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Hispanic link weekly report, September 8, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 8, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
The attorney for Anita Castelo, personal maid for Nancy Reagan, says the first lady may be called as a character witness in Castelo’s trial. Paraguay-born Castelo was indicted for illegal munitions export to her native country... The government of Mexico honors Vernon Gomez, an employee of the U.S. Labor Department’s Mine Safety and Health Administration, for his rescue efforts in the aftermath of Mexico City's earthquake in September 1985. Gomez heads the MSHA office in Phoenix, Ariz... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Robert Cardenas from El Cajon to the California Council on Criminal Justice... Chicago Mayor Harold Washington announces the appointment of Natalia Delgado and Jorge Morales to the
Chicago Transit Authority and the International Port Authority. The appointments to the agencies are the first of such kinds in the city’s history. . . The National Puerto Rican Coalition selects Ramon Daubon, formerly the director of the Office for the Caribbean of the Inter-American Foundation, as its vice president. . . Thirteen U.S.* Hispanics, all from California, are among the 67 people aboard a Aeromexico jet liner who died in the midaircollision with a small plane in Cerritos, Calif. . . The Agency for International Development presents a platinum record to Latino teen musical artists Johnny Lozada Correa from Puerto Rico and Tatiana Palacios from Mexico for the success of their records promoting abstention from premarital sex. The duet’s flip-side singles are No. 1 in Mexico and are enjoying brisk sales in the United States...

Justice Shifts on Voting Rights
U.S. Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds announced Aug. 29 that the U.S. Justice Department will cease considering whether proposed state and local redistricting plans and changes in voting procedures are discriminatory.
The Voting Rights Act of 1965 mandated that certain states with a history of discrimination, including Texas and Arizona, must submit any redistricting plans or voting procedure changes to the department for “preclearance.” The 1982 amendment to the Voting Rights Act widened the use of the “results test,” which allowed the department to declare invalid any election changes that diluted the voting strength of Hispanics, blacks and other minorities.
Jose Juarez, a staff attorney with the San Antonio office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said the shift “will in effect be potentially devastating.” Calling the performance of the Justice Department under the current administration
Lutherans Okay Quotas
The three Lutheran denominations which decided two weeks ago to merge agreed Aug. 27 to use quotas for Hispanics, blacks and other minorities in choosing the church’s national leadership.
With a total membership of 5.3 million, the three denominations passed a constitutional provision requiring that 10% of the leadership members be persons whose primary language is not English and “who are of color.” The United Church of Christ, another Protestant denomination, has used quotas for its leadership positions for years. Currently, Hispanics and other minorities comprise less than 2% of the three merging denominations.
The provision, passed in Milwaukee by delegates from each denomination, impacts the legislating and operating bodies of the church, which decide church policy, and the agencies that control overseas missionary work, pensions and public relations.
Made up of Scandinavians, Norwegians, Germans and other Northern Europeans, the three practice a more orthodox version of Lutheranism. For example, women are not allowed \0 be ordained.
“dismal,” Juarez said the policy“is a different route to gut the original act.” The Reagan administration had been trying for years to limit the scope of the 1982 amendment.
Reynolds said Congress intended the amendment to apply to voting rights cases that end up in court, not to proposed changes submitted for preclearance. He told a forum of political scientists that considering discriminatory effects in preclearance reviews was too burdensome.
The Justice Department left itself the option of later challenging in court a plan it has approved, but one federal official noted that this is unlikely because it has rarely filed such lawsuits.
Under the shift in policy, election plans will be rejected only if their“intenf is discriminatory or if they leave the affected parties worse off than before the changes.
A Justice Department official said the Attorney General has “not signed off’ on the change, but Reynolds said it has been in practice for about 18 months.
On June 31, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a case from North Carolina that Congress intended for elections laws to be found discriminatory if their result, not their intent, weakened the voting power of minorities. The court struck down the state’s multimember voting district elections.
- Felix Perez
Beserra to White House
Rudy Beserra, 32-year-old native of Albuquerque, N.M., will join the White House Office of Public Liaison Sept. 22 as an associate director.
His principal responsibilities wilf be working with the Hispanic, Asian and other ethnic communities.
Former New Mexico state director of the League of United Latin American Citizens’ educational service centers, Beserra has worked in Washington for nearly five years with the Republican National Committee. For the past 2 1/2 years, he served as the RNC’s liaison to Hispanics and small business
He holds a political science degree from the University of New Mexico.
Martinez Reaches Runoff in Florida
Two-term Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez attracted a strong 45% of the vote in Florida’s Sept. 2 Republican gubernatorial primary, but must face runner-up Lou Frey, a former congressman from Orlando, on Sept. 30 to lock up the nomination.
With 24% of the vote, Frey edged Miami state Rep. Tom Gallagher, who had 23%.
Martinez, 51, with family roots in Spain, gained national attention and an invitation to the White House in 1983 yyhen he converted from Democrat to Republican while in office.
His margin of victory last Tuesday- more than 100,000 votes- was larger than projected by late polls.
If he wins the runoff, he will face the winner of a Democratic runoff between Steve Pajcic and Jim Smith, who polled 36% and 30% respectively in their race to replace Gov. Bob Graham. Graham, a Democrat, is prohibited from seeking a third term and is challenging incumbent Republican Paula Hawkins for a U.S. Senate seat.
No Hispanics serve Florida in Congress. Three tried for seats in the primary and two were eliminated. Gabe Cazares of Clearwater ran unopposed in the District 9 Democratic primary and will face incumbent Republican Michael Bilirakis Nov. 4.
In District 19, Republican Jose Clay of Miami lost to Bill Flanagan, 42% - 58%. In District 2, Democrat Mario Rivera of Bronson ran last in a field of five with 2% of the vote.
CMA Drops Raid Leader
The Arizona leader of a paramilitary group accused of detaining at gunpoint a group of undocumented aliens in early July has been ousted from the group because of his plans to continue border patrols, a spokesman for the group announced Sept. 1.
On July 5, the Tucson chapter of the Alabama-based Civilian Materiel Assistance allegedly ventured into Mexico, and then held at gunpoint 16 persons - including women and children - in Arizona’s Lochiel Valley for 90 minutes.
J.R. Hagan, the Arizona leader, has vowed to continued patrols and set up his own group, Border Watch.


N.Y. Dropout Initiatives Proposed MaidiqueTakesFiuHeim
In an effort to induce dropouts to return to school, the head of New York City’s high school system proposed Aug. 28 that divisions between grades be abolished and that students be required to amass a certain number of credits instead.
Frank Smith, new chief of the city's 111 high schools, suggested the plan so that students be allowed to complete school at their own pace.
Recent studies have put the dropout rate for Hispanics in New York City as high as 80%. The city’s overall dropout rate is35.3%.
