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Hispanic link weekly report, August 25, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 25, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News This Week
President Ronald Reagan nominates Charles Pilliod, retired chairman of the board of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., to succeed John Gavin as U.S. Ambassador to Mexico... Nancy Reagan’s personal maid, Paraguayan Anita Castelo, is placed on paid administrative leave after her arrest on illegal export of munitions chargee.. Bill Clements, seeking to regain the Texas governor's mansion from Mark White, announces his30’member Hispanic statewide executive committee, including Bob Estrada and Don Navarro of Dallas; Eduardo Bernaldez of San Antonio and Willie Serna of San Angelo ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints San Diegans Ruth . Jaramillo and Oscar Padilla and Salustio Salas of Los Angeles to
the state’s Small Business Advisory Council. . . SER-Jobs for Progress’ national board of directors picks Edward Franco, interim president since May, as its new national president... Washington, D.C., Superior Court Judge Richard Urbina swears in Rafael Diaz as president of the capital’s Hispanic Bar Association... Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Dion Morrow denies a pretrial motion by Arturo Hernandez, attorney for alleged “Night Stalker'’ Richard Ramirez, to allow non-English-speaking jurors to hear case in which Ramirez is accused of 14 murders... Mexico native Raul Alcald, 22, now of Boulder, Colo., wins the Coors International Bicycle Race in Aspen, Colo.... The Committee on the Status of Chicanos of The American Political Science Association honors Frank Bonilla, director of the Centro de Estudios Puertorriquehos at the City University of New York, for his efforts with Chicano and Puerto Rican researchers..

Exams in Spanish for NY Diplomas?
A New York City education task force announced Aug. 15 that it plans to recommend that the state’s exams for granting high school diplomas be available in some foreign languages, including Spanish.
The Commission on Minimum Standards, empaneled by Schools Chancellor Nathan Quiftones in April 1985, proposed that the exams be given in a student’s native language if he or she arrives from another country after the eighth grade. The 24-member commission reasoned that since the bulk of these students are primarily taught in their native tongue, the exam should follow suit and test their knowledge in areas such as math and science.
A spokesperson for the New York City Board of Education said 72% of the city’s 931,000 limited-English-proficient students are Hispanic.
The Regents examination, which commission members said penalized limited English proficient students even if they performed well in non-language-related subjects, is considered a measurement of whether students can handle college-level work Any exam changes must be approved by the State Board of Regents.
The minimum standards task force will soon submit its recommendation, along with others it is formulating, to Quiftones and the city board.
Immigration Bill
Nearing the end of the 1986 congressional session Oct. 3, the U.S. Congress is running out of time to consider major immigration • reform and six immigration - related actions. Although the House of Representatives is expected to vote on the main bill by September, i it is not certain, even if the measure passes, that it will get through a Senate-House con- • ference before the 99th Congress adjourns, Hispanic lobbyists say.
Introduced by Rep. Peter Rodino (D-N.J.) and Romano Mazzoli (D-Ky.), the bill is pres-| ently in the House Rules Committee. Chairman Claude Pepper has said all amendments to it should be introduced before Sept. 9. If the 13-member committee passes it the bill will go to the full House for a vote.
1 A Senate version,' sponsored by Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), was passed Sept. 19 * of last year.
| A key amendment that is expected to aid i chances of the House bill, which was approved by its Judiciary Committee July 25, was introduced by Rep. Charles Schumer(D-N.Y.). The amendment would grant residence status,
| and:e later citizenship^ to farm workers working for at least 60 days between May 1,1985, to May 1, 1986. After that period, additional farm workers will have to work here for two years, 60 days each year, to obtain residency, and three additional years for citizenship.
Contrary to the House version, the Senate bill would permit entry of 350,000 temporary workers. It offers no legalization for un-
Nears
Pesticide Amendment Gains in Senate
The U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee approved Aug. 13 an amendment to the federal pesticide control act that would instruct the Environmental Protection Agency to create, for the first time, federal standards to prevent pesticide contamination among farm workers.
Considered the most important revision of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act since 1972,-the legislation would also impose new health and safety standards for testing, marketing and use of new pesticides and re-evaluation of old ones.
The bill gives the EPA administrators three-year period “to promulgate regulations, as" appropriate or necessary” to protect workers
from pesticide contamination. The regulations pertain to “re-entry’ time (after which workers can return to sprayed fields), protective clothing, medical surveillance, pesticide spraying training and disposal of drinking and washing water.
Jay Feldman, from the National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides, warned that because the instructions to the federal agency were not specific, it could lead to lax regulations in these areas.
In California, 57 pesticides have been detected in more than 2,000 wells in 24 counties, most of them in the state’s principal farming regions.
documented persons who entered the country after 1979, except for Cubans and Haitians, who have an October 1981 cutoff date.
Dolores Huerta, vice president of United Farm Workers, has supported the Schumer amendment as a way to give leverage to workers.
The National Council of La Raza, the League of United Latin American Citizens and some non-Hispanic groups are currently pushing for a “sunset” amendment placing an expiration date on employers’ sanctions “three or five years” after the law takes effect The sanctions must then be re-enacted by Congress. The groups are also lobbying for an amendment to prohibit deportation of Salvadorans presently living in the United States. This provision is included in another bill amending the Housing Act of 1986.
Rep. Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) is expected to propose an amendment on the floor that would prevent eviction from public housing of any person over62 years old claiming to be a U.S. citizen without extra documentation and of families with at least one member who
continued on page 2
Anti-Nativist Pact Declared
A coalition of Hispanic, Asian and Anglo political, civic and organizational leaders joined Aug. 20 in Washington to announce a national effort against the English Only movement.
A spokeswoman for the League of United Latin American Citizens, one of the organizers of the event, said the purpose for the coalition was twofold: to emphasize that being bilingual is not unpatriotic, as implied by English Only advocates, and that the nativist movement is not solely the concern of Hispanics.
Attending the press conference were Oscar Mor6n, president of LULAC, Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, as well as representatives from six other organizations.
