosta, Chicago; Jacqueline Perez, .St Louis; Ania Fernandez, Miami; Mario Castro and Eva Burrull, El Paso; Garrett Terrones, La Puente, Calif.; and Julia Alvarez, Huntington Beach, Calif.
is fully supported by party officials, saying its efforts helped increase from 30% in 1980 to 48% in 1984 the Latino vote for President Reagan’s election.
Hispanic caucuses, along with their black and women counterparts, are intended to enhance minority participation in the party structure. Of 162 National Republican Committee members, there are six Hispanic voting members - three from Puerto Rico. Of 371 National Democratic Committee members, there are 24 Hispanic voting members-eight from Puerto Rico.
LA. OKs Alatorre Plan
The Los Angeles City Council voted 10-5 in favor of a redistricting plan that would create the 15-member body’s second pre-! dominantly Hispanic district
The plan, drawn up by the Council's lone Hispanic member, Reapportionment Committee Chairman Richard Alatorre, would increase the Hispanic constituency in District 13 from 31% to 65%. The district in question is represented by the only Asian American on the Council, Michael Woo.
The plan will go back to the Council for a second reading - a procedure invoked if a resolution fails to gain unanimous approval at its first reading. The plan then goes to Mayor Tom Bradley for his signature. The city has until July 31 to submit a plan to the federal judge overseeing the court-mandated redistricting.
The U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit in November that charged the city, which is 27% Latino, with weakening the voting strength of Latinos through its 1982 reapportionment proposal.
If Bradley does not sign the plan, the Council must secure 10 votes to override the veto. The mayor has been careful not to divulge his position.
Hispanic Link Weekly Repoit


COLLECTABLES
ENGLISH MOVEMENT: The League of United Latin American Citizens has published a 31 -page booklet titled “English Only Movement An Agenda for Discrimination” with articles by three congressmea Fora copy, send $2 and a self-addressed envelope with 39 cents postage to LULAC, 200 First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8516.
U.S. ENGLISH: For free brochures on the U.S. English movement, write to U.S. English, 1424 16th St.NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 232-5200.
ENGLISH FIRST: Free information packets on this organization can be obtained by writing to: English First 5881 Leesburg Pike, Suite 204, Falls Church, Va 22041 (703) 931-7111.
FASHION SHOW POSTER: Puerto Rican artist Antonio, who lives in New York and teaches at the Altos de ChavdnSchool of Design in the Dominican Republic, designed the poster for the 1986 Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit. The 29 1/4 x 16 inch poster is available for $4 (folded in envelope) and $5.50 (rolled in a tube) from: Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit, 1201 16th St. NW, Suite 420, Washington, D.C. 20036.
BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS: The National Education Association’s new 40-page publication “Blueprint for Success” reviews seven essential components in school dropout prevention. Cost 1-10 copies, $3.50 each plus 75 cents handling; 11-100 copies, $3.00 each, plus $1.75 handling charge for every 10 copies; over 100, $2.00 each. Available after July 18. Order from: Julie Seiter, Operation Rescue, National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036. (202) 822-7840.
DROPOUT GRANTS: The National Education Association will fund an additional $500,000 in dropout prevention projects this year through its affiliated education associations. Collaborative efforts between community groups and school districts are encouraged. Deadlines for NEA-affiliate proposals: Aug. 10 and Dec. 1. Interested organizations may contact any of 12,000 NEA affiliates nationally or Julie Seiter, Operation Rescue, NFIE, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7840.
YOUTH EMPLOYMENT: The 22-page “Youth Employment Today. Invest Now or Pay Later” reports on employment, education and poverty levels of Hispanic and black 16-to 19-year-old from 1979-1985. For free single copies, contact: Calvin George, National Committee for Full Employment, 81516th St NW, Suite301, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 393-7415.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N W, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT
Evaluating applications, travel, interviewing and special projects Evening and weekend work is necessary. Bachelor's degree minimum. Admissions or related experience required. Position opens August 1986. Submit resume and the names and phone numbers of three references by July 30 to: Kathie S. Weibust, Associate Director of Admissions, 194 S. Prospect St, Burlington, Vermont05401-3596.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
CLINICAL THERAPIST for Hispanic Mental Health Services To provide mental health services to general and H ispanic adults families and childrea Minimum requirements fluency in Spanish and a master's degree i n psychology, social workcounseling for nursing and one-year experience counseling adults families or children. Salary range: $21,700 to $28,751. Application deadline: July 31, 1986, 5 p.m. Contact Genesee County Community Mental Health Services Personnel Department, 420 W. 5th Ave., Flint Michigan 48503 (313) 257-3709. EOE/MF.