Hoping to have the plan in effect by September 1987, Smith said the proposal is designed to lure back students who feel alienated from the educational system,
Smith’s tentative implementation date coincides with the imposition of recommendations
from a task force empaneled by Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones.
Luis Reyes, research and advocacy director of Aspira of New York and a member of the chancellor’s task force, told Weekly Report that the eight-member taskforce will recommend that standardized tests for public school students be made available in Spanish.
Reyes said that the tests are inaccurate barometers because they do not test bilingual education students in their primary language. Schools within the city with high numbers of recently arrived limited-English-proficient students - there has been a large influx of Dominicans and Asians recently- report low scores. Reyes said the low scores do not necessarily reflect academic deficiency but rather unfamiliarity with the language in which the tests are administered.
Modesto Maidique was selected Aug. 27 as president of Florida International University in Miami.
Maidique, 46, a Cuba-born entrepreneur and academic, was chosen by a five-person subcommittee of the state Board of Regents. He has taught at the Harvard Business School and is director of the University of Miami’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute.
Winning out over former U.S. Ambassador to Algeria Uiric Haynes, Maidique said he will quit his job at a venture firm and at the University of Miami to head the40% Hispanic FIU. Maidique was the only Hispanic candidate vying for the post.
Maidique, born in Havana, is a graduate of the doctoral electrical engineering program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Studies Track Hispanic Plunge Into Poverty
Hispanics will replace blacks as the ethnic group with the highest poverty rate in the United States by 1990,the Centeron Budget' and Policy Priorities projected in a study released Sept. 2.
The Washington-based center's report is one of several recent studies which show U.S. Latinos plunging deeper into poverty. Two out of five Hispanic children already are living in poverty, it reported.
The number of Hispanics living in poverty rose from 4.8 million in 1984 to 5.2 million in 1985, according to an Aug. 26 report from the U.S. Census Bureau. The increase contrasted with a decline in the number of poor blacks-9.5 million to8.9-and whites-33.7 million to 33.1 million.
Titled “Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the United States:
1985 FAMILY INCOME
Median Mean
Hispanic $19,027 $23,152
Black $16,746 $21,359
White $29,152 $34,375
Source: "Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the United States: 1985, ” U. S. Bureau of the Census.
1985,” the report said that 29% of the Hispanic population was poor in 1985, up 0.6% from 1984. The percentage of Latinos in poverty in 1985 was the highest in the last 13 years, with the exception of 1982 when the rate reached 29.9%.
The poverty rate among blacks decreased from 33.8% in 1984 to 31.3% in 1985; for whites from 14.4% to 14%.
Based solely on income statistics, the re-
port’s poverty estimates did not include such non-cash benefits as food stamps, Medicare, Medicaid and public housing or account for geographical cost of living differences Data from the 1980 Census and its March 1986 update were used.
While both black and white families attained median income gains in 1985, Latino families experienced a drop from $19,505 in 1984 to $19,027 in 1985. Overall, the median family income increased from $26,430 to $27,740. Adjusting for inflation, there was still a 1.3% income increase registered.
The median figure is the middle number in a series The mean is the intermediate between two extremes.
The average poverty thresholds ranged from an annual $5,469 for individuals and $10,989 for a family of four.
HISPANIC FAMILY INCOME - IN 1985 DOLLARS
Total money income 1985 1984 1983r 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974' 1973 1972
Number thous... 4 206 3 939 3 788 3 369 3 305 3 235 3 029 2 741 2 764 2 583 2 499 2 475 2 365 2 312
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Under $2,500 2.9 3.4 3.5 3.1 2.5 2.3 2.1 2.0 2.1 1.6 2.1 1.6 2.0 1.5
$2,500 to $4,999 5.4 6.2 5.5 5.1 4.6 4.8 3.8 3.5 2.7 3.9 4.4 2.9 2.0 3.0
$5,000 to $7,499 8.5 • 7.7 8.5 8.9 8.3 7.7 7.3 7.2 7.3 7.7 7.6 6.6 6.3 5.4
$7,500 to $9,999 8.5 7.6 8.5 9.2 7.2 7.9 6.5 7.2 7.8 8.2 8.1 8.0 6.3 8.0
$10,000 to $12,499 8.1 7.6 7.6 8.5 8.2 8.2 7.4 7.4 7.6 8.6 8.7 7.8 8.2 7.9
$12,500 to $14,999 6.8 6.7 7.0 6.7 7.5 7.5 7.1 7.4 7.7 7.0 8.1 7.2 7.1 7.3
$15,000 to $19,999 12.1 12.0 14.7 13.3 13.1 14.1 13.7 14.5 15.0 15.4 14.2 13.7 15.6 14.8
$20,000 to $24,999 11.3 11.7 11.6 12.0 12.9 11.4 11.8 11.1 11.8 11.7 12.1 13.4 12.8 14.2
$25,000 to $34^999 16.0 16.9 15.2 15.3 16.2 16.8 18.5 18.7 18.4 17.7 18.9 20.4 18.8 20.6
$35,000 to $49,999 12.5 12.8 11.5 11.7 12.9 12.7 13.6 14.0 12.9 12.7 10.8 12.0 14.5 11.6
$50,000 and over 8.1 7.6 6.5 6.1 6.7 6.4 8.3 7.0 6.7 5.6 4.9 6.3 6.3 5.7
HISPANIC FAMILY INCOME - 1985 TO 1972
Total money income 1985 1984 1983' 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974' 1973 1972
Number thous... 4 206 3 939 3 788 3 369 3 3Q5- 3 235 3 029 2 741 2 764 2 583 2 499 2 475 2 365 2 312
Percent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Under $2,500 2.9 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.0 3.6 3.4 3.7 4.2 5.0 6.4 5.3 5.8 7.6
$2,500 to $4,999 5.4 6.3 6.3 6.5 7.0 7.9 9.1 10.9 11.6 14.1 15.6 16.2 17.2 19.1
$5,000 to $7,499 8.5 8.1 10.0 10.8 9.3 10.5 10.2 11.9 13.7 15.6 16.6 16.6 17.9 19.5
$7,500 to $9,999 8.5 7.6 8.2 8.7 8.7 10.3 9.9 11.3 13.0 14.0 13.7 14.7 16.6 18.1
$10,000 to $12,499 8.1 8.0 8.1 9.0 9.6 10.0 11.6 12.7 13.1 12.2 12.9 13.9 14.6 14.2
$12,500 to $14,999 6.8 7.0 7.6 7.5 8.0 8.8 8.6 8.5 9.8 9.3 9.8 10.9 8.5 7.7
$15,000 to $19,999 12.1 11.7 13.9 14.1 15.2 14.9 15.8 16.7 15.4 15.3 14.2 12.5 11.9 8.6
$20,000 to $24,999 11.3 12.1 13.0 11.7 12.0 11.3 12.0 10.9 9.6 7.7 5.8 5.6 4.3 2.9
$25,000 to $34,999 16.0 16.7 14.1 14.3 14.4 14.2 11.9 9.2 6.6 4.8 3.6 3.1 2.5 1.7
$35,000 to $49,999 12.5 12.4 10.1 10.0 9.5 6.1 5.4 3.2 2.5 1.8 .8 1.0 .3 .3
$50,000 and over 8.1 6.7 5.1 3.9 3.5 2.5 2.0 1.0 .5 .4 .5 .4 .3 .4
Source: Current Population Report: “Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the United States: 1985," Bureau of the Census.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Ron Arias, guest columnist
A Chicano ‘Inkspot’
When I was a kid my stepfather affectionately called me The Inkspot and it wasn’t because he liked those popular singers of the forties. It was because I was the darkest in the family-el mas prietito, as Mexicans say.