Earlier this month, many of the same groups staged press conferences in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Sacramento to protest California’s English language proposition. Proposition 63 calls for a constitutional amendment tha would make English the state’s official language.


Sin pelos en la lengua
KEEP ON BEATING ME- It feels so good when you stop.
This weeks nominees for the most blatant anti-Hispanic poison pen contributions to the U.S. media are:
1. Jack Anderson and Dale Van Atta This dyspeptic duo led off their syndicated column of Sunday, Aug. 17, with:
“By the turn of the century, the babies of Mexico could be a greater threat to the United States than the nuclear missiles of the Soviet Union.”
That’s just sick.
“ 2. Dan Williams, Los Angeles Times correspondent in Mexico. In an Aug. 13 news analysis of Mexico’s political stability, he told us, in paragraph 2:
“In the land of mahana, chaos appears to be mahanas away.” His lengthy assessment concludes with the suggestion that the end of Mexico’s stability may yet come - “But not today. Perhaps mahana.”
So impressed were the Times’ editors with Williams’ ability to stereotype that they splashed his piece on page 1 and decorated it .with the head: “Surprising Stability: In Mexico, Chaos Comes... Mahana.”
Now, thafs cute. The reason Mexico isn’t burning - like South Africa, Lebanon, Ireland, to name a few hotspots- is NOT because its leaders and people are doing anything right They’re just too darn' lazy.
Maybe the Times can prod the CIA to light a fire under their tail.
NO HABLAMOS ESPANOL: You noticed that Mexico President Miguel de la Madrid was in Washington this month?
So were 90 members of the Mexican press who accompanied him on his trip.
When de la Madrid addressed a luncheon gathering of U.S. and Mexican reporters at the National Press Club in Spanish, the monolingual-English reporters just tapped into the little gray boxes by their plates and received instant translations.
Then, Press Club President Mary Kay Quinlan, Gannett News Service correspondent, informed the assembly that President de la Madrid would answer written questions- which should be written in English only, because she couldn’t speak Spanish and she had designated herself as the person to read them.
Thus, the only way the 90 Spanish-speaking Mexican reporters could ask a question of their Spanish-speaking president was in English.
Thafs weird. But thafs the American Way, right Mary?
- Kay darbaro
Time Running Out on Immigration Bill
i continued from page 1
Third LA. Rep. Possible
The death of Los Angeles City Councilman Howard Finn on Aug. 12 may bring about a potential third Hispanic councilmember as a replacement
Finn, 68, died of a ruptured aorta He represented the 1 st District a San Fernando • Valley areai that; recently increased from 36% to 40% Hispanic as a resu It of the city’s new redistricting plan. The plan was submitted July 30 to a federal court by the. Council in answer to a lawsuit brought by ( the U.S. Justice Department. The lawsuit charged that the city diluted the voting strength of Latinos with its 1982 reapportionment plan.
New boundaries for the 13th District in; downtown Los Angeles increased its His- j panic population from 33% to 69%, paving the wayfora second likely Hispanic council-member next year. Presently, Richard Alatorre is the only Latino on the 15-member body.. His Eastside District No. 14 is 75% Hispanic
The Council has two options on how tol replace Finn’s successor appointing! someone or calling for a special election. The Council could call for an election as early as Nov. 4 but no later than the next scheduled election in April, 1987.
The Justice Department said Aug. 15 that it was prepared to accept the city’s redistricting plan provided the city calls an election in the proposed downtown district next year.
500 Respond to Cisneros
Some 500 civic and community leaders from West and South Texas convened in San Antonio Aug. 17 at the invitation of Mayor Henry Cisneros and adopted more than 75 resolutions beneficial to their region.
They endorsed an increase in state taxes for higher education, economic development and human service programs while rejecting, one calling for a re-evalution of the state’s bilingual education program.
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is a U.S citizea The exemption is also contained in a separate bill, which was approved June 11 by the House. It is still pending in the Senate.
Other bills relating to immigration include:
• Marriage Fraud Deterrent- would impose
Latino Saves DEA Agent
A Hispanic U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency agent probably saved a fellow Hispanic DEA agent from being fatally tortured, said DEA sources Aug. 17.
Tony Ayala, the head of the DEA office in Guadalajara, Mexico, forced his way into the Jalisco State Police detention center and remained there for five hours until agent Victor Cortez was released.
Cortez, along with a DEA informant, was arrested Aug. 13 in Guadalajara, Mexico's second largest city, after weapons were f oun d in the trunk of the car he was in. DEA officials charge that Cortez, a Brownsville, Texas, native, was tortured with a cattle prod, beaten and had seltzer water mixed with jalap^ho peppers squirted up his nose.
The Jalisco state Attorneys Office admitted that Cortez had been detained but denied that he had been tortured. The White House filed a formal protest.
The Cortez incident came thfe same day Mexico President Miguel de la Madrid met with President Ronald Reagan in Washington, D.C., to smooth over relations between the two countries. It also came 18 months after a DEA agent, Enrique Camarena Salazar, was abducted and murdered. The police squad involved in the Camarena kidnapping was also implicated in the Cortez abduction.
The Camarena murder, which had been at a standstill and has since been assigned to a U.S. federal grand jury, received a breakthrough recently when a Mexican real-estate agent agreed to testify before the investigative body. Jorge Gomez Espaha is thought to have been present during Camarena’s torture..
criminal penalties on those involved in immigration-related marriage fraud and revoke fraudulent marriages. The measure, sponsored by Rep. Bill McCollum (R-Fla.), is pending action from the full Senate and from the House Immigration Subcommittee.
• Cuban-Haitian Amnesty - would grant permanent residency to Cubans and Haitians who arrived in the U.S. before Jan. 1,1982.
• Amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act- in redefining certain classes of immigrants, this bill would repeal the Cuban Adjustment Act of 1966, which permits fewer years of U.S. residency from Cuban refugees applying for citizenship. Action for this bill, sponsored by Rep. Mazzoli, is pending in the House Subcommittee on Immigration.