Site Coordinator
Queens House of Detention for Men
Duties Hiring, supervising, and assisting instructional staff; recruiting, testing, placing and advising students recruiting and supervising inmate tutors and collecting statistical program data Qualifications Bachelor's degree, teaching and/or counseling experience, and at least one year experience in program supervision. Salary $12,500 for20 hours parttime a week/12 months (Part-time, grant- funded position.) Send letter and resume by Aug. 6 to: Shirley Miller, Director,'Special Projects, Room 4, Division of Continuing Education, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, New York 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. The Father Moriarty Central American Refugee Program, San Francisco, Calif., provides legal and social services Responsibilities: fund-raising, administration, public relations Call Libby (415) 824-1830. Application deadline: July 31.
CHEMISTRY FACULTY Duties Teaching general chemistry and chemistry for allied health students studerty advisement and curriculum development. Qualifications Doctorate preferred; minimum of three years teaching experience necessary. Rank and Salary Commensurate with qualifications Full-time tenure track line. Send resume and letter by August 22nd to: Department of Natural and Applied Science, Science Search Committee, Room 3.
VIDEO POSITIONS
TRAINING INSTRUCTOR - Low$20’s, Full time, two years experience as a TV instructor with curriculum design, studio/ field production and coordinate community-based training program, flexible hours a; must
TEACHING ASSISTANT-$5 per hour, part time. 3/4 inch hands-on experience a must. Assist instructor in TV classes Send resume to: Attn: Training, P.O.Box 4611, Rockville, Maryland 20850.
PRODUCER
NATIONAL NEWS operation seeks applicants for senior producer position. Must be fully bilingual in English and Spanish. Have ample experience producing live news telecasts and specials. Experience in the field as well as writing skills in Spanish. Confidential. Deadline: Aug.4,1986. Please send resume to: NEWS, P.O. Box 350776, Miami, Florida 33135-0776.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LATINA SCHOLARS Davis, Calif. July 24-26
Developing research by Hispanas on Hispanas, encouraging the growth of Latina scholars and promoting the viability of Chicana studies are goals of this workshop by Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social Linda Facio (916) 752-2421
HISPANIC BUSINESS Chicago July 25
This will be the 5th of seven regional conferences on issues of importance to Hispanic businesses by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
Sonia Rosario (816) 531-6363
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET
Montebello, Calif. July 25
Sergeant-at-Arms for the U.S. Senate Ernie Garcia
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
and U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commissioner Tony Gallegos will attend this scholarship banquet by the American Gl Forum Southern California Scholarship Foundation.
Ben Rodriguez (213) 921-4945
HJSPANIC DEACONS San Antonio July 25-28
Diaconos Permanentes Hispanos will hold a reunion for its members and deacons who work in predominantly Hispanic parishes.
Maria Montoya (512) 732-2156
FIESTA DE SANTIAGO APOSTOL New York July 27
Retaining Indian, African and Spanish traditions, a procession of music and statues of the saint El Mata Moro will wind through East Harlem t6 emulate the festival that originated in Puerto Rico.
Nancy Donner (212) 873-3400
COMING SOON
HISPANIC BUSINESS ISSUES CONFERENCE Latin American Manufacturers Association Washington, D.C. July 28, 29 Steve Denlinger (202) 546-3803
“A BRIDGE TO BETTER BUSINESS”
Texas Association of Mexican-American Chambers of Commerce
Waco, Texas July 31- Aug. 2 Elena de la Garza (512) 495-6465
HISPANICS IN OHIO: PUBLIC HEARING Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs Lorain, Ohio Aug. 2 Julia Arbini-Haywood (614) 466-8333
YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE LULAC, District IV El Paso, Texas Aug. 9 Mary Y6hez (915) 598-0333
SPOTLIGHT
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES: The sixth annual conference by the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations will cover a wide range of issues, including AIDS, teen pregnancy, substance abuse and health-care financing. The conference will be held Sept. 4-7 in New York For further information, contact Linda Neal at (202) 371-2100.
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Arts & Entertainment
LEADERS TALK MEDIA: Back-to-back gatherings of national H ispanic leaders in Nevada and California featured discussions on the portrayal and employment of Hispanics by entertainment news media.
Closing its annual convention in Las VegasJuly 13, the League of United Latin American Citizens passed a resolution to “urge and encourage its councils to address media issues at the local and national level in regards to employment, portrayal and news coverage, and to work with Hispanic media organizations in addressing those issues
At a panel discussion the next day in Los Angeles, F6lix Gutierrez warned that media involvement is “everybody’s second-favorite issue” and that unless national organizations recognize it as a“bread and butter” concern, little progress will be made in the area.
Gutierrez, a journalism professor at the University of Southern California, spoke at a media panel during the annual conference of the National Council of La Raza in Los Angeles. Other panelists included Jose Lozano, publisher of that city’s Spanish-language daily La Opinion, Frank Cruz, programming director at KVEA-TV in Los Angeles and Frank Zuniga, a film director and outgoing Hollywood chapter president of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and. Sciences.
