Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, September 1, 1986

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, September 1, 1986
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
President Ronald Reagan announces his intentio'n to re-appoint Miami businessman Jorge Mas Canosa as chairman of the federal Advisory Committee for Radio Broadcasting to Cuba. If he is confirmed, his second term will run through August 1989... U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) declares his support of that state’s initiative to proclaim English its official language. Wilson says there “is a good deal of wisdom” in such a referendum... U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston(D-Calif.) receives the endorsement of the Mexican American Political Association. MAPA’s 353 convention delegates also choose Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley as their candidate for California governor... Gustavo Villareal, mayor of Hidalgo del Parral, Mexico, asks for
f SEP Ox
political asylum in the United States. Villareal ISftfYAember of the Partido Accidn National (PAN), the opposition political party in Mexico.. .San Diego County Registrar of Voters Roy Ortiz quits his job amid allegations that he took contract payments from a firm doing business with his office by submitting doctored bills to the county... Cuba-born Modesto Maidique is one of three finalists being considered for the presidency of Florida International University... Jalisco Mexico authorities charge 11 policemen from that state with physical mistreatment in the detention of U.S. Drug Enforcement agent Victor Cortez . . California Gov. George Deukmejian announces that he will oppose the reconfirmation of state Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso charging that Reynoso “has demonstrated a lack of impartiality and objectivity” in overturning death penalty sentences...
Vol. 4 No.
HISPANI^UNKWEEKLY REPORT ffl
Sept 1,1986
Athlete is Refused
A eeH _ â– 
Latino Groups Tackle Illiteracy
Athlete is Refused Spanish SAT Test
The National Collegiate Athletic Association denied Aug. 20 an appeal on behalf of a Latino football player that he be allowed to retake his college entrance exam on the grounds that Spanish is his primary language.
The family of Alan Zendejas, of Chino, Calif., asked that Zendejas be allotted more time to take the exam - the Scholastic Aptitude Test - or that it be prepared in Spanish. The NCAA held that all students must take the test in English.
This is the first year the NCAA's Proposal 48, which requires that athletes^ SAT scores must be a minimum-of between 660-700 out of a possible 1,600 points, was in effect.
Zendejas, 18, came to the United States from Mexico at the age of six He enrolled at Arizona State University in Tempe on Aug. 25 on a full athletic scholarship, but he will not practice or play football for a year.
Joaquin Zendejas, Alan’s father, told Weekly Report he will not appeal to a court. The younger Zendejas’ cousin, Tony Zendejas, kicks for the professional Houston Oilers.
Alatorre Pays $142,000
Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre on Aug. 21 agreed to pay$141,966 to settlea lawsuit brought by the city for campaign law violations.
Alatorre, who ran successfully for the Council last year while still serving in the California Assembly, was accused byCity Attorney James Hahn of using his state campaign chest to run for the city’s 14th District seat and failing to disclose its contributing sources.
Alatorre, the 15-member body’s lone Hispanic, did not face criminal charges, but three of his aides did. In the settlement, he admitted personal negligence and agreed to pay $5,000 himself.
The settlement, largest in California history for campaign finance law violations, also closed the criminal case against his aides.
Antonio Rodriguez, director of the city’s Center for Law and Justice and Alatorre’s opponent for the seat, said he does not think the settlement will cast a pall over Alatorre’s political future.
National Hispanic organizations, encouraged by the attention given in Washington and in the media to the problem of illiteracy, are pushing for more programs designed for Latinos and putting the issue on an equal footing with bilingual education and English as a Second Language programs.
Depending on the standard used, the illiteracy rate among Hispanics ranges from 13.5% -persons over 25 years of age with less than six years of schooling - to 56% - adults without the basic skills to function properly in society, a July report from the National Council of La Raza says.
It calculates that 80% of Latino high school students cannot read well enough to understand their textbooks. The inability to read or write English, the report continues, is often compounded by their inability to speak the lan-
& A Police Chief Resigns
San Antonio Police Chief Charles Rodriguez resigned Aug. 25 following an officer’s slaying in that city by another officer the previous week.
Rodriguez, who was on vacation the week of the slaying, said: “I think the fact that I didn't call in precipitated the whole thing.” He did not learn of the shooting until he returned to San Antonio Aug. 25.
City Manager Lou Fox said his request for the resignation of the chief was not related to the slaying. Officer Stephen Smith was shot by his former partner during an investigation of a murder plot. Smith’s wife charged that Smith was planning to assassinate the city's district attorney and two top San Antonio police officials, not including Rodriguez.
$1 Million Health Grants
Recipients of $1 million dollars in grants to fund about five minority community health projects will be announced late this month, Dr. Herbert Nickens, director of the Office of Minority Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, told Weekly Report last week.
More than 100 proposals, including several from Hispanic groups, were submitted by the Aug. 25 deadline, he said.
guage.
The U.S. Department of Education says that 13% of the U.S. population was illiterate in 1982, the latest year for which it has statistics Forty-five percent of that figure were non-English-speaking adults Reynaldo Macias a scholar conducting research on Latino illiteracy for the California-based Tomds Rivera Center, says that because of the great influx of uneducated immigrants to adult education classes program administrators government officials and Hispanic organizations are realizing that teaching English without literacy instruction is not enough.
I n Chicago, for example, a community based-organization called Universidad Popular began in 1982 a program to teach Spanish literacy as a first step to learn English.