• Military on the Border- would allow the president to station armed forces on the border when needed to control illegal immigration, drug smuggling and terrorist activity. If the major reform bill is not passed, the measure would take effect on Oct. 1,1986; if' passed, on Oct. 1,1988. No action has been taken on this bill, sponsored by Rep. Eldon Rudd (R-Ariz.)
- Dora Delgado
‘Official English’ by 3-1
A California Poll by the Field Institute released Aug. 19 showed that voters who are aware of the state’s “Official English” Proposition 63 favor it by more than a 3-1 margin.
The poll, using 747 registered voters statewide, found that 35% were not familiar with the November ballot proposition, 47% favored it, 14% opposed it and the remaining 4% who knew of it were still undecided.
Proposition 63 would amend the state constitution to require that state officials insure that the role of English is preserved and enhanced.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTABLES
FACTS OF LIFE: Compiled annually by the U.S. Census Bureau, the 106th edition of “Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1986” offers statistics ranging from women’s marital status, ceasarean section deliveries, how adults use leisure time, to union memberships, immigration and health. For a copy, send a $22 prepaid order for paperbacks, $27 forclothbounds,to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
FIND THE EXPERTS AND SPOKESPERSONS: The 206-page “1986-87 Talk Show Guest Directory of Experts, Authorities and Spokespersons” provides a list of addresses and telephone numbers of individuals and organizations in more than 2,000 topics of expertise. Included also is a Spanish-speaking guest subindex. For a copy, send$19.96, plus$3.50 for postage, to: Broadcast Interview Source, Mitchell Davis, Editor, 2500 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 333-4904.
HISPANIC VOTERS IN CHICAGO: The 13-page report “A Political and Demographic Profile of Hispanics in Wards 22,25,26 and 31 in Chicago” provides Hispanic voter registration data in all 50 Chicago wards plus more detailed information from four Hispanic wards. Request free single copies(90 cents for additional ones) from: Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, Marfa Elena Molina, 50 W. Broad St., Suite 622, Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 464-1116.
HISPANIC JOURNAL This 30-minute television news special can be purchased or rented in 1/2”, 3/4” or 1 ” video formats. Prices are $350 for purchase and $100 for weekly rental. Contact Rod Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91105 (818) 799-1795.
IMMIGRATION AND LATIN AMERICA: The 39-page “Immigration to the United States from Latin America: Past and Present,” the fourth booklet in a series on Latin America by the League of United Latin American Citizens has been released. Send a 56-cent stamped, self-addressed 7 1/2 x 10 1/2 inch envelope to: LULAC, c/o Daisy Hernandez, 400 First St, NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C., 20001 (202) 628-8516.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone yourcorporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St N W, Washington: D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.;
RESEARCH INTERVENTIONIST Univ. of Connecticut Health Center Department of Pediatrics Research Interventionistfor3*yearfederally * funded model demonstration project serving severely handicapped Hispanic infants and their families. B.S. degree in Human Services, bilingual (Spanish) skills, and early intervention experience preferred. Send curriculum vitae ' to: Pediatric Research Training Center, 181 East Cedar St, Newington, Conn. 06111. ASSISTANT DIRECTOR PARKS AND RECREATION The City of San Jose, Calif., has an immediate opening for an Assistant Director of Parks & Recreation. $56,640 - $68,856 annually. .Incumbent will report to Director and be responsible for operation of department with 570 employees. Requires BS degree plus seven (7) years professional experience in the field with at least three (3) years at executive/management level. Send resume to Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Department, 801 N. First St., Rm. 207, San Jose, Calif. 95110 (408) 277-4204.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND.
ASSISTANT CITY AUDITOR San Jose, California
$53,952 - $65,568 annually plus excellent fringe benefits.
Reports to the City -Auditor. Coordinate and participate in the development and implementation of goals, objectives, policies and priorities for the City Auditor's office. Requires seven (7) years experience in accounting, auditing, fiscal management or budget control work Two (2) of the years must have been at the management level. Master’s degree in accounting, business or public administration is preferred.
Send resume and a cover letter indicating availability to: Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Dept., 801 N. First St., Rm. 207, San Jose, Calif. 95110. (408) 277-4204.
BANKING OPPORTUNITY
Organizing group for the District of Columbia national development bank is interviewing for a Chief Executive Officer. Experience in banking and local economic development a requirement. Applications confidential.
Apply to: P.O. Box 32086, Washington, D.C. 20007. An equal opportunity employer.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltran (213) 743-7158
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE Los Angeles Aug. 28
The final of eight regional business conferences, this event by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will highlight areas of interest to Hispanic business owners.
Sonia Rosario (816) 531-6363
SALSA FESTIVAL
New York Aug. 29-Sept 2
Sponsored by Ralph Mercado Management this
11 th annual festival will feature top salsa stars and
groups, including Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, El Gran
Combo and Hector Lavoe.
Harriet Wasser(212) 570-7037
GAY TEJANOS CONFERENCE Houston Aug. 30,31
Gay & Lesbian Hispanics Unidos will co-sponsor this conference, which will have workshops on women’s issues in the state legislature, AIDS and ethnic minorities, and leadership development. Joe P6rez (713) 529-8947
FIESTA ’86 Indianapolis Aug. 30
“Hispanic Culture Throughout the Americas” will be Hispanic Link Weekly Report
the theme of this year’s fiesta, which will feature an art competition for youth, crafts* food and dance from Latin America and the influence of the Hispanic culture.
Monica Medina (317) 636-6551
COMING SOON
PUERTO RICAN COMMUNITY- ECONOMICS
National Puerto Rican Coalition
New York Sept. 3-5
Mara Patermaster (202) 223-3915
HISPANIC HEALTH ISSUES
National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human
Services Organizations
New York Sept. 4-7
Linda Neal (202) 371-2100
BUSINESS AWARDS BANQUET Latin Chamber of Commerce of Nevada Las Vegas Sept 5 Otto Merida (702) 385-7367
ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSE Hispanic Institute for Research & Development Hackensack, N.J. Sept. 6-Nov. 8 George Dumenigo (201) 447-9477
ADAMS-MORGAN DAY FESTIVAL Star Step Inc.