Ivy Orta, recently elected national chairperson of HAMAS, told conference participants that to move on the issue would require gathering the leaders of the nation’s major Hispanic organizations. Orta, director of contract administration at Columbia Pictures, told Weekly Report that she would like to plan such a caucus for next year’s National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles.
Raul Yzaguirre, president of NCLR, said he would participate in that meeting. He said a'‘legislative framework” should be worked out and that Hispanics should urge the Federal Communications Commission to adopt a policy to“make public airwaves responsive to public needs.”
Responding to Gutierrez’s statement Yzaguirre said media involvement is “a second issue that everybody can act on.”
ONE LINERS: Choreographer Graciela Daniele has been selected to head the INTAR Hispanic American Music Theater Lab in NewYork... Miami Vice actors Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago will appear in Spanish- and English-language announcements for the Books Make a Difference public service campaign airing this summer on NBC... Following a one-week master’s course at USC, classical guitarist Andres Segovia will offer a recital in Los Angeles July 26 with three of his students... The XIII International Chicano-Latino Theater Festival begins July 27 in Cuernavaca, Mexico. . . And, according to an EFE wire story, men who consider themselves women will participate in nightgown, swimwear and cultural awareness competitions at the upcoming Miss Honduras Tercer Sexo beauty pageant in Tegucigalpa... _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NAHJ, NABJ MEETING PLANNED: The board of directors of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists^ meeting in Washington, D.C., July 12-13, voted to conduct its next meeting in conjunction with the board of the National Association of Black Journalists.
Pending confirmation by NABJ, the board set Philadelphia on Oct. 31-Nov. 1 as the site and dates.
The board expressed hope that the meeting will result in a joint resolution on the hiring of minorities by establishment media
The NAHJ body also approved a request by Audrey Alvarado, executive director of Denver’s Latin American Research and Service Agency (LARASA) calling for a statement in support
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H&ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your next conference or convention. For details contact H6ctor Ericksen* Mendoza (202) 234-0737.;
of Hispanic leadership there. The citys Latino leaders recently challenged congressional testimony on Hispanic immigrants by Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm as racist and nativist. In turn, they were attacked in editorials by The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News as “knee-jerk’ respondents and demagogues
The board also agreed to hear proposals at its next meeting from a trio of Texas cities competing to host the 1988 National Hispanic Media Conference. In 1987, it will be staged in Los Angeles.
POST PROMISES CHANGES: Long a target of criticism by U.S. Hispanics for its failure to hire Latino newspersons or to cover Latinos adequately and fairly, The Washington Post is about to make some “dramatic changes in newsroom personnel policies” which should improve its performance and reputation.
That promise was delivered to 100 Hispanic ^ business and professional leaders at the July' 16 luncheon of the Greater Washington Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce by Post Publisher Donald Graham.
The newspaper, which recently completed a thorough analysis of its minority staffing, will begin implementing the changes this week. Included will be the creation of a fulltime minority recruiter position, Graham said..
MOVING DAY: Carlos Morales, editor of Hispanic Link Weekly Report since July 1985, departs this week to become a copy editor with The Miami News... Replacing him is F6lix P6rez, a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service for the past year... New York Dajly News reporter Dayid Medina will also join The Miami News next month, as assistant city editor...
Former Los Angeles Times staff writer Mercedes Lynn de Uriarte, now with the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been selected as a W. K. Kellogg fellow... Another former Times staffer, Robert Monte-,
mayor, will join The Wall Street Journal Aug. 18 to work in retail sales in the Caribbean and South America areas ..