Of course, The Inkspot and other labels were always said with affection- or in jest. I must have giggled a hundred times or more at the stock family joke about how my grandmother, who helped care for me after I was born, would keep me warm on winter nights by placing me near a lit, open oven. One especially cold Los Angeles night she put me in the oven, and there I toasted to my present shade of brown.
Actually, I’m olive skinned, according to one government form on me. Olive, when referring to complexion, means “yellowish gr brown” But for years I thought it referred to the little fruit used in cocktails, and I imagined my skin as some weird shade of green, a sickly, yellowish-brown green.
By the time I was 17, I was thoroughly indoctrinated. The world was mostly composed of three legitimate population colors: fc m black, white and yellow. Off to one side, I suppose somewhere on official forms, were the olives. ^
Years went by. College, travel, marriage, many jobs. By now I think I had accepted the olive category. But deep down I know I preferred the more graphic, straightforward, boyhood tags like The Inkspot and El Indio - Indian, another term for dark ones among Mexicans.
MARCHING FOR ‘OLIVE’ POWER Then came the Chicano Movement in the late ’60s and early 70s Now I was officially “brown,” and all the other color appellations apparently were discarded - including olive, which is just as well; it would be difficult to march behind the banner of Olive Power.
Today I’m no longer bothered by what color I’m called. Looking back on all those years of giggles and embarrassed glances to my elders, I realize I was benevolently introduced to color intolerance among the fair skinned of the world. The message I received at home ; seemed to be: the darker you are, the less esteemed, less capable ! and more comical you are. Comical, by the way, only because of the || family jokes.
j There were other evidences of this color drawback: the anxious ! efforts of my mother to hide her fair complexion from the darkening I rays of the sun - and to lighten her very black hair to a reddish j brown. Her idols were Lana Turner and June Allyson. And whenever j( family babies were bom, adults invariably went on about skin color, with the most cheerful remarks saved for the hueritos, or white I babies. Lucky them, we all thought. They’ve already got one foot in i the happy world of the light skinned.
COLOR AND CUPHANDLED EARS So when I won a third-place ribbon in my high school science fair, I ! was still trying to pull both my feet out of the world of the less j esteemed, less capable and more comical. I was also out to disprove the notion that pigmentation determines success and a good life.
I would like to believe kids today are freed from the handicap of | color prejudice. Of course, they’re not not any more than they’re \ freed from the bother of cuphandled ears, as endearing as those | features may seem to parents.
To show how ridiculous color prejudice is, consider my very dark friend from Sri Lanka. There, the darker the skin, the healthier the ! person. Pale or light brown skin is a sign of illness, anemia. And \ perhaps because we’re friends, we’ve never said a word about our respective skin colors. But it may happen and l know what I’ll say. j He’ll say, with a concerned expression, “You’re looking a bit pale.” “No, I’m not,” I’ll say proudly. “I’m just olive, very olive.”
(Ron Arias, author of the award-winning novel, "The Road to ; Tamazunchale, ” is a senior writer with People magazine. This column ! is reprinted from Hispanic Link News Service.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
WHO SPEAKS FOR HISPANICS? The national 1986/87 Talk Show Guest Directory was just released, with 2,192 “experts, authorities and spokespersons” on 3,355 topics ranging from AIDS (10 experts listed) to women (61 experts).
So who does it recommend to talk-show hosts as the outstanding oracles on el movimiento hispano?
Well, let’s check the topic index under “Hispanic.” Take your I choice of three - Hispanic Americans: Cuaron & Gomez of Denver, Colo.; Hispanic Education: Consortium of National Hispanic Organizations, Washington, D.C.; Hispanic Issues: League of United Latin American Citizens, also of Washington, D.C.
Hardly comprehensive, but it’s a start
So lets check Cuban-Americans:
One listing: Cuban National Planning Council, Miami, Fla.
It’s one of several credible groups.
Puerto Ricans? None, but under Puerto Rico, it proposes two authorities: the Puerto Rican Socialist Party and the New Movement in Solidarity with Puerto Rican Independence.
I see some eyebrows starting to raise.
Mexican Americans?
Not a single listing.
But if Donahue or Carson or King want an Animal expert fast, the directory provides 16 of them, with their expertise varying from Animal Rights to Animals and Religion.
Under English, U.S. English is the lone listing, and under Immigration, the Federation for American Immigration Reform is listed twice. And under White Separatism, the League of Pace Amendment Advocates accompanies its mention with a full-page ad explaining why it wants to repeal the 14th Amendment to “provide for the repatriation of nonwhites from America.” That should make a good, wholesome show.
Presumably, editor Mitchell Davis will be producing another directory next year. So if you’re the ultimate authority on Bilingual Graffiti, Alien-Smuggling or the Joy of Working with a Short-Handled Hoe, send your resume to him at Broadcast Interview Source, 2500 Wisconsin Ave. NW, #930, Washington, D.C. 20007-4570. ;
I suspect he’s dying to hear from you.
RELATIVE GUILT? Nancy Reagan’s personal maid, Anita Castelo, a U.S citizen since 1967, was indicted Aug. 27 by a Norfolk, Va, federal grand jury for allegedly buying 10,000 rounds of .22-caliber ammunition for shipment to her native Paraguay.
Castelo’s arrest has raised some questions in the mind of syndicated columnist Andy Rooney. Assesses Andy:
“Compared to her employer's husband, Ronald Reagan, (Castelo) is responsible for shipping a very small amount of ammunition. When you authorize as many bullets to be shipped to Central and South America as President Reagan has, it’s called national defense. When you ship a couple of lousy cases, as Castelo apparently has, if s a criminal offense.” - Kay B&rbaro
Quoting..