Washington, D.C. Sept. 7 Melvin Clarke (301) 899-1444
HISPANIC FASHION DESIGNERS SHOW
Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit Miami Sept. 12
Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 Penny Harrison (202) 822-7895
PAN-AMERICAN FESTIVAL The Arts Exchange Atlanta Sept 13 Alice Lovelace (404) 624-4211
AN EVENING WITH THE STARS
Mexican and American Foundation
San Diego Sept 13
Ron Luis Valles (619) 232-1010
SPOTLIGHT
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION: “Economic Development: A Political Strategy for the Puerto Rican Community” is the theme for the 6th annual conference by N PRC to be held Sept. 3-5 in New York City. Some of the topics to be covered include models for community development financing projects, starting and expanding your business and franchising opportunities. For further information, contact Mara Patermaster at (202) 223-3915
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
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Arts & Entertainment
HISPANIC HERITAGE ON THE AIR: A five-part radio series highlighting the variety of Latin music being performed and enjoyed in the United States will air this year on National Public Radio during Hispanic Heritage Week.
The program, hosted by Edward James Olmos, will be broadcast in stereo on many NPR member stations around the country. (Check local listings.)
A different style of Latin music will be the topic of each program. The series begins with a program about flutist Dave Valentin, a leader in the Latin jazz scene. Following is a show about norteho music, with sounds from the annual Norteho Festival in San Antonio and a performance by Narciso Martinez at the Smithsonian Institute’s annual Festival of American Folklife in Washington, D.C.
Next will be a program featuring Los Folklor.istas, a group of Mexican musicians who travel throughout Latin America reviving ancient folk tunes. That program will be followed by a show with Rumisonko, a Washington-based quartet that performs Andean music. The series will end with a recital of classical and operatic music by bass-baritone Juan Carlos Morales Ferrer and sopranos Monica Philibert and Marcela Holzatfel.
All shows will be presented with hour-long versions in Spanish and half hour editions in English. Coordinating producer for the specials is Jose McMurray; executive producer is Frank Tavares.
Another Hispanic Heritage Week special, on video, is being made available by its Los Angeles^based producers for broadcast and/or exhibition this year.
The 30-minute production, Hispanic Journal, is hosted by Yolanda Nava and Mario Machado, with segments highlighting contributions by Hispanics in business, the military and the arts.
Produced by Rod Enterprises and Mestizo Production Associates, the show is intended to call attention to the yearly celebration of national Hispanic Heritage Week. The producers wish to turn the show into a weekly series (See Collectables for details.)
In a related item, various shows by Hispanic producers are among 21 new public television projects funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in its third Open Solicitation round for 1986.
Three public affairs show are included: The Global Assembly Line, to be produced by Lorraine Gray, Anne Bohlen and Maria Patricia Fernandez of the Educational TV and Film Center of Washington, D.C.; In the Shadow of the Law, by Paul Espinosa, KPBS-TV, San Diego; and Toward the American Dream, by Raquel Ortiz, WGBT-TV, Boston.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
LA’s FIRST LATINA ANCHOR: Beginning Sept. 1, Linda Alvarez will co-anchor KNBC-■nrs6 p.m. newscasts, marking the first time that a Hispanic has anchored a major English-language weekday news program in Los Angeles, the nation’s No. 2 market.
A native of that city, Alvarez taught school in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York before turning to TV. She joined KNBC-TV in August 1985 as weekend co-anchor.
Before then, she anchored the No. 1-rated 5,6 and 11 p.m. news broadcasts at KPNX in Phoenix, Ariz. She also had worked with WMAQ-TV in Ghicago.
IN DEFENSE OF VAZQUEZ RANA: Since Mario Vazquez Rana purchased United Press International June 11 for $41 million, the Mexico media magnate has been the subject of several expos6-type articles in the U.S.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting Dora Delgado, Lucienne Lopez Loman, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request
press- most notably The Miami Herald and The Los Angeles Times.
The. pieces have mixed innuendo spread by home-country competitors with concern about Vazquez Rafta'sclose relationship withsome past Mexican presidents and the Partido Revolucionario InstitucionaL
Now, in its Aug. 2 and 9 editions, Editor & Publisher challenges the U.S. press attacks.
It points out that publishers of both the Herald and the Times have held positions in the U.S. government - the former’s Richard Capen in the Defense Department and the latter’s Tom Johnson in the White House.
E&P quotes UPI advisory board member Eugene Roberts, executive editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer “I can cite publisher upon publisher that has been tied (to government). ..
“(Is) it worse to be associatecfwith Mexican politics than American politics?. . .. That
(judgment) smacks of what the Mexicans would caH’Gringo arrogance,’ I just wonder if there isn’t some sort of anti-Latin, anti-Mexican prejudice at work here...”
Former UPI President Luis Nogales, who quit the wire service after the Vazquez Rana deal was finalized, added: “People who couldn’t compete with him in Mexico are doing a splendid job of beating him up in the U.S., and U.S. publishers are being very receptive to it.”
E&P Managing Editor John Consoli editorialized in reaction to press hints thatVazquez Rana is out to “Mexicanize” UPI:
“He did pay $41 million to obtain the wire service and is willing to pay several million more into it in an attempt to turn it around.
