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Hispanic link weekly report, August 4, 1986

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Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, August 4, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News This Week
The FBI conducts an investigation into allegations that US. Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist, while an attorney in Arizona, took part in a 1960s’ campaign to intimidate Hispanic and black voters. Rehnquist was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to take over as the court’s chief justice... The Rev. Jesse Jackson of the National Rainbow Coalition announces the dispatch of Susana Cepeda to El Salvador as an emissary in discussions aimed at ending that countrys civil war. . . United Nations Secretary General Javier P6rez de Cuellar undergoes successful quadruple-bypass heart surgery in Manhattan, N.Y., on July 24. . . Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) calls
Rodrigo Rojas a “young communist terrorist.|^l^&^^5ident of Washington, D.C., died from burns reportedly inflicted by xne Chilean army... Ex-White House aide Luis Acle joins the j^epublto^fflational Committee Aug. 8 to assist Republican spnat^riarcawSoaies in addressing policy issues affecting the Hispanic community... Jim Kent, a spokesman for Civilian Materiel Assistance, says the group will cease conducting patrols along the U.S.-Mexico border. CMA is under investigation for allegedly detaining 16 undocumented aliens at gunpoint in Arizona... The Taft Institute for Two-Party Government recognizes Lou de Santiago, from El Paso, Texas, as one of the top 31 schoolteachers in the country... The Immigration and Naturalization Service appoints Jose Garza as chief patrol agent - one of 20 nationally - of the Laredo, Texas, U.S. Border Patrol Sector...
^>3.(0) HISPANIC
Coalition Protests Proposed FCC Cable Policy
A coalition of minority broadcasters, among them some Hispanic and Spanish-language station owners, is lobbying the Federal Communications Commission to influence the agencys soon-to-be-released decision on whether cable TV systems should be required to carry minority, public and religious stations
The decision, expected to be released at the Aug. 7 commission meeting, comes as a result of a July 19, 1986, order by the U.S. Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit to design new criteria for cable transmission. A previous FCC regulation, commonly known as the “must carry’ rule, required cable operators to carry all local stations The court, however, eliminated it, saying the requirement impinged on the First Amendment Rights of cable companies.
Following the court’s decision, the National Association of Broadcasters and the National
Latino Dropouts Targeted
More than half of the National Education Association’s initial$2.13,000 commitment in its new dropout prevention campaign is targeted for predominantly Hispanic programs, an NEA spokesperson told Weekly Report.
NEA has pledged $700,000 in teacher-members’ dues to the project, “Operation Rescue,” over its first two years. It hopes to help halve the nation’s 30% dropout rate by 1990.
Projects range from after-school tutoring to working with teenage parents. Community involvement is given high priority in the selection process, according to Donna Rhodes, executive director of the National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, which is administering the activity.
Of 122 applications for first-round funding, eight NEA-affiliated education groups were selected.
Those in predominantly Hispanic communities are United Teachers of Los Angeles, $35,000 fora program at96%-Latino Hollenbeck Junior High School; $36,300 for the Woodland, Calif., Education Association, to work with all at-risk students, eleme-'tary school through high school, in a community with high migrant farm-worker population; and Glendale, Ariz., Classroom Teachers Association, $42,797 to work in that citys three high schools.
Cable Television Association struck an agreement to recommend a new rule based on viewership.
The proposal, which would grant cable access to stations capturing 2%-5% of the TV audience, is strongly opposed by minority broadcasters who argue that it leaves them at the mercy of cable operators.
“With the exception of the network affiliates and very large VHF independent stations, everybody will be in danger of going off the air,” said Ernest Robson, a regulatory consultant who is representing the ad hoc National Coalition of Minority Broadcasters.
If the NAB-NCTA rule is adopted, Robson contends all UHF stations, which, for the most part, cannot meet the required viewership criteria, will lose a substantial number of their viewers and be subject to financial disaster. All six Hispanic-owned and most minority-owned stations are in the less potent UHF frequency.
Affected also will be Spanish-language and
HUD Postpones Evictions
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced July 23 it will hold off evicting undocumented aliens from federally subsidized housing until Sept. 30 or until Congress acts on the matter.
The announcement, contained in a letter to Rep. Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas), chairman of the subcommittee on housing and community development, puts on hold the eviction policy which was to take effect July 31.
Admitting confusion over the policy, HUD Secretary Samuel Pierce said the postponement will provide Congress time to address the issue.
The House adopted an amendment to the omnibus housing bill in June that would allow undocumented families to live in pubjic housing as long as one member was a U.S. citizen or legal resident. Included in that amendment was a provision to protect tenants 62 years old and older. These tenants could declare their citizenship or legal status without furnishing proof.
The Senate is expected to act on the housing bill late this summer or early fall.
other foreign-language stations. Attorney Raul Rodriguez, representing Spanish International Communications Corporation, owner of five major Spanish-language TV stations and five repeater stations, said he was even
BILL OPPOSES SICC SALE U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) has introduced a bill in Congress which could effectively halt the transfer of five major Spanish International Communications Corporation television stations to non-Hispanic owners (See Media Report, Page 4.)
denied attendance at the NAB-NCTA negotiations.
“We apprised the NAB with our concerns, we apprised the FCC with our concerns, but nobody seems to care,” said Rodriguez. He added that if the proposal is not amended, only one or two Spanish-language stations will be left on cable transmission.
Rodriguez said that the viewership criteria is especially problematic for Spanish-language
continued on page 2
84.5% in Labor Force
There were 84.5% of Hispanic families with at least one member-employed or unemployed-counted in the civilian labor force from April to June 1986, compared with 83.8% for white and 81.0% for black families, the U.S. Department of Labor reported July 24.
Five percent of these Latino families had no one employed at the time of the survey, compared with 2.3% of white and 7.4% of black families.
.Based on a survey of 59,500 households, the department projected that the nation’s 4.2 million Hispanic families had median weekly earnings of $409, compared with $558 for white families and $399 for black families There are 54.3 million white families and 6.8 million black families.
Unemployment rates of individual members
of families for Hisp. White Black
Married Couples 9.3% 5.4% 11 m
Women-maintained 16.1 .11.0 23.6
Men-maintained 13.4 10.3 18.7


Sin pelos en la lengua
WORDS AND DEEDS: In Puerto Rico, they call it “de la boca pa’ fuera. In Mexico, it’s“de dientes pa’ fuera”
But whether if s personified by saying that your mouth is sticking out or your teeth are protruding, doubletalk is doubletalk.