- Hector Ericksen-Mendoza and Charlie Ericksen
1986 HISPANIC DESIGNERS SHOW poster. (See Collectables, pg. 3)
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week with $309,014 raised, $200,000 of which he himself contributed. Florida Gov. Bob Graham designates Miami's Calle Ocho-a symbol of that city's Cuban community-as a highway. San Diego City Councilor Uvalda l\r1artinez Judge Joseph Davis to stand on 24 and falsely accounting for p IC With illegally using a city-issued cr t $1 ,840 m meals and drinks ... One of Puerto co's most famous folkloric singers, Pedro Ortiz Davilaknown a . "Davilita"dies in Bayam6n, P.R., July 8. He was 74 ... Jessie M. Gonzales, New Mexico state secretary from 1939-42, dies in Las Vegas, N.M., July 12 at age 82. Tony Casillas, a nose tackle from Oklahoma who last year won the Lombardi Award as the nation's top defensive college lineman , s1gns for four years with the Atlanta Falcons in a deal reportedly valued at $2.35 million ... Vol. 4 No. 29 HISPANIC LIN LY REP July 21, 1986 Latinos Mount Countermoves Against Nativi sts Paramilitary activities in Arizona, an initiative in California to make English the official lan guage there and a new national effort to pass an amendment declaring English the United States' official language have prompted His panic organizations across the country to mount counteroffensives. On a national level, six-month-old English First is steadily gaining ground in its effort to persuade the U . S . Congress to pass a 27th amendment to the constitution. At the state level, Latinos in Tucson, Ariz., enraged over the actions of what they called "domestic terrorists," have threatened to take up arms themselves. They formed the Coalition for Justice, which has called for a grand jury investigation into charges that a paramilitary group ventured into Mexico and illegally de tained a group of undocumented aliens, in cluding women and children. On July 5, the Alabama-based paramilitary groupCivilian Materiel Assistanceallegedly Medicaid OK for Aliens Finding that the 1986 statute authorizing Medicaid contained" no express restrictions on alien eligibility," a federal judge in New York' City ruled July 14 that undocumeflted immigrants living in New York state cannot be denied Medicaid assistance. The ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Charles Sitton applies to an estimated 234,000 undocumented persons in the state, most of whom live in New York City. The decision could lead to lawsuits in other states challenging federal restrictions on Medicaid. The suit was begun in 1981 by nine undocumented immigrants against the city and state and the Federal Departm!3nt of Health and Human Services. Judge Sitton said in his decision tha! those "colloquially referred to as 'illegal . aliens'" were, more accurately, people who had established permanent residence who had not been granted legal permanent res-' ident status. He also found that federal authorities improperly denied aliens Medicaid in 1973. held 16 persons at gunpoint for 90 minutes. Nineteen CMA members from the Tucson area were patrolling Arizona's Lochiel Valley, reportedly searching for drug runners. Antonio Bustamante, a coalition organizer and attorney in Tucson, said he has been receiving conflicting signals from state and federal authorities as to who has jurisdiction. "There has been less talk of taking up arms, but ifs because people are waiting to see what comes of the investigations," Bustamante said CMA has promised to continue its patrols, with the possibility of expanding to the Texas and California borders . The FBI and the U . S . Attorney General's office are conducting investigations. In California, a coalition of civil rights groups, •m;lua•ng the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil LULAC Re--elects Moran Oscar Moran, elected last year as national president of the League of United Latin Ame rican Citizens, was re-elected by acclamation to a second one-year term at the organization's 57th annual convention held July9-13 in Las Vegas, Nev. Tony Bonilla, LULAC president from 1981 to 1983, declined a nomination from the floor that would have pitted him against Moran. Instead, Bonilla threw his support to the incumbent. 'Approximately 3,000 attended the convention, 1with some 900 delegates voting for officers and on resolutions. Re-elected as regionalvice presidents were: o\ndres Tobar, Washington, D .C., Northeast; Robert Canino, Miami, Southeast; Frank Ortiz, Houston, Southwest; Robert Rivas, Las Vegas, Nev., Far West; and Gil Serrano, Anchorage, Alaska, Northwest. Midwest Vice President Ricardo Correa of Omaha, Neb., was defeated by lla Plasencia of Des Moines, Iowa. Among the 20 resolutions passed were ones supporting affirmative action programs, bilingual education and English Plus. Others were passed opposing U.S. House and Senate immigration bills and the English Only movement Uberties Union, have united against an initiative introduced June 25 to make English that state's official language. The initiative, titled English as the Official Language of California, is sponsored by the California arm of the U.S. English movement. Francisco Garcia, an attorney with MALDEF, said that the vague and broad wording o f the initiative would create a "plethora of lawsuit9, pitting community against community. Garcia said the proponents of the initiative are well organized and well financed. "Looking at state history, the chances are good it (the initiative) will pass ... We definitely have an uphill battle," he . said. Among the steps to be undertaken by the coalition are to form a political action committee to raise $300,000 to $500,000 for a direct mail campaign and to distribute information brochures to citizens on the initiative . The group will also have its argument against the initiative printed on the November ballot. The Falls Church, Va.