“This is more than many of his critics -those American news executives who had the opportunity to buy UPI themselves but didn’t- have done for the troubled wire service.” - Charlie Ericksen
WE« 6HT
You re about To meet an older man

4
HIsDanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Makl.ng The Ne S T'h s Ull.e k the state's Small Business Advisory council. . . SEA-Jobs for I j w. I j I VVI e ... Progress' national board of directors picks Edward Franco, interim president sirice May, as its new national presider.t. .. Washington, ' D.C., Superior Court Judge Richard Urbina swears in Rafael r11az as president of the capital's Hispanic Bar Association ... Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Dion Morrow denies a pretrial motion by Arturo Hernandez, attorney for alleged "Night Stalker'' Richard Ramirez, to allow non-English-speaking jurors to hear case in which Ramirez is accused of 14 murders ... Mexico native Raul Alcala, 22, now of Boulder, Colo., wins the Coors International Bicycle Race in Aspen, Colo .... The Committee on the Status of Chicanos of The American Political Science Association honors Frank Bonilla, director of the Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueflos at the City University of New York, for his efforts with Chicano and Puerto Rican researchers. .. President Ronald Reagan nominates Charles Pilliod, retired chairman of the board of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., to succeed John Gavin as U .S. Ambassador to Mexico ... Nancy Reagan's personal maid, Paraguayan Anita Castelo, is placed on paid adminis trative leave after her arrest on illegal export of munitions charges. .. Bill Clements, seeking to regain the Texas governor's mansion from Mark White, announces his30-member Hispanic statewide executive committee, including Bob Estrada and Don Navarro of Dallas ; Eduardo Bernaldez of San Antonio and Willie Serna of San Angelo ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints San Diegans Ruth . Jaramillo and Oscar Padilla and Salustio Salas of Los Angeles to Vol. 4 No. 34 Exams in Spanish for NY Diplomas? Immigration Bill Deadline Nears A New York City education task force announced Aug . 15 that it plans to recom mend that the state's exams for granting high school diplomas be available in some foreign languages, including Spanish . The Commission on Minimum Standards, empaneled by Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones in Aprif 1985, proposed that the exams be given in a studenfs native language if he or she arrives from another country after the eighth grade. The 24member corn mission reasoned that since the bulk of these students are primarily taught in their native tongue, the exam should follow suit and test their knowledge in areas such as math and science. A spokesperson for the New York City Board of Education said 72% of the city's 931,000 limited-English-proficient students are Hispanic. The Regents examination, which com mission members said penalized limited English proficient students even if they performed well in non-language-related subjects, is considered a measurement of whether students can handle college-level work Any exam changes must be approved by the State Board of Regents. The minimum standards task force will soon submit its recommendation, along with others it is formulating, to Quinones and the city board. i Nearing the end of the 1986 congressional I session Oct. 3, the U.S . Congress is running 1 out of time to consider major immigration ' reform and six immigrationrelated actions. Although the House of Representatives is expected to vote on the main bill by September, : it is not certain, even if the measure passes, that it will get through a Senate-House con. terence before the 99th Congress adjourns, Hispanic lobbyists say . Introduced by Rep . Peter Rodino (D-N . J . ) I and Romano Mazzoli (D-Ky . ) , the bill is presently in the House Rules Committee. Chair man Claude Pepper has said all amendments to it should be introduced before Sept. 9. If the 13-member committee passes it, the bill will go to the full House for a vote. I A Senate version ; sponsored by Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), was passed Sept. 19 1 of last year . ! A key amendment that is expected to aid ; chances of the House bill, which was approved by its Judiciary Committee July 25, was intro duced by Rep . Charles Schumer(D-N .Y.). The amendment would grant residence status, 1 and:e later citizenship, to farm workers working for at least 60 days between May 1, 1985, to May 1, 1986. After that period, additional farm workers will have to work here for two years, 60 days each year, to obtain residency, and three additional years for citizenship. Contrary to the House version, the Senate bill would permit entry of 350,000 temporary workers. It offers no legalization for un-PestiCide Amendment Gains in Senate The U .S. Senate Agriculture Committee approved Aug . 13 an amendment to the federal pesticide control act that would instruct the Environmental Protection Agency to create, for the first time, federal standards to prevent pesticide contamination among farm workers. Considered the most important revision of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act since 1972, .the legislation would also impose new health and safety standards for testing, marketing and use of new pesticides and re-evaluation of old ones. The bill gives the EPA administrator a three . year period "to promulgate regulations, as appropriate or necessary'' to protect workers from pesticide contamination . The regulations pertain to "re-entry'' time (after which workers can return to sprayed fields), protective clothing, medical surveillance, pesticide spraying, train ing and disposal of drinking and washing water. Jay Feldman, from the National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides, warned that because the instructions to the federal agency were not specific, it could lead to lax regulations in these areas . In California, 57 pesticides have been de tected in more than 2,000 wells in 24 counties, most of them in the state's principal farming regions. documented persons who entered the country after 1979, except for Cubans and Haitians, who have an October 1981 cutoff date. Dolores Huerta, vice president of United Farm Workers, has supported the Schumer amendment as a way to give leverage t o workers. The National Council of La Raza, the League of United Latin American Citizens and some non-Hispanic groups are currently pushing for a "sunsef' amendment placing an expiration date on employers' sanctions "three or five years" after the law takes effect The sanctions must then be re-enacted by Congress. The groups are also lobbying for an amendment to prohibit deportation of Salvadorans pre sently living in the United States. This provision is included in another bill amending the Housing Act of 1986. Rep . Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) is expected to propose an amendment on the floor that would prevent eviction from public housing of any person over62 years old claiming to be a U.S . citizen without extra documentation and of families with at least one member who continued on page 2 AntiNativist Pact Declared A coalition of Hispanic, Asian and Anglo political , civic and organizational leaders joined Aug. 20 in Washington to announce a national effort against the English Only movement. A spokeswoman for the League of United Latin American Citizens, one of the organizers of the event, said the purpose for the coalition was twofold: to emphasize that being bilingual is not unpatriotic, as implied by English Only advocates, and that the nativist movement is not solely the concern of Hispanics. Attending the press conference were Oscar Moran, president of LULAC, Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, as well as representatives from six other organizations. Earlier this month, many of the same groups staged press conferences in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Sacramento to protest Cali fornia's English language proposition. Pro position 63 calls for a constitutional amendment tha would .make English the state's official language.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua KEEP ON BEATING MEIt feels so good when you stop. Now, that's cute. The reason Mexico isn't burning like South Africa Lebanon Ireland to name a few hotspots-is NOT because its and doing anything right They're just too darn ' lazy . Maybe the Times can prod the CIA to light a fire under their tail. This week's nominees for the most blatant anti-Hispanic poison pen contributions to the U.S . media a r e : 1. Jack Anderson and Dale V an Atta . This dyspeptic duo led off their syndicated column of Sunday, Aug. 17, with: NO HABLAMOS ESPANOL: You noticed that Mexico President Miguel de Ia Madrid was in Washington this month? So were 90 members of the Mexican press who accompanied him "By the turn of the century, the babies of Mexico c ould be a greater threat to the United States than t h e nuclea r m i ssiles of the Soviet Union." on his trip. . When de Ia Madrid addressed a luncheon gather ing of U.S. and Mexican reporters at the National Press Club in Spanish, the . monolingual-English reporters just tapped into the little gray boxes by their plates and received instant translations. That's just sick. 2. Dan Williams, Los Angeles Ti mes cor responden t in Mexico. In an Aug . 13 news analysis of Mexico' s poli t ical s t abili ty, he told us , in paragraph 2 : "In the land of manana, cha os a ppears to be manan a s away . " His lengthy assessment concludes w i t h t h e s ugges t ion t hat the end of Mexico's stability may ye t com e "But not today. Perhaps manana" Then . , Press Club President Mary Kay Quinlan, Gannett News Service correspondent, informed the that President de Ia Madrid would an swer written questions-which should be written in English only, because she could n't speak Spanish and she had designated herself as the person t o r ead them. So impressed were the Time s ' editors wi t h W ill i ams' ability to stereotype that they splashed hi s piece on page 1 and decorated it . with the head: "Surprising Stability: I n Mexico, Chaos Comes ... Thus, the only way the 90 Spa n ish-speaking Mexican reporters could ask a questi on of their Spanish-speaking president was in English. That's weird . But that's the American Way, right , Mary? Manana." Kay aa;baro -. . -. -. . P_o_s_s-ib-le....,. Time Running Out on Immigration Bill The death of Los Angeles CityCouncilman 1 Howard Finn on Aug. 12 may bring about a potential third Hispanic councilmember as 1 conti nu e d from page 1 is a U.S. citizen. The exemption is also contained in a separate bill, which was approved June 11 by the Hbuse. It is still pending in t he a replacement. , Senate . Finn, 68, died of a ruptured aor ta . He : Other bills relating to immigration include: represented the 1st District, a San Fernando e Marriage Fraud Deterrent-would impose Valley area 1 that: recently increased from 36%to40% Hispanicasaresultotthecity's .. L atino Sa v es DEA A gent new redistricting plan. The plan was sub mitted July 30 to a federal court by Council in answer to a lawsu i t brought byj the U.S . Justice Department. The lawsuit charged that the city diluted the voting strength of Latinos with its 1982 reapportion ment plan . New boundaries for the 13th District in . downtown Los Angeles increased its Hisi panic population from 33% to 69% , pa v ing ' the way for a second likely Hispanic councilmember next year. Presently, Richard Alatorre is the'only Latino on the 15-member body. , His Eastside District No. 14 is 75% Hispanic. : The two options on how tol replace Finn's successor. appointing ! someone or calling for a special election. The Council could call for an election as early as Nov . 4 but no later than the ne x t scheduled election in April, 1987. The Justice Department said Aug. 15 th a t i t was prepared to accept the city's redistricting , plan provided the city calls an election in the i propose . d downtown district next year . 500 Respond to Cisneros Some 500 civic and com " munity leaders from West and South Texas convened in San Antonio Aug . 17 at the invitation of Mayor Henry Cisneros and adopted more than 75 resolutions beneficial to their region . They endorsed an increase in state taxes forhigher education, economic development and human service programs while rejecting i one calling for a re-evalution of the state ' s . bilingual education program. 2 A Hispanic U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency . agent probably saved a fellow Hispanic DEA agent from being fatally tortured, said DEA sources Aug. 17. Tony Ayala, the head of the DEA office in Guadalajara, Mexico , forced his way into the Jalisco State Police detention center arid remained there for five hours until agent Victor Cortez was released . Cortez, along with a DEA informant, was arrested Aug. 13 in Guadalajara , Mexico's second largest city, after weapons were found in the trunk of the car he was in. DEA officials charge that Cortez, a Brownsville , Texas, native, was tortured with a cattle prod , beaten and had seltzer water mixed with peppers squirted up his nose . The Jalisco state Attorney's Office admitted that Cortez had been detained but denied that he had been tortured . The White House filed a formal protest. The Cortez incident came the same day Mexico President Miguel de Ia Madrid met with Pres ident Ronald Reagan in Washington, D.C., to smooth over relations between the two coun tries. It also came 18 months after a DEA agent, Enrique Camarena Salazar , was abducted and murdered . The police squad involved in the Camarena kidnapping was also implicated in the Cortez abduction. ' The Camarena murder, which had been at a standstill and has since been assigned to a U.S. federal grand jury, received a break through recently whim a Mexican real-estate agent agreed to testify before the investigative body. Jorge Gomez Espana is thought to have been present during Camarena's torture . . criminal penalti es on those involved in im migration-related marriage fraud and revoke fraudulent marriages. The measure, sponsored by Rep . Bill McCollum (R-Fia.), is pending action from the full Senate and f r om the House Immigration Subcommittee. e Cuban-Haitian Amnesty-would grant permanent residency to Cubans and Haitians who arrived in the U . S . before Jan . 