This week, from Kansas City, Mo., we offer WHAT THEY SAY: Hallmark Cards President Irving Hockaday, on the Spanish-language format of the Spanish International Communications Corporation television stations which Hallmark is purchasing:
“The agreement calls for a two-year commitment, but Hallmark is dedicated to serving the Hispanic community through an on-going and long-term commitment to the Spanish-language format of the stations. We already have served the Hispanic community in the United States, through Spanish-language greeting cards, which were first introduced in the early ’60s.”
WHAT THEY DO: True, Hallmark tried Spanish-language cards in the ’60s. But it discontinued the line in 1974 because of poor sales. It picked them up again nine years later when it felt the market was right. That’s what Hallmark production information coordinator
Rachel Bolton told Weekly Report a year and a half ago. (See Weekly Report, Nov. 19, 1984.)
And from Washington, DC.:
WHAT THEY SAY: “I hope that your presence here today (at the White House) assures you that we do not take the Hispanic community for granted.., Buenas tardes and welcome to the White House... Let me say to each of you, ’Mi casa, su casa’ And it really is... And in this case, this always was su casa I’m just a tenant here...” - Comments by President Ronald Reagan to invited Hispanic leaders in past preelection events at the White House.
WHAT THEY DO: Luis Acle’s departure from the White House’s Office of Public Liaison leaves that 24-member unit - which is responsible for interacting with Hispanic leaders and organizations-without a single Latino. While one of its four special assistants is a black who works exclusively with the black community, there’s no assurance that Acle’s lower-level position will be filled with a Hispanic. Whoever gets it will have several other constituency and issue responsibilities, too. Special Assistant Linas Kojelis told Weekly Report, “We wouldn’t hire just on quotas ... If (someone without Hispanic credentials and connections) is hired, then that person would have to be very smart and politically shrewd and start building bridges and making connections as soon as possible.”
That’s our casa? -Kay Barbaro
i
Court Calls for Registration Campaign
INS Stings44 in Texas
Immigration and Naturalization officials deported 44 undocumented aliens July 26 after luring them into a trap in Midland, Texas, with a promise of a chance to win $26,000 and other prizes.
INS used as bait a letter offering vans, cash prizes and a chance to win a customized trailer home or $25,000. The letter was mailed to 622 individuals who had arrest warrants pending against them.
INS agents, who set up a fake mobile home manufacturing plant as their front, also apprehended 23 other friends or family members who failed to prove legal residence.
Coalition Protests Policy
continued from page 1
stations which forthe last 15 or20 years have fought against “consistent undercount” of Latino viewers by TV rating agencies such as Arbitron and Nielsen.
According to research submitted to the* commission by the coalition, a typical VHF network station in the Los Angeles-San Diego area has 29% of its viewers reached by cable, while in the case of minority, public or religious UHF station viewers, the percentage is 40%. These stations, the coalition argued, could lose eight times the number of viewers § if excluded from the cable system.
Supported by various state and local officials-mcluding San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya - the coalition is recommending a 25%-50% cable channel use allocated for minority, public and religious stations.The stations’ cable access would be based on the percentage of minority or foreign-language population in a given community.
About the possible outcome of the FCC’s decision, Robson said: “I think that we have -been heard and that there is a reasonable chance that the FCC is not going to under-handedly throw people off the air.”
- Dora Delgado
2 I
The Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project, along with other civil rights organizations, won a lawsuit July 24 requiring that approximately 20,000 Los Angeles County health, social services and other public-contact employees actively solicit and assist citizens in filling out and submitting voter registration forms.
The decision, the first of its kind in the nation, calls for the county to comply with state laws requiring government officials to make affirmative efforts to identify and register all eligible voters Although limited to California, the ruling, by Superior Court Judge Jack Newman, is a product of a nationwide effort by voter registration advocates to involve the active participation of local and state governments in voter drives.
Until now, Los Angeles County requested its workers to distribute registration forms among persons served by county agencies. But, alleging that minority and poor residents were substantially underrepresented in voter lists, SVREP and the other plaintiffs, including
Chicago Hiring Pacts Set
Five Chicago suburbs agreed July 16 with the U.S. Justice Department to consent decrees that would allow minorities living outside their boundaries to apply for municipal jobs.
Since December, the Justice Department has filed complaints against 13 predominantly white Chicago suburbs Agreeing to separate decrees were Berwyn, Forest Park, Forest View, Niles and South Holland. Six complaints are pending; two others have already been settled.
The settlements also call for the establishment of recruitment programs within 60 days and advertising of employment opportunities in at least two newspapers that circulate in communities with minority populations.
Submitted to U.S. District Court Judge Prentice Marshall, the decrees do not prevent the suburbs from establishing residency requirements for new employees.
the American Civil Liberties Union, asked the court to demand a more active registration program.
The plaintiffs said that in white and affluent county sectors, such as the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the registration rates reached 93%. In other areas, such as in the predominantly Latino city of Bell, only 32% of the eligible population was registered.
Spanglish Rules Weighed
A New York State Supreme Court judge issued an opinion July 17 that called attention to the heed of state courts for interpreters who understand “Spanglish.”
Judge David Saxe, an acting civil branch judge of the state supreme court, wrote the advisement in a lawsuit brought by a Latina against the New York City transit authority. The plaintiff charged that a train’s abrupt halt caused her to fall and suffer injuries.
In describing the incident, she used the word chocar, standard Spanish for“to crash.” But a bilingual juror conferred with the judge in chambers about the word being Spanglish - a hybrid of Spanish and English-1 and being incorrectly interpreted.
A spokesman for the Courts Administrative Office said the agency will study the opinion and decide whether to devise Spanglish interpretation guidelines.
New York has 103 interpreters, all of whom are fluent in Spanish.
Job Ruling Aids Aliens
Undocumented workers are entitled to the same protections of back pay and job reinstatement provided legal U.S. residents, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled July 22 in Los Angeles.