“We started giving English as a Second Language and GED (General Education Diploma) courses but we had a high dropout rate,” says Dalita Gutierrez, a former student and now director of the Learning to be Free program. “When we looked at the records of those who dropped out, all of them weren't literate in their own language and couldn’t
continued on page 2
‘Culture’ Cited in Death
An undocumented alien was fatally shot outside his East Dallas residence by a police officer on Aug. 22 for what may have been a misunderstanding due to cultural differences.
Delfino Herrera 39, a native of Guanajuato, Mexico, was shot twice in the chest by a 22-year veteran of the city’s police force who claimed his action was in self-defense. The case is expected to be referred for a routine grand jury investigation.
A roommate of Herrera present at the incident said Herrera was firing a newly acquired pistol as a form of celebration commonly practiced on the ranches of Mexico The officer shot Herrera for allegedly pointing the pistol at him. The roommate said that Herrera was waving the gun in the air.
Neither Herrera nor his friend spoke English. Friends pooled funds to return his body to his wife and five children in Guanajuato.


COLLECTING
LATINO ILLITERACY RESEARCH: The Tomas Rivera Center, a two-year-old Hispanic research organization, has available a 60-page bibliography (cost $3) and a free four-page monthly newsletter, Latino Literacy Update, that collect information on illiteracy among Latinos. For copies, write to: The Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 625-6607.
MORE ON ILLITERACY:The U.S. Department of Education publishes the periodical “The Adult Literacy Update” with general information on the subject. For free copies, write to: Adult Literacy Initiative, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Rm. 4145, FOB6, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 732-2959.
AFTER-TAX INCOME: The Census Bureau’s Report “After-Tax Money Income Estimates of Households: 1984” gives a racial/ethnic breakdown of household income after taxes. Price: not available at press time. When ordering, specify Series P-23, No. 174. Send requests to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
SCHOOL DROPOUTS: The 35-page report “School Dropouts: Extent and Nature of the Problem” provides figures for Hispanic, black and white students. First five copies are free, $2 for additional ones. Write to: U.S. Central Accounting Office, DHISF, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
POPULATION SHIFTS AND IMMIGRATION: The population in Latin America will reach 779 million by the year 2025, causing increasing flows of work-seeking migrants to the United States, the 51-page report “Population Pressures in Latin America” contends. Copiesare available bysending$5 to: Population Reference Bureau Inc., 777 14th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 639-8040.
CABLE AND BROADCAST EMPLOYMENT: The two-page reports “Cable TV Equal Employment Opportunity Trend Report” and the “Broadcast Employment Opportunity Trend Report” offerfigures for female, Hispanic and minority employment in the cable TV and broadcasting industries. For free single copies, write to: Federal Communications Commission, Consumer Assistance and Small Business Div., 1919 M St. NW, Rm. 254, Washington, D.C. 20554 (202) 632-7000.
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
FORTUNE 500 LATINOS TO MEET The National Hispanic Corporate Council, which was formally launched Feb. 26 in Arlington, Va, will hold its first annual membership meeting in Washington, D.C., Sept. 15.
The group started with a dozen Hispanic executives representing Fortune 500 companies. It has now grown to 21 paid-up members, with nine more committed, says its president, Olga Aros, regional marketing manager with USA Today in Phoenix, Ariz. She expects its membership to triple in 1987.
FORD AWARDS $1.3 MILLION TO MALDEF Among grants announced by the Ford Foundation in August was $1.3 million to the San Francisco-based Mexican American Legal Defense & Educational Fund as a two-year supplement for research, education and litigation to advance minority rights.
Ford also contributed $250,000 to the National Coalition of Advocates for Students in Boston to support an 18-month study of alien children in public schools. The study will recommend changes in policy and practice that can benefit the newcomer children.
HISPANIC WOMEN RECEIVE $20,000 The National Network of Hispanic Women, Palo Alto, Calif., was given $20,000 by the Adolph Coors Company to expand the circulation of Intercambios Femeniles, its quarterly resource journal. The national publication, which has a 6,000 circulation, is designed to inform its network of the positive contributions of Hispanas.
OTHER NAMES, OTHER PLACES Charito Kruvant, president of the international management services corporation Creative Associates, was elected president of the National Association of Women Business Owners’ Greater Washington D.C., chapter.. .Jesse Aguirre, Anheuser-Busch vice president for corporate relations, announced the appointment of J.C. Alvarez as director of corporate affairs.. .This follows expansion appointments of corporate relations managers Carmen Herrero, East Coast and Puerto Rico, based in New York City; Roy Jasso, West Coast, based in Los Angeles; and Jim Estrada, Midwest based in Houston.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
PUERTO RICAN COMMUNITY- ECONOMICS New York Sept. 3-5
New York Rep. Robert Garcia will be a keynote speakerat the National Puerto Rican Coalition’s6th annual conference, which will examine topics such as business development and financing strategies. Mara Patermaster (202) 223-3915
HISPANIC HEALTH ISSUES New York Sept. 4-7
Among the topics to be covered at the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organization’s 6th annual conference are AIDS, teen pregnancy, health care financing and cancer. Linda Neal (202) 371-2100
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 5 *
The Latin Chamber of Commerce of Nevada will hold its 4th annual business awards banquet honoring individuals and businesses who have made contributions to the community.
Otto Merida (702) 385-7367 4
ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSE Hackensack, N.J. Sept. 6-Nov. 8 The Hispanic Institute for Research and Development will offer a 10-week class in Spanish for youth in the fundamentals of managing a business, setting one up and writing business plans.