1, 1982. • Amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act-in redefining certain classes of immigrants, this bill would repeal the Cuban Adjustmen t Act of 1966, which permits fewer years of U.S . residency from Cuban refugees a pplying for citizenship. Action for this bill , sponsored by Rep. Mazzoli, is pending in the House Subcommittee on Immigration. e Military on the Border-would allow the president to station armed forces on the border when needed to control illegal im migration , drug smuggling and terrorist act ivity. If the major reform bill is not passed , the measure would take effect on Oct. 1 , 1986; if ' passed , on Oct. 1, 1988. No action has been taken on this bill, sponsored by Rep. Eldon Rudd (R Ariz . ) Dora Delgado 'Official English' by 3 A California Poll by the Field Institute released Aug . 19 showed that voters who are aware of the state ' s "Official English" Proposition 63 favor it by more than a 3-1 margin. The poll , using 747 registered voters state wide, found that 35% were not familiar with the November ballot propositiOf\ 47% favored it, 14% opposed it, and the remaining 4% who knew of it were still undecided. Proposition 63 would amend the state constitution to require that state officials insure . that the role of English is preserved and enhanced. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTABLES FACTS OF LIFE: Compiled annually by the U.S. Census Bureau, the 1 06th edition of "Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1986" offers statistics ranging from women's marital status, ceasarean section deliveries , how adults use leisure time, to union memberships, immigration and health . For a copy, send a $22 prepaid order for paperbacks, $27 for cloth bounds, to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S . Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783. FIND THE EXPERTS AND SPOKESPERSONS: The 206-page "1986 Talk Show Guest Directory of Experts, Authorities and , Spokespersons" provides a list of addresses and telephone numbers of individuals and organizations in more than 2,000 topics of expertise . Included also is a Spanish-speaking guest subindex. For a copy, send $19.95, plus$3.50 for postage, to: Broadcast Interview Source, Mitchell Davis, Editor, 2500 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, D . C . 20007 (202) 333. HISPANIC VOTERS IN CHI.CAGO: The 13-page report "A Political and Demographic Profile of Hispanics in Wards 22, 25,26 and 31 in Chicago" provides Hispanic voter registration data in all 50 Chicago wards plus more detailed information from four Hispanic wards. Request free single copies(90 cents for additional ones) from : Midwest Voter Registration Education Project, Maria Elena Molina, 50 W . Broad St., Suite 622, Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 464. HISPANIC JOURNAL: This 30-minute television news special can be purchased or rented in 1 /2", 3/4" qr 1" video formats. Prices are $350 for purchase and $100 for weekly rental. Contact Rod Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91105 (818) 799 1795. IMMIGRATION AND LATIN AMERICA: The39page"lmmigration to the United States from Latin America : Past and Present," the fourth booklet in a series on Latin America by the League of United Latin American Citizens has been released . Send a 56-cent stamped, self-addressed 7 1/2 x 10 1/2 inch envelope to: LULAC, c/o Daisy Hernandez, 400 First St., NW, Suite 721, Washington, D.C., 20001 (202) 628. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals . Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. N W , Washingtol}: D.C. ;woos. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p . m . (El) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates : $35 per column inch. , RESEARCH INTERVENTIONIST. Univ. of Connecticut Health Center Department of Pediatrics ASSISTANT CITY AUDITOR San Jose, California $53,952-$65,568 annually plus excellent Research lnterventionistfor3yearfederally fringe benefits. funded model demonstration project serving Reports to the City -Auditor . . Coordinate severely handicapped Hispanic infants and and participate in the development and im their families. B.S . degree in Human Services, plementation of goals, objectives, policies bilingual (Spanish) skills, and early intervention and priorities fort he City office. Re experience preferred. Send curriculum vitae quires seven (7) years experience in accounting, . to: Pediatric Research Training Center, 181 auditing, fiscal management or budget control East Cedar St, Newington, Conn. 06111. work. Two (2) of the years must have been at ASSISTANT DIRECTOR the management level. degree in PARKS AND RECREATION accounting , busines.sorpublicadministrationis preferred. The City of San Jose, Calif., has an immediate Send resume and a cover letter indicating opening for an Assistant Director of Parks & availability to: Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Recreation. $56,640 $68,856 annually. Personnel Dept, 801 N . First St. , Am . 207, .Incumbent will report to Director and be San Jose, Calif. 9 511 0 . (408) 277. ' responsible for operation of department with 570 employees. Requires BS degree plus seven (7) years professional experience in the field with at least three (3) years at executive/management level . Send resume to Ed Normandy, City of San Jose Personnel Department, 801 N . First St. , Am . 207, San Jose, Calif . 95110 (408) 277-4204. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB holline (301) 952-3408. THE CATHOUC UNIVERSITY of Washington. D.C. , ha s prerecorded job listings , updated Mondays, for position s at the uni ve r si ty. Call ( 2 02) 635-LAND. BANKING OPPORTUNITY Organizing group for the District of Columbia national development bank is interviewing for a Chief Executive Officer. E x p e rience in bank i n g and l oca l economic development a requirement. Applications confidential. Apply to: P . O . Box 32086, Washington. D.C. 20007: An equ a l opportunity employer. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Associat ion ha s a national job clearinghouse for Hispani cs in the media . For information call Magdalena Beltran (213) 743 Calendar the theme of this yea(s fiesta, which will feature an art competition for youth, crafts, food and dance from Latin Amer i ca and the influence of the Hispanic culture. Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit Miami Sept. 12 Washington , D . C . Sept. 14 THIS WEEK HISPANIC BUSINESS CONFERENCE Los Angeles Aug . 28 The final of eight regional business conferences, this event by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will highlight areas of interest to Hispanic business owners. Sonia Rosario (816) 531 SALSA FESTIVAL New York Aug. 29-Sept. 2 Sponsored by Ralph Mercado Management, this 11th annual festival will feature top sa/sa stars and groups, including Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, El Gran Combo and Hector Lavoe. Harriet Wasser (212) 570 GAY TEJANOS CONFERENCE Houston Aug . 