The 2-1 ruling, written by Judge Harry Pre-gerson, reversed a recent policy adopted by the National Labor Relations Board that said such workers weren’t entitled to back pay even if fired unfairly.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTABLES
HISTORICIZING BOOKS: The32-pagepamphlet“The History of Books and Libraries: Two Views” contains the presentations by two English scholars on the role of books as objects, idea transmitters and forces in society. Free single copies are available from: Central Services Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 20540 (202) 287-5221.
WHO’S WHO: The new 312-page “Who’s Who in the Florida’s Latin Community’ lists personal, educational and professional data on approximately 1,500 politicians, educators, doctors, lawyers and other professionals in that state. Price: $97.50 (hardcover); $39,50 (softcover). Send prepaid orders to: Miriam Vega, Worldwide Reference Publications, 3100 North West 17th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33142 (305) 633-2935.
HISPANICS IN U.S. HISTORY: The half-hour educational video “Hispanic Week in Review” chronicles Hispanic contributions to the United States. The video, available on 1/2 inch, 3/4 inch and 1 inch tape, can be rented for $100 per week or bought for $350 ($5 postage) from: Rod Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91105 (818) 799-1795.
30 TRUTHS ABOUT ALCOHOLISM: The Spanish one-pager “Algunas Verdades Sobre los Problemas Relacionados con el Consumo de Bebidas Alcoholicas y el Alcoholismo" presents 30 statistical, medical and other informational capsules on alcoholism. Free copies are available from: George Marcella, National Council on Alcoholism Inc., 12 West 21th St., New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 206-6770.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
Coordinator
Professional Training & Outreach Duties: Responsible for planning, development and implementation of American Sign Language Program and Interpreter Training Program including: curriculum development, student recruitment, staff hiring and supervision, program evaluation Qualifications:,' MA with minimum of five years experience in teaching ASL; strong management skills; experience in interpreter training and good interactive skills important Salary. Mid 20’s, commensurate with qualifications and experience. (Fulltime grant funded position).
Coordinator/Trainer Office Automation Training Program Duties: Student recruitment and as-
sessment, program scheduling, fiscal monitoring, report preparation, teaching keyboarding, word processing and business communications Qualifications Bachelor’s degree required; master’s preferred; at least five years experience teaching business and word processing courses to adults. Salary: Mid 20’s commensurate with qualifications and experience; day, evening and weekend hours required. (Fulltime grant funded position).
Send resume and letter indicating position desired by Aug 24 to: Director, Community Service Programs, Room 2, Division of Continuing Education, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE/AA Employer.
FACULTY/MENTOR FULL-TIME SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE in Syracuse, N.Y., seeks one year leave replacement to begin 10/86 for innovative adult baccalaureate program. Duties include: teaching, advising & educational planning with individual students Interdisciplinary background with expertise in economics, management or related field & Ph.D. preferred. Letter & resume by8/25/86 to: Janet Zimmer, Director, Personnel/AA, SUNY/ESC, Rm.502,2 Union
* Ave, Saratoga Springs N.Y. 12866. An AA/EOE
COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, Los Angeles National civil rights organization (MALDEF) seeks an individual with excellent writing skills communications/journalism degree, 3 years experience in public relations bilingual (Spanish/English). Send writing sample and resume by Aug. 15 to: Rose Calderdn, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014.
REAGAN ON CUBA: The 54-page Spanish booklet “Reagan y Cuba” presents 23 commentaries made from 1976 to 1985 by President Ronald Reagan on various topics pertaining to Cuba Copies are available by sending $4 to: The Cuban American National Foundation, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 265-2422.
BASEBALL(ANNOUNCER) SCOUTS: How well do major league baseball announcers pronounce the names of Spanish-surnamed ballplayers? Hispanic Link is looking for “scouts” in each major league city to assess who’s the best and the worst. Participate in the survey by contacting: Felix Perez, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 237-0737.
CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report pays $25 for political or humorous cartoons. Submit to Felix Perez, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Language Arts Coordinator Duties: Coordination of Language Arts courses and enrichment activities including teaching writing courses; developing language artscurriculum; supervising writing adjuncts; planning field trips and other special projects; editing Vets newsletter. Qualifications: MA in Communication Skills or English with emphasis on writing. Two years experience teaching preferably with adults. Prior experience working with Vietnam or Vietnam-era veterans and f luency in Spanish preferred. Salary: $18,400-$20,400, commensurate with qualifications. Flexible day and evening hours. (Grant Funded Position).
Career/Job Counselor Duties: Job development referrals and placement of students in Vets GED/College program; outreach and recruitment of
Vietnam era veterans; coordination of career, job and college prep activities; monitoring of students’ progress in academic program; VA benefits and personal counseling Qualifications MA in Counseling or Social Work with 2-3 years experience counseling veterans or adults in career education, job placement substance abuse Prior experience working with Vietnam or Vietnam-era veterans and fluency in Spanish preferred. Salary $18,000-S20,000, commensurate with qualifications Flexible day and evening hours. (Grant Funded Position).
Send resume and letter indicating position desired by Aug. 22 to: Veterans Center, C-345, Room 2, Division of Continuing Education, LaGuardia Community College/ CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
YOUTH FESTIVAL Roxbury, Mass. Aug. 4-10
In an effort to reach out to bilingual and minority youth, La Alianza Hispana will hold its youth festival, with workshops on education and job searching. Boston Mayor Raymond Flynn is guest speaker. Jorge Arce (617) 427-7175
TECHNOLOGY AND HISPANICS San Jose, Calif. Aug. 6-10
The American Gl Forum wil hold its 38th annual convention titled “Hispanics in High Technology-The Key to the 21 st Century,” including workshops, speakers and exhibits.
Ernie Abeytia (408) 258-6084
LATIN AMERICA PANEL DEBATE Washington, D.C. Aug. 7
U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), ex-Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre and former Ambassador Diego Asencio
debate the role of U.S. Hispanics in U.S. foreign policy for Latin America. Sponsored by the League of United Latin American Citizens and Hispanic News Media Association,Washington, D.C.
Daisy Hernandez (202) 628-8516
REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON BUSINESS New York, N.Y. Aug. 8
The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will hold its sixth of seven regional business conferences on issues of importance to Hispanic businesses. Sonia Rosario (816) 531 -6363
DRUG AWARENESS FESTIVAL Hyattsville, Md. Aug. 9
Paul Gonzales, a champion professional boxer and 1984 Olympic gold medal winner, will be a guest at the Festival of Champions by the National Hispanic Council on Aging to deter drug use by Hispanic youth.