George Dumenigo (201) 447-9477
ADAMS MORGAN DAY FESTIVAL Washington, D.C. Sept. 7
This festival, sponsored by Star Step, will feature the music of several Latin American countries, their dance and food, as well as handcrafts from Central and South America and the Caribbean.
Melvin Clarke (301) 899-1444
COMING SOON
SIXTH ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET California Chicano News Media Association Los Angeles Sept. 12 Susana Manriquez (213) 743-7158
HISPANIC FASHION DESIGNERS SHOW Hispanic Fashion Designers Show and Benefit Miami Sept. 12 Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 Penny Harrison (202) 822-7895 Sept. 1,1986
HISPANIC HERITAGE OBSERVANCE Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. Sept 12- Oct. 6 Public Affairs (202) 357-2700
AN EVENING WITH THE STARS Mexican and American Foundation San Diego Sept. 13 Ron Luis Valles (619) 232-1010
FESTIVAL PANAMERICANO The Arts Exchange Atlanta Sept. 13 Alice Lovelace (404) 624-4211
MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY FESTIVAL Viva Mexico Committee Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 Mari Callahan (202) 232-2965
SPOTLIGHT
AIDS AND MINORITIES: The National Minority AIDS Council will hold a meeting to discuss new outreach strategies on AIDS to the Hispanic, black and female population. The meeting will take place at the 114th annual conference of the American Public Health Association Sept 28- Oct. 2 in Las Vegas, Nev. For further information, contact Gloria Rodriguez (202) 266-1910.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
CENTRAL AMERICA PROGRAM DIR.
Educated Hispanic youth and adults about connections between non-intervention in Central America and issues affecting U.S. His panics. Organize Hispanic non-intervention groups. Bilingual/bicultural organizer with demonstrated experience working in Hispanic communities. Hispanic candidates strongly urged to apply. Job based in Portland, Ore. Salary begins$20,000. Contact American Friends Service Committee, 814 N.E. 40th St., Seattle, Wash. 98105 (202) 632-0500 for application forms. Applications due by 10/1.
RESEARCH INTERVENTIONIST Univ. of Connecticut Health Center Department of Pediatrics Research interventionist for 3-year federally funded model demonstration project serving severely handicapped Hispanic infants and their families. B.S. degree in Human Services, bilingual (Spanish) skills and early intervention experience preferred. Send curriculum vitae to: Pediatric Research Training Center, 181 East Cedar St., Newington, Conn. 06111.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Atlantic Resources Corporation, Washington, D.C., can do your research. ARC has a history of working with Hispanic non-profit organizations as well as the federal government. We do demographic studies, evaluation and economic impact studies We offer a competent staff and excellent quotes. For more information contact Cristobal Berry-Cab&n at (703) 476-0832.
A CAREER IN MILITARY MEDICINE
A career in medicine doesn’t have to start with concerns about the high costs of a medical education. If you’re interested in serving your country as you study, there’s an alternative: a unique medical program in which students are commissioned as military officers and receive all the pay and benefits of their rank during their medical training.
The F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in Bethesda, Md., is a fully accredited four-year medical school which was created by the U.S. Congress in 1972 to provide the uniformed services of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the U.S. Public Health Service with a cadre of dedicated career medical officers.
Students study the traditional civilian medical curriculum as well as courses of direct military medical relevance. In return for their tuition-free medical education, graduates have a service obligation of seven years, not including time spent in an internship or residency.
If you would like more information about the Hubert School of Medicine, please write to the following address for a free brochure: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Office of Admissions (Attn: HL), 4301 Jones Bridge Rd., Rm. A1041, Bethesda, Md. 20814-4799.
Washington, D.C. research project is hiring top-notch administrative assistant plus writer-editor-researcher. Resumes to: Louise Clarke, Suite 310, 1001 Conn. Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
WEEKLYREPORTSAVAILABLE: Hispanic J Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly J Report sets available: $18 for 18 issues in 1 1983; $53 for 53 issues in 1984; $52 for 52 |
issues in 1985; all three years (123 issues) for j $100. Order prepaid from Hispanic Link Back J Copies, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. ] 20005.
ENTRY LEVELPOSmONSwith Montgomery County Md., are available on a continuous basis. Cali (301) 251-2252.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., govern- j ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)952-3408;
HOUSING
District Heights, Md.
Equal Housing Opportunity
HILLTORGARDEN&
$10.Million Better
New management is spending $r10 million on improvements inside and out! Five minutes to Beltway, Andrews Air Force Base, entertainment and recreation. Close to subway, terrific bus service. One and two bedrooms, $394 to$454. Directions from Washington, D.C.: take Penn. Ave. extended to Silver Hill Road, turn left; or from 1-495 Beltway, take Penn. Ave. west turn right on Silver Hill Road. Go approximately 1 /4 mile, turn right on Marlborough Pike, left on County Road Drive, two blocks to District Heights Parkway and turn right Proceed to Hilltop Gardens leasing office on left Open Monday through Saturday 9-6, Sunday 10-4. Call Joyce or Tony (301) 735-2100.
cfjispamc*
.Americana
Extends best wishes for a most successful conference to all participants in COSSMHO’s Sixth National Hispanic Conference on Health & Human Services and the Symposium on Hispanic Youth & Juvenile Justice.