-based English First organization differs very little from its older continued on page 2 Cuba-U.S. Talks Halted Attempts to revive a 1984 Cuba-U.S. im migration agreement broke down in Mexico City July 10 following Cuba's proposal to broadcast to the United States through an AM "clear channel" radio signal. No further talks were scheduled. U .S. State Department officials said the .Cuban request was rejected because it would have involved "major and disruptive changes" in U.S. stations' operations. A "clear channer' is protected from inter ference from other signals and would give Cuba the same reach the U.S.-beamed Radio Marti has in the island. The immigration pact, suspended by Cuba May 20, 1985, in protest to Radio Marti, stipulated the return to Cuba of 2,700 former criminals and mental patients. In return, the United States was to allow entry to 3,000 Cuban political prisoners and up to 20,000 immigrants a year.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua with "yes" and "no" contribution stickers and a Mexican one-peso bill attach'ed. A quartermillion copies of this appeal were produced by Richard Viguerie for a group calling itself "Save Our Schools." CLEANING MY CLOSET: Every day I reach for the sunshine. Clouds I stick in my closet. But asanybodywho ever owned one knows, even the capacity of a closet is not without limits. The pitch letter's message : " I know the Peso on the enclosed ballot is worthless in the U . S . But I enclosed it to make an important point about a billion dollar U .S. government program that's worthless, too ... " The offending program, of course, was bilingual education. "Many of these foreign students will end up on welfare. So will their children. And their grandchildren . . . " Felix Perez's lead story this week reminds me that my closet is getting full. For too long now, I have been stuffing it with repulsive little items I wanted to pretend didn't exist. One was a commentary, "ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION, THE TRUTH," printed in a Florida publication. It attacked an immigration reform proposal supported by U . S . Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez(DTexas) as an 'Alice in Wonderland bank" which "ultimately would permit hordes of non-Hispanic red and/or mestizo race Mexicans to enter the U.S.A. . . . EXHIBIT NO. 3: There was also a March 19, 1986, Education Week article describing other such groups, like the Council for Inter American Security, which "links bilingual education to Hispanic 'separatism,' 'cultural apartheid,' and the potential for ' terrorism in the u .s:" "There is no doubt, " wrote the author, "that the best interests of the U . S . are served and protected by the immediate and complete sealing off of the US/Mexican border, specifically, with mined fields, machine. gun emplacements (and) K-9 dog patrols ... " EXHIBIT NO.4: And an April28, 1 986, article clipped from the Los Angeles Times describing the "key role" which Harold Ezell , Western regional commissioner of the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service played in uniting an Orange County group of his friends into" Americans for Border Control," an INS support organization, which warns in its brochures of the " appalling legacy which will be left to our children" if we don't watch out The author? Ant h ony Francis Gonzalez , descri bed as a New York lawyer and chairman of the American Spanish Committee, an organization founded in 1962 to "protect the civil and Christian religious rights of Spanish surnamed white American citizens." EXHIBIT NO. 2: Nextwas a state-of -the-art fund-raising mailer Obviously, my closet needs a dicho on the door. Something like: A/ bien buscarlo, y a/ mal, esperarlo. Good things, look for, bad things, wait for. Kay Barbaro LatinosCounterNativists Pendleton Wants Party Caucu ses Cut continued from page 1 prototype, U.S. English. According to Larry Pratt , president of English First and a former Virg i nia state legislator, the organization hopes to surpass its '86 fund-raising goal of $235,000 within the month. U.S. English has an operating budget this year of slightly less than $4 million. Pratt said his group has between 10,000 and 15,000 followers; U.S. English claims 2 million members. English First is currently conducting a national mail campaign to raise funds. "If (bilingualism) would become prevalent, then the politics of guilt and envy can take over. People who want to exploit that can begin to try to divide the country, working to get people to dislike each other .. . rather than work together as a single nation," Pratt told Weekly Report. Joe Trevino, executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizen's Foundation , said such an amendment " would disenfranchise people who are not English proficient." ).ULAC, in conjunction with the National ,Council of La Raza and the American Gl ' Forum, announced July 12 a national campaign to persuade city councils to declare themselves in favor of English Plus and multilingualism. The English Plus movement was introduced in December by LU LAC and theM iami-based Spanish American League Against Dis crimination. The campaign was founded to counter what was seen as a philosophy within the Reagan administration to dismantle bilingual education . Felix Perez Latino Jobless Declines The H ispanic civilian unemployment rate dropped from 1.1% to 10.6% in June, the U .S. Department of Labor reported. The unemployment rate for blacks rose from 14.8% to 15. 1 %, and for whites it declined from 6.2% to 6 . 1%. 