Raquel Baldwin (202) 265-1288
YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE El Paso, Texas Aug. 9
Creating a leadership network, combating the dropout rate and promoting education will be among topics discussed at this event by the Texas League
of United Latin American Citizens, District IV.
Mary Yanez (915) 598-0333
COMING SOON
MIGRANT/BILINGUAL PROGRAM RECRUITERS Hispanic Leadership Program Grand Rapids, Mich. Aug. 12 Dan Dizon (517) 355-8722
HISPANIC FESTIVAL Hispanic Women’s Network Wichita, Kan. Aug. 16 Rosa Molina (316) 788-3605
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC FASHION DESIGNERS SHOW: Featuring the works of top Hispanic designers, including Oscar de la Renta and Carolina Herrera, this benefit will spotlight the contributions of Hispanics to the fashion industry. Co-sponsored by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and Spanish International Network, the show will be held in two cities; Sept. 12 in Washington, D.C., and Sept. 14 in Miami. For further information, contact Penny Harrison at(202) 822-7895.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


Arts & Entertainmeirt
FROM AM ERICA WITH RHYTHM: Two distinct Hispanic American musical styles are gaining popularity in Europe thanks to U.S. performers touring there this summer.
Henry Balderrama reportedly became the first Chicano vocalist to headline a major European tour when he was selected to perform with Flaco Jimenez and his conjunto. The San Antonio musicians are performing with English and European conjunto groups.
Balderrama and Jimenez began the tour in London last month. Their schedule included folk-music festivals in Sweden, Yugoslavia, Switzerland, Germany, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Belgium and Austria.
The conjunto musicians may run into salseros from New York and Puerto Rico. Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, Eddie Palmieri, Ray Barreto, Oscar D’Leon, Willie Colon, Luis Perico Ortiz, La Sonora Poncena, Bobby Rodriguez and Wilfrido Vargas are among the salsa stars with European dates this summer.
Already, salsa performances are gaining rave reviews in Spain. Last week, Madrid’s El Paiz described a weekend performance by Papo
Luca and his Sonora Poncena as “a hail of rhythm,” while the city’s ABC said that Oscar D’Leon “even had the stones dancing.”
RADIO GRANTS AVAILABLE: Proposals to produce Hispanic radio programs for national broadcast, in Spanish or English, are being sought by the Los Angeles-based Latino Consortium. Two grants will be given: one for $2,000 will go to an individual radio producer, another for $3,000 will go to a radio organization.
Proposals must be submitted by Aug. 15. Priority will be given to musical productions, documentaries/news pieces, public affairs programming and information spots.
ONE LINERS: The 10th annual Festival Latino in New York will run Aug. 6 to 31, with performances at the Public and Delacorte Theaters... Live From Lincoln Center. The Chamber Music Study of Lincoln Center with Irene Worth and Horacio Gutierrez, produced by New York’s WNET-TV and aired on PBS, won an Emmy at the July 13 awards ceremony for daytime programming... While SIN stations in the United States have begun accepting applications for this year’s national OTI song festival, the director of Television Espahola has asked for a boycott of the international competition, to be held this year in Chile... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SALE OPPOSITION GROWS: Joining efforts to block the sale to non-Hispanics of five major Spanish-language TV stations and five repeater stations, U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, introduced July 24 a bill that would force the Federal Communications Commission to implement an existing minority set-aside policy for the transfer of the stations’ licenses.-
The FCC is presently evaluating a $301.5 million bid by Hallmark Cards Inc. and First Chicago Venture Capital, an investment firm.
The policy, commonly known as distress sale, allows licensees to sell their stations to minorities at 75% of the fair market value before entering an FCC hearing where they would risk losing all of their investment. The hearings take place when FCC rule violations call for license revocation.
The Spanish International Communications Corporation, owner of the 10 TV stations,
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Lucienne Lopez Loman, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report nr ay be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) S26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
4
has already entered hearing procedures and could not, under normal conditions, qualify for a distress sale. The bill, titled Minority Ownership Improvements Act of 1986, would force belated implementation of the policy, giving U.S. Hispanics an opportunity to acquire the stations.
A similar proposal that would have extended the implementation time for distress sales was scratched at the last minute from the agenda for the commission meeting June 26 and no new date has been set yet, an FCC official said.
The FCC had already bent its rules in this case by approving June 20 the sale of the stations at the midpoint of an SICC appeal. The approval followed a Los Angeles U.S. District judge’s recommendation to sell the stations as part of the settlement of a 1976 shareholders suit over the stations’ profits. The judge, Mariana Pfaelzer, selected the Hallmark-First Chicago bid last month after SICC shareholders and managers were unable to agree on a winning bid.
Terming the proposed sale to non-Hispanics a “slap in the face to our community,” Martinez
questioned whether the bid’s selection was based on the best overall offer or on the bidders’ willingness to guarantee $3 million in salaries for SICC managers who want to remain in place.
He also criticized SICC legal counsel Vilma Martinez, past national president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, for “not advising them (SICC) against selling the stations to non-Hispanics.”
He contended that the Latino bidders presented a better financial proposition because of a capital gain tax deferment granted to owners who sell their stations to minorities.
Both the distress sale and the tax certificate policies were created by FCC in 1978 to increase minority ownership in the broadcasting field.
Asked whether the bill- if passed this year-would come too late to stop the proposed sale, Martinez said petitions to deny the sale approval will be filed with FCC by Hispanic groups, thus postponing any immediate action. FCC is expected to render its decision late this year or early next year.