Rodolfo Balli Sanchez Jose Szapocznik, PhD
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer President
• f
nj
Hispanic Americana, Inc.
1511 K Street NW Suite 1029
Washington, DC 20005 Tel: (202) 393-7836
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
DOING IT ON THE (SPANISH) RADIO: A committee of Spanish-language radio professionals will use Chicago as a test market for a new Hispanic audience survey, and Spanish-language programs on National Public Radio this month will focus on adult illiteracy.
The Spanish Radio Ratings Advising Council has commissioned Information & Analysis, from Hicksville, N.Y., to conduct three types of audience measurement surveys in Chicago beginning next month: door to door, a “listening log” to be filled out by household members and phone interviews. The Windy City was selected to test the surveys because of the diversity of origin of its Hispanic population.
The SRRAC, established last year, groups radio station managers, advertisers and their advertising agencies. The group was formed under the auspices of Caballero Spanish Media, which represents some 80 radio stations nationwide. -
Beginning this month, two weekly Spanish-language programs on National Public Radio will air segments on adult illiteracy in the United States. The segments on Enfoque National, a newsmagazine, and Panorama Hispano, a cultural and language arts magazine, are
funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting as part of Project Literacy U.S
PLUS was created by Capital Cities/ABC Inc. and the Public Broadcasting Service. Special programs about illiteracy will also air on ABC and PBS television stations this month.
In other radio news, Horizons, NPR’s weekly documentary on concerns for minorities, will air Latin Music: A Changing Sound this month. Produced by Elisabeth Perez Luna, the program looks at the diversity of sounds in United States Hispanic musical expression.
ONE LINERS: Puerto Rico actor Jacobo Morales was named “Best Actor" at the recent XXVI Festival de Cine de Cartagena for his performance in Nicolas y los demas.. The 11 th Festival de Salsa de Nueva York concludes this week with an appearance by El Gran Combo at the Copacabana... Mexican singer Emmanuel makes his Las Vegas debut at Ceasar’s Palace Sept. 3. . . An exhibit of photographs by Puerto Rican artist ADAL, along with the documentary Music by Dominican videographer Gustavo A Paredes, continues at the Museum of Modern Art in Latin America, in Washington, D.C., through Sept 5... And, in Los Angeles, keyboardist/songwriter Alice Armend&riz is seeking a “hot girl bassist” for her yet unnamed all-female group... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
ONE RIVER, ONE COUNTRY: Bill Moyers' one-hour report “One River, One Country -the U.S./Mexico Border” airs on CBS television stations nationally Wednesday, Sept. 3, at 8 p.m. EDT.
Based on preview assessments given Weekly Report by Ricardo Chavira of Time magazine and Jose Carreno, Washington, D.C., correspondent forthe Mexican wire service Nbtimex, Moyers did much to redeem his reputation following his “Whose America Is It?” immigration report of a year ago. Both felt it accurately reflected the Mexico/Texas border situation.
Chavira: “It broke new ground tor U.S. commercial television. Most refreshing.”
Carreho: “In some ways, it was a little patronizing, but overall, I liked it.”
SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY: Los Angeles’ Spanish-language daily La OpinicTn celebrates its 60th anniversary this month. To commemo-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Rector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Lucienne Lopez Loman, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column-inch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
rate the occasion, it will sponsor a symposium on U.S. Hispanic journalism at Plaza de la Raza Sept. 12, an appreciation luncheon Sept 16 and a photography and art exhibit, “Opinion Makers for 60 Years,” also at Plaza de la Raza, running from Sept. 11-0ct 7.
THIRD ANNIVERSARY: This week, Hispanic Link Weekly Report starts its fourth year as the nation’s only national Latino newsweekly by expanding from four to six pages. Its paid circulation passed the 1,000 mark in August.
Its format changes include a full-page “Marketplace” advertising section, a weekly guest column featuring Hispanic journalists and opinion-makers, a “Connecting" column offering news on interactions between the. Hispanic community and the private and public sectors and an expanded news section.
« Its parent Hispanic Link News Service, founded in 1980, syndicates opinion columns and news features to 200 newspapers nationally, including 45 in Spanish.
FIRST ANNIVERSARY: The national weekend newspaper supplement Vista, based in
Coral Gables, Fla, toasts its first birthday this week, adding the Phoenix Gazette (26,000 copies) and OaklandTribune(13,000) to21 other papers nationally which carry it in selective distribution.
PUBLICATION AVAILABLE: “Minorities in the Media - Diversity and the End of Mass Communication,” a 247-page overview of the Latino, black, Native American and Asian American experience in the U.S. media is now available.
If s written by University of Southern California School of Journalism Professor Felix Gutierrez and Clint Wilson of Howard University’s School of Communications.
The book examines how minorities created their own media as well as how society is affected by the treatment of minorities in news, advertising and entertainment. It is available in hard ($25) or soft ($12.50) cover.