2 Hispanic representatives in the Republican and Democratic parties reacted strongly against a recommendation by U.S. Civil Rights Com mission Chairman Clarence Pendleton to dis mantle the parties' minority caucuses and auxiliaries. The suggestion, to Republican National Committee Chairman Frank Fahrenkopf , was made public July 14. Democratic party officials have not been contacted by Pendleton. "Mr. Pendleton's recommendation is completely out of line," said Colorado State Sen. Polly Baca, vice chair of the Democratic National Committee and of its Hispanic Caucus . The caucus was established in 1972. Fernando De Baca, chairman of the Re publican National Hispanic Assembly, said : "I don't know why Chairman Pendleton has brought up this matter without checking the facts and effectiveness of the Hispanic aux iliaries . " De Baca has requested to meet with Pendleton this week. The Republican National Committee's minority participation advisory group, created during the committee's semi-annual meeting June 25-27 in St. Louis, has agreed to review the issue. Edward Lujan, chair of the New Mexico Republican Party , is its chairman. De Baca added that the 1 Q-year-old assembly Interns Learn D.C. Ways Twelve Hispanic college-bound students are participating in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's summer intership program in Washington, D.C., that runs through Aug . 3. This year's interns are : Lenny Lugo, Brooklyn; John Elizondo , San Antonio; Rodolfo Ruiz, Brownsville, Texas; Eleanor Gallegos, Al buquerque; Carmen Posada, Mt. Vernon, Ohio; Jesus Acosta, Chicago; Jacqueline Perez, .St Louis; Ania Fernandez, Miami; Mario Castro and Eva Burrull, El Paso; Garrett Terrones, La Puente , Calif.; and Julia Alvarez, Huntington Beach , Calif. is fully supported by party officials, saying its efforts helped increase from 30% in 1980 to 48% in 1984 the Latino vote for President Reagan ' s election. Hispanic caucuses, along with thei r black and women counterparts, are intended to enhance minority participation in the party structure. Of 162 National Republican Com mittee members, there are six Hispanic voting members-three from Puerto Rico . Of 371 National Democratic Committee members, there are 24 Hispanic voting members-eight from Puerto Rico . LA. OKs Alato r re Plan The Los Angeles City Council voted 1 0 5 in favor of a redistricting plan that would create the 15-member body's second pre' dominantly Hispanic district The plan , drawn up by the Counci l's lone Hispanic member, Reapportionment Com mittee Chairman Richard Alatorre, would increase the Hispanic constituency in Dis trict 13 from 31 o/o to 65% . The district in question is represented by the on ly Asian American on the Council, Michael Woo . The p l an will go bac k t o the Council for a second reading-a p rocedure invoked if a resolution fails to gai n unanimous approval at its first reading. The plan then goes to Mayor Tom Bradley for his signature. The city has until July 31 to submit a plan to the federal judge overseeing the court-mandated redistricting. The U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit in November that charged the city, which is 27% Latino, with weakening the voting strength of Latinos through its 1982 reapportionment proposal. If Bradley does not sign the plan , the Council must secure 10 votes to override the veto. The mayor has been careful not to . divulge his position. Hispanic Link Weekly Repott

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COLLECTABLES ENGLISH MOVEMENT: The League of United Latin American Citizens has published a 31-page booklet titled"English Only Movement: An Agenda for Discrimination" with articles by three congressmen . Fora copy, send $2 and a self-addressed envelope with 39 cents postage to LULAC, 200 First St. NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C . 20001 (202) 628-8516. U.S. ENGLISH: For free brochures on the U .S. English movement, write to U.S. English, 1424 16th St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20036 (202) 232-5200. ENGLISH FIRST: Free information packets on this organization can be obtained by writing to: English First, 5881 Leesburg Pike, Suite 204, Falls Church, Va. 22041 (703) 931-7111. FASHION SHOW POSTER: Puerto Rican artist Antonio, who lives in New York and feaches at the Altos de Chav6nSchool of Design in the Dominican Republic, designed the poster for the 1986 Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit. The 29 1/4 x 16 inch poster is available for $4 (folded in envelope) and $5.50 (rolled in a tube) from: Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit, 1201 16th St. NW, Suite 420, Washington, D .C. 20036. BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS: The National Education Association's new 40-page publication "Blueprint for Success" reviews seven essential components in school dropout prevention. Cost: 1-10 copies, $3.50 each plus 75 cents handling; 11-100 copies, $3.00 each, plus $1.75 handling charge for every 10 copies; over 100,$2.00 each . Available after July 18. Order from: Julie Seiter, Operation Rescue, National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036. (202) 822-7840. DROPOUT GRANTS: The National Education Association will fund an additional $500,000 in dropout prevention projects this year through its affiliated education associations. Collaborative efforts between community groups and school districts are encouraged. Deadlines for NEA-affiliate proposals: Aug. 10 and Dec . 1 . Interested organizations may contact any of 12,000 N EA affiliates nationally or Julie Seiter, Operation Rescue, NFIE, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20036 (202) 822-7840. YOUTH EMPLOYMENT: The 22-page "Youth Employment Today: Invest Now or Pay Later" reports on employment, education and poverty levels of Hispanic and black 16-to 19-year-old from 1979-1985. For free single copies, contact: Calvin George, National Com mittee for Full Employment,81516th St. NW, Suite301, Washington, D . C . 20006 (202) 393-7 415. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED$ PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals . Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N W, Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. The Father UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT Moriarty Central American Refugee Program. Evaluating applications. travel, interviewing San Francisco, Calif. , provides legal and socia! and special projects. Evening and weeke nd services. Re sponsibilities: rais i ng, work is necessary . Bachelo(s degree min i mum . administration, public relations . Call Libby Admissions or related experience requ i red . . (415) 8 24. Appli cation deadline: July PositionopensAugust1986. Submitresume 31 . and the names and phone numbers of three references by July 30 to : Kathie S . W e ibust , Asso c iate Director of Admissions , 194 S . Prospect St., Burlington , Vermonl 054013596. An Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer. CLINICAL THERAPIST for Hispani c Mental Health Services . To provide mental h ealth services to general and Hispan i c adults. families and children. Minimum requirements: fluency in Spanish and a mastefs degree in psychology , social work,counseling for nursing and year e xperience counseling adults. families or children . Salary range : $21 ,700 to$28, 751. Application deadline: July 31, 1986, 5 p.m. Contact Genesee County Community Mental Health Services. Personnel Department, 420 W .5th Ave . , Flint , Michigan 48503(3 13) 257 3709. EOE!MF. Site Coordinator Queens House of Detention for Men Duties: Hiring, supervising, and assisting instructional staft, recruiting, testing, pl acing and advising students; recruiting and superv ising inmate tutors; and collecting statistical program data Qualifications; Bachelo(s degree, tea ch ing and/or counseling experience, and at least one year experience in program super vision Salary: $12,500 for20 hours parttime a week/12 months. (Parttime, grant fund e d position. ) Send letter and resume by Aug . 6 to: Shirley Miller, Director, : Special Projects, Room 4 , Division of Continuing Education, LaGuardia Community College /CUNY, 31 10 Thomson Avenue , Long Island City, New York 11101 . EOE!AA Employer. CHEMISTRY FACULTY Du t i es: T eac hing g e neral c h em i s tr y and chemis t ry for a lli e d h ealth students, stude n ) ad v isement a nd c ur r i c ulum d e v e l opment. Qu a lifi ca tions: Doct o r a t e pref e rr ed; min i mum of thre e years tea c hin g e xperi e n ce n e c e ssary . Rank an d Salary: Comm ensurate w i th qual;. ficati o n s . FuiHi m e tenure tra c k line. Send r esume a nd l etter by A ugust 22 n d to: D e part m e nt of N a tural and A ppl ied Sc i ence, Sc ience Searc h Committee, Room 3. VIDEO POSITIONS TRAINING INSTRUCTOR-Low S 20's. Full time, two ye a r s e xperience as a TV instru ctor with curriculum design, studio/ field production and coordinate community based training program, flexi ble hours a must. TEACHINGASSISTANT-$5 per hour, part time. 3 / 4 in c h h a nds on a mu st. Assist in structor in TV classes. Send resume to: Attn : Training , P . O . Box 4611, Rock v ill e , M a ryl a nd 20850. PRODUCER NATIONAL NEWS opera tion se eks applicants for se ni o r producer positio n . Must be full y bilingual in English and Spanish . Ha v e ample ex perience producing live news telecasts and specials. E x peri e nce in the field a s well as writing skill s in Spanish. Confi dential. Deadline: Aug . 4 , 1986. Please se nd resume to: NEWS , P.O . Bo x 350776, Mi a m i , Florida 331350776. Calendar and U . S . Equal Employment Opportunity Commis sioner Tony Gallegos will attend this scholarship banquet by the American Gl Forum Southern California Scholarship Foundation . "A BRIDGE TO BETTER BUSINESS" Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce Waco , Texas July 31Aug. 2 THIS WEEK LATINA SCHOLARS Davis, Calif. July 24 Developing research by H i spanas on Hispanas , encouraging the growth of Latina scholars and promoting the viability of Chicana studies are goals of this workshop by Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social Linda Facio (916) 752 HISPANIC BUSINESS Chicago July 25 Thi s will be the 5th of seven regional conferences on issues of importance to Hispanic businesses by the U .S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Sonia Rosario (816) 531 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Montebello, Calif . July 25 Sergeant-at-Arms for the U.S. Senate Ernie Garcia Plispanic L'ink Weekly Report_ Ben Rodriguez (213) 921-4945 HJSPANIC DEACONS San Antonio July 25 Diaconos Permanentes Hispanos will hold a reunion for its members and deacons who work in pre dominantly Hispanic parishes. Maria Montoya(512) 732-2156 FIESTA DE SANTIAGO APOSTOL New York July 27 Retain i ng Indian, African and Spanish traditions, a procession of music and statues of the saint El Mat a Moro will wind through East Harlem to emulate the festival that originated in Puerto Rico . Nancy Donner (212) 873-3400 COMING SOON HISPANIC BUSINESS ISSUES CONFERENCE Latin American Manufacturers Association Washington, D.C. July 28, 29 Steve Denlinger (202) 546-3803 Elena de Ia Garza (512) 495 HISPANICS IN OHIO: PUBLIC HEARING Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs Lorain, Ohio Aug. 2 Julia Arbini-Haywood (614) 466-8333 YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE LULAC , District IV El Paso, Texas Aug . 9 Mary Yanez (915) 598-0333 SPOTLIGHT HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES: The sixth annual conference by the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations will cover a wide range of issues, including AIDS , teen pregnancy, substance abuse and health care financing. The conference will be held Sept. 4-7 in New York. For further information, contact Linda Neal at (202) 371-2100. 3