This week’s borderline quotes:
GARY JACOBS, Laredo (Texas) National Bank president to Bill Moyers on CBS Reports:
“There is no constituency for the border... It makes no sense for the United States to pursue bilateral trade policies with Korea or Singapore or Taiwan that discriminate in favor of those jurisdictions when we have 80 million people living in Mexico- most just wanting to produce, to improve themselves, to work, to earn a decent living - and we do exactly the opposite... trying to pass trade legislation that specifically discriminates against anything that's produced competitively in the Republic of Mexico... |
BILL TONEY, Dallas Morning News guest columnist in support of workplace raids and employer sanctions to control illegal immigration:
“Being caught after reaching a place of employment is more discouraging to an illegal alien than being caught at or shortly after entry. It is like being held for no gain in football, vs. being called back for offsides after a long run for a touchdown."
Hispanie-Mnfc Weekly Report
Sept 8,1986


Arts& Entertainment
FILM FESTIVAL FLURRY: Hispanic film makers compete in festivals around the world as the nation’s premier film and video festival enters its third decade.
Entries for the 20-year-old San Antonio CineFestival, will be accepted postmarked through Sept. 19. For the first time, the event will be held in ,the fall (Nov. 5-14), and it will be a competitive juried festival, with prizes to be awarded i n Best Feature Film (Fiction), Best Documentary and Best Film or Video category. The CineFestival, will be held again this year at the Guadalupe Theater, under the sponsorship of the Guadalupe Cultural Art Center, with grants from the city of San Antonio, the Texas Commission on the Arts and the Texas Committee for the Humanities.
There will be no competition for prizes, however, in the Sept. 19-Oct 5 New York Film Festival. One of its entries is the French/Brazilian production Malandro A musical, it is directed by Ruy Guerra, with a score by Chico Buarkue.
Another is Miguel Littin’s Record in Chile, covering 12 years of military dictatorship in the director’s country. The documentary is also entered in festivals in Venice, Italy, and San Sebastian, Spain.
The 43rd Venice International Film Festival got under way Aug. 30
with several Latino entries Argentina will be represented by Carlos Borin’s La pelicula del rey and Maria Luisa Bemberg’s Miss Mary, the latter outside of competition.
Two special sections in the San Sebastian International Film Festival, Sept. 17-26, will be dedicated to films from Brazil and Mexico. A dozen films dealing with the Mexican revolution will screen - among them Alberto Isaac’s Quarteiazo and Felipe Casals’ Emiliano Zapata
Back in Mexico, Argentine actress Norma Aleandro begins filming the U.S./Mexican production titled Gaby. Aleandro, seen jn the Oscar-winning film La historia oficial, stars with Liv Ullman and Rachel Levine in the story of Mexican writer Gaby Brimer. Shooting begins Sept. 22 in Cuernavaca.
ONE LINERS: An exhibit of paintings, prints, photographs and sculptures by California’s Raul Guerrero begins Sept. 13 at the Atelier Gallery of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.. The same date begins the Feria Internacional del Libro in Havana, with some 40 countries participating... Emilio Estevez, A. Martinez and Pepe Serna are among the hosts of Amnesty I nternational’s 25 th Anniversary Gala to be held in Beverly Hills Sept. 15... Stage director Jose Quintero will hold an eight-week scene-study workshop for actors in Los AngeleS, beginning Sept 21...
- Antonio Mejias- Rentas
Media Report
CHICANO IN CHINA: Two years ago, New Mexico author Rudolfo A Anaya spent a month in China to check on the rhythms of its ancient culture that blend with those of the Toltecs of ancient Mexico.
Next week, Anaya’s 202-page account of that visit “AChicano in China,” will be published by The University of New Mexico Press ($13.95).
On Sept. 6, the monthly newspaper supplement Vista ran excerpts and critiqued, favorably, that the pilgrimage is “as much an adventure of the mind as it is an experience of the senses.”
In a review for Hispanic Link Newsservice, Douglas Martinez concurred, concluding with the author’s quote: “I knownowwhylwentto China. As I was taught, I hope to teach others to see into the soul of things, to make that
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Erlcksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, F6lix Perez.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in,any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 isf as) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are ‘ , percolumninch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run ip Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week: Multiple us ates on request.
simple, human connection, which unites us all.”
TWO INTERNSHIPS: Recruiting begins this week for two full-year paid journalism internships in Washington, D.C.
Applicants will be judged on basic writing skills, journalistic potential and commitment to pursue journalism as a career. There are no experience requirements.
Selected candidates will begin work this fall as reporters with Hispanic Link News Service.
Internship No. 1: This is sponsored by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, with funding by the Adolph Coors Company. It is open to anyone of Hispanic heritage and provides a one-year salary of $14,000. Application deadline: Oct. 6.
Internship No. 2: This is sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by the Gannett Foundation. It is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage and provides $15,000 salary. Application deadline: Oct.20.
Applications for either or both internships may be obtained by writing or calling Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
SMITHSONIAN FEATURES: Beginning this month, the Smithsonian Institution News Service will start translating one major news feature monthly into Spanish for distribution to requesting Spanish-language media throughout the country. Features will run about 1,400 words. Photos and slides will be available.
The initial feature chosen for distribution is on archeological research being conducted in Panama by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in cooperation with Temple University.
Editors who wish to receive the monthly features may request them from Ink Mendelsohn, Smithsonian News Service, A&l Bldg., Rm. 2410, 900 Jefferson Drive SW, Washington, D.C. 20560.