It may be ordered through the California Chicano News Media Association, USC School of Journalism, GFS-315, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695. Telephone: (213)743-
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

HR!C R Making The News This Week ; i. <:::-on political asylum in the United of the Partido Acci6n . Nacional (PAN), the opposition political party in President Ronald Reagan announces his intention to re-appoint Miami businessman Jorge Mas Canosa as chairman of the federal Advisory Committee for Radio Broadcasting to Cuba. If he is con firmed, his second term will run through August 1989 ... U.S. Sen. . Pete Wilson (A-Calif.) declares his support of that state ' s initiative to proclaim English its official language. Wilson says there "is a good deal of wisdom" in such a referendum ... U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston(D Calif . ) receives the endorsement of the Mexican American Political Association. MAPA's 353 convention delegates also choose Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley as their candidate for California governor .. . Gustavo VIllareal, mayor of Hidalgo del Parral, Mexico, asks for . Mexico . . . San Diego County Registrar of Voters Roy Ortiz quits his job amid allegations that he took contract payments from a firm doing business with his office by submitting doctored bills to the county ... Cuba born Modesto Maldlque is one of three finalists being considered for the presidency of Florida International University ... Jalisco, Mexico, authorities charge 11 policemen from that state with physical mistreatment in the detention of U.S. Drug Enforcement agent VIctor Cortez. . . California Gov. George Deukrnejlan announces that he will oppose the reconfirmation of state Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso charging that Reynoso" has demonstrated a lack of irnp,rtiality and objectivity" in overturning death penalty sentences. . . Vol. 4 No. 35 HISPANIC LINK WE KLY RE 1,1986 Athlete is Refused Spanish SAT Test The National Collegiate Athletic Association denied Aug. 20 an appeal on behalf of a Latino football player that he be allowed to retake his college entrance exam on the grounds that Spanish is his primary language. The family of Alan Zendejas, of Chino, Calif., asked that Zendejas be allotted more time to take the exam the Scholastic Aptitude Test -or that it be prepared in Spanish. The NCAA held that all students must take the test in English . This is the first year the NCAA's Proposal 48, which requires that athletes' SAT scores must be a minimum of between 660 out of a possible 1,600 points, was in effect. Zendejas, 18, came to the United States from Mexico at the age of six. He enrolled at Arizona State University in Tempe on Aug. 25 on a full athletic scholarship, but he will not practice or play football for a year. Joaquin Zendejas, Alan's father, told Weekly Report he will not appeal to a court . The younger Zendejas' cousin, Tony Zendejas, kicks for the professional Houston Oilers. Alatorre Pays $142,000 Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre on Aug . 21 agreed to pay $141 ,966 to settle a lawsuit brought by the city for campaign law violations. Alatorre, who ran successfully for the Council last year while still serving in the California Assembly, was accused by City Attorney James Hahn of using his state campaign chest to run for the city's 14th District seat and failing to disclose its contributing sources. Alatorre, the 15-member body's lone His panic, did not face criminal charges, but three of his aides did In the settlement, he admitted personal negligence and agreed to pay $5,000 himself . The settlement, largest in California history for campaign finance law violations, also closed the criminal case against his aides. Antonio Rodriguez, director of the city's Center for Law and Justice arid Alatorre's opponent for the seat, said he does not think the settlement will cast a pall over Alatorre's political future. l.!:atino Groups Tackle Illiteracy National Hispanic organizations, encouraged by the attention given in Washington and in the media to the problem of illiteracy, are pushing for more programs designed for Latinos and putting the issue on an equal footing with bilingual education and English as a Second Language programs . Depending on the standard used, the illiteracy rate among Hispanics ranges from 13.5%persons over 25 years of age with less than six years of schooling -to 56% adults without the basic skills to function properly in society, a July report from the National Council of La Raza says. It calculates that80% of Latino high school students cannot read well enough to understand their textbooks. The inability to read or write English , the report continues , is often com pounded by their inability to speak the lan-S.A. Police Chief Resigns San Antonio Police Chief Charles Rodriguez resigned Aug . 25 foilowing an slaying in that city by another officer the previous week. Rodriguez, who was on vacation the week of the slaying, said: "I think the fact that I didn't call in precipitated the whole thing. " He did not learn of the shooting until he returned to San Antonio Aug . 25. City Manager Lou Fox said his request for the resignation of the chief was not related to the slaying. Officer Stephen Smith was shot by his former partner during an investigation of a murder plot. Smith's wife charged that Smith was planning to assassinate the city's district attorney and two top San Antonio police officials, not including Rodriguez. .$1 Million Health Grants Recipients of $1 million dollars in grants to fund about five minority community health projects will be announced late this month, Dr . Herbert Nickens, director of the Office of Minority Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, told Weekly Report last week. More than 100 proposals, including several from Hispanic groups , were submitted by the Aug . 25 deadline, he said . guage. . The U.S. Department of Education says that 13% of the U.S. population was illiterate in 1982, the latest year for which ithas statistics. Forty-five percent of that figure were non-English-speak i ng adults. Reynaldo Macias, a scholar conducting r.esearch on Latino illiteracy for the California-based Tomas Rivera Center, says that because of the great influx of uneducated immigrants to adult education classes. program administrators, government officials and Hispanic organizations are realizing that teaching English without literacy instruction is not enough. In Chicago, for example, a community based organization called Universidad Popular began in 1982 a program to teach Spanish literacy as a first step to learn English . "We started giving English as a Second Language and GED (General Education Diploma) courses, but we had a high dropout rate," says Dalita Gutierrez, a former student and now director of the Learning to be Free program. "When we looked at the records of those who dropped out, all of them weren't literate in tlieir own language and couldn't conl\nued on page 2 'Culture' Cited in Death An undocumented alien was fatally shot outside his East Dallas residfince by a police officer on Aug . 22 for what may have been a misunderstanding due to cultural differences. Delfino Herrera, 39, a native of Guanajuato, Mexico, was shot twice in the chest by a 22-year veteran of the city's police force who claimed his action was in self defense. The case is expected to be referred for a routine grand jury investigation . A roommate of Herrera present at the incident said Herrera was firing a newly acquired pistol as a form of celebration commonly practiced on the ranches of Mexico. The officer shot Herrera for allegedly pointing the pistol at him. The roommate said that Herrera was waving the gun in the air. Neither Herrera nor his friend spoke English. Friends pooled funds to return his body to his wife and five children in Guanajuato.