- Dora Delgado
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Rodrigo Rojas a "young communist of Washington, D.C., died from burns report edly inflide'J oy Chilean army ... Ex-White House aide Luis Acle joins Committee Aug. 8 to assist Republican 1n addressing policy issuesaffecting the Hispanic community ... Jim Kent, a spokesman for Civilian Materie l Assistance, says the group will cease conducting patrols along the U . S.-Mex ico border. CMA is under investigation for allegedly detaining 16 undocumented aliens at gunpoint in Arizona . .. The Taft lnstitu.te for Two-Party Government recognizes Lou de Santiago, from El Paso , Texas, as one of the top 31 schoolteachers in the country ... The Immigration and Naturalization Service appoints Jose Garza as chief patrol agent -one of 20 nationallyof the Laredo , Texas , U . S . Border Patrol Sector ... The FBI conducts an investigation into allegations that U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist, while an attorney in Arizona, took part in a 1960s' campaign to intimidate Hispanic and black voters. Rehnquist was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to take over as the court's chief justice . . . The Rev. Jesse Jackson of the National Rainbow Coalition announces the dispatch of Susana Cepeda to El Salvador as an emissary in discussions aimed .at ending that country's civil war. . . United Nations Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar undergoes successful quadruple-bypass heart surgery in Manhattan, N . Y . , on July 24. . . Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N .C.) calls Vol. 4 No. 31 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL Aug.4,1986 Coal_ ition Protests Proposed FCC Cable Polic y A coalition of minority broadcasters, among them some Hispanic and Spanish-language station owners, is lobbying the Federal Com munications Commission to influence the agency's soon-to-be released decision on whether cable TV systems should be required to carry minority, public and religious stations. The decision, expected to be released at the Aug . 7 commission meeting, comes as a result of a July 19, 1985, order by the U . S . Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit to design new criteria for cable trans mission. A previous FCC regulation, com monly known as the "must carry'' rule, required cable operators to carry all local stations. The court, however, eliminated it, saying the requirement impinged on the First Amendment Rights of cable companies. Following the court's decision, the National Association of Broadcasters and the National Latino Dropouts Targeted More than half of the National Education Association's initial $2.13,000 commitment in its new dropout prevention campaign is targeted for predominantly Hispanic programs , an NEA spokesperson told Weekly Report. NEA has pledged $700,000 in teacher members' dues to the project, "Operation Rescue," over its first tv,:o years. It hopes to help halve the nation's 30% dropout rate by 1990. Projects range from after-school tutoring to working with teenage parents. Community . involvement is given high priority in the selec tion process, according to Donna Rhodes, executive director of the National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, which is administering the activity. Of 122 applications for first-round funding, eight NEA-affiliated education groups were selected. Those in predominantly Hispanic communities are United Teachers of Los Angeles, $35,000 for a program at 96%-Latino Hollenbeck Junior High School; $36,300 for the Woodland, Calif., Education Association, to work with all at-risk students, eleme: tary school through high school, in a cc:nmunity with high migrant farm-worker population; and Glendale, Ariz., Classroom Teachers Association, $42,797 to work in that city's three high schools. Cable Television Association struck an agree ment to recommend a new rule based on viewership. The proposal, which would grant cable access to stations capturing 2 % -5% of the TV audience , is strongly opposed by minority broadcasters who argue that it leaves them at the mercy of cable operators. "With the exception of the network affiliates and very large VHF independent stations, everybody will be in danger of going off the air," said Ernest Robson, a regulatory consultant who is representing the ad hoc National Coalition of Minority Broadcasters. other foreign-language stations. Attorney Raul Rodriguez, representing Spanish Inter national Communications Corporation, owner of five major Spanish-language TV stations and fiv e repeater stations, said he was even BILL OPPOSES SICC SALE U . S . Rep . Matthew Martine z ( D-Calif.) has introduced a bill in Congress which could effectively halt the transfer of five major Spanish International Communications Corporation television stations to non Hispanic owners. (See Media Report, Page 4 . ) If the NAB-NCTA rule is adopted, Robson . __ ....;_ _____________ _ contends all UHF stations, which, for the most part, cannot meet the required viewership criteria, will lose a substantial number of their viewers and be subject to financial disaster. All six Hispanic-owned and most minority owned stations are in the less potent UHF frequency. Affected also will be Spanish-language and HUD Postpones Evictions The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced July 23 it will hold off evicting undocumented aliens from federally subsidized housing until Sept. 30 or until Congress acts on the matter. The announcement, contained in a letter to Rep . Henry Gonzalez (DTexas), chairman of the subcommittee on housing and com munity development puts on hold the eviction policy which was to take effect July31. Admitting confusion overt he policy, HUD Secretary Samuel Pierce said the post ponement will provide Congress time to ad dress the issue. The House adopted an amendment to the omnibus housing bill in June that would allow undocumented families to live in public housing as long as one member was a u.'s. citizen or legal resident. Included in that amendment was a provision to protect ten ants 62 years old and older. These tenants could declare their citizenship or legal status without furnishing proof. The Senate is expected to act on the housing bill late this summer or early fall. denied attendance at the NAB-NCTA negoti ations. "We apprised the NAB with our concerns, we apprised the FCC with our concerns, but nobody seems to care," said Rodriguez. He added that if the proposal is not amended, only one or two Spanish-language stations will be left on cable transmission. Rodriguez said that the viewership criteria is especially problematic for Spanish-language continued o n page 2 84.5/o in Labor Force There were 84. 5 % of Hispanic famil1es with at least one member-employed or unemployed counted in the civilian labor force from April to June 1986, compared with 83. 8% for white and 81. 0 % for black families, the U . S . Depart ment of Labor reported July 24. Five percent of these Latino families had no one employed at the time of the survey, compared with 2 . 3% of white and 7.4% of black, families. . Based on a survey of 59,500 households, the department projected that the nation's 4.2 million Hispanic families had median weekly earnings of $409, compared with $558 for white families and $399 for black families. There are 54.3 million white families and 6.8 million black families. Unemployment rates of individual members of families for: Married Couples Women-maintained Men-maintained Hisp. 9 .3% 16. 1 13.4 White 5.4 % .11. 0 10. 3 Black 11. 60,c 23.6. 18.7