30, 31 Gay & Lesbian Hispanics Unidos will co-sponsor this conference, which will have workshops on women's issues in the state legislature, AIDS and ethnic minorities, and leadership development. Joe Perez (713) 529 FIESTA '86 Indianapolis Aug. 30 "Hispanic Culture Throughout the Americas" will be Hispanic Link Weekly Report Monica Medina (317) 636 COMING SOON . PUERTO RICAN COMMUNITY-ECONOMICS National Puerto Rican Coalition New York Sept. 3 Mara Patermaster (202) 223 HISPANIC HEALTH ISSUES National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations New York Sept. 4 Linda Neal (202) 371 00 BUSINESS AWARDS BANQUET Latin Chamber of Commerce of Nevada Las Vegas Sept. 5 Otto Merida (702) 385 ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSE Hispanic Institute for Research & Development . Hackensack, N .J. Sept. 6-Nov. 8 ' George Dumenigo (201) 447 .ADAM&MORGAN DAY FESTIVAL Star Step Inc . Washington, D . C . Sept. 7 Melvin Clarke (301) HISPANIC FASHION DESIGNERS SHOW Penny Harrison (202) 822 PAN-AMERICAN FESTIVAL The Arts Exchange Atlanta Sept. 13 Alice Lovelace (404) 624 AN EVENING WITH THE STARS Mexican and American Foundation San Diego Sept. 13 Ron Luis Valles (619) 232 010 SPOTLIGHT NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION: " Economic Development: A Political Strategy for the Puerto Rican Community" is the theme for the 6th annual conference by NPRC to be held Sept. 3 in New York City. Some of the topics to be covered include models for community development financing projects, starting and expanding your business and franchising opportunities. For further information. contact Mara Patermaster at (202) 223:3915 Calendar will announce events of interest to the nationa( Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Wash ington, D . C . 20005. 3

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Arts & Entertainment All shows will be presented with hour-long versions in Spanish and half hour editions in English. Coordinating producer for the specials is Jose McMurray, executive producer is Frank Tavares. HISPANIC HERITAGE ON THE AIR: A five-part radio series h!ghlighting the variety of Latin music being performed and enjoyed in the United States will air this year on National Public Radio during Hispanic Heritage Week. Another Hispanic Heritage Week special, on video, is being 'made available by its Los Angeles-based producers for broadcast and/or exhibition this year . The 30-"minute production, Hispanic Journal, is hosted by Yolanda Nava and Mario Machado, with segments highlighting contributions by Hispanics in business, the military and the arts. The program, hosted by Edward James Olmos, will be broadcast in stereo on many NPR meniber stations around the country. (Check local listings.) A different style of Latin music will be the topic of each program. The series begins with a program about flutist Dave Valentin, a leader in the Latin jazz scene. Following is a show about norteflo music, with sounds from the annual Norteflo Festival in San Antonio and a performance by Narciso Martinez at the Smithsonian Institute's annual Festival of American Folklife in Washington, D.C. Produced by Rod Enterprises and Mestizo Production Associates, the show is intended to call attention to the yearly celebration of national Hispanic Heritage Week. The producers wish to turn the show into a weekly series. (See Collectables for details.) In a related item, various shows by Hispanic producers are among 21 new public television projects funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in its third Open Solicitation round for 1986. Next will be a program featwing Los Folklor:istas, a group of Mexican musicians who travel throughout Latin America reviving ancient folk tunes. That program will be followed by a show with Three public affairs show are included: The Global Assembly Line, to be produced by Lorraine Gray, Anne Bohlen and Maria Patricia Fernandez of the Educational TV and Film Center of Washington, D.C.; In the Shadow of the Law, by Paul Espinosa, KPB& TV, San Diego; and Toward the American Dream, by Raquel Ortiz, WGBT-TV, Boston. Rumisonko, a Washington-based quartet that performs Andean music. The series will end with a recital of classical and operatic music by bass-baritone Juan Carlos Morales Ferrer and sopranos Monica Philibert and Marcela Holzatfel. Media Rep-ort LA.'s FIRST LATINA ANCHOR: Beginning Sept. 1, Linda Alvarez will co-anchor KNBC TV's 6 p.m. newscasts, marking the first time that a Hispanic has anchored a major Englishlanguage weekday news program in Los Angeles, the nation's No. 2 market. A native of that city, Alvarez taught school in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York before turning to TV. She joined KNBCTV in August 1985 as weekend co-anchor. Before then, she anchored the No . 1-rated 5, 6 and 11 p.m. news broadcasts at KPNX in Phoenix, Ariz. She also had worked With WMAQ TV in Ohicago. IN DEFENSE OF VAZQUEZ RANA: Since Mario Vazquez Raiia purchased United Press International June 11 for $41 million, the Mexico media magnate has been the subject of several expose-type. articles in the U .S. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Dora Delgado. Lucienne Lopez Loman, Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No port1on of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) 526. pressmost notably The Miami Herald and The los Angeles Times. The . pieces have mixed innuendo spread by home-country competitors with concern about Vazquez Raiia'sclose relationship with some past Mexican presidents and the Partido Revolucionario lnstitucional. Now, in its Aug. 2 and 9 editions, Editor & Publisher challenges the U.S. press attacks. It points out that publishers of both the Herald and the Times have held positions in the U.S. government-the former's Richard Capen in the Defense Department and the latter's Tom Johnson in the White House. E&P quotes UPI advisory board member Eugene Roberts, executive editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer: "I can cite publisher upon publisher that has been tied (to govern ment) ... "(Is) it worse to be associatediwith Mexican politics than American politics?. . . . That -Antonio Mejias-Rentas (judgment) smacks of what the Mexicans would call 'Gringo arrogance,' I just wonder if there isn't some sort of antiLatin, anti-Mexican prejudice at work here ... " Former UPI President Luis Nogales, who quit the wire service after the Vazquez Raiia deal was finalized, added: "People who couldn't compete with him in Mexico are doing a splendid job of beating him up in the U.S., and U.S. publishers are being very re ceptive to it." E&P Managing Editor John Consoli editor ialized in reaction to press hints that Vazquez Raiia is out to "Mexicanize" UPI: "He did pay $41 million to obtain the wire service and is willing to pay several million more into it in an attempt to turn it around. "This is more than many of his critics -those American news executives who had the opportunity to buy UPI themselves but didn't-have done for the troubled wire service." Charlie Ericksen CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on reQuest. " ' + -T ld , Youre ai>ou1 to Wtee• ah o er man. 4 Hisoanic Link Weekly Report