PAGE 2

COLLECTING LATINO ILLITERACY RESEARCH: The Tomas Rivera Center, a twoyearold Hispanic research organization, has available a 60 bib_liography (cost $3) and a free four-page monthly newsletter, Lattno Ltteracy Update, that collect information on illiteracy among Lattnos. For co pie, write to: The Tomas Rivera Center, 71 o N . College St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 6256607. MORE ON ILLITERACY: The U .S. Department of Education publishes the periodical "The Adult Literacy Update" with general information on the subject. For free copies, write to: Adult Literacy Initiative, U.S . Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave . SW, Rm. 4145, FOB6 , Washington, D . C . 20202 (202) 732. AFTERTAX INCOME: The Census Bureau's Report "AfterTa x Money Income Estimates of Households: 1984" gives a rac i a V ethnic breakdown of household income after ta x es. Pr ice: not available at press time. When ordering, specify Series P -23, No. 174. Send requests to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402 (202) 783. SCHOOL DROPOUTS: The 35-page report "School Dropouts: E xtent and Nature of the Problem" provides figures for Hispanic, black and white students. First five copies are free, $2 for additional ones. Write to: U . S. Central Accounting Office, DHISF, P .O. Bo x 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275 6241 . POPULATION SHIFTS AND IMMIGRATION: The popu lation in Latin America will reach 779 million by the year 2025, causing increasing flows of work-seeking migrants to the United States, the 51 page ref)ort "Population Pressures in Latin America" contends. Copies are available by sending $5 to: Population Reference Bureau Inc . , 777 14th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D . C . 20005 ( 202) 639 8040. CABLE AND BROADCAST EMPLOYMENT: The two-page reports "Cable TV Equal Employment Opportunity Trend Report" and the "Broadcast Employment Opportunity Trend Reporf' offer figures for female, Hispanic and minority employment in the cable TV and broadcasting industries. For free single copies, write to: Federal Communications Commiss i on , Consumer Assistance and Small Business Div . , 1919 M St. NW , Rm. 254, Washington, D . C . 20554 (202) 632 7000. CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U . S . Hispanic community and t!:ose agencies and corporations that work with it.) FORTUNE 500 LATINOS TO MEET The National Hispanic Corporate Council, which was fo rmally launched Feb. 2e in Arlington , Va. , will hold its first annual membership meeting in Washington, D . C .. Sept. 15. The group started with a dozen Hispanic executives representing Fortune 500 companies. It has now grown to 21 paid-up members, with nine more committed, says its president, Olga Aros , regional marketing manager with USA Today in Phoenix, Ariz . She expects it s membership to triple in 1987. . FORD AWARDS $1.3 MILLION TO MALDEF Among grants announced by the Ford Foundation in August was $1. 3 million to the San Francisco-based Mexican American Legal Defense & Educational Fund as a two-year supplement for rese a rc h , education and litigation to advance minority rights. Ford also contributed $250,000 to the National Coalition of Advo c ates for Students in Boston to support an 18-month study of alien children in public schools. The study will recommend changes in policy and practice that can benefit the newcomer children. HISPANIC WOMEN RECEIVE $ 20,000 The National Network of Hispanic Women, Palo Alto, C a lif., was given $20,000 by the Adolph Coors Company to expand the circulation of lntercambios Femeniles, its quarterly resource journal. The national publication, which has a 6,000 circulation, is designed to inf0rm its network of the positive contributions of Hispanas. OTHER NAMES, OTHER PLACES Charito Kruvant president of the international ma nagement servi ces corporation Creative Associates, was elected president of the Na t ional Association of Women Business Owners' Greater Washingto..Q, D.C., chapter ... Jesse Agu i rre , Anheuser-Busch vice president for corpo r ate relations, announced the appointment of J.C . Alvarez as director o f corporate affairs . .. This follows expansion appointments of corporate relations managers Carmen Herrero, East Coast and Puerto Rico, based in New York City; Roy Jasso, West Coast, based in Los Angeles; and Jim Estrada , Midwest, based in Houston. Calendar ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSE Hackensack, N . J . Sept. 6 Nov . 8 HISPANIC HERITAGE OBSERVANCE Sm ithsonian Institution THIS WEEK PUERTO RICAN COMMUNITY-ECONOMICS New York Sept. 3 New York Rep. Robert Garcia will be a keynote speaker at the National Puerto Rican Coalition's6th annual conference, which will examine topics such as business development and financing strategies. Mara Patermaster (202) 223 HISPANIC HEALTH ISSUES New York Sept. 4 Among the topics to be covered at the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organization' s 6th annual conference are AIDS , teen pregnancy, health care financing and cancer. Linda Neal (202) 371 00 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS Las Vegas, Nev. Sept. 5 The Latin Chamber of Commerce of Nevada will hold its 4th annual business awards honoring individuals and businesses who have made contri butions to the community. Otto Merida (702) 3857367 4 The Hispanic Institute for Research and Development will offer a 1 Oweek class in Spanish for youth in the fundamentals of managing a business , setting one up and writing business plans . George Dumenigo (201) 447 ADAMS MORGAN DAY FESTIVAL Washington, D . C . Sept 7 This festival , sponsored by Star Step, willfeaturethe music of several Latin American countries, their dance and food , as well as handcrafts from Central and South America and the Caribbean . Melvin Clarke (301 ) 899 COMING SOON SIXTH ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET California Chicano News Media Association Los Angeles Sept. 12 Susana Manriquez (213) 743 FASHION DESIGNERS SHOW Hispanic Fashion Designers Show and Benefit Miami Sept. 12 Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 Penny Harrison (202) 822 Sept. 1 , 1986 Washington, D . C . Sept. 12 O ct. 6 Public Affairs (202) 3572700 AN EVENING WITH THE STARS Mex ican and American Foundati on San Diego Sept. 13 Ron Luis Valles (619) 232 010 FESTIVAL PANAMERICANO The Arts Exchange Atlanta Sept. 13 Alice Lovelace (404) 624 4211 MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY FESTIVAL Viva Mexico Committee Washington, D .C. Sept. 14 Mari Callahan (202) 232 SPOTLIGHT AIDS AND MINORITIES: The National Minority AIDS Council will hold a meeting to discuss new outreach strategies on AIDS to the Hispanic, black and female population. The meeting will take place at the 114th annual conference of the American Public Health Association Sept. 28 Oct. 2 in Las Vegas , Nev. For further information, contact Gloria Rodriguez (202) 266 191 0. Hi s pani c L i n k Weekly R e p ort

PAGE 3

I coRPORATE cLASSIFIEosl A CAREER IN MILITAR . . MEDICINE CENTRAL AMERICA PROGRAM DIR. Educated Hispanic youth and adults about connections between non-intervention in Central America and issues affecting U.S. Hispanics. Organize Hispanic non-intervention groups. Bilingual/bicultural organizer with demonstrated experience working in Hispanic communities. Hispanic candidates strongly urged to apply. Job based in Portland, Ore. Salary begins$20,000. Contact American Friends Service Committee, 814 N.E. 40th St, Seattle, Wash . 98105 (202) 632 for application forms. Applications due by 10/1. RESEARCH INTERVENTIONIST Univ. of Connecticut Health Center Department of Pediatrics Research interventionist for 3year federally funded model demonstration project serving severely handicapped Hispanic infants and their families. B.S. degree in Human Services. bilingual (Spanish) skills and early intervention experience preferred. Send curriculum vitae to: Pediatric Research Training Center, 181 East Cedar St. Newington, Conn. 06111. I PROFESSIONAL SERVICES' Atlantic Resources Corpomtlon, Washington, D.C., can do your research. ARC has a history of working with Hispanic non-profit organizations as well as the federal government We do demo graphic studies, evaluation and economic impact studies. We offer a competent staff and excellent quotes. For more information contact Cristobal Berry-Caban at (703) 476. A career in medicine . doesn't have to start with concerns about the high costs of a medical education. If you're interested in serving your country as you study, there's an alternative: a unique medical program in which students are commissioned as military officers and receive all the pay and benefits of their rank during their medical training . The F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in Bethesda, Md., is a fully accredited fouryear medical school which was created by the U.S. Congress in 1972 to provide the uniformed services . of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the U.S. Public Health Service . with a cadre of dedicated career medical officers. Students study the traditional civilian medical curriculum as well as courses of direct military medical relevance. In return fortheir tuition free medical education, graduates . have a ser vice obligation of seven years. not including time spent in an internship or residency. If you would like more information about the Hebert School of Medicine, please write to the following address for a free brochure: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Office of Admissions (Attn: HL), 4301 Jones Bridge Rd. , Rm. A1041, Bethesda, Md. 20814 4799. Washington, D.C. research project is hiring top-notch administrative assistant plus writer editor-researcher . Resumes to: Louise Clarke, Suite 310, 1001 Conn. Ave. NW , Washington, D.C. 20036. Y REPORTS'AVAILABl.E: His panic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly Report sets available: $18 for 18 issues in 1983; $53 for 53 issues in 1984; $52 tor 52 issues in 1985; all three years (123 issues) for $100. Order prepaid from Hisp;inic Link Back copies, 1420. N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005: ENTRY . LEVELPGSITION&withMontgomery County, . Md : , are available on a continuous .. basis. Call (301) 251. PAINCE' GEORGE;'SCOUNiTY, Mel., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952: I H0USING District Heights. Md Equal Housing _Opportunity HIL:LTOP'GARDENS , $.10 . Million Better Newmanagement.isspending$1 0 millio. n on improvements inside and out! Five minutes to Beltway, Andll!WS Air Force Base, entertainment and recreation : Close to subway, terrific bus service. One and two bedrooms. $394 to$454. Directions from Washington, D.C.: take Penn. Ave . extended to Silver Hill Road, turn left; or from 1 Beltway, take Penn. Ave. west. turn right on Silver Hill Road. Go approximately 1/4 mile, turn right on Marlborough Pike, left on County Road Drive, two blocks to District Heights Parkway and turn right. Proce .ed to Hilltop Garde . ns leasing office on left. Open Monday through Saturday 9, Sunday 1 0. Call Joyce or Tony (301) 735. Extends best wishes for a most successful conference to all participants in COSSMHO's Sixth National Hispanic Conference on Health & Human Services and the Symposium on Hispanic Youth & Juvenile Justice. Rodolfo Balli Sanchez Jose Szapocznik, PhD President Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Hispanic Link Weekly Report Hispanic Americana, Inc. 1511 K Street NW Suite 1029 Washington, DC 20005 Tel: (202) 393-7836

PAGE 4