- Charlie Ericksen
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' Weekly Report


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PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Chicago Transit Authority and the International Port Authority. The appointments to the agencies are the first of such kinds in the city's history. . . The National Puerto Rican Coalition selects Ramon Daubon, formerly the director of the Office for the Caribbean of the Inter-American Foundation, as its vice president. .. Thirte.en U .S: The attorney for Anita Castelo, personal maid for Nancy Reagan, says the first lady may be called as a character witness in Castelo's trial. Paraguay-born Castelo was indicted for illegal munitions export to her native country ... The government of Mexico honors Vernon Gomez, an employee of the U.S. Labor Departmenfs Mine Safety and Health Administration, for his rescue efforts in the aftermath of Mexico City's earthquake in September 1985. Gomez heads the MSHA office in Phoenix, Ariz ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Robert Cardenas from El Cajon to the California Council on Criminal Justice . . . Chicago Mayor Harold Washington announces the appointment of Natalia Delgado and Jorge Morales to the Hispanics, all from California, are among the 67 people aboard a Aero mexico jet liner who died in the midair collision with a small plane in Cerritos, Calif . . . The Agency for International Development presents a platinum record to Latino teen musical artists Johnny Lozada Correa from Puerto Rico and Tatiana Palacios from Mexico for the success of their records promoting abstention from premarital sex. The duet's flip-side singles are No. 1 in Mexico and are enjoying brisk sales in the United States ... Voi.4No.asl HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Sept 8, 1986 Justice Shifts on Voting Rights Martine_z u.s. Assistant Attorney General William "dismal," Juarez said the policy"isa different Runoff In Flonda Bradford Reynolds announced Aug. 29 that route to gut the original act." The Reagan Two-term Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez attrac-the U.S. Justice Department will cease con-administration had been trying for years to ted a strong 45% of the vote in Florida's Sept. side ring whether proposed state and local limit the scope of the 1982 amendment. 2 Republican gubernatorial primary, but must redistricting plans and changes in voting Reynolds said Congress intended the amend-face runner-up Lou Frey, a former congress-procedures are discriminatory. ment to apply to voting rights cases that end man from Orlando, on Sept. 30 to lock up the The Voting Rights Act of 1965 mandated up in court, not to proposed changes submitted nomination. that certain states with a history of discrimination, for preclearance. He told a forum of political With 24% of the vote, Frey edged Miami including Texas and Arizona, must submit scientists that considering discriminatory state Rep. Tom Gallagher, who had 23%. any redistricting plans or voting procedure effects in preclearance reviews was too bur-Martinez, 51, with family roots in Spain, changes to the department for"preclearance." densome. gained national attentioQ &nd an invitation to The 1982 amendment to the Voting Rights The Justice Department left itself the option the White House in 1983 when he converted Act widened the use of the "results test," of later challenging in court a plan it has from Democrat to while in office. which allowed the department to declare approved, but one federal official noted that His margin of victqry ll;!st Tuesday-more invalid any election changes that diluted the this is unlikely because it has rarely filed such than 100,000 votes-was larger than projected voting strength of Hispanics, blacks and other lawsuits. by late polls. minorities. Under the shift in policy, election plans will If he wins the runoff, ne will face the winner Jose Juarez, a staff attorney with the San be rejected only if their"intenf' is discriminatory of a Democratic runoff bel\yeen Steve Pajcic Antonio office of the Mexican American Legal or if they leave the affected parties worse off and Jim Smith, who polled 36% and 30% Defense and Educational Fund, said the shift than before the changes. respectively in their race to replace Gov. Bob "will in effect be potentially devastating." A Justice Department official said the Attorney Graham. Graham, a Democrat, is prohibited Calling the performance of the Justice DeGeneral has "not signecl off' on the change, from seeking a third term and is challenging partment under the current administration but Reynolds said it has been in practice for incumbent Republican Paula Hawkins for a Lutherans Okay Quotas The three Lutheran denominations which decided two weeks ago to merge agreed Aug. 27 to use quotas for Hispanics, blacks and other minorities in choosing the church's national leadership. With a total membership of 5.3 million, the three denominations passed a constitutional provision requiring that 1 Oo/o of the leadership members be persons whose primary language is not English and "who are of color." The United Church of Christ, another Protestant denomination, has used quotas for its leader ship positions for years. Currently, Hispanics and other minorities comprise less than 2% of the three merging denominations. The provision, passed in Milwaukee by delegates from each denomination, impacts the legislating and operating bodies of the church, which decide church policy, and the agencies that control overseas missionary work, pensions and public relations. Made up of Scandinavians, Norwegians, Germans and other Northern Europeans, the three practice a more orthodox version of Lutheranif'm. For example, women are not allowed t/J be ordained. about 18 months. U.S. Senate seat. On June 31, the U .S. Supreme Court ruled No Hispanics serve Florida in Congress. in a case from North Carolina that Congress Three tried for seats in the primary and two intended for elections laws to be found dis-were eliminated. Gabe Cazares of Clearwater criminatory if their result, not their intent, ran unopposed in the District 9 Democratic weakened the voting power of minorities. The primary and will face incumbent Republican court struck down the state's multimember Michael Bilirakis Nov. 4 . voting district elections. In District 19, Republican Jose Clay of -Felix Perez Miami lost to Bill Flanagan, 42%-58%. In ,.-------------------, District 2, Democrat Mario Rivera of Bronson Beserra to White House ran last in a field of five with 2% of the vote. Rudy Beserra, 32-year-old native of Albuquerque, N . M . , will join the White House Office of Public Liaison Sept. 22 as an associate director. His principal responsibilities will be work ing with the Hispanic, Asian and other ethnic communities. Former New Mexico state director of the League of United Latin American Citizens' educational service centers, Beserra has worked in Washington for nearly five years with the Republican National Committee. For the past 2 1 /2 years, he served as the RNC's liaison to Hispanics and small business. He holds a politica l science degree from the University of New Mex ico. CMA Drops Raid Leader The Arizona leader of a paramilitary group ac cused of detaining at gunpoint a group of undocumented aliens in early July has been ousted from the group because of his plans to continue border patrols, a spokesman for the group announced Sept. 1 . On July 5, the Tucson chapter of the Alabama based Civilian Materiel Assistance allegedly ventured into Mexico, and then held at gun point 16 persons including women a nd childrenin Arizona' s Lochiel V a lle y for 90 minutes. J .R. Hagan, the Ariz o n a l eader, has vowed t o continued p a trol s a nd se t up hi s own group, Border W a t c h .