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Arts & Entertainment Ivy Orta, recently elected national chairperson of HAMAS, told conference participants that to move on the issue would require gathering the leaders of the nation's major Hispanic organizations . Orta, director of contract administration at Columbia Pictures, told Weekly Report that she would like to plan such a caucus for next year's National Hispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles. LEADERS TALK MEDIA: Back-to-back gatherings of national Hispanic leaders in Nevada and California featured discussions on the portrayal and employment of Hispanics by entertainment news media. Closing its annual convention in Las Vegas July 13, the League of United Latin American Citizens passed a resolution to "urge and encourage its councils to address media issues at the local and national level in regards to employment, portrayal and news coverage, and to work with Hispanic media organizations in addressing those issues." Raul Yzaguirre, president of NCLR, said he would participate in that meeting. He said a "legislative framework'' should be worked out and that Hispanics should urge the Federal Communications Commission to adopt a policy to" make public airwaves responsive to public needs." Responding to GutiE'meis statement, Yzaguirre said media involvement is "a second issue that everybody can act on." At a. panel discussion the next day in Los Angeles, Felix Gutierrez warned that media involvement is "everybody's second-favorite issue" and that unless national organizations recognize it as a "bread and butter' ' concern, little progress will be made in the area. . ONE LINERS: Choreographer Graciela Daniele has been selected to head the INTAR Hispanic American Music Theater Lab in New York. .. Miami Vice actors Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago will appear in Spanishand English-language announcements for the Books Make a Difference public service campaign airing this summer on NBC ••• Following a one-week master's course at USC, classical guitarist Andres Segovia will offer a recital in Los Angeles July 26 with three of his students ... The XIII International Chicano-Latino Theater Festival begins July 27 in Cuernavaca, Mexico. . . And, according to an EFE wire story, men who consider themselves women will participate in nightgown, swimwear and cultural awareness competitions at the upcoming Miss Honduras Tercer Sexo beauty pageant in Tegucigalpa.. . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Gutierrez, a journalism professor at the University" of Southern California, spoke at a media panel during the annual conference of the National of La Raza in Los Angeles. Other panelists included Jose Lozano, 'publisher of that city's Spanish-language daily La Opinion, Frank Cruz, programming director at KVEATV in Los Angeles and Frank Zuniga, a film director and outgoing Hollywood chapter president of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and. Sciences. Media Report NAHJ, NABJ MEETING PLANNED: The board of directors of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, meeting in Washington, D.C., July 12-13, voted to conduct its next meeting in conjunction with the board of the National Association of Black Journalists. Pending confirmation by NABJ, the board set Philadelphia on Oct 31-Nov. 1 as the site and dates. The board expressed hope that the meeting will result in a joint resolution on the hiring of minorities by establishment media The NAHJ body also approved a request by Audrey Alvarado, executive director of Denver's Latin American Research and Service Agency (LARASA) calling for a statement in support HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 PubliSher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez . Charlie Ericksen , Antonio MejiasRentas . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants packets at your ne x t conference or convention. For details, contact H":tor EricksenMendoza (202) 234-Q737.; of Hispanic leadership there. The city's Latino leaders recently challenged congressional testimony on Hispanic immigrants by Colorado Gov. Richard i...amm as racist and nativist. In turn, they were attacked in editorials by The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News as "knee-jerk'' respondents and demagogues. The board also agreed to hear proposals at its next meeting from a trio of Texas cities competing to host the 1988 National His panic Media Conference. In 1987, it will be staged in Los Angeles. POST PROMISES CHANGES: Long a target of criticism by U.S. Hispanics for its failure to hire Latino newspersons or to cover Latinos adequately and fairly, The Washington Post is about to make some "dramatic changes in newsroom personnel policies" which should improve its performance and reputation. That promise was delivered to 100 Hispanic 1 . business and professional leaders at the July 16 luncheon of the Greater Washington lbero American Chamber of Commerce by Post Publisher Donald Graham. The newspaper, which recently completed a thorough analysis of its minority staffing, will begin implementing the changes this week. Included will be the creation of a full time minority recruiter position, Graham said . . MOVING DAY: Carlos Morales, editor of Hispanic Link Weekly Report since July 1985, departs this week to become a copy. editor with The Miami News ..• Replacing him is Felix Perez, a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service for the past year ... New York Daily News reporter Dwid Medina will also join The Miami News next month, as assistant city editor ... Former Los Angeles Times staff writer Mercedes Lynn de Uriarte, now with the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been selected as a W. K. Kellogg fellow ... mayor , will join The Wall Street Journal Aug . 18 to work in retail sales in the Caribbean and . South America areas ... -Hector EricksenMendoza and Charlie Ericksen 1986 HISPANIC DESIGNERS SHOW poster. (See Collectables, pg. 3) Another former Times staffer, '--------------..._-----' 4 Hispanic Link Weekly Report