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Rachel Bolton told Weekly Report a year and a half ago. (See Weekly Report, Nov. 19, 1984.) And from Washington, D.C.: WORDS AND DEEDS: In Puerto Rico, they call it "de Ia 'boca pa ' fuera. In Mexico, it's " de dientes pa' tuera" WHAT THEY SAY: "I hope that your presence here today(at the White House) assures you that we do not take the Hispanic community for granted ... Buenas tardes and welcome to the White House ... Let me say to each of you, 'Micas a, su cas a.' And it really is ... And in this case, this always was su cas a. I'm just a tenant here . .. " Comments by President Ronald Reagan to invited Hispanic leaders in past pre election events at the White House. But it's personified by saying that your mouth is sticking out or your teeth are protruding, doubletalk is doubletalk. This week, from Kansas City, Mo., we offer: WHAT THEY SAY: Hallmark Cards President Irving Hockaday, on the Spanish-language format of the Spanish International Com munications Corporation television stations which Hallmark is purchasing: "The agreement calls for a two-year commitment, but Hallmark is dedicated to serving the Hispanic community through an on-going and long-term.commitmerit to the Spanish-language format of the stations. We already have served the Hispanic community in the United States, through Spanish-language greeting cards, which were first introduced in the early '60s. " WHAT THEY DO: True, Hallmark tried Spanish-language cards in the '60s: But it discontinued the line in 197 4 because of poor sales. It picked them up again nine years later when it felt the market was right. That's what Hallmark production information coordinator WHAT THEY DO: Luis Acle's departure from the White House's Office of Public Liaison leaves that 24-member unit-which is responsible for interacting with Hispanic leaders and organizationswithout a single Latino. While one of its four special assistants is a black who works exclusively with the black community, there's no assurance that Acle's lower-level position will be filled with a Hispanic . Whoever gets it will have several other constituency and issue responsibilities, too. Special Assistant Linas Kojelis told Weekly Report, "We wouldn't hire just on quotas ... If (someone without Hispanic credentials and connections) is hired , then that person would have to be very smart and politically shrewd and start building bridges and making connections as soon as possible." That's our casa? -Kay Barbaro • INS Stings44 in Texas Court Calls for Registration Campaign Immigration and Naturalization officials deported 44 undocumented aliens July 26 after luring them into a trap in Midland, Texas, with a promise of a chance to win $25,000 and other prizes. INS used as bait a letter offering vans, cash prizes and a chance to win a customized trailer home or $25,000. The letter was mailed to 622 individuals who had arrest warrants pending against them. INS agents, who set up a fake mobile home manufacturing plant as their front, also apprehended 23 other friends or family members who failed to prove legal residence. Coalition Protests Policy continued from page 1 stations which for the last 15 or20 years have. fought against "consistent undercounf' of Latino viewers by TV rating agencies such as Arbitron and Nielsen. According to research submitted to the' commission by the coalition, a typical VHF network station in the Los Angeles-San Diego area has 29% of its viewers reached by cable, while in the case of minority, public or religious UHF station viewers, the percentage is 40%. These stations, the coalition argued, could lose eight times the number of viewers 'if excluded from the cable system . Supported by various state and local officialsincluding San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros and New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya the coalition is recommending a 25%-50% cable channel use allocated for minority, public and religious stations.The stations' cable access would be based on the percentage of minority or foreign-language population in a given community. About the possible outcome of the FCC's decision, Robson said: " I think that we have been heard and that there is a reasonable chance that the FCC is not going to under handedly throw people off the air." Dora Delgado 2 The Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project, along with other civil rights organizations, won a lawsuit July 24 requiring that approximately 20,000 Los Angeles County health, social services and other public-contact employees actively solicit and assist ciHzens in filling out and submitting voter registration forms. The decision, the first of its kind in the nation, calls for the county to comply with state laws requiring government officials to make affirmative efforts to identify and register all eligible voters. Although limited to California, the ruling, by Superior Court Judge Jack Newman, is a product of a nationwide effort by voter registration advocates to involve the active participation of local and state governments in voter drives. Until now, Los Angeles County requested its workers to distribute registration forms among persons served by county agencies. But, alleging that minority and poor residents were substantially in voter lists, SVREP and the other plaintiffs , including Chicago Hiring Pacts Set Five Chicago suburbs agreed July 16 with the U .S. Justice Department to consent de crees that would allow minorities living outside their boundaries to apply for municipal jobs. Since December, the Justice Department has filed complaints against 13 predominantly white Chicago suburbs. Agreeing to separate decrees were Berwyn, Forest Park, Forest View, Niles and South Holland. Six complaints are pending; two others have already been se . ttled. The settlements also call for the establish ment of recruitment programs within 60 days and advertising of employment opportunities in at least two newspapers tnat circulate in communities with minority populations. Submitted to U.S. District Court Judge Prentice Marshall, the decrees do not prevent the suburbs from establishing residency re quirements for new employees. the American Civil Liberties Union, asked the court to demand a more active registration program. The plaintiffs said that in white and affluent county sectors, such as the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the registration rates reached 93%. In other areas, such as in the predominantly Latino city of Bell, only 32% of the eligible population was registered. Spanglish Rules Weighed A New York State Supreme Court judge issued an opinion July 17 that called attention to the need of state courts for interpreters . who understand "Spanglish." Judge David Sax e , an acting civil branch judge of the state supreme court, wrote the advisement in a lawsuit brought by a Latina against the New York City transit authority. The plaintiff charged that a train ' s abrupt halt caused her to fall and suffer injuries. In describing the incident, she used the word chocar, standard Spanish for"to crash." But a bilingual juror conferred with the judge in chambers about the word being Spanglish -a hybrid of Spanish and Englishand being incorrectly interpreted. A spokesman for the Courts Administrative Office said the agency will study the opinion . and decide whether to devise Spanglish interpretation guidelines. New York has 103 interpreters, all of whom are fluent in Spanish. Job Ruling Aids Aliens Undocumented workers are entitled to the same protections of back pay and job reinstatement provided legal U.S. residents, the 9th U.S Circuit Court of Appeals ruled July22 in Los Angeles. The 2-1 ruling, written by Judge Harry Pre gerson, reversed a recent policy adopted by the National Labor Relations Board that said such workers weren't entitled to back pay even if fired unfairly. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTABLES HISTORI CIZING BOOKS: The32page pamphlet"The History of Books and Libraries: Two Views" contains the presentations by two English scholars on the role of books as objects, idea transmitters and forces in society. Free single copies are available from: Central Services Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D .C. 20540 (202) 287. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS WHO'S WHO: The new 312-page "Who's Who in the Florida's Latin Community" lists personal, educational and professional data on approximately 1 ,500 politicians, educators, doctors, lawyers and other professionals in that state. Price: $97.50 (hardcover); $39,50 (softcover). Send prepaid orders to: Miriam Vega, Worldwide Reference Publications, 3100 North West 17th Ave. , Miami, Fla. 33142 (305) 633-2935. HISPANICS IN U . S. HISTORY: The half-hour educational video "Hispanic Week in Review" chronicles His panic contributions to the United States. The video, available on 1/2 inch, 3/4 inch and 1 inch tape, can be rented for $100 per week or bought for $350 ($5 postage) from: Rod Enterprises, P.O . Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 30 TRUTHS ABOUT ALCOHOLISM: The Spanish one-pager " Aigunas Verdades Sabre los Problemas Relacionados con el Consumo de Bebidas Alcoh61icas y el Alcoholismo" presents 30 statistical, medical and other informational capsules on alcoholism. Free copies are available from: George Marcella, National Council on Alcoholism Inc. , 12 West 21th St., New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 206-6770. REAGAN ON CUBA: The 54-page Spanish booklet "Reagan y Cuba" presents 23 commentaries made from 1976 to 1985 by President Ronald Reagan on various pertaining to Cuba Copies are available by sending $4 to: The Cuban American National Foundation, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St. NW, Suite 601, Washington, D .C. 20007 (202) 265. BASEBALL(ANNOUNCER) SCOUTS: How well do major league baseball announcers pronounce the names of Spanish-surnamed ballplayers? Hispanic Link is looking for "scouts" in each major league city to assess who's the best and the worst. Participate in the survey by contacting: Felix Perez, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 237-0737. CARTOONISTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report pays $25 for political or humorous cartoons. Submit to Felix Perez, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Coordinator Professional Training & Outreach Duties: Responsible for planning, development and implementation of Ame ric a n Sign Language Program and Interpreter Training Program including: curriculum development, student recruitme nt, staff hiring and supervision program evaluation Oualificc.ttions:; MA with minimum of f ive years experie6ce in teaching ASL; strong management skills; experience in interpreter training and good interactive skills important Salary Mid 20's. commensurate with qualifications and experience. (Full time grant funded position). Coordinator/Trainer Office Automation Training Program Duties: Student recruitment and as FACULTY/MENTOR FULL-TIME SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE in Syracuse. N.Y., seeks one year le ave replace ment to begin 10/86 for inn ovat ive adult baccalaureate program Duties incl ude: teach ing. advisin g & educational pl anning with individual students. Interdisc iplinary back ground w ith expertise in economics, manage mentor rel ated field & Ph . D . preferred . L ette r & resume by 8/25/86 to: Janet Z immer , Director. Personnei/AA. SUNY/ESC. Rm . 502,2 Union Language Arts Coordinator Duties: Coordination of Language Arts courses and enrichment activities inc luding teaching writing courses: developing languag e a rts curriculum; supervising writ ing adjuncts: planning field trips and other special projects: editing Vets newslette r . Q ualifications: MAin Communi ca tion Skill s or English with emphasis on writing. Two years experience teaching, preferably with adults. P rior experience working with Vietnam or Vietnam-era veterans and fluen cy in Spanish preferred. Salary: S 18.400-$20.400. com m e nsurat e with qu a lifi ca tions. Flexible day and evening hours . (Grant Funded Pos ition). Career/ Job Counselor Duties: Job development. r e ferra ls a n d placement of students in Vets GED/College program; outreach and recruitme nt of sessment. program scheduling, fis _cal monito ring , report teaching keyboarding, word pr ocess ing and business comm unications. Qualifi ca tions: Bachelors degree required; master's preferred; at least five years experience teaching busi ness and word processing courses to adults. Sal ary: Mid 20's, commensurate with qualifications and experience; day, even ing and weeke nd hours require _ d (Fult tim e g rant funded position). Send resume and letter indicating position desired by Aug. 24 to: Dir8ctor, Community Service Programs, Room 2, Division of Continuing Education. L aGuardia Com munity College/CUNY. 37 Thomson. Avenue. Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. EOE!AA Employer. Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. An ANEOE COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, L os Angeles. National civ il rights organization (MALDEF) seeks an individual with excellent writing skills. communications/journalism deg ree, 3 yea r s expe rienc e in public relations,. bilingual (Spanish/English). Send writing sampl e a nd resum e by A ug . 15 to: Rose Calderon, 634 S. Spring St.. 11th Floor. Los Angel es. Calif. 90014. Viet nam e r a veterans; c6ord1ri81fon Of car eer, job and college prep activities; monitoring o f students' progress in aca demic program: VA benefits and personal coun seli n g . Qualifications: MA in Counsel ing or Soc i al Workwith 2 3 years experience counseling veterans or adults in career education . job placement. substance abuse. Prior exper ie nce working w ith Vietnam or Vietnam-e r a ve t erans an d fluency in Spanish pre f erred. Salary: S 18,000-$20,000, com mensurate wi th qualifications. Flexible day and eveni ng h ours. (Grant Funded Position). Send r esume and le tter i ndiCating position desired by Aug. 22 to: Veterans Center, C, Room 2, Division of Continuing Educatiof\ LaGuardia Community College/ CUNY, 3110 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. Calendar debate the role of U.S. Hispanics in U.S. foreign policy for Latin America. Sponsored by the League of United Latin American Citizens and Hispanic News Media Association, Washington, D .C. of United Latin American Citizens , District IV. Mary Yanez (915) 598 0333 THIS WEEK YOUTH FESTIVAL Roxbury, Mass . Aug. 4-10 In an effort to reach out to bilingual and minority youth, La Alianza Hispana will hold its youth festival, with workshops on education and job searching . Boston Mayor Raymond Flynn is guest speaker. Jorge Arce (617) 427 TECHNOLOGY AND HISPANICS San Jose, Calif. Aug. 6-10 The American Gl Forum wil hold its 38th annual convention titled" Hispanics in High Technology The Key to the 21st Century, " including workshops, speakers and exhibits. Ernie Abeytia (408) 258-6084 LATIN AMERICA PANEL DEBATE W as hington, O.C. Aug. 7 U.S. Rep . Esteban Torres (D-Calif.). ex-Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre and former Ambassador Diego Asencio Hispanic Link Weekly