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N.Y. Dropout Initiatives Proposed In an effort to induce dropouts to return to school, the head of New York City's high school system proposed Aug . 28 that divisions between grades be abolished and that students be required to amass a certain number of credits instead. Frank Smith, new chief of the city's 111 high . schools, suggested the plan so that students be allowed to complete school at their own pace. Recent studies have put the dropout rate for Hispanics in New York City as high as 80%. The city's overall dropout rate is35. 3%. Hoping to have the plan in effect by Sep tember 1987, Smith said the proposal is designed to lure back students who feel alienated from the educational system . Smith ' s tentative implementation date coin cides with the imposition of recommendations from a task force empaneled by Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones. Luis Reyes, research and advocacy director of Aspira of New York and a member of the chancellor's task force, told Weekly Report that the eightmember task force will recommend that standardized tests for public school students be made available in Spanish. Reyes said that the tests are inaccurate barometers because they do not test bilingual education students in their primary language . Schools within the city with high numbers of recently arrived limited-English-proficient students-there has been a large influx of Dominicans and Asians recently-report low scores. Reyes said the low scores do not necessarily reflect academic deficiency but rather unfamiliarity with the language in which the tests are administered. Maidique Takes FlU Helm Modesto Maidique was selected Aug. 27 as president of Florida International University in Miami. Maidique, 46, a Cuba-born entrepreneur and academic, was chosen by a five-person subcommittee of the state Board of Regents. He has taught at the Harvard Business School and is director of the University of Miami ' s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute. Winning out over former U . S . Ambassador to Algeria Ulric Haynes, Maidique said he will quit his job at a venture firm and at the University of Miami to head the40% Hispanic FlU. Maidique was the only Hispanic candidate vying for the post. Maidique, born in Havana , is a graduate of the doctoral electrical engineering program at the Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology. Studies Track Hispanic Plunge . lnto Poverty Hispanics will replace blacks as the ethnic group with the highest poverty rate in the United States by 1990,the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities projected in a study released Sept. 2 . The Washington-based center's report is one of several recent studies which show U.S . Latinos plunging deeper into poverty. Two out of five Hispanic children already are living in poverty, it reported. The number of Hispanics living in poverty rose from 4 . 8 million in 1984 to 5.2 million in 1985, according to an Aug. 26 report from the U.S. Census Bureau . The increase contrasted with a decline in the number of poor blacks9 . 5 million to 8 .9-and whites-33. 7 million to 33.1 million . Titled" Money Income and Poverty Status of Families and Persons in the United States: 1985 FAMILY INCOME Hispanic Black White Median $19,027 $16,746 $29,152 Mean $23,152 $21,359 $34,375 Source: " MoRey Inc o me and Poverty Status of Families and Per s ons in the United States : 1985," US. Bureau of the Census . 1985," the report said that 29% of t he His . panic population was poor in 1985, up 0 . 6% from 1 984. The percentage of Latinos in poverty in 1985 was the highest in the last 13 years, with the exception of 1982 when the rate reached 29.9%. The poverty rate among blacks decreased from 33.8% in 1984 to 31 .3% in 1985; for whites from 14. 4% to 14%. Based solely on income statistics, the report's poverty estimates did not include such non-cash benefits as food stamps , Medicare, Medicaid and public housing or account for geographical cost of living differences. Data from the 1980 Census and its March 1986 update were used . While both black and white families attained median income gains in 1985, Latino families experienced a drop from $19,505 in 1984 to $19,027 in 1985. Overall, the median family income i ncreased f rom $26,430 to $27,7 40. Adjusting for inflation, there was still a 1 . 3% income increase registered. The median figure is the middle number in a series. The mean is the intermediate between two extremes. The average poverty thresholds ranged from an annual $5,469 for individuals and $10,989 fo r a family of four. HISPANIC FAMILY INCOME-IN 1985 DOLLARS Total money income 1965 1964 1963' 1962 1 961 1960 1979 1976 1977 1 976 1975 1974 ' 1973 1972 Number ... 00 00 . 00 . 00 00 00 . . thous . 00 4 206 3 939 3 766 3 369 3 305 3 235 3 029 2 741 2764 2 563 2 499 2 475 2 365 2 312 Percent 0000000000000 00 000000. 100. 0 100. 0 100.0 100 .0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100 . 0 100. 0 100. 0 100 . 0 100. 0 100.0 100 . 0 Under $2,500 00 00 . 00 oo oo • 00 .. oo oo .. 2.9 3.4 3.5 3.1 2.5 2.3 2 . 1 2.0 2. 1 1 . 6 2.1 1.6 2.0 1 . 5 $2,500 to $4,999 . 00 00 00 00 . 00 00 . oo • • 5.4 6.2 5.5 5.1 4.6 4.6 3.6 3.5 2 . 7 3.9 4.4 2.9 2.0 3 . 0 $5,000 to $7,499. 00 .... 00 00 00 .•. 00. 6.5 7.7 6.5 6.9 6 . 3 7.7 7.3 7.2 7.3 7.7 7.6 6 . 6 6.3 5 . 4 $7,50U to $9,999 .............•.•... 6.5 7.6 6.5 9.2 7.2 7.9 6.5 7.2 7 . 6 6.2 6.1 6.0 6.3 6.0 $10,000 to $12,49900 00 00 00. 00 00 00 .. 6.1 7.6 7.6 6.5 6.2 6 .2 7.4 7.4 7.6 6 . 6 6.7 7.8 8.2 7 . 9 $12,500 to $14,999 ...........•..... 6.8 6.7 7.0 6.7 7.5 7.5 7.1 7.4 7.7 7.0 8.1 7.2 7.1 7 . 3 $15,000 to $19,999.00 00 00 00 .. ...... 12 . 1 12.0 14.7 13.3 13 . 1 14.1 13 . 7 14.5 15. 0 1 5.4 14.2 13.7 15.6 14 . 8 $20,000 to $24,999 00 ... 00 00 .. 00 .... 11.3 11. 7 11.6 12 .0 12 .9 11.4 11. 8 11. 1 11.8 11. 7 12.1 13.4 12 . 6 14 . 2 $25,000 to $34,999 00 00 00 ..... 00 .... 16.0 16.9 15.2 15.3 16 . 2 16.6 16. 5 16.7 18.4 17.7 18 . 9 20.4 16 . 6 20 . 6 $35,000 to $49,999 .. 00 . . 00 .... 00 ... 12.5 12. 6 11.5 11.7 12. 9 12. 7 13. 6 1 4.0 1 2 . 9 12 . 7 10. 6 12 . 0 14.5 11.6 $50,000 and over . . 00 . ............. 6 . 1 7.6 6.5 6.1 6 . 7 6.4 8 . 3 7.0 6 . 7 5 . 6 4 . 9 6 . 3 6 . 3 5 . 7 HISPANIC FAMILY INCOME -1985 TO 1972 Total mon e y income 1985 1984 i983' 1982 1961 1980 1979 1976 1 977 1976 1975 1974 ' 1973 1972 Number . 00 . . 00 ... 00 oo •• 00 . thous . 00 4 206 3 939 3 766 3 369 3_395 3 235 3 029 2 741 2 764 2 583 2 499 2 475 2 365 2 312 Percent . . . . . .............. ... 100.0 100 . 0 100 . 0 100.0 100 . 0 100.0 100 . 0 100. 0 100.0 100 . 0 100.0 100 . 0 1 00 . 0 100. 0 Under $2,500 ... 00 00 ... 00 00 00 . ..... 2.9 3 . 4 3.7 3 . 6 3 . 0 3.6 3.4 3 . 7 4 . 2 5 . 0 6.4 5 . 3 5.8 7 . 6 $2,500 to $4,999 ... .... .... . . . .••.. 5.4 6.3 6.3 6.5 7 . 0 7.9 9 . 1 10.9 11.6 14 . 1 15.6 16 . 2 1 7.2 19 . 1 $5,000 to $7,499 ...............••.. 8.5 8.1 10.0 10.8 9.3 10 .5 10.2 11.9 13 .7 15.6 16.6 16.6 17.9 19 . 5 $7,500 to $9,999 ............. .•.•.. 6.5 7.6 8.2 8.7 8 . 7 10.3 9.9 11.3 13.0 14.0 13 . 7 14.7 16.6 16.1 $10,000 to $12,499 .....• . ........•. 8.1 8.0 6.1 9.0 9.6 10.0 11.6 12.7 1 3 . 1 12 . 2 12 . 9 13.9 14 . 6 14 . 2 $12,500 to $14,99900.00 00 00 00 00 .. .. 6.8 7 . 0 7.6 7.5 6 . 0 6.8 8.6 8.5 9.8 9 . 3 9.6 10 . 9 8.5 7 . 7 $15,000 to $19,99900.00 00 00 ... : ..• . 12.1 11.7 13.9 14.1 15 . 2 14.9 15. 6 1 6.7 15.4 15.3 14 . 2 12 . 5 11.9 8 . 6 $20,000 to $24,999 . . ............... 11. 3 12. 1 13 . 0 11. 7 12 . 0 11.3 12 . 0 10. 9 9 . 6 7 . 7 5 . 8 5 . 6 4 . 3 2 . 9 $25,000 to $34,999 00 00 00 ........ 00 • 16.0 16.7 14. 1 14.3 14.4 14.2 11. 9 9.2 6 . 6 4.8 3 . 6 3 . 1 2.5 1 . 7 $35,000 to $49, 999 00 00 .. 00 . . 00 .. 00 . 12.5 12 .4 10 . 1 10 .0 9 . 5 6.1 5.4 3.2 2.5 1 .8 .8 1 . 0 . 3 . 3 $50,000 and over . 00 00 . 00 . . . . 00 .. 00 . 8 . 1 6.7 5.1 3.9 3 . 5 2.0 1 .0 .5 .4 .5 .4 .3 .4 source: Current Population Report: Income and Poverty Status of Fam11Jes and Persons m the Umted States: 1985," Bureau of the Census. 2 Hi span ic Link Weekly Report