-'. 1-Arts & Entertainment funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting as part of Project Literacy US. DOING IT ON THE (SPANISH) RADIO: A com,.;,ittee of Spanishlanguage radio professionals will use Chicago as a test market for a new Hispanic audience survey, and Spanish-language programs on National Public Radio this month will focus on adult illiteracy. PLUS was created by Capital Cities/ABC Inc. and the Public Broadcasting Service. Special programs about illiteracy will also air on ABC and PBS television stations this month. In other radio news , Horizons, NPR's weekly documentary on concerns for minorities, will air Latin Music : A Changing Sound this month. Produced by Elisabeth Perez Luna, the program looks at the diversity of sounds in United States Hispanic musical expression. The Spa"lsh Radio Ratings Advising Council has commissioned Information & Analysis, from H icksvi lie, N.Y., to conduct three types of audience measurement surveys in Chicago.beginning next month: door to door, a "listening log" to be filled out by household members and phone interviews. The Windy City was selected to test the surveys because of the diversity of origin of its Hispanic population. The SRRAC, established last.year, groups radio station managers, advertisers and their advertising agencies. The group was formed under the auspices of Caballero Spanish Media, which represents some 80 radio stations nationwide. . Beginning this month, two weekly Spanish-language programs on National Public Radio will air segments on adult illiteracy in the United States. The segments on En toque a newsmagazine, and Panorama Hispano, a cultural and language arts magazine, are ONE LINERS: Puerto Rico actor Jacobo Morales was named "Best Actor'' at the recent XXVI Festival de Cine de Cartagena for his performance in Nicolas y los demas .. The 11th Festival de Salsa de Nueva York concludes this week with an appearance by El Gran Combo at the Copacabana ... Mexican singer Emmanuel makes his Las Vegas debut at Ceasar's Palace Sept. 3. . . An exhibit of photographs by Puerto Rican artist ADAL, along with the documentary Music by Dominican videographer Gustavo A Paredes, continues at the Museum of Modern Art in Latin Americti, in Washington, D.C., through Sept. 5 ... And, in Los Angeles, keyboardisVsongwriter Alice Armendariz is seeking a "hot girl bassisf' for her yet unnamed all female group. . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media .ONE RIVER, ONE COUNTRY: Bill Moyers' one-hour report "One River, One Countrythe U.S./ Mexico Border" airs on CBS television stations nationally Wednesday, Sept. 3 , at 8 p.m. EDT . Based on preview assessments given Weekly Report by Ricardo Chavira of Time magazine and Jose Carreno, Washington, D.C., corres pondent for the Mexican wire service N6timex, Moyers did much to redeem his reputation following his "Whose America Is It?" im migration report of a year ago. Both felt it accurately reflected the Mexico/Texas border situation. Chavira: "It broke new ground tor U.S . commercial television. Most refreshing . " Carrel'lo: "In some ways , it was a little patronizing, but overall, I liked it." SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY: Los Angeles' Spanish-language daily La Opinion celebrates its 60th anniversary this month. To com memo6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publiclltion of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publisher. Hector Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Dora Delgado . Lucienne Lopez Lomal'\ Charlie ErickSen , Antonio Mejias Rentas. No portton of Htspanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display adsare$35 percolumn.i nch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in "weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. rate the occasion, it will sponsor a symposium on U .S. Hispanic journalism at Plaza de Ia Raza Sept. 1 2, an appreciation luncheon Sept. 16 and a photography and art exhibit, "Opinion Makers for60 Years," also at Plaza de Ia Raza, running from 11-0ct. 7. THIRD ANNIVERSARY: This week, His panic Link Weekly Report starts its fourth year as the nation's only national Latino newsweekly by expanding from four to six pages . Its paid circulation passed the 1 ,000 mark in August. Its format changes include a full-page "Marketplace" advertising section, a weekly •"guest column featuring Hispanic journalists and opinion-makers, a "Connecting" column offering news on interactions between the. Hispanic community and the private and public sectors and an expanded news section. ,. Its parent Hispanic Link News Service, founded in 1980 , syndicates opinion . columns and news features : to 200 newspapers nationally, including 45 in Spanish. , . FIRST ANNIVERSARY: The national week end newspal?er supplement Vista, based in Coral Gables, Fla, toasts its first birthday this week, adding the Phoenix Gazette (26,000 copies) and Oakland Tribune(13,000) to 21 other papers nationally which carry it in se lective distribution. PUBLICATION AVAILABLE: "Minorities in the Media Diversity and the End of Mass Communication," a 24 7page overview of .the Latino, black, Native American and Asian American experience in the U.S. media, is now available. lfs written by University of Southern California School of Journalism Professor Felix Gutierrez and Clint Wilson of Howard University's School of Communications. The book examines how minorities created their own media as well as how society is affected by the treatment of minorities in news, advertising and entertainment. It is available in hard ($25) or soft ($12.50) cover. It may be ordered through the California Chicano News Media Association, USC School of Journalism, GFS-315, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695. Telephone : (213) 7 43-7158. Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Link Weekly Report