Report Daisy Hernandez (202) 628-8516 REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON BUSINESS New York, N.Y. Aug. 8 The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will hold its sixth of seven regional business conferences on issues of importance to Hispanic businesses. Sonia Rosario (816) 531-6363 DRUG AWARENESS FESTIVAL Hyattsville, Md. Aug. 9 Paul Gonzales, a champion professional boxer and 1984 Olympic gold medal winner, will be a guest at the Festival of Champions by the National Hispanic Council on Aging to deter drug use by Hispanic youth. Raquel Baldwin (202) 265 YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE El Paso, Texas Aug. 9 Creating a leadership network, combating the drop out rate and promoting education will be among topics discussed at this event by the Texas League COMING SOON MIGRANT/BILINGUAL PROGRAM RECRUITERS Hispanic Leadership Program Grand Rapids, Mich. Aug. 12 Dan Dizon (517) 355-8722 HISPANIC FESTIVAL Hispanic Women's Network Wichita , Kan. Aug. 16 Rosa Molina (316) 788 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC FASHION DESIGNERS SHOW: Featuring the works of top Hispanic designers, including Osc a r de Ia Rent a and Carolina Herrera, this benefit will spotlight the contributions of His panics to the fashion indu s try. Co-sponsored by the Con gressional Hispani c Caucus and Spanish International Network, the show will be h eld in two cities ; Sept. 12 in Washington, O.C., and Sept. 14 in Miami. For further inform a ti o n . co ntact Penny H a rris o n a t( 202) 82_2-7895. 3

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Arts & Entertainment Luca and his Sonora Poncefla as "a hail of rhythm," while the city's ABC said that Oscar D 'Le6n "even had the stones dancing." FROM AMERICA WITH RHYTHM: Two distinct Hispanic American musical styles are gaining popularity in Europe thanks to U.S. performers touring there this summer. RADIO GRANTS AVAfLABLE: Proposals to produce Hispanic radio programs for national broadcast, in Spanish or English, are being sought by the Los Angeles-based Latino Consortium. Two grants will be given: one for $2,000 will go to an individual radio producer, another for $3,000 will go to a radio organization. Henry Balderrama reportedly became the first Chicano vocalist to headline a major European tour when he was selected to perform with Flaco Jimenez and his conjunto. The San Antonio musicians are performing with English and European conjunto groups. Proposals must be submitted by Aug . 15. Priority will be given to musical productions, documentaries/news pieces, public affairs pro gramming and information spots. Balderrama and Jimenez began the tour in London last month . Their schedule included folk-music festivals in Sweden, Yugoslavia, Switzerland , Germany, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Belgium and Austria . ONE LINERS: The 1Oth annual Festival Latino in New York will run Aug. 6 to 31, with performances at the Public and Delacorte Theaters . . . Live From Lincoln Center: The Chamber Music Study of Lincoln Center with .lrene Worth and Horacia Gutierrez, produced by New York's WNET-TVandaired on PBS, won an EmmyattheJuly13 awards ceremony for daytime programming ... While SIN stations in the United States have begun accepting applications for this year's national OTI song festival , the director of Television Espanola has asked for a boycott of the international competition, to be held this year in Chile... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas The conjunto musicians may run into sa/seros from New York and Puerto Rico. Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, Eddie Palmieri, Ray Barreto, Oscar D ' Le6n, Willie Colon, Luis Perico Ortiz, La Sonora Poncefla, Bobby Rodriguez and Wilfrido Vargas are among the sa/sa stars with European dates this summer. Already, sa/sa performances are gaining rave reviews in Spain. Last week, Madrid' s El Paiz described a weekend performance by Papo Media Report SALE OPPOSITION GROWS: Joining efforts to block the sale to non-Hispanics of five major Spanish-language TV stations and five repeater stations, U . S . Rep . Matthew Martinez, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, introduced July 24 a bill that would force the Federal Communications Commission to implement an existing minority set-aside policy for the transfer of the stations' licenses .. The FCC is presently evaluating a $301 . 5 million bid by Hallmark Cards Inc. and First Chicago Venture Capital, an investment firm . The policy, commonly known as distress sale , allows licensees to sell their stations to minorities at 75% of the fair market value before entering an FCC hearing where they would risk losing all of their investment. The hearings take place when FCC rule violations call for license revocation. The Spanish International Communications Corporation, owner of the 1 0 TV stations, HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT ,_., publ i c a t ion of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting : Dora Delgado . Lu c ie n ne Lop ez L oman. Charlie Ericksen. Antonio Mejias R entas. No portiOn of 111Spalllc Lmk Report 1ray be r eproduce d or b r oadl..ast 111 any tonr without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) S26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad r a te s a r e 7 5 c ents per wor d . Display ads are $3S per column inch . Ads placed b y Tuesday will run. in Weekly Report s mailed Frida y of same week. Multiple use rat es on request 4 has already entered hearing procedures and could not, under normal conditions, qualify for a distress sale. The bill, titled Minority Ownership Improvements Act of 1986, would force belated implementation of the policy, giving U . S . Hispanics an opportunity to acquire the stations. A similar proposal that would have extended the implementation time for distress sales was scratched at the last minute from the agenda for the commission meeting June 26 and no new date has been set yet, an FCC official said. The FCC had already bent its rules in this case by approving June 20 the sale of the stations at the midpoint of an SICC appeal. The approval followed a Los Angeles U.S. District judge's recommendation to sell the stations as part of the settlement of a 1976 shareholders suit over the stations' profits. The judge, Mariana Pfaelzer, selected the Hallmark-First Chicago bid last month after SICC shareholders and managers were unable to agree on a winning bid. Terming the proposed sale to nonHispanics a "slap in the face to our community, " Martinez questioned whether the bid's selection was based on the best overall offer or on the bidders' willingness to guarantee $3 million in salaries for SICC managers who want to remain in place. He also criticized SICC legal counsel Vilma Martinez, past national president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, for "not advising them (SICC) against selling the stations to nonHispanics." He contended that the Latino bidders pre sented a better financial proposition because of a capital gain tax deferment granted to owners who sell their stations to minorities. Both the distress sale and the tax certificate policies were created by FCC in 1978 to increase minority ownership in the broadcasting field .. Asked whether the bill-if passed this yearwould come too late to stop the proposed sale, Martinez said petitions to deny the sale approval will be filed with FCC by Hispanic groups, thus postponing any immediate action. FCC is expected t o render its decision late this year or early next year. Dora Delgado Hispanic Link Weekly Report