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Ron Arias, guest columnist A Chicano 'lnkspot' When I was a kid my stepfather affectionately called me The lnkspot, and it wasn't because he liked those popular singers of the forties. It was because I was the darkest in the family e/ mas prietito, as Mexicans say . Of course, The /nkspot and other labels were always said with affection-or in jest. I must have giggled a hundred times or more at the stock family joke about how my grandmother, who helped care for me after I was born , would keep me warm on winter nights by placing me near a lit , open oven . One especially cold Los Angeles night she put me in the oven, and there I toasted to my present shade Actually , I ' m olive skinned, according to one government form on me. Olive, when referring to complexion, means " yellowish brown." But for years I thought it referred to the little fruit used in cocktails, and I imagined my skin as some weird shade of green, a sickly, yellowish-brown green. By the time I was 17 , I was thoroughly indoctrinated. The world was mostly com posed of three legitimate population colors: black, white and yellow . Off to one side , I suppose somewhere on official forms, we r e the olives . a.. Years went by . College, travel , marriage , many jobs. now I had accepted the olive category. But deep down I know I preferred the more graphic, straightforward , boyhood tags like The lnkspot and EllndioIndian, another term for dark ones among Mexicans. MARCHING FOR 'OLIVE' POWER Then came the Chicano Movement in the late '60s and early '70s. Now I was officially "brown," and all the other color appellations appa rently were discarded including ol i ve , which i s just as well ; it would be difficult to march behind the banner of Olive Power . Today I ' m no longer bothered by what color I ' m called. Looki ng back on all those years of giggles and embarrassed glances to my elders, I realize I was benevolently introduced to color intolerance among the fair skinned of the world. The message I received at home seemed to be: the darker you a re, the less esteemed, less capable and more comical you are. Comical , by the way, only because of the family jokes. There were other evidences of this color drawback: the anxious efforts of my mother to hide her fair complexion from the darkening rays of the sun -and to lighten her very black hair to a reddish brown . Her idols were Lana Turner and June Allyson. And whenever family babies were born , adults invariably went on about skin color, with the most cheerful remarks saved for the hueritos, or white babies . Lucky them, we all thought. They've already got one foot in the happy world of the light skinned. COLOR AND CUPHANDLED EARS So when I won a third-place ribbon in my high school science fair, I was still trying to pull both my feet out of the world of the less esteemed, less capable and more comical. I was also out to disprove the notion that pigmentation determines success and a good life . I would like to believe kids today are freed from the handicap of color prejudice. Of course, they're not, not any more than they're freed from the bother of cuphandled ears, as endearing as those features may seem to parents. To show how ridiculous color prejudice i s , consider my very dark friend from Sri Lanka. There, the darker the skin, the healthier the person . Pale or light brown skin is a sign of illness, anemia. And perhaps because we' re friends, we've never said a word about our respective skin colors. But it may happen and I know wnafi' ll say. He'll say, with a concerned expression, " You're looking a bit pale." "No, I ' m not," I'll say proudly. "I' m just olive, very olive . " (Ron Arias, author of the award-winning novel, " The Road to Tamazunchale," is a senior writer with People magazine. This column .is reprinted from Hispanic Link News Service . ) Sin pelos en Ia lengua WHO SPEAKS FOR HISPANICS? The national 1986/87 Talk Show Guest Directory was just released, with 2,192 "experts, authorities and spokespersons" on 3 ,355 topics ranging from AIDS (1 0 experts listed) to women (61 experts) . So who does it recommend to talk-show hosts as the outstanding oracles on e(movimi ento hispano ? Well , let's check the topic index under "Hisi)anic." Take your choice of three-Hispanic Americans: Cuar6n & Gomez of Denver, Colo.; Hispanic Education: Consortium of National Hispanic Or ganizations, Washington, D.C. ; Hispanic Issues: League of Un ited Latin American Citizens , also of Washington, D . C . Hardly comprehensive, but it's a start. So let's check Cuban-Americans: One listing : Cuban National Planning Council, Miami, Fla . It's one of several credible groups. _ Puerto Ricans? None, but under Puerto Rico, i t proposes two auth.orities: the Puerto Rican Socialist Party and the New Movement in Solidarity with Puerto Rican Independence. I see some eyebrows starting to raise. Mexican Americans? Not a single listing . But if Donahue or Carson or King want an Animal expert fast, the directory provides 16 of them, with their expertise varying from Animal Rights to Animals and Religion. Under English, U.S. English is the lone listing, and under Immigration, the Federation for American Immigration Reform is l isted twice. And under White Separatism, the League of Pace Amendment Advocates accompanies its mention with a full-page ad explain i ng why it wants to repeal the 14th Amendment to" provide fort he repatriation of non whites from America." That should make a good, wholesome show. Presumably , editor Mitchell Davis will be producing another directory next year. So if you ' re the ul t imate authority on Bilingual Graffiti , Alien-Smuggling or the Joy of Working with a Short-Handled Hoe, send your resume to h i m at Broadcast Interview Source, 2500 Wisconsin Ave . NW , #930, Washington, D.C. 20007-4570. I suspect he ' s dying to hear from you. RELATIVE GUILT? NancyReagan'spersonal maid, Anita Castelo, a U.S citizen since 1967, was indicted Aug. 27 by a Norfolk, Va, federal grand jury for allegedly buying 10,000 rounds of . 22-caliber ammunition for shipment to her' native Paragvay . Castelo ' s arrest has raised some questions i n the mind of syndicated columnist Andy Rooney. Assesses Andy : "Compared to her employer's husband, Ronald Reagan, (Castelo) is responsible for shipping a very small amount of ammuniti on. When you authorize as many bullets to be shipped to Central and South America as President Reagan has , it's called national defense. When you ship a couple of lousy cases , as Castelo apparently has, it's a . criminal offense." -: l(_ay Barbaro Quoting. • • This week's borderline quotes: GARY JACOBS, Laredo (Texas) National Bank president, to Bill Moyers on CBS Reports: "There is no constituency for the border. . . It makes no sense for the United States to pursue bilateral trade polic i es with Korea or Singapore or Taiwan that discriminate in favor of those jurisdictions when we have 80 million people living in Mexico-most just wanting to produce, to improve themselves, to work, to earn a decent living-and we do exactly the opposite ... trying to pass trade legislation that specifically discriminates against anything that's produced competitively iri the Republic of Mexico ... " BILL TONEY, Dallas Morning News guest columnist, in support of workplace raids and employer sanctions to control illegal immigration : "Being caught after reaching a place of employment is more discouraging to an illegal alien than being caught at or shortly after entry. It is like being held for no gain in footbal( vs. being called back for offsides after a long run for a touchdown. " HispaoKH.irt Weekly Report Sept 8 , 1986

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Arts & Entertainment with several Latino entries. Argentina will be represented by Carlos Borin's La pelicula del rey and Maria Luisa Bemberg's Miss Mary, the latter outside of competiti on. FILM FESTIVAL FLURRY: Hispanic film makers compete i n festivals a round the world as the nation's premier film and video festival enters i t s third decade. Entries for the 20-year-old San Antonio CineFestival, will be accepted postmarked through Sept. 19. For the first time, the event will be held in the fall (Nov. 5-14), and i t will be a competitive juried festival , with prizes to be awarded in Best Feature Film (Fiction) , Best Documentary and Best F i lm or Video category. The CineFestival, will be hel d agai n this year at the Guadalupe Theater, under the sponsorship of the Guadalupe Cultural Art Center, w i th grants from the city of San Antonio, the Texas Commission on the Arts and the Texas Committee for the Humanities. Two special sections i n the San Sebastian In ternational Film Festival , Sept. 17-26, will be dedicated to films from Brazil and Mexico. A dozen films dealing with the Mex ican revolution will screen-among them Alberto Isaac's Quartelazo and Felipe Casals' Emiliano Zapata Back in Mexico, Argentine actress Norma Aleandro begins filming the U .S./Mexican production titled Gaby. Aleandro, seen in the Oscar-winning film La historia oficial, stars with Liv Ullman and Rachel Lev ine in the story of Mexican writer Gaby Brimer. Shooting begins Sept. 22 in Cuernavaca. There w i ll be no competition for prizes, however, in the Sept. 190ct 5 New York Film Festival . One of its entries is the French/Brazilian production Malandro. A musical, it is directed by Ruy Guerra, with a scor e by Chico Buarkue. ONE LINERS: An exhibit of paintings, prints, photographs and sculptures by California's Raul Guerrer o begins Sept. 13 at the Atelier Gallery of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. .. The same date begins the Feria lnternacional del Libro in Havana, with some 40 countries participating ... Emilio Estevez, A. Martinez and Pepe Serna are among the hosts of Amnesty International' s 25th Anniversary Gala, to be held in Beverly Hills Sept. 15 .. . Stage director Jose Quintero will hold an eight-week scene-study workshop for actors in Los Angeles, beginning Sept. 21 ... Another is Miguel Littin' s Record in Chile , covering 12 years of militat y dictatorship in the director's country. The documentary is entered in festivals in Venice, Italy, and San Sebastian, Spain . The 43rd Venice International Film Festival got unde r way Aug . 30 Media CHICANO IN CHINA: Two years ago, New Mexico author Rudolfo A. Anaya spent a month in China to check on the rhythms of its ancient culture that blend with those of the Toltecs of ancient Mexico. Next week, Anaya ' s 202-page account of that visit " A Chicano in China," will be published . by The University of New Mexico Press ($13.95). On Sept. 6, the monthly newspaper supple Vista ran e xc erpts and critiqued , favorably , that the pilgrimage is "as much an adventure of the m i nd as i t is an experience of the senses." In a review for Hispanic Link News Service, Douglas Martinez concurred , concluding with the author's quote: " I know now why I went to China. As I was ta ught, I hope to teach others to see into the soul of things, to make that HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nation a l p ublication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 ' N ' S treet NW Washingto n , D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publis h er. Hector Erick&en-M endo z a Ed itor. Feli x Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias Rentas. F e lix Perez. N o pon1on of H1spanic Link Weekl v Report may be reprodu ced o r broadcast m.any fo r m without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 :,;sues) $ 9 6 . Trial subscription (13 i s 1 a s ) $26. CORPORAT E CLAS:'IF1ED: Ad rates are 75 cents p e r wo r d . Display ads ar•, . ,per column inch. Ad s p l aced by T uesday will r u n rr \I' ;, k ly Reports mailed F ri day of sam e week: Multrple u s 3tes on request. simple, human connecti on , which unites us all ." TWO INTERNSHIPS: Recrui t ing begins this week for two full-year paid journalism internships in Washington, D.C . Applicants will be judged on basic writing skills, journalistic potential and commitment to pursue journalism as a career. There are no experience requirements. Selected candidates will begin work this fall as reporters with Hispanic Link News Service. Internship No. 1: This is sponsored by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, with funding by the Adolph Coors Company. It is open to anyone of Hispanic heritage and provides a one-year salary of $14,000. Application deadline: Oct. 6 . Internship No. 2: Thi s is sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by the Gannett Foundation. It is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage and provides $15,000 salary. Application deadline: Oct.20. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Applications for either or both internships may be obtained by writing or calling Hector EricksenMendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 2340280. SMITHSONIAN FEATURES: Beginning this month , the Smithsonian Institution News Service will start translating one major news feature monthly into Span i sh for distribution to requesting media out the country . Features will run about 1,400 words. Photos and slides will be available . The initi al feature chosen for distribution is on archeological research being conducted in Panama by the Smithsoni an Tropical Re s earch Institute in cooperation with Temple University. Editors who wish to receive the monthly features may request them from Ink Mendelsohn, Smithsonian News Service, A&l Bldg. , Rm. 2410, 900 Jefferson Drive SW, Washington, D . C . 20560. Charlie Ericksen S\/'IFF' P.W1> EXI-II""S\ToRS ONLY 0 Weekly R e p o rt